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Killexams : Exin Perimeter exam - BingNews https://killexams.com/pass4sure/exam-detail/SCNS-EN Search results Killexams : Exin Perimeter exam - BingNews https://killexams.com/pass4sure/exam-detail/SCNS-EN https://killexams.com/exam_list/Exin Killexams : Without consent part 2: What local lawmakers are doing about pelvic exams without consent

KANSAS CITY, Mo.  — Doctors-in-training performing intimate exams on anesthetized or unconscious patients without their knowledge and without their consent — it's a little known practice in medicine the KSHB 41 I-Team discovered is legal in a majority of states, including Missouri and Kansas.

Learning how to do a pelvic and prostate exam is part of medical students' education and ongoing training. These exams are also an extremely important part of a person's basic care.

However, ethical lines blur when a person's body is viewed as a teaching tool.

You probably won't go in for knee surgery and end up getting a pelvic exam while you're under.

But abdominal surgery? Gynecological surgery? It could happen.

The problem is, there's no way to know exactly how often it happens. The I-Team found out it's a common practice and you might not ever know it happened.

In part one of this story, the I-Team explains more about this complicated issue and how failing to get consent can negatively impact patient trust.

For part two, KSHB talked to local lawmakers who want to fix this issue and ensure patients’ rights are always protected.

Kansas and Missouri don't have anything set-in-stone in the laws about this.

"I was shocked. I had no idea that this was a common practice," Missouri Sen. Lauren Arthur said.

Arthur is one of the local lawmakers who want to find a legislative cure.

"I had a visceral reaction to it," Arthur said, which is what made her want to jump into action.

Arthur introduced a bill last year that would require healthcare providers, including students, to get explicit consent from patients before doing pelvic, prostate or rectal exams on them while they are unconscious.

Arthur’s bill had a couple exceptions, like when an exam is necessary for treatment or diagnosis or if a court orders one to collect evidence.

"These are important procedures," Arthur said. "I don't want to create any stigma around them, but under all circumstances, they should only be performed if a patient has given explicit, informed consent.

Arthur's bill died in committee.

In 2020, Missouri state representative Shamed Dogan filed a similar bill. It didn’t pass, but made it to a hearing, with more than a dozen people testifying in support, saying a woman’s body, or anyone’s body, shouldn’t be used as a mere teaching tool.

Ashley Weitz was one of those who submitted written testimony in support of the bill.

"I was shocked to learn this wasn't an anomaly, and my experience was a product of a way of educating that is not only antiquated, not only is it harmful, but it's unnecessary," Weitz said.

It’s personal to her.

"I woke up in the middle of the exam screaming," Weitz said.

A doctor performed a pelvic exam she didn’t consent to while she was heavily sedated in a Utah emergency room 15-years-ago.

As a sexual assault survivor, the experience traumatized her so much that she’s gone without necessary healthcare.

But she found her voice to help pass bills in Utah and in other states that would ban what happened to her.

"I just wanted to be asked," Weitz said.

MOCSA, the Metropolitan Organization to Counter Sexual Assault, also advocated for the Missouri bill.

The organization work with survivors of sexual abuse and trauma, like Weitz, who they say could face irreparable harm.

"Having something done to their body, or worrying that something may have been done to their body can be tremendously impactful and can cause anxiety and stress, re-traumatization and flashbacks," said Victoria Pickering, MOCSA's director of advocacy.

Kansas representative Rui Xu is also trying to stop this practice. He says patients likely understand medical students could be involved in their care, especially at teaching hospitals. But this, he says, is different.

"A pelvic exam is an extra level of invasion, in my opinion, so that should require an extra level of consent that did not seem like has been happening and certainly not written into statute," Xu said.

Xu filed a bill in 2020 – his first act as a freshman lawmaker. It died too.

He thinks he knows why.

"The medical society tends to have a little more lobbying force in Kansas," Xu said. " In the super minority, we don't get much opportunity to get hearings on our bills in the first place, let alone something with opposition."

Xu and Arthur plan to re-file their bills in January.

"I think with the right forces, with you guys shining a light on this, potentially maybe we can change more hearts and eventually get this passed," Xu said.

The Kansas Medical Association declined to tell the KSHB 41 I-Team why it opposed Xu’s bill, but did provide us with a statement.

“Should Representative Xu introduce a similar bill next legislative session, we will read the language of the bill before taking a position on it, if any," it said in a statement.

A tip to take away: Pay attention to hospital consent forms. They may not mention anything about med students and doctors-in-training practicing pelvic exams.

You have the right as a patient to ask your doctor who will be in the room for your surgery or procedure. You also have the right to tell them you do not want any doctors-in-training to do pelvic exams on your body as practice.

In some hospitals, med students don't play a direct role in patient care.

However, these pelvic exams are not done for patient care; they're often done solely so that the medical student or the doctor-in-training can learn.

We reached out to national medical associations, who say doctors need to get prior, informed consent before performing an exam the patient wouldn't be expecting.

The lawmakers we talked to believe it should be a law, even if hospitals have policies in place.

Copyright 2022 Scripps Media, Inc. All rights reserved. This material may not be published, broadcast, rewritten, or redistributed.

Tue, 04 Oct 2022 07:36:00 -0500 en text/html https://www.kshb.com/news/local-news/investigations/without-consent-part-2-what-local-lawmakers-are-doing-about-pelvic-exams-without-consent
Killexams : More Than 200 Students Take Spring Makeup Exams

Last week, more than 200 Harvard undergraduates took final exams within the first month of the semester.

The Faculty of Arts and Science Registrar administered a total of 208 makeup final exams in the Student Organization Center at Hilles. Students who were unable to take their spring 2022 finals last semester were required to make them up last week — roughly four months after classes concluded.

Some students who took makeup exams expressed mixed feelings about the policy, citing difficulty preparing for the belated test.

“It’s a blessing and a curse. I got more time to study, but at the same time, over the summer, I forgot a lot of material,” John P. Ho ’25 said. “I think it could be more convenient to have the final take place in May. Having alternate dates for you to take the final within the same week that you missed it.”

Scott W. Arbery ’24 said he utilized class resources, including office hours, to prepare for his Ec10b: “Introduction to Macroeconomics” makeup exam.

Julian Giordano ’25 said he received minimal support and communication from course staff for his makeup final.

“The exam, as it turns out, was a different format from the exam that I was expecting to take in May, which was not communicated to us,” said Giordano, a Crimson multimedia editor.

For certain classes, the final exam could make or break a student’s grade.

“Knowing that it was out of my hands, if I did poorly, it was more of a reflection on the fact that it was such a long time in between when I was studying for the class and when I took the exam,” Giselle Chiprez ’25 said. “It definitely felt like I was on my own.”

For some students, making up last semester’s work meant sacrificing this semester’s.

“I had to, obviously, miss classes that day,” Adam S. Mohamed ’25 said. “I guess I would have liked to have more time to study, but since that didn’t happen, retrospectively, I would have preferred to do [the exam] last semester.”

FAS spokesperson Rachael Dane declined to comment on student criticisms, pointing to the policy guidelines.

“Regarding makeups, there is quite a lot of communications with both faculty and students,” Dane wrote. “During makeups last week, if a student missed an exam due to positive COVID diagnosis, the Registrar invited them to reach out to exams to see if they could accommodate them on a day this week.”

“The Registrar is holding a special makeup exam day this Wed. for those students who are out of isolation and feel well enough to take it,” she added.

—Staff writer Edona Cosovic can be reached at edona.cosovic@thecrimson.com.

Mon, 19 Sep 2022 15:24:00 -0500 text/html https://www.thecrimson.com/article/2022/9/20/students-take-makeup-exams/
Killexams : Taliban blocks women from college entrance exams in subjects deemed "too difficult"

Afghanistan's Taliban rulers have blocked young women from taking college entrance exams for a wide range of subjects, with one student saying the Islamic extremist group has deemed many subjects "too difficult for women to handle." Several female students told CBS News that they and their peers were not allowed to take exams for university majors including engineering, economics, veterinary medicine, agriculture, geology, and journalism.

Meena, one of the high school graduates who took exact college entrance exams, wanted to study economics, but said she wasn't allowed to choose the subject and was left with literature as her only option.  

"I was so hopeless that at one time, I started crying and decided to leave my paper for them to decide which field I should study," she told CBS News in a telephone interview from her home in eastern Afghanistan. "Then I chose literature, only because my family invested in my education over the past 12 years, and I could not let them down."

Afghan women and girls struggle for basic human rights under Taliban rule 08:52

Another student, in western Herat province, said she wanted to study civil engineering but found that major removed from the list of options presented to her when she showed up for the exams.

"I've been studying hard and preparing for the field of my choice for the past two years, but these oppressors and enemies of women don't even let us study what book we want. Where is the justice?" she asked through sobs over the phone. "They say these fields are too difficult for women to handle, and instead women should learn how to raise better children."

Maryam, a survivor of the bloody suicide bombing at the KAAJ education center in Kabul, which targeted young women preparing for their exams, said she wanted to study journalism to help supply a voice to her people. She was forced to choose pharmacology instead, a major she said she had no interest in pursuing.

The legacy of a 20-year war in Afghanistan: Many Afghans are still struggling to recover 03:27

"The result of this exam is not important for me," Maryam said. "I'm glad this exam is over, which shows our resilience, and I will wait and try next year."

A spokesman for the Taliban's Ministry of Higher Education, which oversees the nation's universities, did not respond to repeated CBS News requests for comment on this story.

The Taliban regime has yet to be formally recognized as a legitimate government by any country since the group reclaimed power over Afghanistan in August 2021. In just over a year, the hardliners have dealt a major blow to Afghan women and girls, whose rights had increased significantly during 20 years of U.S.-backed governance. Girls aged 12 and above have been banned from attending virtually all public schools, women have been forced to leave their jobs in most government ministries, female journalists and guests must appear on TV with a face covering, and parks and classrooms have been segregated by sex. 

Most of the women who participated in the exact university exams graduated from high school before the Taliban's takeover 14 months ago.

Taliban answers CBS News' questions 16:26

Despite all the backsliding on women's rights, the Taliban's supreme leader apparently still isn't content with the imposition of the group's draconian interpretation of Islamic Shariah law.

On Monday, Mawlawi Haibatullah Akhundzada ordered his intelligence officials to fully implement an edict he issued earlier this year relating to women.

Paying "special attention to the implementation of Sharia, all officials will supply me an account of how much Sharia has been implemented in the one year of our government, and fully implement my six-point edict on women's rights," he said in a statement.

Hibatullah Akhundzada, Afghan political and religious leader who currently serves as the leader of the Islamic Emirate of Afghanistan, as the supreme leader of the Taliban
The Afghan Taliban's supreme leader Mawlawi Haibatullah Akhundzada is seen in a 2021 file photo. Rob Welham/Universal History Archive/Universal Images Group/Getty

The edict focused largely on the Taliban's requirement for women and older girls to wear the hijab in public, covering their hair and bodies. In it, Akhundzada offered the advice that, "not leaving home unnecessarily is the best way to observe hijab."

In response to the repression of women's rights, the U.S. government recently announced new sanctions barring current and former Taliban members behind actions "restricting access to secondary or higher education for girls and women, preventing women's full participation in the workforce and their ability to choose their career" from traveling to the United States. The Biden administration called on its allies to follow suit.

In an apparent response to the U.S. visa restrictions, Akhundzada released an audio message on Thursday declaring the Taliban's desire to foster relations with all nations, "within the framework of Sharia and the interests of our people."

He vowed that the Taliban regime would "remove all un-Islamic laws and institutions created over the past 20 years, regardless of the outside pressure."

Students like Maryam, holding out hope for another opportunity to chose their own futures, will take little heart in the words of their unelected leader.

Fri, 14 Oct 2022 03:10:00 -0500 en-US text/html https://www.cbsnews.com/news/taliban-blocks-women-college-entrance-exams-subjects-too-difficult/
Killexams : Princeton should adopt oral exams

As September concludes and October commences, the ebb and flow of Princeton’s academic calendar pulls students along to their next destination: midterms week. Princeton students are already busy preparing for written, in-class midterm exams, which dominate the University’s examination structure. 

Yet, it doesn’t have to be this way. By “it,” I mean that the current structure of midterm and final assignments — the old combination of papers and multiple choice or short answer tests — isn’t the only, or even the superior, method of evaluating student learning. And it’s for this reason that I propose something new: an oral examination system in which students verbally respond to questions from course instructors.

To be clear, I’m not calling for the elimination of papers or written tests. They remain valuable pedagogical tools. But it is problematic that we rely on this combination alone when other effective assessments exist, as well. Princeton should offer oral exams, an evaluation system with a particularly strong track record

Oral exams, long-used and common in countries like Germany, are beneficial for students — not just because they mirror the type of tasks required in academic settings, but also because they apply to a multitude of career fields and have functional implications beyond graduation. You might not draft a 20-page research paper or take a three-hour test in your life again, but regardless of your profession, you’ll definitely interview for jobs, hold presentations, host meetings, or simply talk to people — aspects the oral exam imitates and addresses.

Thus, the oral exam, by virtue of its configuration, allows students to hone their communication skills in a manner that papers or written tests cannot, while still testing what they would cover in terms of content. Speaking in an oral exam is quite similar, after all, to preparing an essay or short answer — except now, you need to say it aloud. The ability to speak lucidly and persuasively while engaging with diverse sources is just as important as the ability to write in such fashion, and oral exams enable sufficient practice of the former.

Another major benefit of oral exams is that they make it harder to cheat: You walk into the room, and you either comprehend the material or you don’t. This feature also makes it difficult for students to slack off on readings — anything listed on the syllabus could be fair game on an oral exam, letting students demonstrate how they’d relate their broad conceptual knowledge to distinct posed scenarios. As a result, implementing oral exams may serve as a motivator for students to study carefully and avoid embarrassing themselves, while reducing instances of academic dishonesty.

A third advantage of the oral exam is its versatility: It can be applied to a range of disciplines without much trouble. Initially, the oral exam seems most favorable for the humanities or social sciences — areas like politics, history, or foreign languages. But oral exams can be easily applied to STEM fields with slight modifications, e.g., providing for a chalkboard or necessary software, so that, besides merely answering questions, students can draw or show their processes when solving problems, as when proving a math theorem.

Oral exams even have some precedent at Princeton. As is the case with most American universities, they are administered at the graduate level for everything from computer science to philosophy, and even exist in some form on the undergraduate level with senior thesis defenses in departments like SPIA and History. So if anyone wanted confirmation of oral exams’ feasibility, the University has already provided it by putting them into effect.

Granted, oral exams aren’t perfect. They’re often criticized as subjective; different students are asked different questions. That’s a valid concern — would graders fairly administer the exam? The good news, however, is that the issue of subjectivity can be mitigated through a committee system, with panels composed of two or three course instructors, both professors and preceptors. This design minimizes the risk that a student’s grade depends on a single grader’s opinion, and it ensures a more representative faculty sample. 

Another objection to oral exams is that they potentially disadvantage students who are nervous when speaking. I recognize that fear personally — I’m hesitant, on occasion, to contribute to class discussions, because I imagine I have nothing valuable to say. But oral exams would not be a wholly new burden, on this count. Most Princeton courses already have significant “participation” components that encourage students’ engagement. 

Though imperfect, oral exams have merits that papers and written tests don’t, from promoting greater academic integrity to fostering greater scholarly conversation. We shouldn’t be locked into believing that papers and written tests are the only — indeed, preferred — way to conduct midterms and finals. Rather, we should expand our view of academic assessment. Implementing oral exams as an option opens up another avenue for Princeton students to demonstrate their critical analysis and communication skills, without sacrificing rigor.

It’s time, then, for Princeton to supply undergraduate oral exams the chance they deserve.

Henry Hsiao is a first-year contributing columnist from Princeton, N.J. He can be reached at henry.hsiao@princeton.edu.

Sun, 02 Oct 2022 13:56:00 -0500 text/html https://www.dailyprincetonian.com/article/2022/10/princeton-university-oral-exams-midterms-benefits
Killexams : Self-compassion is the superpower year students need for exams and life beyond school

This week, year 12 students in New South Wales will begin their final exams, with students in other states soon to follow.

This can be one of the most stressful times in a students' life. It can also be very stressful for parents trying to support their children.

But there is a superpower in the arsenal of every year 12 student that can be harnessed to manage this stress. This superpower fuels resilience, not only for exams, but for any difficult situation they may be faced with across their lifespan. It's called self-compassion.

I am a who specializes in self-compassion. This is how you can use it, both for yourself and for your kids.

What is is self-compassion?

The most enduring relationship we have is the the one we have with ourselves.

This relationship shapes how we think, feel and behave to such an extent that often we are not even aware of it. We may think being hard or critical on ourselves pushes us to achieve results. But research shows this can lead to , avoidance of hard tasks, higher risk of psychological illness and poor resilience.

In contrast, self-compassion encourages us to feel comfortable in our own skin. It allows us to generate our own feelings of warmth, reassurance, soothing and liking who we are.

What does it look like?

Difficult moments, like an unexpected exam question, are a ripe breeding ground for self-criticism. You may be familiar with thoughts like, "I'm not good enough, I can't do this, I should have worked harder, I'm going to fail, I am a failure." These self-critical thoughts are almost addictive—when they pop up it is easy to fixate on them and spiral into panic or avoidance.

In contrast, picture a friend sitting the same exam and getting the same unexpected question. This is a good friend who you really care about. If you could say something to them in that moment, it's probably easy to think of supportive words. Such as, "I know this is hard, but you can do this. Your best is good enough. This one exam will not define your life, even if you get this wrong. I still think you're a wonderful person."

Self-compassionate responses are more likely to make us feel confident, safer and therefore resilient. If we're feeling this way, it will likely be easier to at least attempt the question rather than supply up. It it is easy to draw on compassionate wisdom for our friends. But why don't we say these things to ourselves?

Our tricky brains

We don't because we have a "tricky brain".

We like to think of ourselves as sensible and rational, but the brain is actually a faulty piece of machinery. The brain is hardwired, through evolution, to focus on threat.

Noticing threat, and triggering the flight or fight response, is what kept our ancestors alive when they were faced with an aggressive cave man or attack from a saber tooth tiger.

Today, threats tend to be less extreme: like not getting the score we want in a test or not having the career pathway we might like. But our mind and body still react in the same way as if we are facing a saber tooth tiger, flooding our body with adrenaline and the stress hormone cortisol.

The (many) advantages of self-compassion

Treating ourselves with the same kindness and support as we would a good friend comes with a plethora of mental health benefits.

It is associated with greater psychological well-being and a lower risk of developing symptoms of poor mental health.

It leads to better stress-management and boosts motivation to study for exams, often contributing to better grades. Self-compassion gives us the bravery to try things we may fail at, because we can take bigger chances if we know we won't beat ourselves up if we fall short. And sometimes, as with more study, these chances and extra effort pay off.

Self-compassion can also weaken the link between perfectionism and depression. Perfectionism involves and high levels of self-criticism and which can lead to depressive symptoms, especially when we fall short of our goals. But self-compassion may enable perfectionists to have high standards and be motivated to do well, without experiencing the mental health cost.

For example, in the lead up to an exam, having high standards and wanting to achieve can motivate us to study. But during and after the exam, this perfectionism can turn into self-criticsm which places us at risk of feeling low and unmotivated.

If we are compassionate with ourselves, we can normalize how tough exams are, and show unconditional positive regard for ourselves no matter the outcome. These compassionate ways of thinking can help protect us from depression symptoms.

How can we learn and teach self-compassion?

Some of us tend to be more self-compassionate than others. But if you're not naturally a very self-compassionate person, there is good news. Research suggests you can learn to do it.

Here are some ways to approach it, both for yourselves and your kids:

  • Check yourself: before talking with your child about self-compassion, consider how you treat yourself when under stress. Do you notice when your self-critic is triggered? It is hard to be genuine when encouraging someone else to be self-compassionate if you are not.
  • Model self-compassion: when you make an error, try replacing "I'm so stupid I let this happen" with "I'm upset about this and that's okay—anyone would feel this way in this situation". Talk to yourself in a soft, calm tone. Whether you say it aloud or even just think it, your behavior in that moment will change, and your kids will see this
  • Talk about it: start a conversation with your child about their relationship with themselves. You could start with: "what do you tend to say to yourself or feel about yourself during exams?" or "what effect does this have on you?"
  • Help them spot self-criticism: encourage your child to notice when pops up. supply the self-criticsm a name such as "Voldemort" or the "angry voice". Say, "When you notice Voldemort is hanging around, gently ask yourself, what would you say to a good friend or a ten-year-old version of yourself in this situation?" This simple question is a powerful way to tap into the compassionate wisdom we all carry
  • Give yourself a hug: to help calm yourself, supply yourself a hug. Either wrap your arms around yourself or hold your hand on your heart or chest and notice the warmth. Research tells us we get a flood of oxytocin—the body's "love drug"—and relax when we are hugged by someone we trust. Our brain and body has an almost identical reaction when we hug ourselves. Use as a this short-cut to trigger some feelings of self-compassion.

And don't forget this

Self-compassion is not something you master once, and then move on from. It is a lifelong journey of practicing and learning. Sometimes, especially when we are busy or stressed, it will drop off and we may need reminding of it's superpower.

As a self-compassion researcher, I talk, write, think, debate and practice daily. Yet I still find myself listening to Voldemort at times. This is part of living with a "tricky brain". But there is a more self-compassionate option. And if we take it, the science says we will be more resilient and more likely to accomplish our goals.



This article is republished from The Conversation under a Creative Commons license. Read the original article.The Conversation

Citation: Self-compassion is the superpower year students need for exams and life beyond school (2022, October 11) retrieved 17 October 2022 from https://medicalxpress.com/news/2022-10-self-compassion-superpower-year-students-exams.html

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Killexams : Perimeter Medical Imaging AI Graduates to Tier 1 of the TSX-V

TORONTO & DALLAS, October 03, 2022--(BUSINESS WIRE)--Perimeter Medical Imaging AI, Inc. (TSX-V:PINK)(OTC:PYNKF) (FSE:4PC) ("Perimeter" or the "Company") – a medical technology company driven to transform cancer surgery with ultra-high-resolution, real-time, advanced imaging tools to address high unmet medical needs – announces that the TSX Venture Exchange (TSX-V) has approved its application to graduate from a Tier 2 Issuer to a Tier 1 Issuer. Tier 1 is reserved for senior TSX-V companies with the most significant financial resources and those that have demonstrated a sustainable business model and operational track record.

Jeremy Sobotta, Perimeter’s Chief Executive Officer stated, "We are very pleased that the TSX-V has recognized Perimeter’s growth since it became public in 2020. We were already recognized as part of the 2022 TSX Venture 50®, and to us this graduation is the natural next step. We look forward to continuing to grow our business and providing value to our shareholders as a Tier 1 company."

Important factors included in Perimeter’s successful tier graduation application include the Company’s well capitalized position with cash and cash equivalents of $44,966,273 as of June 30, 2022; Perimeter’s significant intellectual property in its optical tissue imaging system including five issued patents in the U.S. and internationally; and the broadening public distribution of Perimeter’s common shares traded on the TSX-V, OTC and FSE.

Perimeter’s common shares will begin trading on Tier 1 at the open of trading on October 5, 2022.

With the graduation to Tier 1 listing, Perimeter’s common shares previously deposited into escrow pursuant to TSX-V rules will now be governed by the applicable Tier 1 release provisions. As such, 5,080,959 common shares of Perimeter as well as approximately 687,105 warrants, options or underlying common shares of Perimeter will be eligible for release from escrow immediately, including 5,008,057 common shares held by Perimeter’s largest shareholder, Roadmap Capital.

About Perimeter Medical Imaging AI, Inc.

Based in Toronto, Canada and Dallas, Texas, Perimeter Medical Imaging AI (TSX-V:PINK) (OTC:PYNKF) (FSE:4PC) is a medical technology company driven to transform cancer surgery with ultra-high-resolution, real-time, advanced imaging tools to address areas of high unmet medical need. Available across the U.S., our FDA-cleared Perimeter S-Series OCT system provides real-time, cross-sectional visualization of excised tissues at the cellular level. The breakthrough-device-designated investigational Perimeter B-Series OCT with ImgAssist AI represents our next-generation artificial intelligence technology that is currently being evaluated in a pivotal clinical trial, with support from a grant of up to US$7.4 million awarded by the Cancer Prevention and Research Institute of Texas. The company’s ticker symbol "PINK" is a reference to the pink ribbons used during Breast Cancer Awareness Month.

Neither the TSX Venture Exchange nor its Regulation Services Provider (as that term is defined in policies of the TSX Venture Exchange) accepts responsibility for the adequacy or accuracy of this release.

Forward-Looking Statements

This news release contains statements that constitute "forward-looking information" within the meaning of applicable Canadian securities legislation. In this news release, words such as "may," "would," "could," "will," "likely," "believe," "expect," "anticipate," "intend," "plan," "estimate," and similar words and the negative form thereof are used to identify forward-looking statements. Forward-looking information may relate to management’s future outlook and anticipated events or results and may include statements or information regarding the future financial position, business strategy and strategic goals, competitive conditions, research and development activities, projected costs and capital expenditures, research and clinical testing outcomes, taxes and plans and objectives of, or involving, Perimeter. Without limitation, information regarding the development and potential benefits of Perimeter S-Series OCT, Perimeter B-Series OCT and Perimeter ImgAssist are forward-looking information. Forward-looking statements should not be read as guarantees of future performance or results, and will not necessarily be accurate indications of whether, or the times at or by which, any particular result will be achieved. No assurance can be given that any events anticipated by the forward-looking information will transpire or occur. Forward-looking information is based on information available at the time and/or management’s good-faith belief with respect to future events and are subject to known or unknown risks, uncertainties, assumptions, and other unpredictable factors, many of which are beyond Perimeter’s control. Such forward-looking statements reflect Perimeter’s current view with respect to future events, but are inherently subject to significant medical, scientific, business, economic, competitive, political, and social uncertainties and contingencies. In making forward-looking statements, Perimeter may make various material assumptions, including but not limited to (i) the accuracy of Perimeter’s financial projections; (ii) obtaining positive results from trials; (iii) obtaining necessary regulatory approvals; and (iv) general business, market, and economic conditions. Further risks, uncertainties and assumptions include, but are not limited to, those applicable to Perimeter and described in Perimeter’s Management Discussion and Analysis for the year ended December 31, 2021, which is available on Perimeter’s SEDAR profile at www.sedar.com, and could cause real events or results to differ materially from those projected in any forward-looking statements. Perimeter does not intend, nor does Perimeter undertake any obligation, to update or revise any forward-looking information contained in this news release to reflect subsequent information, events, or circumstances or otherwise, except if required by applicable laws.

View source version on businesswire.com: https://www.businesswire.com/news/home/20221003005378/en/

Contacts

Chris Scott
Chief Financial Officer
Perimeter Medical Imaging AI, Inc.
Investors: investors@perimetermed.com
Toll-free: 888-988-7465 (PINK)

Jodi Regts
Corporate Communications
Perimeter Medical Imaging AI, Inc.
Media: media@perimetermed.com
Mobile: 469-743-1834

Mon, 03 Oct 2022 15:04:00 -0500 en-US text/html https://www.yahoo.com/entertainment/perimeter-medical-imaging-ai-graduates-114500943.html
Killexams : Perimeter Security Market 2022 : Company Profile Analysis, Industry Segmentation, Opportunity Assessment and Forecast by 2029 | 100 Pages Report

The MarketWatch News Department was not involved in the creation of this content.

Oct 12, 2022 (The Expresswire) -- According to this latest study, In 2022 the growth of Perimeter Security Market is projected to reach Multimillion USD by 2029, In comparison to 2021, Over the next Seven years the Perimeter Security Market will register a magnificent spike in CAGR in terms of revenue, In this study, 2021 has been considered as the base year and 2022 to 2029 as the forecast period to estimate the market size for Perimeter Security.

Global “Perimeter Security Market" Report is a detailed and comprehensive analysis for global Door and Perimeter Security market. Both quantitative and qualitative analyses are presented by manufacturers, by region and country, by Type and by Application. As the market is constantly changing, this report explores the competition, supply and demand trends, as well as key factors that contribute to its changing demands across many markets. Company profiles and product examples of selected competitors, along with market share estimates of some of the selected leaders for the year 2022, are provided.

Perimeter Security Market Research Report is spread across 100 Pages and provides exclusive data, information, vital statistics, trends, and competitive landscape details in this niche sector.

Final Report will add the analysis of the impact of COVID-19 on this industry.

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COVID-19 can affect the global economy in three main ways: by directly affecting production and demand, by creating supply chain and market disruption, and by its financial impact on firms and financial markets. Our analysts monitoring the situation across the globe explains that the market will generate remunerative prospects for producers post COVID-19 crisis. The report aims to provide an additional illustration of the latest scenario, economic slowdown, and COVID-19 impact on the overall industry.

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Chapter 3focuses on analyzing the current competitive situation in the Perimeter Security market and provides basic information, market data, product introductions, etc. of leading companies in the industry. At the same time, Chapter 3 includes the highlighted analysis--Strategies for Company to Deal with the Impact of COVID-19, Top Key Players are as follows :

● Dahua Technology Co., Ltd.
● Puretech Systems, Inc
● Southwest Microwave, Inc.
● United Technologies Corporation
● Bosch Security Systems
● Johnson Controls International PLC
● Axis Communications AB
● Rbtec Perimeter Security Systems
● Hangzhou Hikvision Digital Technology Co., Ltd
● Cias Elettronica
● Fiber Sensys, Inc.
● Senstar Corporation
● Honeywell International Inc.

Scope Of the Perimeter Security Market:

The Global Perimeter Security market is anticipated to rise at a considerable rate during the forecast period, between 2022 and 2029. In 2020, the market is growing at a steady rate and with the rising adoption of strategies by key players, the market is expected to rise over the projected horizon.

North America, especially The United States, will still play an important role which cannot be ignored. Any changes from United States might affect the development trend of Perimeter Security. The market in North America is expected to grow considerably during the forecast period. The high adoption of advanced technology and the presence of large players in this region are likely to create ample growth opportunities for the market.

Europe also play important roles in global market, with a magnificent growth in CAGR During the Forecast period 2022-2029.

Perimeter Security Market size is projected to reach Multimillion USD by 2029, In comparison to 2022, at unexpected CAGR during 2022-2029.

Despite the presence of intense competition, due to the global recovery trend is clear, investors are still optimistic about this area, and it will still be more new investments entering the field in the future.

This report focuses on the Perimeter Security in global market, especially in North America, Europe and Asia-Pacific, South America, Middle East and Africa. This report categorizes the market based on manufacturers, regions, type and application.

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Report further studies the market development status and future Perimeter Security Market trend across the world. Also, it splits Perimeter Security market Segmentation by Type and by Applications to fully and deeply research and reveal market profile and prospects.

Chapter 4 provides breakdown data of different types of products, as well as market forecasts.

● Perimeter Intrusion Detection Systems
● Access Control Systems
● Video Surveillance Systems
● Alarms and Notifications Systems
● Others

Different application fields have different usage and development prospects of products. Therefore, Chapter 5 provides subdivision data of different application fields and market forecasts.

● Commercial
● Government
● Industrial
● Military and Defense
● Transportation
● Others

Chapters 7-26 focus on the regional market. We have selected the most representative 20 countries from ;197 countries in the world and conducted a detailed analysis and overview of the market development of these countries.

● North America (United States, Canada and Mexico) ● Europe (Germany, UK, France, Italy, Russia and Turkey etc.) ● Asia-Pacific (China, Japan, Korea, India, Australia, Indonesia, Thailand, Philippines, Malaysia and Vietnam) ● South America (Brazil, Argentina, Columbia etc.) ● Middle East and Africa (Saudi Arabia, UAE, Egypt, Nigeria and South Africa)

This Perimeter Security Market Research/Analysis Report Contains Answers to your following Questions

● Which Manufacturing Technology is used for Perimeter Security? What Developments Are Going On in That Technology? Which Trends Are Causing These Developments? ● Who Are the Global Key Players in This Perimeter Security Market? What are Their Company Profile, Their Product Information, and Contact Information? ● What Was Global Market Status of Perimeter Security Market? What Was Capacity, Production Value, Cost and PROFIT of Perimeter Security Market? ● What Is Current Market Status of Perimeter Security Industry? What’s Market Competition in This Industry, Both Company, and Country Wise? What’s Market Analysis of Perimeter Security Market by Taking Applications and Types in Consideration? ● What Are Projections of Global Perimeter Security Industry Considering Capacity, Production and Production Value? What Will Be the Estimation of Cost and Profit? What Will Be Market Share, Supply and Consumption? What about Import and Export? ● What Is Perimeter Security Market Chain Analysis by Upstream Raw Materials and Downstream Industry? ● What Is Economic Impact On Perimeter Security Industry? What are Global Macroeconomic Environment Analysis Results? What Are Global Macroeconomic Environment Development Trends? ● What Are Market Dynamics of Perimeter Security Market? What Are Challenges and Opportunities? ● What Should Be Entry Strategies, Countermeasures to Economic Impact, and Marketing Channels for Perimeter Security Industry?

Our research analysts will help you to get customized details for your report, which can be modified in terms of a specific region, application or any statistical details. In addition, we are always willing to comply with the study, which triangulated with your own data to make the market research more comprehensive in your perspective.

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Major Points from Table of Contents

Global Perimeter Security Market Research Report 2022-2029, by Manufacturers, Regions, Types and Applications

1 Introduction
1.1 Objective of the Study
1.2 Definition of the Market
1.3 Market Scope
1.3.1 Market Segment by Type, Application and Marketing Channel
1.3.2 Major Regions Covered (North America, Europe, Asia Pacific, Mid East and Africa)
1.4 Years Considered for the Study (2015-2029)
1.5 Currency Considered (U.S. Dollar)
1.6 Stakeholders

2 Key Findings of the Study

3 Market Dynamics
3.1 Driving Factors for this Market
3.2 Factors Challenging the Market
3.3 Opportunities of the Global Perimeter Security Market (Regions, Growing/Emerging Downstream Market Analysis)
3.4 Technological and Market Developments in the Perimeter Security Market
3.5 Industry News by Region
3.6 Regulatory Scenario by Region/Country
3.7 Market Investment Scenario Strategic Recommendations Analysis

4 Value Chain of the Perimeter Security Market

4.1 Value Chain Status
4.2 Upstream Raw Material Analysis
4.3 Midstream Major Company Analysis (by Manufacturing Base, by Product Type)
4.4 Distributors/Traders
4.5 Downstream Major Customer Analysis (by Region)

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5 Global Perimeter Security Market-Segmentation by Type

6 Global Perimeter Security Market-Segmentation by Application

7 Global Perimeter Security Market-Segmentation by Marketing Channel

7.1 Traditional Marketing Channel (Offline)
7.2 Online Channel

8 Competitive Intelligence Company Profiles

9 Global Perimeter Security Market-Segmentation by Geography

9.1 North America
9.2 Europe
9.3 Asia-Pacific
9.4 Latin America

9.5 Middle East and Africa

10 Future Forecast of the Global Perimeter Security Market from 2022-2029

10.1 Future Forecast of the Global Perimeter Security Market from 2022-2029 Segment by Region
10.2 Global Perimeter Security Production and Growth Rate Forecast by Type (2022-2029)
10.3 Global Perimeter Security Consumption and Growth Rate Forecast by Application (2022-2029)

11 Appendix
11.1 Methodology
12.2 Research Data Source

Continued….

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Tue, 11 Oct 2022 23:55:00 -0500 en-US text/html https://www.marketwatch.com/press-release/perimeter-security-market-2022-company-profile-analysis-industry-segmentation-opportunity-assessment-and-forecast-by-2029-100-pages-report-2022-10-12
Killexams : We can predict final school marks in year 11. It's time to replace stressful exams with more meaningful education

Year 12 students around Australia are preparing to sit their final exams. For many young people this is one of the most stressful parts of school, with their future supposedly coming down to one number.

This is an outdated way of finishing school and working out what students do in the next phase of their lives.

Universities and TAFEs are increasingly using other methods—such as interviews or portfolios—to offer places to school leavers. In 2021, more than 25,000 NSW students applied for an early offer through the "schools recommendation scheme," to lock in a university place before they sit their exams. This is up from 5,447 in 2014, suggesting year 12 exams may not be as necessary as we once thought.

Our research shows you can reliably predict a student's year 12 results by year 11. This also suggests we don't need a battery of stressful exams to work out if a student is suited for tertiary education.

This gives us the opportunity to radically rethink how the final years of school are structured.

Our research

Two years ago, we studied more than 10,000 students in the Catholic Education Diocese of Paramatta, NSW. We have repeated the study and our work now includes 20,000 students across 21 areas.

We used predictive analytics which links multiple pieces of information about student progression through school.

We used 17 variables including year 9 NAPLAN scores, Higher School Certificate subject choices and year 11 attendance. We also use demographic information, such as how long a student has lived in Australia and a school's socioeconomic rating.

Across both our studies, we found we could predict year 12 results in year 11, with a 93% accuracy rate.

Our purpose here is not to label students, but to change the focus of school and the efforts of students and teachers.

What can we do differently in schools?

We are already seeing the beginnings of new ways of "doing school" in Australia. Some schools are changing their focus from year 12 exams to students doing internships, creating portfolios of work, doing TAFE or university certificates, or doing an overseas exchange.

In British Columbia, Canada, final school assessments include a project that connects "real-world" applications of the curriculum for each student.

In Estonia, now among the world leaders in education, traditional "knowledge and understanding" approaches have been replaced with a strong emphasis on , problem-solving, entrepreneurship, digital skills and citizenship. These are all qualities that fit with both employers' needs and measures of success in the adult world.

Students undertake a cross-disciplinary creative project to graduate from the equivalent of year 10—an example might be studying the impact of music on managing the onset of dementia in older people. They then do a research project before finishing .

Year 12 exams are outdated

High school as we've known it has been dominated by high stakes, high-pressure exams that have outlived their usefulness. If we can reliably predict the results, we don't need the tests.

We know 's mental health is already poor, and has suffered further during COVID.

We should be looking for ways to improve, rather than exacerbate this. We also know universities are increasingly open to other ways of admitting .

There is an enormous opportunity here to reallocate resources and create a modern, meaningful school experience that excites young people. It can encourage them to seek career-building activities, study overseas, learn languages or follow passion projects—not just study for stressful exams that tell us what we already know.



This article is republished from The Conversation under a Creative Commons license. Read the original article.The Conversation

Citation: We can predict final school marks in year 11. It's time to replace stressful exams with more meaningful education (2022, September 19) retrieved 17 October 2022 from https://phys.org/news/2022-09-school-year-stressful-exams-meaningful.html

This document is subject to copyright. Apart from any fair dealing for the purpose of private study or research, no part may be reproduced without the written permission. The content is provided for information purposes only.

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Killexams : Perimeter Medical Imaging AI Graduates to Tier 1 of the TSX-V

Perimeter Medical Imaging AI, Inc. PINKPYNKF (FSE:4PC) ("Perimeter" or the "Company") – a medical technology company driven to transform cancer surgery with ultra-high-resolution, real-time, advanced imaging tools to address high unmet medical needs – announces that the TSX Venture Exchange (TSX-V) has approved its application to graduate from a Tier 2 Issuer to a Tier 1 Issuer. Tier 1 is reserved for senior TSX-V companies with the most significant financial resources and those that have demonstrated a sustainable business model and operational track record.

Jeremy Sobotta, Perimeter's Chief Executive Officer stated, "We are very pleased that the TSX-V has recognized Perimeter's growth since it became public in 2020. We were already recognized as part of the 2022 TSX Venture 50®, and to us this graduation is the natural next step. We look forward to continuing to grow our business and providing value to our shareholders as a Tier 1 company."

Important factors included in Perimeter's successful tier graduation application include the Company's well capitalized position with cash and cash equivalents of $44,966,273 as of June 30, 2022; Perimeter's significant intellectual property in its optical tissue imaging system including five issued patents in the U.S. and internationally; and the broadening public distribution of Perimeter's common shares traded on the TSX-V, OTC and FSE.

Perimeter's common shares will begin trading on Tier 1 at the open of trading on October 5, 2022.

With the graduation to Tier 1 listing, Perimeter's common shares previously deposited into escrow pursuant to TSX-V rules will now be governed by the applicable Tier 1 release provisions. As such, 5,080,959 common shares of Perimeter as well as approximately 687,105 warrants, options or underlying common shares of Perimeter will be eligible for release from escrow immediately, including 5,008,057 common shares held by Perimeter's largest shareholder, Roadmap Capital.

About Perimeter Medical Imaging AI, Inc.

Based in Toronto, Canada and Dallas, Texas, Perimeter Medical Imaging AI PINK PYNKF (FSE:4PC) is a medical technology company driven to transform cancer surgery with ultra-high-resolution, real-time, advanced imaging tools to address areas of high unmet medical need. Available across the U.S., our FDA-cleared Perimeter S-Series OCT system provides real-time, cross-sectional visualization of excised tissues at the cellular level. The breakthrough-device-designated investigational Perimeter B-Series OCT with ImgAssist AI represents our next-generation artificial intelligence technology that is currently being evaluated in a pivotal clinical trial, with support from a grant of up to US$7.4 million awarded by the Cancer Prevention and Research Institute of Texas. The company's ticker symbol "PINK" is a reference to the pink ribbons used during Breast Cancer Awareness Month.

Neither the TSX Venture Exchange nor its Regulation Services Provider (as that term is defined in policies of the TSX Venture Exchange) accepts responsibility for the adequacy or accuracy of this release.

Forward-Looking Statements

This news release contains statements that constitute "forward-looking information" within the meaning of applicable Canadian securities legislation. In this news release, words such as "may," "would," "could," "will," "likely," "believe," "expect," "anticipate," "intend," "plan," "estimate," and similar words and the negative form thereof are used to identify forward-looking statements. Forward-looking information may relate to management's future outlook and anticipated events or results and may include statements or information regarding the future financial position, business strategy and strategic goals, competitive conditions, research and development activities, projected costs and capital expenditures, research and clinical testing outcomes, taxes and plans and objectives of, or involving, Perimeter. Without limitation, information regarding the development and potential benefits of Perimeter S-Series OCT, Perimeter B-Series OCT and Perimeter ImgAssist are forward-looking information. Forward-looking statements should not be read as guarantees of future performance or results, and will not necessarily be accurate indications of whether, or the times at or by which, any particular result will be achieved. No assurance can be given that any events anticipated by the forward-looking information will transpire or occur. Forward-looking information is based on information available at the time and/or management's good-faith belief with respect to future events and are subject to known or unknown risks, uncertainties, assumptions, and other unpredictable factors, many of which are beyond Perimeter's control. Such forward-looking statements reflect Perimeter's current view with respect to future events, but are inherently subject to significant medical, scientific, business, economic, competitive, political, and social uncertainties and contingencies. In making forward-looking statements, Perimeter may make various material assumptions, including but not limited to (i) the accuracy of Perimeter's financial projections; (ii) obtaining positive results from trials; (iii) obtaining necessary regulatory approvals; and (iv) general business, market, and economic conditions. Further risks, uncertainties and assumptions include, but are not limited to, those applicable to Perimeter and described in Perimeter's Management Discussion and Analysis for the year ended December 31, 2021, which is available on Perimeter's SEDAR profile at www.sedar.com, and could cause real events or results to differ materially from those projected in any forward-looking statements. Perimeter does not intend, nor does Perimeter undertake any obligation, to update or revise any forward-looking information contained in this news release to reflect subsequent information, events, or circumstances or otherwise, except if required by applicable laws.

© 2022 Benzinga.com. Benzinga does not provide investment advice. All rights reserved.

Sun, 02 Oct 2022 23:52:00 -0500 text/html https://www.benzinga.com/pressreleases/22/10/b29115647/perimeter-medical-imaging-ai-graduates-to-tier-1-of-the-tsx-v
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