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Killexams : Military Section test - BingNews https://killexams.com/pass4sure/exam-detail/ASVAB-General-Science Search results Killexams : Military Section test - BingNews https://killexams.com/pass4sure/exam-detail/ASVAB-General-Science https://killexams.com/exam_list/Military Killexams : China releases video of anti-missile interception test
  • Footage of the test of a midcourse missile was released in the build-up to a major political gathering this month
  • The military has been showcasing its abilities and achievements in a documentary

China has released a video of an anti-ballistic missile interception test as part of a drive to showcase its military abilities ahead of a major Communist Party gathering.

The 23-second clip released on a social media account affiliated with the Chinese military on Friday evening did not identify the time and location of the test, but it referred to an announcement by the defence ministry in June that a missile test had been carried out.

Chinese scientists plan supersonic missile that can fly and swim

It said a land-based midcourse missile had been tested within China's borders and "achieved its objective". It added that the missile test was defensive in nature and not aimed at any country. There was no further information, including the type of system being tested or the missile being intercepted.

Do you have questions about the biggest subjects and trends from around the world? Get the answers with SCMP Knowledge, our new platform of curated content with explainers, FAQs, analyses and infographics brought to you by our award-winning team.

Song Zhongping, a former People's Liberation Army instructor, said the new video was part of the documentary about the Chinese military's achievements in accurate years.

"Those videos ... were for celebrating the national anniversary [on October 1] and the upcoming Communist Party congress," he said.

The once-every-five-year party congress, which begins on October 16, will see a major leadership reshuffle and officials from different agencies have been using the build-up to promote what they have achieved.

The anti-ballistic missile test was China's sixth publicly announced land-based anti-ballistic missile test since 2010. The last such missile interceptor test was in February 2021.

Shao Yongling, a former member of the PLA's missile force, told state broadcaster CCTV in June that the technology was aimed at protecting the country's nuclear capabilities.

The footage included animation of the missile test. Photo: Weibo © Provided by South China Morning Post The footage included animation of the missile test. Photo: Weibo

The defence ministry's announcement that a test had been carried out in June was made a day after the United States announced the successful launch of four Trident II (D5LE) missiles from an Ohio-class submarine off the coast of southern California.

China became only the second country after the United States to intercept a ballistic missile with a kinetic kill vehicle in 2010, according to state media reports.

The US Ground-based Midcourse Defence system was deployed in 2004 and is designed to protect the country from a limited long-range ballistic missile attack.

Once the Chinese technology is fully developed, it could change the balance of nuclear deterrence. The aim is to knock out incoming intercontinental ballistic missiles outside the Earth's atmosphere.

This week North Korea carried out six missile tests that prompted a series of launches and joint military exercises from the US, South Korea and Japan.

China's military blasts US call to ban anti-satellite missile tests

The US this week accused Beijing and Moscow of enabling North Korean leader Kim Jong-un by blocking efforts to strengthen United Nations sanctions against Pyongyang.

But Beijing blamed Washington for creating tensions in the Korean peninsula. It said the US had failed to address North Korea's concerns and its efforts to strengthen its alliances had heightened the risk of military confrontation.

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This article originally appeared on the South China Morning Post (www.scmp.com), the leading news media reporting on China and Asia.

Copyright (c) 2022. South China Morning Post Publishers Ltd. All rights reserved.

Sat, 08 Oct 2022 05:19:00 -0500 en-XL text/html https://www.msn.com/en-xl/news/other/china-releases-video-of-anti-missile-interception-test/ar-AA12JvxG
Killexams : Workout of the Week: Pull Day With a Swim Bonus

If you like to do deadlifts and pull-ups, you'll love this pulling day combination focused on pulling heavy things off the floor, walking with them, and pulling yourself over a pull-up bar or around (also known as the USMC College boy roll).

This workout is especially useful if you need to find ways to Excellerate your deadlifts and pull-ups, which can be necessary for a wide variety of the military's fitness tests.

This workout is a classic way to mix in some challenging military tests, obstacle course events, and exercises used throughout the military. The advanced combination of pulling weight off the ground using a hip hinge movement -- a deadlift -- and pulling yourself over a bar represents two of the most difficult exercises. But they're also the most effective in creating true strength and durability for any tactical profession.

Kick this workout off with a warm-up of a pyramid style mix of pull-ups and kettlebell Romanian Deadlifts (KB RDL).

Warm-Up:

Pull-ups/KB RDL run pyramid 1-10 50m runs in between set

You'll end up with 55 total rep of pull-ups and RDLs, mixed with short, easy runs. Add dynamic stretches to fully prepare yourself for the upcoming runs and lifts.

You can also opt to do straight-back toe touches during the warm-ups instead of lifting heavy kettlebells.

Workout:

Run 1 mile fast or bike/row 10 minutes

Repeat 5 times: Max pull-ups 5 deadlifts

10 hanging knee-ups

Run 1 mile fast or bike/row 10 minutes

Repeat 4 times: 1 college boy roll 100m farmer walks with 45 lbs. weight in each hand 10 KB RDL 800-meter run or 5-minute bike

Note: The college boy roll is a movement to get over the first obstacle in the USMC obstacle course where you must perform a half pull-up then pull your hips to the bar. Then, flip over the bar in a reverse rotation to clear the first obstacle.

Cooldown:

Bike, row or easy jog option for 20 min or swim if you need more time in the water.

The grip workout alone in the above sets is challenging enough. But if you are preparing only for events of the Army Combat Fitness Test, the Marine Corps Combat Fitness Test, and the Marine Corps Obstacle Course, the land-based section is probably enough.

But if you need to add in a swimming portion to such a workout for a future in Dive School, RECON or SEAL training, you need a good way to mix in the techniques of strength and durability with treading and swimming.

Try the 50-50 workout as a bonus to the land-based workout above. And if you are struggling to swim 500 meters non-stop or get winded after a few laps, you can try the 50-50 swim workout below four to five days a week.

Warm-Up:

Swim 500 meters

Repeat 10 times:

Swim 50 meters free at 6-8 strokes per breath Swim 50 meters combat swimmer stroke (CSS) goal pace (minimum rest)

Cooldown:

10-min water tread or aqua jog and stretch

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Fri, 07 Oct 2022 07:33:00 -0500 en text/html https://www.military.com/military-fitness/workout-of-week-pull-day-swim-bonus
Killexams : Is the military too ‘woke’ to recruit?

The Army missed its recruiting goal by about 15,000 new soldiers in 2022, coming up 25% short of its goal at a time when each of the services were struggling to meet their benchmarks. Military officials worry that all of the branches have had to reach deep into their pools of delayed entry applicants, a move that puts them behind in recruiting for the new year.

Military recruiters have leaned on tried-and-true factors to explain the challenges, including low unemployment and a dearth of applicants up to physical, educational and behavioral standards.

But the truth is, no one keeps detailed data on what’s stopping America’s youth from signing up. Experts and senior military leaders point to the perennial factors of competition from the private sector and a dwindling number of young Americans both qualified and interested in military service. But what they don’t have much information on is why that propensity is going down, and whether the country is undergoing an ideological shift in attitude toward military service.

One possibility that is increasingly resonating with veterans is that the military is too “woke.” Sen. Tommy Tuberville, R-Ala., for example, is among a group of Republican senators who have repeatedly blamed recruiting problems on the Biden administration for trying to build a “woke Army.”

Thomas Spoehr, director of the Center for National Defense at The Heritage Foundation, a conservative think tank, recently opined that wokeness is the “chief worry of grizzled American veterans today.”

“The largest threat they see by far to our current military is the weakening of its fabric by radical progressive (or ‘woke’) policies being imposed, not by a rising generation of slackers, but by the very leaders charged with ensuring their readiness,” he wrote. “Wokeness in the military is being imposed by elected and appointed leaders in the White House, Congress, and the Pentagon who have little understanding of the purpose, character, traditions, and requirements of the institution they are trying to change.”

Spoehr acknowledged that “direct ‘cause and effect’ studies on the impact of woke policies such as these do not exist,” but suggested that “common sense” dictates that it is having an effect on recruiting.

“Is anyone surprised that potential recruits — many of whom come from rural or poor areas of the country — don’t want to spend their time being lectured about white privilege?” he wrote.

In an interview with Fox News, former Secretary of State Mike Pompeo, a West Point graduate and Army officer who served in Germany during the Cold War, talked about the campaign he is launching, including TV ads and a website, to target what he calls “woke polices” directed toward the military.

“How can we ask young men and women who have decided to risk their lives for America, even die for America, to affirm that our country is inherently racist?” Pompeo wrote in a Sept. 28 opinion column for Fox. “How can we ask them to view their brothers and sisters in arms through the narrow prisms of race or gender? The clear and obvious answer is that we cannot — not without putting their lives at risk on the battlefield. A woke military is a weak military.”

But Defense Department leaders, while often apprehensive to address the intersection of politics and recruiting, have said they don’t see a connection anecdotally or statistically

“That whole ‘woke’ terminology has me a little perplexed,” Chief Master Sergeant of the Air Force JoAnne Bass told Air Force Times Sept. 6. “I don’t know that I agree [with] and appreciate that term.

“I’ve said it before; I think perhaps we do need to wake up to what our society is about today. Perhaps we need to wake up to how we actually have more in common than not. Perhaps we need to wake up to the goodness of the diversity that America brings to the table. That diversity is not just singular to demographic diversity, but … it’s experiences and it’s cognitive diversity as well. I don’t subscribe to the ‘wokeness’ in the way that it’s discussed. I actually think that, yeah, we probably need to wake up to the goodness of what all airmen and what all people bring to the fight.”

In reality, service members spend hundreds of hours a year on mandatory training, covering everything from operational safety to financial responsibility and suicide and sexual assault prevention, with a tiny fraction of that focusing on diversity, equity and inclusion education.

But what seems to incense people is that the issue of racial disparity is discussed at all, not that it’s truly cutting into time spent on training.

Reader feedback

When Marine Corps Reserve Col. Matthew F. Amidon, director of veterans and military families at the George W. Bush Institute, wrote a commentary urging veterans to help during the recruiting crisis by recommending military service to their kids and other young people, Military Times was inundated with a hundreds of emails from veterans saying they would do no such thing.

Their reasons varied, but most said wokeness is to blame. They accused the military of becoming so “political,” or such a “social experiment,” that even proud veterans wouldn’t recommend service.

“I’ll be blunt. I wouldn’t encourage anyone to join today’s armed forces and I discouraged both of my sons from considering serving,” wrote Peter Demas, who described himself as a third-generation veteran. “America’s military leaders have sold out the Services for their own advancement and reflect all the poorest qualities of civilian ‘leadership’ from whom they accepted thirty pieces of silver; instead of being the nation’s repository of integrity and moral courage, they have become more political than the political animals they grovel before.”

Survey data compiled by the Defense Department three times a year shows that propensity to serve has been dipping in accurate years. A report from fall 2021 shows that just 9 percent of 16- to 24-year-old survey respondents affirmed that they were likely to be serving in the military “in the next few years,” down from highs of 13% in 2018 and 15% in 2013.

But the survey doesn’t drill down into the why, leaving open questions of whether that’s due to disinterest in the military, known factors that would prevent someone from joining, or a concrete aversion overall. So, while the Pentagon regularly takes the temperature of American youth and their likelihood to join up, they don’t regularly drill down into the “why.”

Still, a vocal group of veterans insist they know the answer.

“With a woke military, whose most senior officer is concerned about ‘white rage,’ searching for a tattle tale process to discover and discharge white ‘extremists,’ blaming it on toxic masculinity, discharging real warriors for not getting vaccinated, having a two-day stand down to discuss white extremism, the promotion and expansion of women in combat, lowering physical fitness standards to accommodate naturally weaker women, recruiting with social justice and diversity ads, stating we need more female and minority pilots, promotions based on the color of one’s skin or genitalia, lowering recruiting standards, blaming the military for 247 years of institutional racism, is not the military I was in for 26 years,” wrote Dale Papworth, who said he was a retired Marine Corps lieutenant colonel.

Papworth’s comments run counter to some evidence. For instance, the dearth of women and people of color in the upper ranks suggests that if there is a biased promotions system, it’s biased toward white men.

His comments resemble those made by Fox News host Tucker Carlson last year, in response to news reports that the Air Force had authorized a maternity flight suit.

“So, we’ve got new hairstyles and maternity flight suits,” Carlson said, also referring recently updated Army and Air Force hair regulations allowing braids and ponytails. “Pregnant women are going to fight our wars. It’s a mockery of the U.S. military.”

That statement was misinformed at best, and deliberately misleading at worst. Pregnant women in the military are not allowed to deploy, while pilots and aircrew are required to secure waivers from their doctors in order to do training flights.

That is without even mentioning that the maternity flight suit that so incensed Carlson is not just worn by aircrew onboard aircraft ― it’s a standard day-to-day office uniform in aviation units.

Reader feedback suggests that a military and veteran population that has traditionally leaned conservative is no longer supportive of an institution they find unrecognizable.

“My 19-year-old has expressed in no uncertain terms he does not want to serve in the U.S. military in any capacity,” wrote Adam, who asked to be identified by his first name only. “The politicization of our [government] institutions is creeping into the services now, and that is also having an effect. They may as well put out a sign that conservative or right of center Americans are not welcome. They just keep making it worse with their messaging. Boys want to be challenged and go on adventures, not be schooled on pronouns or the sins of their skin color. Girls want to beat boys and prove themselves.”

Since 2020, the services have ramped up their diversity, equity and inclusion efforts, following a lead from then-Defense Secretary Mark Esper, who in the wake of George Floyd’s murder called on the department to do better.

Defense Secretary Lloyd Austin ran with that idea in the early weeks of the Biden administration, ordering a day-long stand down in every unit to discuss the threat of violent extremism, following years of proclamation from the FBI that right-wing domestic terrorism is on the rise.

But to some, these efforts were a direct attack on their worldview.

“Instead of training and preparing for combat, today’s military is too busy worrying about teaching proper pronouns, how to incorporate men who think they’re women and women who think they’re men into the barracks and showers,” wrote Ron Eslick, describing himself as a 1970s-era Navy submariner. “[Joint Chiefs Chairman] General Milley and Sec Def Austin are a disgrace to the uniform I once wore. They are nothing less than lap dogs to the current administration. What a shame that our country has now become a second rate threat in today’s world.”

And then came the COVID-19 vaccine mandate, one of nearly two dozen inoculations service members must receive in order to join and/or stay in the military, but one whose controversy pushed thousands to preternaturally end their careers.

“Covid vaccine mandates are undermining the military’s recruitment goals as well as harming overall morale,” wrote Harrison Wills. “Even if most troops complied with the mandate, how many did so only because their livelihoods were threatened? How many troops applied for exemptions but were denied? How many soldiers suffered and/or are suffering from side effects? How many people would consider joining the military but now won’t due to coercive mandates?”

A survey released this year of more than 8,600 military families found that troops are becoming less likely to recommend that their kids join up, potentially cutting into a traditionally reliable recruiting pool.

But it wasn’t because of politics, according to Shannon Razsadin, president and executive director of the Military Family Advisory Network, who put out the survey. It was because of quality of life.

“At the end of the day, families are having a hard time making ends meet, and that’s affecting their overall well-being,” she said in July. “We see the connection between well-being and loneliness, well-being and housing, well-being and food security. When you layer that on top of the fact that fewer people are likely to recommend military service, it paints a very clear picture of concern related to the future of the all-volunteer force.”

Notably, however, the survey doesn’t ask specific questions about politics.

Addressing the ‘woke military’ message

Each of the services, along with DoD, are continuously researching the recruiting environment, including tweaking resources and messaging to draw in more prospects.

“The Department continues to review our recruiting programs to ensure current funding and policies align with the realities of today’s youth market. We recognize we must ensure the Services have the resources and support they need to successfully man the All-Volunteer Force,” Army Maj. Charlie Dietz, a Pentagon spokesman, told Military Times.

But they don’t always get it right. In 2018, the Army missed its recruiting goal by about 6,500, the result of an end-strength bump that opened up the doors for more accessions.

The service announced a host of initiatives to Excellerate its 2019 prospects, including a push into major metropolitan areas, with the feeling that their suburban/small-town Southeast well was starting to dry up.

“They did report some positive effects, but the fact that they’re not doing that now suggests that they were limited,” Bruce Orvis, a senior behavioral scientist at the federally funded think tank Rand Corp. who has done dozens of recruiting studies, told Military Times on Sept. 13.

It’s unlikely the Pentagon’s strategy for communicating about its initiatives will change.

“The communication methods on new policies continue to follow a long-standing standard and there have not been any discussions of framing the policies to appease someone that will mold it to meet their argument,” Dietz said.

So, while department officials don’t plan on getting into a direct argument with some of its detractors, they will continue to present their case in as straightforward and nonconfrontational a manner as possible.

“A policy that may increase diversity and inclusion makes us a better military because it brings new perspectives of decision making, operational decision making that we conduct, as well as better ideas, more unique perspectives and increased understanding of experiences which might actually make us smarter on the battlefield,” Dietz added. “We are a stronger military because of our diversity and because we represent all Americans, just like we defend all Americans.”

The chief master sergeant of the Air Force described the path forward differently.

“I feel like I’m a pretty conservative American, but … I’m a conservative American who values what everybody brings to the fight,” Bass said. “… We actually have to educate ourselves and help make ourselves more aware. Often, what you see in a two-second sound bite is not truth. When we read things like, ‘Hey, the military is focused more on pronouns,’ that could not be more inaccurate. We are not focused more on pronouns. We are focused on warfighting and ensuring that we’re able to defend the homeland. That’s what we’re focused on. But the quick two-second sound bite always seems pretty attractive.”

If a misunderstanding of policy is driving down propensity to serve, particularly in communities that have been more likely to join the military in the past, the service could take steps to diagnose that.

One would be to expand the DoD Youth Poll’s questions to drill down into why the respondents answered the way they did.

For example:

  • Do you have work or education plans already lined up?
  • Do you believe you wouldn’t be able to meet accessions standards?
  • Has someone in your life discouraged you from serving in the military?
  • Have you read or seen media reports that discourage you from military service?

A task force is already dedicated to looking into some theories about why propensity to serve is down, Orvis said.

The trick will be determining which factors can be remedied without second and third-order effects. For instance, if tight regulations on past mental health history, or criminal history, are keeping the recruiting pool small, the services may be wary of risking continued issues once someone is in uniform.

“Because you don’t want to implement something nationally, on a more or less a permanent basis, if it turns out it’s going to bite you later on it, and you just don’t know,” he said.

The services will also have to redouble their efforts to explain to American youth what it means to serve in the military.

“We must also increase desire to serve in the Army by reconnecting to America through improved marketing and meeting America through interactive events across our nation, including a dedicated surge of Army leaders and soldiers telling their stories,” retired Gen. Paul Funk II, formerly head of Army Training and Doctrine Command, told Military Times last summer.” American youth simply don’t understand us, we owe it to them to ensure they understand all the benefits of service.

But in the meantime, with every report of lower recruiting numbers, military leaders will have to fight a perception of political indoctrination.

“The U.S. Army has fallen 15,000 soldiers short of its recruitment goal this year,” tweeted Rep. Andy Biggs, R-Ariz. “Maybe we ought to stop imposing vaccine mandates, preferred pronouns, and woke education training on them. Just a thought.”

Is there truth to any of that? Maybe, but the research hasn’t been done. Until it is, the narrative belongs to the loudest voices.

Air Force Times senior reporter Rachel Cohen contributed to this report.

Meghann Myers is the Pentagon bureau chief at Military Times. She covers operations, policy, personnel, leadership and other issues affecting service members.

Sun, 16 Oct 2022 05:15:00 -0500 en text/html https://www.militarytimes.com/news/your-military/2022/10/13/is-the-military-too-woke-to-recruit/
Killexams : Service members sound alarm against 'extremely woke' military

While President Biden's Secretary of the Army has defended its diversity, equity and inclusion (DEI) programs this week as "important," several current and former members of the U.S. military, who have put their lives on the line to ensure America's security and defend its freedoms, are sounding the alarm over what they call a culture putting "wokeness" before training and combat effectiveness.

Those service members, some of whom served with Special Operations Forces in Iraq and Afghanistan, are blaming that culture for its recruiting challenges, which have risen to a level unseen since it was transitioned to an all-volunteer force.

"The military is extremely woke," one service member told Fox News Digitial recently.

"I do perceive the Army leadership as woke, and probably the lower enlisted (they have been indoctrinated in school)," another service member said. "Equity-diversity is another way to divide and control the masses. It does nothing for the warfighter."

"We get criticized, frankly, sometimes for being ‘woke,'" Army Secretary Christine Wormuth said at a Monday discussion with other military leaders on national security and the branch’s modernization efforts. "I'm not sure what ‘woke’ means. I think ‘woke’ means a lot of different things to different people."

Members of the U.S. Army stand in formation. (U.S. Army)

She continued, "But, first of all, if ‘woke’ means we are not focused on warfighting, we are not focused on readiness, that doesn’t reflect what I see at installations all around the country or overseas when I go and visit."

ARMY MISSES RECRUITING GOALS WHILE OTHER BRANCHES FALL BEHIND FOR NEXT YEAR

The service members, who remained anonymous so they could speak freely, almost universally shared a similar sentiment, with many noting that senior members who speak out on the issue risk their careers or retirement pensions.

"Merely questioning the goals or methods used to promote ‘Equity & Diversity’ is punished and that punishment is swift, harsh, and public," one service member said.

BIDEN'S ARMY SECRETARY RESPONDS TO ‘WOKE’ CRITICISMS, SAYS DEI PROGRAMS ‘IMPORTANT’

"I 100% believe the military is woke. I see daily minorities, overweight people and women not adhering to military standards," another said. "Nobody corrects them due to the fear of being fired and labeled a racist or a sexist."

"I do think we do have a wide range of soldiers in our Army, and we've got to make them all feel included," Wormuth said Monday. "And that’s why a lot of our diversity, equity and inclusion programs are important."

Another service member pointed to the military's COVID-19 policies, noting the vaccine mandate has forced many members in good standing into difficult decisions.

LAWMAKERS SOUND ALARM OVER U.S. MILITARY RECRUITMENT CRISIS: ‘WHY WOULD I JOIN?’

"Most of us who serve did so because we came from military families. Patriotism and American values are no longer appreciated or expected," one service member said. "Troops themselves are largely treated as expendable and they don't even pretend otherwise. Spending 15+ years in the military during wartime with multiple deployments risking their lives only to be tossed out like garbage. Losing the retirement they have worked years to earn because they didn't want to take an experimental vaccine for an illness that was mild for fit and healthy people."

The military has been facing a recruiting crisis, with the Army failing to meet its recruiting goals in 2022 and the Marines, Air Force and Navy all dipping deep into their pools of delayed entry program candidates to scratch by this year, putting them well behind the pace for meeting next year's goals.

Members of the Navy Ceremonial Guard stand for the national anthem during a ceremony for National POW/MIA Recognition Day, at the U.S. Navy Memorial. (Kevin Dietsch)

"In the Army's most challenging recruiting year since the start of the all-volunteer force, we will only achieve 75% of our fiscal year '22 recruiting goal," Wormuth said in a statement after the numbers were publicly released.

While the military has faced several challenges in accurate years, including restrictions to entering schools brought on by the COVID-19 pandemic and a tight jobs market, many others have pinned the blame for the issue on a culture becoming less focused on winning the nation's wars.

"How can we ask young men and women who have decided to risk their lives for America, even die for America, to affirm that our country is inherently racist?" former Secretary of State Mike Pompeo wrote for Fox News last month. "How can we ask them to view their brothers and sisters in arms through the narrow prisms of race or gender? The clear and obvious answer is that we cannot – not without putting their lives at risk on the battlefield. A woke military is a weak military. Unfortunately, woke and weak are exactly what our military is becoming under Biden’s leadership."

AMERICA’S MILITARY AND OUR COUNTRY WON’T SURVIVE IF WOKEISM CONTINUES TO RULE

Many of the service members reached by Fox News Digital expressed similar concerns, with some saying they would not encourage their children to join the military.

"I would not have my children join for the same reason they are in private schools vs. public schools," one service member said.

"I couldn’t allow my kids to join the military, and risk having them serve under commanders like I saw on deployments," another service member said, citing the failures of leadership witnessed in Afghanistan and Iraq.

"They’d be better off serving for one of our allies who are focused on defending their country and will come to our aid when our woke and unready force embarrasses itself," another said.

"Why would I have my kids join an institution who works every day to call them evil and diminish the contributions of their ancestors," said another.

AIR FORCE ACADEMY PROMOTES FELLOWSHIP THAT BANS ‘CISGENDER' MEN: ‘THIS PROGRAM ISN’T FOR YOU’

A Tactical Control Party Airmen and qualified Joint Terminal Aircraft Controller assigned to the 9th Air Support Operations Squadron at Fort Hood, Texas. (U.S. Air Force photo by Master Sgt. JT May III)

Service members also complained of an overly-political culture among the military's leadership, arguing it has hindered their ability to prepare the country for conflict.

"The DOD is absolutely politicized. No matter what party is in power. Generals have basically become politicians, and ‘yes men’ and will conform to whatever party is in power," one service member said.

"It seems like in the '90s, DOD was apolitical, but that doesn’t seem to be the case now. It seems like more and more leaders are more overtly supporting a political side, rather than their oath," another said.

Though most of the members expressed concern about the direction of the military, some shared optimism that the culture could be turned around.

"I still think the military has values that are salvageable," one service member said.

CLICK HERE TO GET THE FOX NEWS APP

Others stressed that the military needs to return its focus on the mission in order to turn things around.

"I prefer a military that was more concerned with the standards of the unit, rather than equity," a service member said, describing those initiatives as "disruptive towards the real training the military should focus on."

Fox News' Houston Keene contributed to this report.

Tue, 11 Oct 2022 09:15:00 -0500 Fox News en text/html https://www.foxnews.com/politics/service-members-speak-out-against-woke-military
Killexams : North Korea’s Kim Guides Missile Test in Latest Show of Military Might

Wed, 12 Oct 2022 12:29:00 -0500 en-US text/html https://www.wsj.com/articles/north-koreas-kim-guides-missile-test-in-latest-show-of-military-might-11665619087
Killexams : Military deploys in newfound oilfields

THE Zimbabwean military is in Mashonaland Central province for a routine training exercise as part of efforts by the Zimbabwe Defence Forces (ZDF) to protect national security and interests.

In e-mailed responses to questions posed by the Zimbabwe Independent, the ZDF concerned  that it had notified stakeholders in Mashonaland Central ahead of the training exercise and was committed to protecting everything inside the country.

ZDF, the statement further read, was well positioned to defend the country.

“All government ministries, the provincial leadership, traditional leaders and all stakeholders in Mashonaland Central province were engaged during the planning stages of the exercise.

“At the commencement of the exercise, the whole nation was then informed through a press release issued on September 23 2022,” ZDF said.

The ZDF said it was resolute in protecting, “everything within the boundaries of Zimbabwe”.

“The constitution of Zimbabwe Amendment (No.20) Act 2013 Section 212 provides that, the function of the Defence Forces is to protect Zimbabwe, its people, its national security and interests and its territorial integrity. What is implied in the constitution is that the ZDF must protect everything within the boundaries of Zimbabwe’,” the ZDF said.

As part of its adventures in Mashonaland Central, ZDF noted that it was collaborating with all state security agencies charged with the constitutional duty of protecting the country’s territory.

“The defence and security of our nation is not the preserve of the ZDF alone but en- compasses the role played by other security agencies.

“Therefore, the act of defending the country’s territorial integrity naturally re- quires the highest level of coordination be- tween all the defence and security agencies which is achieved through joint training activities such as the training exercise currently underway in Mashonaland Central province,” the ZDF added

Last month, the ZDF announced that it was embarking on a month-long training exercise in Mashonaland Central, which would culminate in the movement of a sizeable number of troops and military vehicles from Harare into the area.

The troops are being deployed to six districts, namely Bindura, Mbire, Muzarabani, Rushinga, Mt Darwin and Shamva.

The training exercise, which comes after ZDF conducted routine military drills in Masvingo last year, is set to end on October 21 as the army gears to “sharpen and perfect its operational skills so as to enhance the Zimbabwe Defence Force’s capability to fulfill its mandate”. 

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Fri, 07 Oct 2022 00:46:00 -0500 en text/html https://newsday.co.zw/theindependent/local-news/article/200001638/military-deploys-in-newfound-oilfields
Killexams : North Korea says missile tests simulate striking South with nuclear weapons

North Korea’s accurate flurry of missile tests were designed to simulate showering the South with tactical nuclear weapons as a warning after large-scale navy drills by South Korean and US forces, state news agency KCNA said on Monday (10 October).

North Korea fired two ballistic missiles early on Sunday, officials in Seoul and Tokyo said, the seventh such launch since 25 September.

Leader Kim Jong Un guided exercises by nuclear tactical units over the past two weeks, involving ballistic missiles with mock nuclear warheads, KCNA reported, saying they were meant to deliver a strong message of war deterrence.

The tests simulated striking military command facilities, main ports, and airports in the South, KCNA added.

“The effectiveness and practical combat capability of our nuclear combat force were fully demonstrated as it stands completely ready to hit and destroy targets at any time from any location,” KCNA said.

“Even though the enemy continues to talk about dialogue and negotiations, we do not have anything to talk about nor do we feel the need to do so,” KCNA quoted Kim as saying.

KCNA said North Korea’s ruling Workers’ Party decided to conduct the drills as an unavoidable response to a large-scale mobilisation of US and South Korean naval forces, including an aircraft carrier and a nuclear-powered submarine.

“The statement they’ve released is crystal clear that this accurate spate of tests was their way of signaling resolve to the United States and South Korea as they carried out military activities of their own,” said Ankit Panda of the US-based Carnegie Endowment for International Peace.

The United States and South Korea held joint maritime exercises involving a US aircraft carrier on Friday, a day after the South scrambled fighter jets in reaction to an apparent North Korean aerial bombing drill.

The navy exercises involved the US carrier Ronald Reagan and its strike group. The naval forces of South Korea, Japan and the United States also conducted joint drills before that.

After the North Korea statement on Monday, South Korean President Yoon Suk-yeol’s office said “it is important to accurately recognize the severity of security issues in the Korean Peninsula and Northeast Asia to prepare properly,” an official was quoted as saying.

The US-led UN forces are still technically at war with North Korea as the 1950-1953 Korean War ended in an armistice rather than a peace treaty.

Tactical nuclear weapons

North Korea had only referred to one missile as having a tactical nuclear capability, but the statement clarifies that many systems, new and old, will be assigned such a role, Panda said.

If North Korea resumes nuclear testing, it could include development of smaller “tactical” warheads meant for battlefield use and designed to fit on short-range missiles such as the ones tested recently, analysts said.

South Korean and US officials say there are signs North Korea could soon detonate a new nuclear device in underground tunnels at its Punggye-ri Nuclear Test site, which was officially shuttered in 2018.

Analysts say putting small warheads on short-range missiles could represent a dangerous change in the way North Korea deploys and plans to use nuclear weapons.

New missile, underwater silos

On 4 October the North test-fired a ballistic missile farther than ever before, flying what it said was a new intermediate-range ballistic missile (IRBM) missile over Japan for the first time since 2017.

Analysts confirmed the photos released by state media do show a previously unseen IRBM.

“It’s incredibly unusual, though, that they’d test a previously untested missile for the first time over Japan; it suggest a substantial degree of confidence in the engine,” Panda said.

Among the other missiles shown in the photos were short-range ballistic missiles (SRBMs) that included KN-25 and KN-23 types as well as one with a heavy 2.5-ton payload, as well as a KN-09 300mm Multiple Launch Rocket System (MLRS).

The photos notably showed a test of a “navalised” KN-23 designed to be launched from a submarine. That missile was showcased in a test in the ocean last year, but this time the test was conducted in a way that simulated a launch from what state media called “a silo under a reservoir.”

This year has seen North Korea test fire missiles from different locations and launch platforms, including trains, in what analysts say is an effort to simulate a conflict and make it difficult for enemies to detect and destroy the missiles.

The KN-23 is designed to perform a “pull-up” maneuver as it approaches a target, intended to help it evade missile defenses.

Sun, 09 Oct 2022 17:43:00 -0500 en-GB text/html https://www.euractiv.com/section/defence-and-security/news/north-korea-says-missile-tests-simulate-striking-south-with-nuclear-weapons/
Killexams : South Korea, U.S. fire missiles to protest 'reckless' North Korean test

SEOUL/UNITED NATIONS, Oct 5 (Reuters) - South Korea and the U.S. military conducted rare missile drills and an American supercarrier repositioned east of North Korea after Pyongyang flew a missile over Japan, one of the allies' sharpest responses since 2017 to a North Korean weapon test.

U.S. Secretary of State Antony Blinken warned that nuclear-armed North Korea risked further condemnation and isolation if it continued its "provocations."

However, Russia's deputy U.N. envoy told a U.N. Security Council meeting called by the United States that imposing sanctions on North Korea was a "dead end" that brought "zero result," and China's deputy U.N. ambassador said the council needed to play a constructive role "instead of relying solely on strong rhetoric or pressure."

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North Korea test-fired an intermediate-range ballistic missile (IRBM) farther than ever before on Tuesday, sending it soaring over Japan for the first time in five years and prompting a warning for residents there to take cover.

Washington called the test "dangerous and reckless," and the U.S. military and its allies have stepped up displays of force.

South Korean and American troops fired a volley of missiles into the sea in response, South Korea's Joint Chiefs of Staff said on Wednesday, and the allies earlier staged a bombing drill with fighter jets in the Yellow Sea.

The aircraft carrier Ronald Reagan, a U.S. Navy ship that made its first stop in South Korea last month for the first time in years, will also return to the sea between Korea and Japan with its strike group of other warships. The South Korean military called it a "highly unusual" move designed to show the allies' resolve to respond to any threats from North Korea.

Speaking during a visit to Chile, Blinken said the United States, South Korea and Japan were working closely together "to demonstrate and strengthen our defensive and deterrent capabilities in light of the threat from North Korea."

He reiterated a U.S. call for Pyongyang to return to dialogue, and added: "If they continue down this road, it will only increase the condemnation, increase the isolation, increase the steps that are taken in response to their actions."

The U.N. Security Council met on Wednesday to discuss North Korea despite China and Russia telling council counterparts they were opposed to an open meeting of the 15-member body.

The top U.S. diplomat for East Asia, Daniel Kritenbrink, accused China and Russia this week of emboldening North Korea by not properly enforcing sanctions.

U.S. Ambassador to the United Nations, Linda Thomas-Greenfield, in an address to the Security Council, said North Korea had "enjoyed blanket protection from two members of this council."

In May, China and Russia vetoed a U.S.-led push to impose more U.N. sanctions on North Korea over its renewed ballistic missile launches, publicly splitting the Security Council for the first time since it started punishing Pyongyang with sanctions in 2006.

Kritenbrink also said a resumption of nuclear weapons testing by North Korea for the first time since 2017 was likely only awaiting a political decision.

South Korean officials said North Korea had completed preparations for a nuclear test and might use a smaller weapon meant for operational use or a big device with a higher yield than in previous tests.

The South Korean military confirmed that one of its Hyunmoo-2C missiles failed shortly after launch and crashed during the exercise, but that no one was hurt.

Footage shared on social media by a nearby resident and Tested by Reuters showed smoke and flames rising from the military base.

South Korea's military said the fire was caused by burning rocket propellant, and although the missile carried a warhead, it did not explode. It apologised for worrying residents.

It is not rare for military hardware to fail, and North Korea has suffered several failed missile launches this year as well. However, the South Korean failure threatened to overshadow Seoul's efforts to demonstrate military prowess in the face of North Korea's increasing capabilities.

The Hyunmoo-2C is one of South Korea's latest missiles and analysts say its capability as a precision "bunker buster" make it a key part of Seoul's plans for striking the North in the event of a conflict.

In its initial announcement of the drill, South Korea's military made no mention of the Hyunmoo-2C launch or its failure, but later media briefings were dominated by questions about the incident.

South Korean President Yoon Suk-yeol, who has made such displays of military force a cornerstone of his strategy for countering North Korea, had vowed that the overflight of Japan would bring a decisive response from his country, its allies and the international community.

U.S. President Joe Biden and Japanese Prime Minister Fumio Kishida condemned North Korea's test in the "strongest terms," and the European Union called it a "reckless and deliberately provocative action." U.N. Secretary-General Antonio Guterres condemned the launch and said it was a violation of Security Council resolutions.

It was the first North Korean missile to follow a trajectory over Japan since 2017, and its estimated 4,600-km (2,850-mile) flight was the longest for a North Korean test, which are usually "lofted" into space to avoid flying over neighbouring countries.

Analysts and security officials said it may have been a variant of the Hwasong-12 IRBM, which North Korea unveiled in 2017 as part of what it said was a plan to strike U.S. military bases in Guam.

Neither North Korea's government nor its state media have reported on the launch.

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Reporting by Joori Roh in Seoul, Humeyra Pamuk in Santiago, David Brunnstrom in Washington and Michelle Nichols at the United Nations; Editing by Chris Reese, Sandra Maler, Gerry Doyle and Jonathan Oatis

Our Standards: The Thomson Reuters Trust Principles.

Wed, 05 Oct 2022 09:01:00 -0500 en text/html https://www.reuters.com/world/asia-pacific/skorea-us-military-launch-4-surface-to-surface-missiles-response-nkorea-missile-2022-10-04/
Killexams : South Korea, US fire missiles into the sea in response to ‘reckless’ North Korea test

South Korea and the US military conducted missile drills in response to North Korea’s launch of a ballistic missile over Japan, as the United Nations Security Council prepares to meet over what was Pyongyang’s longest-range test.

Nuclear-armed North Korea test-fired an intermediate-range ballistic missile (IRBM) farther than ever before on Tuesday (4 October), sending it soaring over Japan for the first time in five years and prompting a warning for residents there to take cover.

South Korean and American troops fired a volley of missiles into the sea in response, South Korea’s Joint Chiefs of Staff said on Wednesday, and the allies earlier staged a bombing drill with fighter jets in the Yellow Sea.

The military separately confirmed that a South Korean Hyunmoo-2 missile failed shortly after launch and crashed during the drill, but that no one was hurt.

South Korea’s military said that the missile carried a warhead but that it did not explode, and apologised for causing residents to worry.

The US military and its allies have stepped up displays of force and the White House National Security Council called the latest test “dangerous and reckless.”

US President Joe Biden and Japanese Prime Minister Fumio Kishida condemned North Korea’s test in the “strongest terms,” the European Union called it a “reckless and deliberately provocative action”, and UN Secretary-General António Guterres condemned the launch and said it was a violation of Security Council resolutions. The UN Security Council will meet on Wednesday to discuss North Korea at the request of the United States, despite China and Russia telling council counterparts they were opposed to an open meeting of 15-member body. They argued that the council’s reaction should be conducive to easing the situation on the Korean Peninsula, diplomats said.

It was the first North Korean missile to follow a trajectory over Japan since 2017, and its estimated 4,600 km (2,850 mile) flight was the longest for a North Korean test, which are usually “lofted” into space to avoid flying over neighbouring countries.

Analysts and security officials said it may have been a variant of the Hwasong-12 IRBM, which North Korea unveiled in 2017 as part of what it said was a plan to strike US military bases in Guam.

Neither North Korea’s government nor its state media have reported on the launch or disclosed what type of missile was used.

The flight has increased concerns that North Korea may soon conduct an expected nuclear test, which would be the first since 2017.

South Korea’s defence minister, Lee Jong-sup, told parliament North Korea had completed preparations for a test and might use a smaller weapon meant for operational use, or a big device with a higher yield than in previous tests.

South Korean President Yoon Suk-yeol called the test “reckless” and said it would bring a decisive response from his country, its allies and the international community.

The launch was a “reckless and deliberately provocative action” that violated UN security council resolutions, a European Union spokesperson said.

Mon, 03 Oct 2022 12:00:00 -0500 en-GB text/html https://www.euractiv.com/section/global-europe/news/south-korea-us-fire-missiles-into-the-sea-in-response-to-reckless-north-korea-test/
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