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500-215 courses - SP Mobility Technology Systems Engineer Representative Updated: 2024

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Exam Code: 500-215 SP Mobility Technology Systems Engineer Representative courses January 2024 by Killexams.com team

500-215 SP Mobility Technology Systems Engineer Representative

Exam Details

The VMware vSAN 6.7 Specialist test 2019 (5V0-21.19) which leads to VMware Specialist – vSAN 2020 badge, is a 60-item exam, with a passing score of 300 using a scaled method. Candidates are given an appointment time of 120 minutes, which includes five-minute seating time and adequate time to complete the test for non-native English speakers. real test time is 115 minutes



VMware test blueprint sections are now standardized to the seven sections below, some of which may NOT be included in the final test blueprint depending on the test objectives.

Section 1 – Architecture and Technologies

Section 2 – Products and Solutions

Section 3 – Planning and Designing

Section 4 – Installing, Configuring, and Setup

Section 5 – Performance-tuning, Optimization, and Upgrades

Section 6 – Troubleshooting and Repairing

Section 7 – Administrative and Operational Tasks

If a section is missing from the list below, please note it is because the test has no testable objectives
for that section. The objective numbering may be referenced in your score report at the end of your
testing event for further preparation should a retake of the test be necessary.

Sections Included in the Exam

Section 1 – vSAN Architectures and Technologies

Objective 1.1 – Describe vSAN requirements

Objective 1.2 – Demonstrate how vSAN stores and protects data

Objective 1.3 – Define vSAN space efficiency features

Objective 1.4 – Define vSAN stretched cluster architecture requirements

Objective 1.5 – Compare the architectural requirements of a vSAN 2-node cluster and a stretched cluster

Section 2 - Planning and Designing – There are no testable objectives for this section

Section 3 - Planning and Designing a vSAN Solution

Objective 3.1 – Define and demonstrate vSAN design considerations

Objective 3.2 – Design a vSAN cluster

Objective 3.3 – Use vSAN design and sizing tools

Objective 3.4 – Explain interoperability with vSphere features

Objective 3.5 – Define which VMware solutions integrate with vSAN

Section 4 – vSAN Installation, Configuration, and Setup

Objective 4.1 – Configure and validate a vSAN configuration

Objective 4.2 – Create and manage disk groups

Objective 4.3 – Configure and validate vSAN services

Objective 4.4 – Configure vSAN stretched cluster and 2-node configurations

Section 5 – Performance-tuning, Optimization, and Upgrades – There are no testable objectives for this section

Section 6 – Troubleshooting and Repairing a vSAN solution

Objective 6.1 – Identify failure scenarios

Objective 6.2 – Interpret vSAN Health warnings

Objective 6.3 – Determine vSAN Health using vSphere Host Client, ESXCLI, and RVC

Objective 6.4 – Evaluate performance information in the UI and using CLI

Objective 6.5 – Manage hardware replacement

Section 7 – vSAN Administrative and Operational Tasks

Objective 7.1 – Create, update, and modify vSAN policies and apply to objects

Objective 7.2 – Describe vSAN data placement changes

Objective 7.3 – Interpret vSAN capacity terms

Objective 7.4 – Evaluate vSAN performance metrics

Objective 7.5 – Describe effects of maintenance mode options

Objective 7.6 – Explain how to add capacity to a vSAN cluster

Objective 7.7 – Patch or upgrade a vSAN cluster

Objective 7.8 – Describe the operational characteristics/differences between vSAN 2-node architecture and stretched cluster

Objective 7.9 – Explain encryption processes

Objective 7.10 – Explain how to utilize TRIM and UNMAP from vSAN and guest perspective
SP Mobility Technology Systems Engineer Representative
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SP Mobility Technology Systems Engineer Representative
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Question: 41
Which two are characteristics of the high availability task? (Choose two.)
A. It is found on the management module only
B. It is responsible for executing a recovery action for any failure that occurs in the system
C. It is responsible for maintaining the operational state of tasks in the system
D. It triggers an event to the RCT subsystem to take corrective action
E. It is responsible for storing configuration data for the applications that run on the system
F. It runs only on the active SMC
Answer: CD
Question: 42
What is the subsystem task that is responsible for performing a centralized IMSI lookup?
A. MME Manager
B. MME Demux Manager
C. Session Manager
D. IMSI Manager
Answer: D
Question: 43
How many VLAN tags may contain each physical port on an Ethernet 1000 line card?
A. up to 124
B. up to 1024
C. up to 1820
D. up to 2000
Answer: B
Question: 44
Which card has the resources to run multiple services?
A. redundant crossbar card
B. switch processor I/O card
C. system management card
D. packet service card
Answer: D
Question: 45
Which bus interconnects RCCs and line cards?
A. control bus
B. system management bus
C. TDM bus
D. redundancy bus
Answer: D
Question: 46
Which controller task is used to facilitate IP routing across and within contexts?
A. Session Controller
B. VPN Controller
C. Driver Controller
D. Resource Manager Controller
Answer: B
Question: 47
What is the Cisco ASR 5000 operating system software based on?
A. Cisco IOS
B. Combination of Linux and Cisco IOS
C. Linux software
D. Star OS
Answer: D
Question: 48
On the Cisco ASR 5000, which three features help to ensure high availability? (Choose three.)
A. inter-chassis redundancy
B. online software upgrades are not supported
C. no single point of failure
D. virtual memory protects software tasks
E. terminated tasks have to be manually restarted
F. no session recovery for common services
Answer: ACD
Question: 49
Which option is the unique differentiator that sets Cisco ASR 5000 apart from competitors?
A. seamless interoperability with GGSN
B. cost-effective evolution to 2G
C. combines 2G, 3G, and 4G SGSN into the same platform
D. P2P detection and control
Answer: C
Question: 50
How many Packet Service Cards are located in a fully loaded Cisco ASR 5000 chassis?
A. 8
B. 14
C. 16
D. 24
Answer: B
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Cisco Representative courses - BingNews https://killexams.com/pass4sure/exam-detail/500-215 Search results Cisco Representative courses - BingNews https://killexams.com/pass4sure/exam-detail/500-215 https://killexams.com/exam_list/Cisco Hot courses To Watch For In Cisco's Q4 Earnings

A New Year At Cisco

Cisco's fiscal 2011 began on Aug. 1, and given the groundwork Cisco laid during its last fiscal year, with everything from its consumer advances to acquisitions, adjacencies and an all-out data center assault, it's going to be another wild, woollly, opportune-rich year for Cisco and its partners.

That said, Cisco wasn't spared the effects of the economic downturn and subsequent demand upturn, which sent its supply chain into a tailspin and left the networking titan shorthanded in more than one product line. All of it will be on the minds of investors, analysts and channel partners Wednesday when Cisco reports Q4 and yearly earnings.

Cisco's report is scheduled for 4:30 p.m. EST. Here's a look at courses that'll be top of mind as John Chambers and Co. deliver a rundown.

Numbers Vs. Expectations

First, the raw financials: Cisco is expected to report about a 28 percent increase in sales, with analysts predicting 42 cents a share for Cisco on revenue of $10.9 billion. If it pans out, that would be a spike from 31 cents a share on $8.5 billion in revenues in the year-ago quarter.

Whether the numbers line up exactly, Wall Street is confident in a big quarter for Cisco. "All indications are that demand for Cisco products remained strong throughout the quarter, with the company's newer products continuing to lead the way," wrote BMO Capital analyst Tim Long in a research note this week, also noting that Chambers' commentary "should set the tone for Cisco and the rest of tech."

The continuing economic softness in Europe has been a concern for Cisco, as well as other tech giants, in latest months, but a quick scan of Wall Street analyst research notes this week doesn't suggest it'll be much of an issue on the call.

Supply Chain Update

Cisco's supply chain woes are by now well documented: a pullback in demand during the recession, an uptake in demand that happened much faster than anyone expected, and product shortages and lead time difficulties for Cisco that according to some Cisco partners, might have been at least partly alleviated with better communication to the channel on Cisco's part. In the past several earnings calls, Chambers and other Cisco executives have reported continued progress on the supply chain issues but remained vague on both their extent and how long they expect those issues to continue.

Look for plenty of questions for Team CIsco on the supply chain, as well as whether lead times for some of the most affected product lines -- including in switching and security -- have returned to normal.

UCS Has Muscles

There's no question that Cisco's major data center play, the Unified Computing System (UCS), has seen substantial growth since its introduction a year and a half ago. Last quarter, Cisco noted 900 UCS customers to date and a run rate of $200 million to $250 million for UCS. According to Oppenheimer & Co., which in late July released results of its quarterly survey of Cisco resellers, some 60 percent of Cisco's channel expects continued moderate to high UCS adoption within the year. UCS, it appears, has traction.

Cisco's been a lot more public about discussing key UCS wins, too, shopping around implementation victories with everyone from distributor Westcon Group to key VAR partners. It's also been placing greater emphasis on the VCE coalition it has with EMC and VMware, and the Acadia cloud computing venture it's mounting with EMC, as well as the flow of UCS sales through two-tier distribution.

Got It Covered: UC And C

The research note from Oppenheimer & Co. also identified unified communications as a major area of strength for Cisco in Q4, and the past few months have definitely seen a number of new UC and collaboration advances from the company, including the most comprehensive update yet on its enterprise collaboration platform, Cisco Quad, TelePresence interoperability with third party products and the push of its Intercompany Media Engine, and new UC-geared products, including the Cius tablet (see slide 9), not to mention its integration of Tandberg's sizable video line.

UC was and remains a key Cisco battleground, but it has plenty of hungry competition in the form of everyone from Avaya and ShoreTel to Microsoft and Siemens. Will Chambers and his lieutenants hint at how they see Cisco's UC vision continuing to evolve?

Dark Horses

Cisco plays a lot of markets this days, so it's easy to get focused on one or more obvious ones (data center, unified communications, consumer electronics), and take your eye off other areas in which Cisco may have a lot to talk about.

Cisco is no small fish in service provider routing for example, but only now is the market starting to bud again. Researcher Dell'Oro Group last week projected a revenue increase of more than 60 percent worldwide over the next half-decade, following the service provider router market's plummet in 2009. The cause? Internet traffic demands, which, along with Cisco's snazzy CRS-3 and a heating-up competition with Juniper, Alcatel-Lucent and Huawei, are a favorite Cisco talking point.

And, hey, what do we make the $99 million acquisition of CoreOptics Cisco made in May? It's been years since Cisco made any major optical networking moves at all, let alone an acquisition. At the very least, Cisco sees stiff competition for optical networking shaping up.

Cloudy Forecast

Cisco's cloud strategy often comes up, and in latest months, the networking giant's focus on cloud computing technologies and cloud plays across its various product lines has been a regular discussion point. One sign Cisco's cloud priorities are getting even more intensive? In June, the company tapped former Sun Microsystems executive Lew Tucker to be its new cloud CTO, backstopping the efforts of Cisco CTO Padmasree Warrior and her role as Cisco's chief cloud strategist.

Cius Is Believing

Meet the Cius: an Android tablet, UC device and arguably Cisco's most buzzed-about product release since the UCS was unveiled in March 2009. Announced during Cisco Live in late June, the Cius is said by Cisco to offer realtime video, multiparty conferencing, e-mail, messaging, Web browsing and cloud-based content sharing. Physically, it's 1.5 pounds, offers 8 hours of battery life and includes a front-mounted 720p HD camera and a 7-inch VGA touch target display, plus a 5-megapixel rear-facing camera.

Cisco said the Cius will support Cisco Quad and other Cisco collaboration tools, and also be supported by Cisco's Unified Communications Manager, which was enough to excite solution providers curious about what their role in Cius sales will be when the device finally lands in 2011.

It's Cisco, it's a tablet (definitely trendy), it's geared to enterprise (very trendy) and it's an Android device (mega-trendy, given the explosion of Android devices out there).

Setting The Tone

Taken together, all of these categories should help Chambers and Cisco set their tone for the new fiscal year. But observers pay very close attention to tone any time there's a Cisco earnings call: if Chambers seems a little withdrawn (and withdrawn for the super-energetic Cisco chief is a relative term), the markets panic.

But maybe Cisco's tone and the market's reaction have a strange relationship, anyway; after Cisco's Q3 earnings report, with Chambers describing the quarter as one of the best Cisco had ever had, Cisco's stock dipped and Chambers was hustled into a CNBC interview to explain his "tone." Over-intepretation or mixed messages?

Sat, 16 Dec 2023 15:49:00 -0600 text/html https://www.crn.com/slide-shows/networking/226600342/hot-topics-to-watch-for-in-ciscos-q4-earnings
Ransomware Gang Posts Data Online Stolen From Cisco

But enterprise networking and security giant says the data was not sensitive and the hack had ‘no impact to our business.’

ARTICLE TITLE HERE

Cisco is confirming that data recently splashed across the internet by the Yanluowang ransomware gang included information that was hacked from its network this past spring.

But the San Jose, Calif.-based Cisco stressed that the leaked information, which first appeared online on Sept. 11, was not sensitive and the incident didn’t effect business.

“We continue to see no impact to our business, including Cisco products or services, sensitive customer data or sensitive employee information, intellectual property, or supply change operations,” Cisco Talos said in a blog update post.

Noting that it previously acknowledged in August that it had been the target of an cyberattack in May, Cisco said its assessment of what happened overall hasn’t changed over the weeks – that the attack wasn’t a severe hit to Cisco.

Still, Cisco did note that the attacker was persistent and wouldn’t deliver up easily even after being detected.

“During the investigation (by Cisco Security Incident Response) and Cisco Talos, it was determined that a Cisco employee’s credentials were compromised after the attacker gained control of a personal Google account where credentials saved in the victim’s browser were being synchronized,” Cisco wrote.

“The attacker conducted a series of sophisticated voice phishing attacks under the guise of various trusted organizations attempt to convince the victim to accept multi-factor authentication (MFA) push notifications initiated by the attacker. The attacker ultimately succeed in achieving an MFA push acceptance, grant them to VPN in the context of the targeted user.”

Once detected, it wasn’t easy getting rid of the attacker, which Cisco said “displayed persistence, repeatedly attempting to regain access in the weeks following the attack; however these attempts were unsuccessful.”

According to BleepingComputer, the Yanluowang leader is now claiming Cisco is downplaying the severity of the attack, telling BleepingComputer “that they stole thousands of files amounting to 55GB and that the cache included classified documents, technical schematics, and source code.”

BleepingComputer said Cisco denied the possibility that the intruders had exfiltrated or accessed any source code.

A Cisco representative could not be reached for comment by CRN as of mid-afternoon Monday.

At least one Cisco partner said that the Yanluowang ransomware gang attack against Cisco is another sign of the difficulty of securing a large global enterprise in the wake of the post-pandemic work-at-home era.

In the blog post, Cisco said “initial access” to the Cisco VPN was achieved “via the successful compromise of a Cisco employee’s personal Google account.” That user had enabled password syncing via the Google Chrome browser and had stored their “Cisco credentials” in the browser.

“It could happen to anybody,” said a top executive for an SP500 Cisco enterprise partner who did not want to be identified.

“With work-from-home and distributed workforces there is just so much opportunity for company data to be where it is not supposed to be. I am sure Cisco has policies that says you should not put data on non-approved cloud resources but it happens,” said the executive.

The top technology executive emphasized that Cisco’s network remained secure.

“The network itself is not what was compromised,” he said. “This was an employee breaking Cisco policies and electronic protections by moving data into a non-managed resource like Box.”

The attack highlights the need for employees to be trained and educated on the “damage” they can cause by not following corporate security policies, said the executive.

“Education and training is paramount,” he said. “I am sure Cisco does security training. This accentuates the need for continuous training for employees and contractors and continual refinement of security policies and the tools you have available to enforce those policies.”

The technology executive said ransomware breaches are at an all-time high. “It is non-stop,” he said.

The SP500 executive said his company’s security business has doubled in the last year.

“Any partner that is not investing in their security practice is missing an opportunity and a need of their customers,” he said.

Mon, 12 Sep 2022 08:26:00 -0500 text/html https://www.crn.com/news/security/ransomware-gang-posts-data-online-stolen-from-cisco
Cisco: The Power of Purpose

Published 12-28-23

Submitted by Cisco Systems, Inc.

child and adult with technology between them

We released our annual Purpose Report, which reflects and celebrates the past year’s work towards Powering an Inclusive Future for All—the progress we’ve made against our goals, and the people and lives we’ve touched. The report explores the theme, The Power of Purpose, because we recognize that when we intersect our business, technology, and a network of partners together with our purpose, we create a powerful force for lasting change. And we have some incredible examples from this year, including the announcement that we achieved our goal of positively impacting 1 billion lives, and did so over a year early!

For many years, the purpose of our Purpose Report has been to look back. But we must also look ahead.

Any company looking to successfully execute their business strategy must consider the changing terrain, identify upcoming challenges and trends, and anticipate how to best meet evolving requirements. The same is true for purpose. This year’s Purpose Report begins to explore the landscape, and where we see opportunities for Purpose to grow.

Our biggest challenges are interconnected and interdependent

The past several years brought us all unprecedented challenges, and a world more prone to polarization than before. But instead of binary questions and issues, a more multipolar world has emerged, requiring us to operate with more nuance and greater context than ever. In this context one thing is clear—we are more interconnected and interdependent than ever.

Our lives and futures are linked by our shared dependence on our planet and its environments. We have a global responsibility to solve the climate crisis together. We see the growth of an increasingly digital and global economy, keeping us connected through ecosystems of financial interdependence. And as we learned in the latest pandemic, our collective health is also inextricably linked.

Global crises also continue to grow increasingly interconnected­­––and the consequences disproportionately fall on vulnerable communities. Developing nations who often contribute the least to climate change bear the brunt of its impact. And due to a lack of infrastructure and technological advancement, they are often the least equipped to respond to natural disasters. While the digital economy continues to grow, 2.6 billion people remain unconnected, denying them access to the opportunities and resources available. The consequences of each crisis exacerbate others­­—access to education is disrupted, progress for women and girls is set back, and extreme poverty rates rise.

Pursuing our Purpose can and must be the glue that brings us together to meet this moment and address these complex, interconnected issues. The question we must continue to ask as we look ahead is, how?

This year’s report reflects on howhow we achieved our goal of positively impacting 1 billion lives, how the private sector can work in new ways to address critical issues facing our societies, and how we can apply lessons from the past to build resilience in our communities for the future.

Where do we go from here?

There is no doubt that the path forward for business in a multipolar world isn’t entirely clear. There is significant work ahead to address risks in supply chains and manufacturing, and complex questions on how to best navigate a shifting geopolitical terrain. But should these challenges and uncertainties also apply to Purpose?

I don’t think so. In fact, in this moment when many are shying away from a global mindset and approach, our Purpose work proceeds by pursuing what is most meaningful, regardless if that is at the local or global level. Purpose can flex. It operates in a lane that is valued around the world, giving all of us who do this work the space to create and iterate, to sway and pivot, and find our rhythm. And when we do, pursuing our Purpose holds the door open for economic initiatives.

As we close the year in which we reached a goal of positively impacting one billion people, I’m looking ahead and considering the next goal we’ll set for ourselves. We are stronger with our partners by our side—an ecosystem focused on driving impact. We’ll continue to do this if we integrate the lessons of the past and take a new approach in the days and years ahead. I hope you’ll join us on this journey and read about our impact this year, and my reflections on what’s next, in our FY23 Purpose Report. Together, we can do good for our communities, good for our businesses, and good for all.

Read the full Cisco FY23 Purpose Report

View original content here.

Thu, 28 Dec 2023 01:11:00 -0600 en text/html https://www.csrwire.com/press_releases/791941-cisco-power-purpose
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The Learning Network

Student Opinion

How Do You Feel About High School?

Scroll through some work by the winning students and educators who participated in our “What High School Is Like in 2023” multimedia challenge. Then tell us how well the collection captures your experiences.

 By

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Remote Jobs You Can Do While Traveling No result found, try new keyword!Are you passionate about traveling the world while earning a living? I might be able to help you find the perfect job. I took a leap of faith from my traditional 9-5 job to enter the world of remote ... Tue, 27 Jun 2023 17:00:00 -0500 en-us text/html https://www.msn.com/ STATE REPRESENTATIVE MATT MURDOCK

Michigan will likely have a leading role in tonight’s prime time hearing as the state has been consistently at the center of all of this, from the stop the count mob at the TCF Center to false claims of voter fraud to false electors and capitol rioters. All it points to Michigan likely making up a big part of these hearings.

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Topic - Duckduckgo

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International Economics for Research Students

This information is for the 2020/21 session.

Dr Swati Dhingra 32L.2.31

Prof David Donaldson

This course is available on the MRes/PhD in Economics. This course is not available as an outside option.

This course is concerned with the latest developments in international economics. The course builds on techniques introduced in MSc International Economics (EC421) to take students to the research frontier.  One term covers international trade and the other term covers international macroeconomics.

The course is based around research papers. courses covered vary from year as the research frontier expands. A list of representative courses in international trade includes: micro-econometric studies of international trade, theories of heterogeneous firms and trade, theories of incomplete contracts and trade, and the political economy of trade policy. A list of representative courses in international macroeconomics includes international business cycles, determinants of international capital flows, portfolio choice and risk sharing, monetary and fiscal policy in open economies, theoretical and empirical work on the real exchange rate and international financial crises (e.g., currency attacks and sovereign defaults).

30 hours of lectures in the MT. 30 hours of lectures in the LT.

This year, at least for Michaelmas term, some or all of the teaching for this course may have to be delivered through a combination of virtual webinars, online videos and virtual classes.

Readings will be from journal articles; a list will be supplied at the start of term.

Coursework (50%) in the MT.
Coursework (50%) in the LT.

Two take-home assignments, one in MT and one in LT.  Each assignment will carry equal weight.  Take-home assignments may require students to analyse data, empirically solve a computational exercise, solve theoretical models, or assess latest research.

Thu, 22 Oct 2020 22:00:00 -0500 text/html https://www.lse.ac.uk/resources/calendar2020-2021/courseGuides/EC/2020_EC532.htm
Japanese and Chinese Studies

The Department of Japanese and Chinese houses two interdisciplinary studies programs, the Chinese Studies program and the Japanese Studies program, offering a minor in Chinese Studies, a major in Japanese Studies, and a minor in Japanese language. The goal of these programs is to provide a quality opportunity for interdisciplinary teaching and learning about the language and culture of China and Japan. We expect our students to acquire the language skills and the analytical abilities to operate effectively in an increasingly complex and diverse world. It is our belief that as students apply what they learn in our classes they will gain an understanding and appreciation of other peoples and cultures.

Japanese Studies Major

The Japanese Studies major is an interdisciplinary major combining language study with cultural studies. Students majoring in Japanese Studies are required to take courses in Japanese language at all levels and courses on the history, literature, art history, cinema, religion and culture of Japan. Majors students are strongly recommended to study abroad in Japan for one or two semesters through the Japan Study Program (JSP) at our sister university, Tokyo International University, Kawagoe, Japan. The majors are also encouraged to take advantage of the opportunities for language and cultural exchange offered by Tokyo International University of America (TIUA) on our campus.

The Japanese Studies major is structured to include: (1) the study of Japanese language through the fourth year (sixteen semester hours); (2) an elective concentration consisting of courses on literature, history, religion, art history and culture of Japan and/or Asia (sixteen semester hours); and (3) a Senior Year Experience (four semester hours) involving a writing project which will integrate and consolidate knowledge and understanding of Japan which the student has gained through the program's course of studies. Credits from studying abroad in Japan will be transferred upon faculty approval.

A variety of career opportunities are available to students who graduate with a strong grounding in the study of Japanese. These include the Japanese Exchange and Teaching (JET) program in Japan as well as graduate study, foreign service, international business, and international non-profit organizations in the US and Japan.

Requirements for the Japanese Studies Major (36 semester hours)

Core course (4 semester hours)

Japanese Language: Sixteen semester hours from the following or from equivalent study abroad (16)

  • JAPN 331 Third Year Japanese (4)
  • JAPN 332 Third Year Japanese II (4)
  • JAPN 430 Japanese reading and Composition I (4)
  • JAPN 431 Japanese reading and Composition II (4)
  • JAPN 432 Conversational Japanese I (4)
  • JAPN 434 Conversational Japanese II (4)
  • JAPN 490 Reading and Conference (2 or 4)
  • JAPN 491 Reading and Conference (2 or 4)

Japanese Culture: Sixteen semester hours from the following or from study abroad courses. One of which must be at the 300- or 400-level (16)

  • JAPN 199 courses in Japanese Studies (1-4)
  • JAPN 201W Modern Japanese Society and Culture (4)
  • JAPN 299 courses in Japanese Studies (1-4)
  • JAPN 314W Japanese Literature in Translation (4)
  • JAPN 340 The Japanese Cinema (4)
  • JAPN 399 courses in Japanese Studies (1-4)
  • JAPN 429 courses in Japanese Studies (1-4)
  • ARTH 114 Introduction to Japanese Art History (4)
  • HIST 131W Historical Inquiry: The Pacific War 1931-1945 (topic dependent) (4)
  • HIST 281 History of Modern Japan (4)
  • IDS 334 Field Studies: Environmental Studies and Sustainability in Japan (4)
  • JAPN 199 courses in Japanese Studies (1-4)
  • JAPN 201W Modern Japanese Society & Culture (4)
  • JAPN 299 courses in Japanese Studies (1-4)
  • RHET 271 Telling the Internment Story (4)

Four of the 16 semester hours can be fulfilled by the following:

  • ANTH 356 Language and Culture (4)
  • ASIA 201 Gateway to East Asia (4)
  • ASIA 210 Making and Playing of Traditional Musical Instruments (4)
  • ASIA 288 Introducing Asia to the World (4)
  • ASIA 258 Topics in Asian Studies (4)
  • ASIA 301 Asian Visual and Creative Culture (4)
  • ASIA 310 Asian Social Media in a Global Context: Critique and Design (4)
  • CHNSE 258 Gender & Mass Communication in Asia (4)
  • HIST 118 East Asian Civilization Since 1800 (4)
  • HIST 331 Asian Environmental History (4)
  • PHIL 370W Philosophy of Language (4)
  • REL 135 Religions of Asia (4)

Requirements for the Japanese Minor (20 semester hours)

Five courses from the following (20 semester hours)

  • JAPN 232 Intermediate Japanese II (4)
  • JAPN 331 Third Year Japanese I (4)
  • JAPN 332 Third Year Japanese II (4)
  • JAPN 430 Japanese reading and Composition I (4)
  • JAPN 431 Japanese reading and Composition II (4)
  • JAPN 432 Conversational Japanese I (4)
  • JAPN 434 Conversational Japanese II (4)
  • JAPN 490 Reading and Conference (2 or 4)
  • JAPN 491 Reading and Conference (2 or 4)

Chinese Studies Minor

The Chinese Studies minor is an interdisciplinary program combining language and culture courses on China. Students minoring in Chinese Studies are required to take courses in Chinese language at all levels, and are required to take courses in other departments and programs that focus on China in such areas as economics, politics, religion, history, art history, communication, anthropology, and folklore. Study abroad in China is encouraged. Credits from study in China will be transferred with faculty approval.

For those who are interested in majoring in Chinese, please visit our Individualized Majors information. An interdisciplinary Chinese major template is available, which combines language and culture courses on China. For more details, please contact the faculty in the Chinese program.

Requirements for Chinese Studies Minor (20 semester hours)

At least four language semester hours at or above the 300 level (4-12)

At least eight culture semester hours at any level (8-16)

  • ARTH 112 Introduction to South Asian Art History (4)
  • ARTH 113 Introduction to Chinese Art History (4)
  • ARTH 114 Introduction to Japanese Art History (4)
  • ASIA 258 Topics in Asian Studies (4)
  • ASIA 352 Field Study in Asia (4)
  • ASIA 390-391 Independent Study (2 or 4)
  • CHNSE 235 Chinese Language Practicum (1)
  • CHNSE 254 Folklore and Identity (4)
  • CHNSE 258 Gender and Mass Communication in Asia (4)
  • CHNSE 269 Chinese Society and Media (4)
  • CHNSE 352 Rites of Passage in Chinese Societies (4)
  • ECON 453 International Economics (4)
  • HIST 118 East Asian Civilization since 1800 (4)
  • HIST 131W Historical Inquiry: Gender and Society in East Asia (topic dependent) (4)
  • HIST 233 Asian Empires on the Silk Road (4)
  • HIST 265 Late Imperial China (4)
  • HIST 281 History of Modern Japan (4)
  • HIST 282 China in Revolution 1911-1949 (4)
  • HIST 331 Asian Environmental History (4)
  • HIST 344W Studies in East Asian History (4)
  • HIST 383 Mao's China (4)
  • HIST 452W Topics in Chinese/Japanese History (4)
  • JAPN 201W Modern Japanese Society and Culture (4)
  • JAPN 314W Japanese Literature in Translation (4)
  • JAPN 340 The Japanese Cinema (4)
  • POLI 374 Asian and International System (4)
  • POLI 380 Asian Politics and Development (4)
  • REL 135 Religions of Asia (4)
  • REL 354 courses in Asian Religions (4)

*Only one of the Japan-focused courses may be counted toward the Chinese Studies Minor

Indicators of Achievement

We have identified three Student Learning Outcomes (SLOs) that we expect our major students gain during their course of study in Japanese Study at Willamette University.

Student Learning Outcomes for the Japanese Studies Major

  1. Obtain Advanced level of language proficiency defined by the American Council for the Teaching of Foreign Languages (ACTFL)
  2. Gain a broad knowledge of the cultures of Japan through interdisciplinary approaches
  3. Demonstrate their interdisciplinary understanding of Japan by completing a project in the Senior Seminar

Faculty

Visiting Faculty


Course Listings

JAPN 131 Elementary Japanese I (4)

The goal of this course is the development of fundamental communication skills in real-life settings. All four language skills (listening, speaking, reading, and writing) and culture will be emphasized. Class will be conducted based on explanations of language structures and various activities. Approximately 30 kanji in addition to hiragana and katakana will be introduced..

  • Offering: Fall
  • Instructor: Johnson

JAPN 132 Elementary Japanese II (4)

The goal of this course is the development of fundamental communication skills in real-life settings. All four language skills (listening, speaking, reading, and writing) and culture will be emphasized. Class will be conducted based on explanations of language structures and various activities. Approximately 70 new kanji will be introduced.

  • Prerequisite: JAPN 131 or consent of instructor
  • Offering: Spring
  • Instructor: Johnson

JAPN 199 courses in Japanese Studies (1-4)

A semester-long study of courses in Japanese Studies. courses and emphases will vary according to the instructor. This course may be repeated for credit with different topics. See the New and courses Courses page on the Registrar’s webpage for descriptions and applicability to majors/minors in other departments.

  • General Education Requirement Fulfillment: course dependent
  • Prerequisite: course dependent
  • Offering: Occasionally
  • Professor: Staff

JAPN 201W Modern Japanese Society and Culture (4)

An introduction to modern Japan through its social institutions, beliefs and cultural practices. Representative courses include: marriage and family life, child-rearing, education, religion, the role of women, attitude toward work and leisure, organization of the workplace, and social issues such as environmental and sustainability issues. Writing-centered. Conducted in English.

  • General Education Requirement Fulfillment: Writing-centered; Arts & Humanities, Social Sciences; World Engagement: CV
  • Offering: Alternate years in fall
  • Instructor: Fujiwara

JAPN 231 Intermediate Japanese I (4)

The goal of this course is the development of communication skills in a large range of everyday conversations. All four language skills (listening, speaking, reading, and writing) and culture will be emphasized in this course. Class will be conducted based on explanations of language structures and various activities. Approximately 80 new kanji will be introduced.

  • Prerequisite: JAPN 132 or consent of instructor
  • Offering: Fall
  • Instructor: Johnson

JAPN 232 Intermediate Japanese II (4)

The goal of this course is the development of communication skills in a large range of everyday conversations. All four language skills (listening, speaking, reading, and writing) and culture will be emphasized in this course. Class will be conducted based on explanations of language structures and various activities. Approximately 80 new kanji will be introduced.

  • Prerequisite: JAPN 231 or consent of instructor
  • Offering: Spring
  • Instructor: Johnson

JAPN 299 courses in Japanese Studies (1-4)

A semester-long study of courses in Japanese Studies. courses and emphases will vary according to the instructor. This course may be repeated for credit with different topics. See the New and courses Courses page on the Registrar’s webpage for descriptions and applicability to majors/minors in other departments.

  • General Education Requirement Fulfillment: course dependent
  • Prerequisite: course dependent
  • Offering: Occasionally
  • Professor: Staff

JAPN 314W Japanese Literature in Translation (4)

The course examines selected works in novels, essays, drama and poetry from the classical and modern periods. Emphasis will be on 19th- and 20th-century novels, novellas and short stories. The works are viewed in their historical context so that the unique aspects of Japanese literature can be appreciated.

  • General Education Requirement Fulfillment: Writing-centered; Arts & Humanities; World Engagement: CV
  • Offering: Alternate years in fall
  • Instructor: Staff

JAPN 331 Third Year Japanese I (4)

Third Year Japanese I begins with a comprehensive pattern review with an emphasis on speaking. Chinese characters are learned, approximately 20 per week, and students are tested regularly. In Third Year Japanese II, more attention will be given to reading. Students will be expected to read materials in Japanese and discuss them in class in Japanese. Students should be able to read and recognize approximately 900 Chinese characters by the end of the year.

  • General Education Requirement Fulfillment: Arts & Humanities
  • Offering: Fall
  • Instructor: Fujiwara

JAPN 332 Third Year Japanese II (4)

Third Year Japanese I begins with a comprehensive pattern review with an emphasis on speaking. Chinese characters are learned, approximately 20 per week, and students are tested regularly. In Third Year Japanese II, more attention will be given to reading. Students will be expected to read materials in Japanese and discuss them in class in Japanese. Students should be able to read and recognize approximately 900 Chinese characters by the end of the year.

  • General Education Requirement Fulfillment: Arts & Humanities
  • Offering: Spring
  • Instructor: Fujiwara

JAPN 340 The Japanese Cinema (4)

A survey of major Japanese films and film directors from the "golden age" of Japanese cinema in the 1950s - 1960s to the present. Emphasis will be on the style and feel of Japanese films, and how stylistic elements embody and reflect traditional aesthetics, the social and political contexts of the films and aspects of their production and consumption will be examined as well. Conducted in English.

  • General Education Requirement Fulfillment: Arts & Humanities; World Engagement: CV
  • Offering: Alternate years
  • Instructor: Staff

JAPN 380 Practicum in Japanese Language Facilitation (1-2)

Open to native speakers or advanced students of Japanese. Native/advanced speakers will attend some class sessions and work under the supervision of a faculty member, assisting students enrolled in Japanese language classes. Native/advanced speakers will keep a journal of their observations and their application of pedagogical principles as they assist students in developing their language skills. A weekly session with the instructor will be an integral part of this course. Credit/NC only.

  • Course is offered as Credit/No Credit
  • General Education Requirement Fulfillment: Arts & Humanities
  • Prerequisite: Consent of instructor
  • Offering: Fall semester
  • Instructor: Johnson

JAPN 399 courses in Japanese Studies (1-4)

A semester-long study of courses in Japanese Studies. courses and emphases will vary according to the instructor. This course may be repeated for credit with different topics. See the New and courses Courses page on the Registrar’s webpage for descriptions and applicability to majors/minors in other departments.

  • General Education Requirement Fulfillment: course dependent
  • Prerequisite: course dependent
  • Offering: Occasionally
  • Professor: Staff

JAPN 429 courses in Japanese Studies (1-4)

A semester-long study of courses in Japanese Studies. courses and emphases will vary according to the instructor. This course may be repeated for credit with different topics. See the New and courses Courses page on the Registrar’s webpage for descriptions and applicability to majors/minors in other departments.

  • General Education Requirement Fulfillment: course dependent
  • Prerequisite: course dependent
  • Offering: Occasionally
  • Professor: Staff

JAPN 430 Japanese reading and Composition I (4)

Emphasis on vocabulary, reading, writing and kanji expansion. Grammar will be reviewed through various short formal and informal writing assignments and readings will be selected from a variety of materials including authentic texts.

  • General Education Requirement Fulfillment: Arts & Humanities
  • Prerequisite: JAPN 332
  • Offering: Fall
  • Instructor: Fujiwara

JAPN 431 Japanese reading and Composition II (4)

Emphasis on vocabulary, reading, writing and kanji expansion. Grammar will be reviewed through various short formal and informal writing assignments and readings will be selected from a variety of materials including authentic texts.

  • General Education Requirement Fulfillment: Arts & Humanities
  • Prerequisite: JAPN 430
  • Offering: Spring
  • Instructor: Fujiwara

JAPN 432 Conversational Japanese I (4)

Emphasis on development of practical conversational proficiency in a culturally and linguistically appropriate way in both formal and informal styles. Intensive training in oral expression and listening comprehension exercises, including authentic listening materials and vocabulary enlargement.

  • General Education Requirement Fulfillment: Arts & Humanities
  • Prerequisite: JAPN 332
  • Offering: Fall
  • Instructor: Fujiwara

JAPN 434 Conversational Japanese II (4)

Emphasis on development of practical conversational proficiency in a culturally and linguistically appropriate way in both formal and informal styles. Intensive training in oral expression and listening comprehension exercises, including authentic listening materials and vocabulary enlargement.

  • General Education Requirement Fulfillment: Arts & Humanities
  • Prerequisite: JAPN 432
  • Offering: Spring
  • Instructor: Fujiwara

JAPN 490 and 491 reading and Conference (2 or 4 each)

Designed to enable students who have a sound grasp of Japanese grammar to develop reading skills and to extend their knowledge of Chinese characters. Students must have completed two years of college Japanese and/or studied Japanese in Japan.

  • General Education Requirement Fulfillment: Arts & Humanities
  • Prerequisite: Consent of instructor
  • Offering: On demand
  • Instructor: Fujiwara

JAPN 499W Senior Seminar (4)

[Crosslisted with CHNSE 499W]

Provides a framework for students to develop a research project or other equivalent activity in consultation with faculty. The objective of the Senior Year Experience will be to consolidate and integrate the student's knowledge of Japan and/or China and the fields of Japanese Studies and/or Chinese Studies. Conducted in English.

  • General Education Requirement Fulfillment: Writing-centered; Arts & Humanities
  • Offering: Spring
  • Instructor: Staff
Sun, 28 Aug 2022 17:25:00 -0500 en text/html https://willamette.edu/arts-sciences/catalog/archive/2021/disciplines/i-p/japn/index.php




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