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Exam Code: AACD Practice exam 2022 by Killexams.com team
American Academy of Cosmetic Dentistry
Medical Dentistry test prep
Killexams : Medical Dentistry test prep - BingNews https://killexams.com/pass4sure/exam-detail/AACD Search results Killexams : Medical Dentistry test prep - BingNews https://killexams.com/pass4sure/exam-detail/AACD https://killexams.com/exam_list/Medical Killexams : Dental Veneers: Everything You Need To Know

Having dental veneers put on is a relatively simple procedure performed in your dentist’s office. However, you may need to make a few appointments to complete the entire process, says Samantha Rawdin, D.M.D., a prosthodontist based in New York. Typically, you’ll have a consultation, then a follow-up or two for fitting and applying. Below is a breakdown of the steps involved:

Initial Consultation

“The first step for diagnosis involves an intimate consultation between the dentist and patient,” says Dr. Rubinov. “I always ask my patients to explain to me in detail the insecurity they have with their smile. “This helps me come up with a plan that produces the result that they are trying to achieve.”

The initial appointment will likely involve a physical exam to assess your overall oral hygiene, spot any issues (like excessive tooth decay) before veneers are applied and discuss your goals, says Dr. Rawdin. “You should also expect to have X-rays and photos taken, and possibly even impressions of your teeth,” she says.

Preparing Your Teeth

Once both you and your dentist have decided you’re a good candidate for veneers, your dentist will prepare your teeth. This can involve fixing cavities, reshaping the surface of your teeth and “roughing” the enamel to help the cement adhere better, says Dr. Rubinov.

Fitting and Bonding the Veneers

Once your custom veneers come back from the lab, which Dr. Rawdin says can take several weeks, you’ll go in for a fitting appointment. Here, your dentist will test the size, color and overall appearance. If everything looks and feels right, your veneers will be bonded right away. If not, your veneers may need to be sent back to the lab for adjustments.

Aftercare

Getting dental veneers isn’t overly painful and there isn’t much of a recovery period. “In the hours following your procedure, your gums might be sore from the area that we administered local anesthesia,” says Dr. Rubinov, “but the next day you can expect to love your new smile.” If you do experience discomfort afterward, over-the-counter medication can help, he adds.

Clear, affordable and effective

Are invisible aligners the right option for your smile makeover? Alignerco makes at-home teeth straightening easy and affordable.

Tue, 12 Jul 2022 05:33:00 -0500 en-US text/html https://www.forbes.com/health/body/dental-veneers/
Killexams : Tiruchi students find NEET exam easier than last year

As many as 7,000 candidates took the National Eligibility-cum-Entrance Test (NEET) conducted by the National Testing Agency in Tiruchi on Sunday, to secure admission to undergraduate medical and dental programmes.

There were 596 absentees for the examination, which was held at 13 centres under COVID-19 safety protocols to prevent infection.

Candidates found the Chemistry component tough, but were comfortable with Physics and Biology. Ranjith, a State Board student and first-time candidate, said: “Most of the questions in Chemistry were indirect, and we spent a lot of time in that section alone. Physics and Biology were easier and preparing with the NCERT textbooks helped,” he said.

S. Kanniga who prepared on her own and took the exam for the second time said, “Chemistry part was lengthy and tough just as last year; otherwise the exam was moderate.”

Candidates began assembling as early as 10 a.m. for the test which began at 2 p.m. and ended at 5.20 p.m. At the centres, parents were seen crowding at the entrances as they were not allowed inside.

There were 200 questions of which students had to attend 180 for a total of 750 marks.

According to R.V.S. Murlidhar, Founder of Seekers Education that trains students for the NEET exam, this year's test was less difficult than last year because of the students' adequate preparation. “The majority of the questions were from the NCERT textbooks,” he said.

Sun, 17 Jul 2022 03:12:00 -0500 en text/html https://www.thehindu.com/news/cities/Tiruchirapalli/tiruchi/article65651361.ece
Killexams : CMS Proposes 4.4% Cut in Physicians' Medicare Payments

CMS released its 2023 Physician Fee Schedule proposed rule Thursday, recommending lower payments for physicians under fee-for-service Medicare plans, as well as expansions related to behavioral health, cancer screenings, dental care, and patient access to accountable care organizations (ACOs).

The changes include a decrease in the conversion factor, a multiplier used to calculate physician reimbursement for fee-for-service payments under Medicare. The proposed conversion factor for the 2023 Physician Fee Schedule rule is $33.08, a decrease of $1.53 from last year, according to a CMS fact sheet.

The proposed conversion factor accounts for the statutorily required update of 0%, the expiration of a 3% increase in physician payments required by Congress, and the required budget neutrality adjustment to account for changes in relative value units, CMS said.

The recommendation to lower clinician payments follows a Medicare Payment Assessment Commission (MedPAC) report from March, stating that Medicare payments to physicians do not need to be increased next year, which did not sit well with physician groups.

Jack Resneck, Jr., MD, president of the American Medical Association (AMA), said that while his organization is still reviewing the proposed fee schedule, "it is immediately apparent that the rule not only fails to account for inflation in practice costs and COVID-related challenges to practice sustainability, but also includes a significant and damaging across-the-board reduction in payment rates."

"Such a move would create long-term financial instability in the Medicare physician payment system and threaten patient access to Medicare-participating physicians," he noted.

Additionally, the Medical Group Management Association stated that it "is incredibly concerned about the likely impact of the proposed 4.42% reduction to the conversion factor, especially in light of the financial uncertainty which medical groups have faced over the past two years stemming from the COVID-19 pandemic, inflation, and the staffing crisis."

The proposed changes related to expansion of behavioral health, cancer screenings, dental care, and patient access to ACOs will likely be more warmly accepted by physicians and patients alike.

"At CMS, we are constantly striving to expand access to high quality, comprehensive health care for people served by the Medicare program," said CMS Administrator Chiquita Brooks-LaSure in a press release. "Today's proposals expand access to vital medical services like behavioral health care, dental care, and cancer treatment options, all while promoting access, innovation, and cost savings in the Medicare program."

Expanded Behavioral Health Coverage

The agency stated that it will aim to address the behavioral health provider shortage by proposing to allow a range of mental health practitioners, including licensed professional counselors, marriage and family therapists, and others to provide behavioral health services under general, instead of direct, supervision.

Additionally, CMS proposed bundling certain chronic pain management services into monthly payments to Improve patient access. The agency also suggested covering opioid treatment and recovery services from mobile units, including vans, to increase access for people who are unhoused or living in rural areas.

Increasing Access to Colon Cancer Screening

Aiming to reduce barriers to getting a colonoscopy, CMS proposed that a follow-up colonoscopy after an at-home test should be covered as a preventive service, meaning that cost-sharing would be waived for Medicare patients. The agency also proposed to cover the service for patients 45 and older, in compliance with younger age recommendations from the U.S. Preventive Services Task Force.

Payment for Dental Services

CMS covers dental services that are integral to medically necessary services, and is offering to pay for dental care for new procedures. The agency proposed to pay for dental exams and treatments prior to an organ transplant, and is seeking comment on other medical conditions for which it should pay for dental services, such as cancer treatment or joint replacement surgeries.

Improving Opportunities for ACOs

CMS has proposed changes to the Medicare Shared Savings Program, a voluntary initiative that supports providers and hospitals who want to create an ACO. The agency wants to incorporate advance shared savings payments into certain ACOs, which can be used for Medicare patients' social needs -- one of the first times traditional Medicare payments would be permitted for such uses.

Additionally, the agency is proposing that smaller ACOs have more time to transition to downside risk, in which organizations have to pay back any money they lose from the program, aiming to promote growth in rural and underserved communities. CMS has also proposed a health equity adjustment to ACOs' quality performance category to reward organizations for excellent care to underserved populations.

The National Association of ACOs applauded these proposed changes, commending CMS for "taking steps to reach its goal of creating a stronger Medicare by strengthening accountable care models and speed the movement toward value for all patients."

The 60-day comment period for the agency's proposal will close on September 6. The final rule will be released this fall.

  • Amanda D'Ambrosio is a reporter on MedPage Today’s enterprise & investigative team. She covers obstetrics-gynecology and other clinical news, and writes features about the U.S. healthcare system. Follow

Fri, 08 Jul 2022 07:17:00 -0500 en text/html https://www.medpagetoday.com/practicemanagement/reimbursement/99646
Killexams : Why investigate one patient's charges?
Carlos Carmonamedina for NPR Public Editor
Illustration by Carlos Carmonamedina
Carlos Carmonamedina for NPR Public Editor

A feature in health care journalism is the deep dive into medical bills. With the series Bill of the Month, NPR and Kaiser Health News regularly investigate specific bills to shed light on the costs of care in the United States. This type of consumer advocacy is most effective when the bill in question exposes common problems.

One reader objected to a accurate Bill of the Month story, concerned that drawing attention to a high colonoscopy bill will deter others from getting their screening tests.

Raising that concern is really raising a question about journalistic purpose. Bill of the Month was not designed to educate people about getting their recommended cancer screenings.

Medical bill investigations are about accountability. That's because paying for medical care in the U.S. means navigating a Byzantine and opaque system. It's often difficult for the average consumer to cut through the bureaucracy to arrive at a clear understanding of the money owed after a medical treatment.

This gap between the reader's concern and the story's intent exposes a common shortcoming in the news. Journalists rarely tell their audience what the purpose of a story is. Mostly they assume that the story itself makes their intention clear.

Bill of the Month is an exception. NPR does explain the purpose of the series: "Journalists from Kaiser Health News and NPR will be looking at surprising medical bills and figuring out what they can tell us about the health care system."

And when this particular story aired on All Things Considered, the host introduced it by telling listeners that colonoscopies are mostly free, and that if Bill of the Month is looking into one, then "something is not going as it should in our health care system."

Read on to learn more about Bill of the Month's purpose.

We have two additional audience inquiries about the specific words and phrases that journalists use when covering the polarizing issues of gun policies and abortion access.

Finally, we spotlight a accurate episode of It's Been A Minute that explores a curious trend in entertainment.

FROM THE INBOX

Here are a few quotes from the Public Editor's inbox that resonated with us. Letters are edited for length and clarity. You can share your questions and concerns with us through the NPR Contact page.

A discouraging headline and article?

Jody Hoyos, president of the Prevent Cancer Foundation, wrote on June 13: Michelle Andrews' recent article, "Her First Colonoscopy Cost Her $0. Her Second Cost $2,185. Why?" raises critical issues with hospital billing codes and educates readers about the "No Surprises Act." Our concern is that it will also discourage Americans from getting the annual health screenings that could save their lives.

... Readers may not scroll through 25 paragraphs to find that the $2,185 bill was due to a coding error and Elizabeth Melville owed nothing for her colonoscopy.

The article also misses the opportunity to educate readers on basic insurance coverage, what they need to ask before scheduling their colonoscopy or that other non-invasive screening options, like Cologuard, are readily available in the market with no additional cost to patients.

Early detection is the most important thing people can do to stay healthy. Everyone must feel empowered in navigating screening options. ...

We hope future headlines will focus on, "Early Detection Will Save Your Life - What You Need to Know About Cancer Screenings," to encourage everyone to get their routine screenings back on the books.

This story was published under Bill of the Month, a crowdsourced investigation by Kaiser Health News (KHN) and NPR that dissects and explains medical bills. The story explored New Hampshire ski instructor Elizabeth Melville's colonoscopy bill, and provided helpful information on talking to insurance companies before an exam.

Diane Webber, KHN's national editor for broadcast, oversees the partnership and assigns reporters to the coverage.

"We use it to try to illuminate different financial pitfalls of our complex health care system," she said.

She wrote the headline in question, which appeared on KHN's website. The story is also featured on NPR.org under a different headline written by Carmel Wroth, an NPR Science Desk senior editor: "Cancer screenings like colonoscopies are supposed to be free. Hers cost $2,185."

Webber told me Melville's colonoscopy bill was chosen because everyone over 45 years of age, in consultation with their doctor, should get screened for colon cancer. Her team has received letters from people who experienced scenarios similar to Melville's.

"We think this is a really widespread problem, and that a lot of hospitals are charging people for colonoscopies after they find something," she said. "And the government has done no enforcement of making sure preventive care is free when it should be free. It's a dramatic headline and we want people to click on the story and understand what their rights are."

To Webber, this KHN headline shows an example of a woman who got her important diagnostic tests as directed by her doctor.

Webber emphasized that this is an accountability story. "If you get a big bill after a screening colonoscopy, and you have employer-sponsored insurance, there's a high likelihood that your hospital system is not following the rules," she said. "So we want other people in her position to know that they have a very good argument to fight that big bill."

"It is not a story about the public health importance of people getting a colonoscopy, though we certainly recognize the public health importance of getting a colonoscopy," she said. "The story was about giving people the tools to get this test paid for properly."

She also noted that the article does include information about the lifesaving significance of screenings. For example, the story cited a 2020 analysis of published studies stating that "screening colonoscopies reduce the relative risk of getting colorectal cancer by 52% and the risk of dying from it by 62%."

We often get comments from readers and listeners who are upset that a story and its headline didn't deliver the message they were hoping for. When medical facilities unfairly bill for diagnostic procedures, people are discouraged from seeking recommended tests. Holding the doctors' offices and insurance companies accountable for this is the best way to fix the problem, not minimizing the fact that it happens.

Bill of the Month's findings aim to help other readers navigate the U.S. health care system should they ever encounter the same issue. This story, and its multiple headlines, fulfilled that purpose. — Amaris Castillo

Why does NPR use the term 'abortion care'?

Gwendolyn Barlow wrote on May 26: Could you please explain the frequent use of the phrase "abortion care?" When covering other medical procedures, do your reporters exercise consistency by referring to "appendectomy care," "chemotherapy care," and "coronary bypass care?" Or does abortion alone enjoy this elevated status as a procedure with "care" added to it?

... In the interests of journalistic integrity, please consider more neutral language.

Journalists often follow specific style guides, such as the Associated Press Stylebook, and also general language conventions when deciding which terms to use. AP and NPR do not address the term "abortion care" in their guidance to journalists.

We asked a few NPR journalists to weigh in on the use of "abortion care" in reporting:

  • Sarah McCammon, a National Desk correspondent who regularly covers reproductive issues, told us she tends not to use the term to be succinct. But sometimes sources may use it when being directly quoted.
  • Scott Hensley, senior health editor on the Science Desk, said: "An abortion is a form of medical care and involves more than the procedure itself. Our reporting often includes this language as context."
  • Tony Cavin, managing editor for standards and practices, said: "I think the term 'abortion care' is appropriate in certain circumstances where we are discussing more than just the procedure itself. NPR's reporters and editors are knowledgeable and I trust them to use their judgment as to when the term might be appropriate."

"Care" is often attached to areas of medicine, including "cancer care" and " dental care," both terms that NPR has used in its reporting. Journalists also use the widely applied general terms "health care" and "medical care."

The term "care" may also be attached to these medical areas because they involve more than one type of procedure or treatment, as Hensley and Cavin mentioned. Multiple abortion procedures can fall under "abortion care," just as multiple dental treatments can fall under "dental care." The difference is that the former is more often politicized, but still a part of medical practice.

"Abortion care" seems to be used by NPR because of its precision and not because it is meant to sway the audience. — Emily Barske

'Gun control' or 'gun safety'?

Catherine Fenollosa wrote on June 6: There were two stories on ME this morning about the gun debate. Both mentioned "gun control" several times. I'm curious why it's not referred to as "gun safety?" It seems to me that media outlets have adopted the NRA's language on the conversation much like pro-life was referred to for many years instead of the more appropriate anti-abortion. (I am a former employee of WBUR.)

Other NPR audience members have suggested that "gun safety" is the more accurate term. In a newsletter last year, we addressed an audience member who suggested language like "gun violence prevention" or "harm reduction" were better terms than "gun control."

NPR's Style Guide has no entries for coverage on guns or any other weapons. And the AP Stylebook has guidelines on the correct language to describe guns, but doesn't list specific preferences for talking about gun legislation or safety measures.

NPR Managing Editor for Standards and Practices Tony Cavin said NPR hasn't issued specific advice to its journalists on the term "gun control."

"With questions about gun legislation, as with anything else, NPR tries to use the clearest and most accurate language to describe things," he said via email. "Gun control, like narcotics control or air traffic control, describes government efforts to regulate a situation. It has been used for many years [in] proposals to regulate the sale, use and possession of firearms. Gun safety is the stated aim of some of those measures."

He said both terms — "gun control" and "gun safety" — seem to be accurate descriptions of the various legislative proposals that are being made.

Even without formal guidance, NPR journalists are using both of those terms to describe the current debate, as well as some other phrases. In one of the June 6 Morning Edition stories referenced, host Leila Fadel used the term "gun control proposals." On the same show on June 13, host Rachel Martin used the term "gun safety proposals."

NPR is using the terms appropriately, although neither term is perfect or precise. As we articulated when addressing this a few months ago, the Public Editor's Office continues to be an advocate for specificity and clarity over brevity. "Gun violence prevention," as suggested by the audience member in last year's newsletter, is another good option for NPR to use from time to time.

As gun policy debates continue in the U.S., it's time for NPR and the AP to issue specific guidelines so journalists can ensure that their language is informing the debate rather than tilting the scales. When the news media use accurate, clear and neutral language, we can better serve the public. — Emily Barske

SPOTLIGHT ON

The Public Editor spends a lot of time examining moments where NPR fell short. Yet we also learn a lot about NPR by looking at work that we find to be compelling and excellent journalism. Here we share a line or two about the pieces where NPR shines.

The parental apology fantasy

It's Been A Minute delivered a fascinating conversation about a accurate trend in on-screen storytelling: the "millennial parental apology fantasy." These portrayals of parents and children in conflict span a variety of genres, including animation (Encanto), the big screen (Everything Everywhere All At Once) and TV series (Ms. Marvel). Guest host B.A. Parker spoke to Vox Entertainment Critic Emily St. James, who explained that core to this fantasy is "a bad parent who apologizes eventually, and that apology kind of fixes everything" in the story. The discussion can provoke deeper thinking about just how much trauma parents potentially inflict on their children. — Amaris Castillo

The Office of the Public Editor is a team. Editor Kayla Randall and reporters Amaris Castillo and Emily Barske make this newsletter possible. Illustrations are by Carlos Carmonamedina. We are still practicing all of your messages on Facebook, Twitter and from our inbox. As always, keep them coming.

Kelly McBride
NPR Public Editor
Chair,
Craig Newmark Center for Ethics & Leadership at the Poynter Institute

Fri, 08 Jul 2022 02:28:00 -0500 en text/html https://www.npr.org/sections/publiceditor/2022/07/08/1110469029/why-investigate-one-patients-charges Killexams : Henry Schein Completes Acquisition of Condor Dental

MELVILLE, N.Y.--(BUSINESS WIRE)--Jul 7, 2022--

Henry Schein, Inc. (Nasdaq: HSIC), the world’s largest provider of health care solutions to office-based dental and medical practitioners, today announced it has completed the acquisition of Condor Dental Research Company SA (Condor Dental), a dental distribution company that serves dental general practitioners, specialists, and laboratories in Switzerland. The transaction was announced on June 7, 2022.

Henry Schein acquired 100% of Condor Dental from MCCB II Holding, owned by Christèle Herreman. This transaction is expected to be neutral to Henry Schein’s 2022 diluted earnings per share and to be accretive thereafter. Financial terms were not disclosed.

Since 2004, Henry Schein has served the Swiss dental implant market through Camlog Biotechnologies GmbH, a Basel-based division of Henry Schein, Inc., a member of the Company’s Global Oral Reconstruction Group, and a global leader in dental implants, biomaterials, and oral reconstruction. The addition of Condor Dental will expand Henry Schein’s entry into the Swiss market for its dental distribution business.

“Our partnership comes at a time of growing demand for dental services in Switzerland and with the completion of our strategic investment in Condor Dental, we see a significant opportunity to help dental practitioners provide high-quality care as part of operating efficient and successful practices," said Stanley M. Bergman, Chairman of the Board and Chief Executive Officer of Henry Schein. “We at Henry Schein welcome our new Condor Dental colleagues and we look forward to bringing new products, services, and solutions to the Swiss dental community."

Condor Dental is based in Vouvry, Switzerland, and was established in 1978. Sales for 2021 were approximately $18 million, the majority of which were from dental consumable merchandise, with further revenue from the design and customization of dental practices and dental laboratory installations. With the transaction closed, Condor Dental joins Henry Schein’s International Distribution Group, and the business will continue to be led by Yves Mailliard, Condor’s Chief Operating Officer.

“We are extremely pleased to complete our partnership with Henry Schein, a company that shares our commitment to providing our customers with the tools and solutions they need to deliver quality care to patients,” said Mr. Mailliard. “As part of the Henry Schein family, Condor Dental has several exciting opportunities to accelerate organic growth including geographic expansion, leveraging Henry Schein’s private-label products, and accelerating participation in the digitalization of dental practices. Along with expanding our customer base, we also look forward to increasing Condor Dental’s existing customer base while facilitating excellent patient care and improving practice profitability.”

“A highly regarded company that has been serving dental professionals for more than 40 years, Condor Dental nicely complements our European dental business,” said Andrea Albertini, President of Henry Schein’s International Distribution Group. “With the support of Henry Schein’s operational expertise, Condor Dental will be better resourced to strengthen its position in the marketplace and Improve the level of services and solutions offered to dental practitioners.”

About Henry Schein, Inc.

Henry Schein, Inc. (Nasdaq: HSIC) is a solutions company for health care professionals powered by a network of people and technology. With nearly 22,000 Team Schein Members worldwide, the Company's network of trusted advisors provides more than 1 million customers globally with more than 300 valued solutions that help Improve operational success and clinical outcomes. Our Business, Clinical, Technology, and Supply Chain solutions help office-based dental and medical practitioners work more efficiently so they can provide quality care more effectively. These solutions also support dental laboratories, government and institutional health care clinics, as well as other alternate care sites.

Henry Schein operates through a centralized and automated distribution network, with a selection of more than 120,000 branded products and Henry Schein private-brand products in stock, as well as more than 180,000 additional products available as special-order items.

A FORTUNE 500 Company and a member of the S&P 500® index, Henry Schein is headquartered in Melville, N.Y., and has operations or affiliates in 32 countries and territories. The Company's sales reached $12.4 billion in 2021, and have grown at a compound annual rate of approximately 12.5 percent since Henry Schein became a public company in 1995.

For more information, visit Henry Schein at www.henryschein.com, Facebook.com/HenrySchein, Instagram.com/HenrySchein, and Twitter.com/HenrySchein.

Cautionary Note Regarding Forward-Looking Statements

In accordance with the “Safe Harbor” provisions of the Private Securities Litigation Reform Act of 1995, we provide the following cautionary remarks regarding important factors that, among others, could cause future results to differ materially from the forward-looking statements, expectations and assumptions expressed or implied herein. All forward-looking statements made by us are subject to risks and uncertainties and are not guarantees of future performance. These forward-looking statements involve known and unknown risks, uncertainties and other factors that may cause our real results, performance and achievements or industry results to be materially different from any future results, performance or achievements expressed or implied by such forward-looking statements. These statements include EPS guidance and are generally identified by the use of such terms as “may,” “could,” “expect,” “intend,” “believe,” “plan,” “estimate,” “forecast,” “project,” “anticipate,” “to be,” “to make” or other comparable terms. A fuller discussion of our operations, financial condition and status of litigation matters, including factors that may affect our business and future prospects, is contained in documents we have filed with the United States Securities and Exchange Commission, or SEC, including our Annual Report on Form 10-K, and will be contained in all subsequent periodic filings we make with the SEC. These documents identify in detail important risk factors that could cause our real performance to differ materially from current expectations. Forward looking statements include the overall impact of the Novel Coronavirus Disease 2019 (COVID-19) on the Company, its results of operations, liquidity and financial condition (including any estimates of the impact on these items), the rate and consistency with which dental and other practices resume or maintain normal operations in the United States and internationally, expectations regarding PPE and COVID-19 related product sales and inventory levels, whether additional resurgences or variants of the virus will adversely impact the resumption of normal operations, whether vaccine mandates will adversely impact the Company (by disrupting our workforce and/or business), whether supply chain disruptions will adversely impact our business, the impact of restructuring programs as well as of any future acquisitions, and more generally current expectations regarding performance in current and future periods. Forward looking statements also include the (i) ability of the Company to have continued access to a variety of COVID-19 test types, expectations regarding COVID-19 test sales, demand and inventory levels, as well as the efficacy or relative efficacy of the test results given that the test efficacy has not been, or will not have been, independently Verified under normal FDA procedures and (ii) potential for the Company to distribute the COVID-19 vaccines and ancillary supplies.

Risk factors and uncertainties that could cause real results to differ materially from current and historical results include, but are not limited to: risks associated with COVID-19 and any variants thereof, as well as other disease outbreaks, epidemics, pandemics, or similar wide-spread public health concerns and other natural disasters; our dependence on third parties for the manufacture and supply of our products; our ability to develop or acquire and maintain and protect new products (particularly technology products) and technologies that achieve market acceptance with acceptable margins; transitional challenges associated with acquisitions, dispositions and joint ventures, including the failure to achieve anticipated synergies/benefits; financial and tax risks associated with acquisitions, dispositions and joint ventures; certain provisions in our governing documents that may discourage third-party acquisitions of us; effects of a highly competitive (including, without limitation, competition from third-party online commerce sites) and consolidating market; the repeal or judicial prohibition on implementation of the Affordable Care Act; changes in the health care industry; risks from expansion of customer purchasing power and multi-tiered costing structures; increases in shipping costs for our products or other service issues with our third-party shippers; general global and domestic macro-economic and political conditions, including inflation, deflation and changes to other economic indicators, international trade agreements, potential trade barriers and terrorism; failure to comply with existing and future regulatory requirements; risks associated with the EU Medical Device Regulation; failure to comply with laws and regulations relating to health care fraud or other laws and regulations; failure to comply with laws and regulations relating to the collection, storage and processing of sensitive personal information or standards in electronic health records or transmissions; changes in tax legislation; risks related to product liability, intellectual property and other claims; litigation risks; new or unanticipated litigation developments and the status of litigation matters; risks associated with customs policies or legislative import restrictions; cyberattacks or other privacy or data security breaches; risks associated with our global operations; our dependence on our senior management, employee hiring and retention, and our relationships with customers, suppliers and manufacturers; and disruptions in financial markets. The order in which these factors appear should not be construed to indicate their relative importance or priority.

We caution that these factors may not be exhaustive and that many of these factors are beyond our ability to control or predict. Accordingly, any forward-looking statements contained herein should not be relied upon as a prediction of real results. We undertake no duty and have no obligation to update forward-looking statements.

View source version on businesswire.com:https://www.businesswire.com/news/home/20220706005587/en/

CONTACT: Investors

Ronald N. South

Senior Vice President and Chief Financial Officer

ronald.south@henryschein.com

+1 (631) 845-2802Graham Stanley

Vice President, Investor Relations and Strategic Financial Project Officer

graham.stanley@henryschein.com

+1 (631) 843-5963Media

Ann Marie Gothard

Vice President, Global Corporate Media Relations

annmarie.gothard@henryschein.com

+1 (631) 390-8169

KEYWORD: EUROPE SWITZERLAND UNITED STATES NORTH AMERICA NEW YORK

INDUSTRY KEYWORD: SURGERY MEDICAL DEVICES HEALTH DENTAL MEDICAL SUPPLIES

SOURCE: Henry Schein, Inc.

Copyright Business Wire 2022.

PUB: 07/07/2022 06:30 AM/DISC: 07/07/2022 06:32 AM

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Wed, 06 Jul 2022 22:32:00 -0500 en text/html https://www.valdostadailytimes.com/news/business/henry-schein-completes-acquisition-of-condor-dental/article_dc3d1365-7e98-59e3-81d0-8dba6102af48.html
Killexams : Be the first to know

“I can’t sleep without it!” “I’m waking up refreshed and feel more rested.” “I’m not snoring anymore!”  

The reason: These patients were fitted with an oral appliance to treat their sleep apnea. 

“Sleep apnea is not only one of the most under-diagnosed conditions in the U.S., but also one of the most serious,” said Dr. Melissa Sheets, DDS, of Advanced Dental Sleep Treatment Center in Omaha.

An estimated 90% of people who suffer from sleep apnea aren’t aware of it, she added. 

What is sleep apnea?

Sleep apnea occurs when you stop breathing during sleep long enough for your blood oxygen level to drop to a point where your brain senses danger. Those who suffer from it rarely experience a full night’s sleep without waking up often — sometimes even hundreds of times.

People are also reading…

Obstructive sleep apnea, or OSA, is the most common type of sleep apnea and occurs when a person’s airway collapses during sleep. Risks associated with sleep apnea can be serious, including dementia, heart attacks, strokes and pulmonary embolisms.  

“It’s like you’re suffocating,” Dr. Sheets said. “Your muscles relax, and the tissue in your throat closes if the muscles are unsupported.”

Being overweight or having an anatomically narrow airway are the most common causes of OSA. 

Severe sleep apnea is best treated using a Continuous Positive Airway Pressure (CPAP) machine, which provides air flow at a designated pressure to the upper airway during sleep. That air flow keeps the airway open, which allows for uninterrupted breathing and sleep.

CPAP treatment typically involves wearing a mask that covers the nose (and often the mouth) and is an extremely effective treatment — if a patient wears it.   

“That’s the challenge with CPAP — it can be awkward and uncomfortable for patients, which is why they abandon their treatment,” Dr. Sheets said. “For many patients, the CPAP machine often ends up under the bed.” 

Treatment with results

Thankfully, there’s an alternative to CPAP that is also effective in treating OSA: An oral appliance — similar to a mouthpiece — worn at night.

An oral appliance worn at night is effective in treating obstructive sleep apnea. The appliance moves the lower jaw forward, which also moves the tongue forward, and allows for unobstructed airflow.

The appliance moves the lower jaw forward, which also moves the tongue forward, and allows for unobstructed airflow. The appliances are small, easy to travel with, and a treatment that patients find comfortable enough to wear all night every night. 

“For many patients, this is the best option — and one that is better for the patient’s sleep partner, too” she said.  

Diagnosis and treatment of sleep apnea begins with an evaluation with the professionals at Advanced Dental Sleep Treatment Center. If not already diagnosed, a sleep test — often conducted at the patient’s home rather than in a lab — follows.

Sleep physicians then review the test data and recommend treatment options. Most medical insurance will cover diagnosis and treatment, and the staff at Advanced Dental Sleep Treatment Center ensure patients know what to expect along the way. 

“The result? A good night’s sleep, often for the first time in a long time,” Dr. Sheets said. 

For more information or to book an appointment, go to WhyWeSnore.com or call 1-866-59-SLEEP. 

Sun, 10 Jul 2022 01:00:00 -0500 en text/html https://omaha.com/sponsored/alternative-to-cpap-offers-relief-rest-to-patients-suffering-with-sleep-apnea/article_77369a3e-f7d9-11ec-9902-a7b16f45f832.html
Killexams : Precision COVID-19 test devised to finish diagnoses in just 9 minutes

Japanese researchers announced the development of precision diagnostic testing equipment for COVID-19 that produces a result in only 9 minutes.

They added that the method has the potential to “be applied to earlier detection of cancer and other disorders as well.”

The team, comprised primarily of members from the Riken research institute, the University of Tokyo, Kyoto University, Tokyo Medical and Dental University and Jichi Medical University in Tochigi Prefecture, said the test has an accuracy rate of more than 98 percent.

Aside from producing a result far faster than a typical polymerase chain reaction (PCR) test, the procedure costs about the same, just $2 (269 yen).

Team members relied on technology developed last year to identify viruses without proliferating their genetic material. The technique’s sensitivity improved 1,400-fold during the latest round of testing.

“We aim to deliver our device to clinics in towns for speedier diagnoses,” said Rikiya Watanabe, a chief scientist at Riken in Wako, Saitama Prefecture, who was involved in the project. 

In April 2021, the researchers unveiled what they call the SATORI method, which relies on the function of an enzyme that beomes active when mixed with viruses' genetic material.

This method detects the presence of viruses when light emitted from fluorescent substances mixed with enzymes and specimens in a solution. The enzymes activated by the viruses in the specimens cause the fluorescent substances to emit light. 

Samples from saliva and throat mucous membranes are mixed with the enzyme and luminous substance. The mixture is then placed in a dish resembling a compact disc comprised of microchambers to gauge the chemical reaction, thereby allowing the light-emitting parts to be counted.

The time it took to produce a positive result improved dramatically. A PCR test takes an hour or so due to its genetic material amplification process.

A remaining challenge to overcome was the SATORI technology’s lower detection sensitivity than PCR tests.

The team then discovered an easier-to-activate enzyme to heighten sensitivity. Magnetic beads were used, which attached themselves to the enzyme to reach the microchambers more easily.

Those efforts resulted in an improved positive accuracy rate of more than 98 percent and allowed the testing cost to be lowered to $2, equivalent to that of a PCR analysis.

After creating a fully automated detection machine fitted with a specimen preparation robot and a microscope for measurements, the examination time ended up being reduced to just 9 minutes.

With an eye on commercialization of the device next fiscal year, the team aims to tie up with a business partner to make the equipment smaller.

The device can identify different variants of the novel coronavirus, and the technology is anticipated to be utilized in the future for other sorts of infectious diseases.

Mon, 11 Jul 2022 12:01:00 -0500 en text/html https://www.asahi.com/ajw/articles/14635073
Killexams : Health Care Heroes 2022: Cassandra Holder Christiansen of UTHSC College of Dentistry No result found, try new keyword!The world’s been in a health crisis for a couple years now. So, in 2020, MBJ’s Health Care Heroes focused on those doctors, scientists, health professionals, and administrators who steered us through ... Thu, 07 Jul 2022 15:22:00 -0500 text/html https://www.bizjournals.com/memphis/news/2022/07/07/health-care-heroes-cassandra-holder-christiansen.html Killexams : Revision strategies to ace NEET (UG) – 2022 No result found, try new keyword!It is a national-level exam meant for admission to MBBS, BDS, BSMS, BAMS, BHMS, BUMS and other undergraduate courses in medical and dental institutions across India. Wed, 06 Jul 2022 20:31:01 -0500 en-in text/html https://www.msn.com/en-in/news/other/revision-strategies-to-ace-neet-ug-2022/ar-AAZj6Og Killexams : Henry Schein Completes Acquisition of Condor Dental

Henry Schein, Inc. HSIC, the world's largest provider of health care solutions to office-based dental and medical practitioners, today announced it has completed the acquisition of Condor Dental Research Company SA (Condor Dental), a dental distribution company that serves dental general practitioners, specialists, and laboratories in Switzerland. The transaction was announced on June 7, 2022.

Henry Schein acquired 100% of Condor Dental from MCCB II Holding, owned by Christèle Herreman. This transaction is expected to be neutral to Henry Schein's 2022 diluted earnings per share and to be accretive thereafter. Financial terms were not disclosed.

Since 2004, Henry Schein has served the Swiss dental implant market through Camlog Biotechnologies GmbH, a Basel-based division of Henry Schein, Inc., a member of the Company's Global Oral Reconstruction Group, and a global leader in dental implants, biomaterials, and oral reconstruction. The addition of Condor Dental will expand Henry Schein's entry into the Swiss market for its dental distribution business.

"Our partnership comes at a time of growing demand for dental services in Switzerland and with the completion of our strategic investment in Condor Dental, we see a significant opportunity to help dental practitioners provide high-quality care as part of operating efficient and successful practices," said Stanley M. Bergman, Chairman of the Board and Chief Executive Officer of Henry Schein. "We at Henry Schein welcome our new Condor Dental colleagues and we look forward to bringing new products, services, and solutions to the Swiss dental community."

Condor Dental is based in Vouvry, Switzerland, and was established in 1978. Sales for 2021 were approximately $18 million, the majority of which were from dental consumable merchandise, with further revenue from the design and customization of dental practices and dental laboratory installations. With the transaction closed, Condor Dental joins Henry Schein's International Distribution Group, and the business will continue to be led by Yves Mailliard, Condor's Chief Operating Officer.

"We are extremely pleased to complete our partnership with Henry Schein, a company that shares our commitment to providing our customers with the tools and solutions they need to deliver quality care to patients," said Mr. Mailliard. "As part of the Henry Schein family, Condor Dental has several exciting opportunities to accelerate organic growth including geographic expansion, leveraging Henry Schein's private-label products, and accelerating participation in the digitalization of dental practices. Along with expanding our customer base, we also look forward to increasing Condor Dental's existing customer base while facilitating excellent patient care and improving practice profitability."

"A highly regarded company that has been serving dental professionals for more than 40 years, Condor Dental nicely complements our European dental business," said Andrea Albertini, President of Henry Schein's International Distribution Group. "With the support of Henry Schein's operational expertise, Condor Dental will be better resourced to strengthen its position in the marketplace and Improve the level of services and solutions offered to dental practitioners."

About Henry Schein, Inc.

Henry Schein, Inc. HSIC is a solutions company for health care professionals powered by a network of people and technology. With nearly 22,000 Team Schein Members worldwide, the Company's network of trusted advisors provides more than 1 million customers globally with more than 300 valued solutions that help Improve operational success and clinical outcomes. Our Business, Clinical, Technology, and Supply Chain solutions help office-based dental and medical practitioners work more efficiently so they can provide quality care more effectively. These solutions also support dental laboratories, government and institutional health care clinics, as well as other alternate care sites.

Henry Schein operates through a centralized and automated distribution network, with a selection of more than 120,000 branded products and Henry Schein private-brand products in stock, as well as more than 180,000 additional products available as special-order items.

A FORTUNE 500 Company and a member of the S&P 500® index, Henry Schein is headquartered in Melville, N.Y., and has operations or affiliates in 32 countries and territories. The Company's sales reached $12.4 billion in 2021, and have grown at a compound annual rate of approximately 12.5 percent since Henry Schein became a public company in 1995.

For more information, visit Henry Schein at www.henryschein.com, Facebook.com/HenrySchein, Instagram.com/HenrySchein, and Twitter.com/HenrySchein.

Cautionary Note Regarding Forward-Looking Statements

In accordance with the "Safe Harbor" provisions of the Private Securities Litigation Reform Act of 1995, we provide the following cautionary remarks regarding important factors that, among others, could cause future results to differ materially from the forward-looking statements, expectations and assumptions expressed or implied herein. All forward-looking statements made by us are subject to risks and uncertainties and are not guarantees of future performance. These forward-looking statements involve known and unknown risks, uncertainties and other factors that may cause our real results, performance and achievements or industry results to be materially different from any future results, performance or achievements expressed or implied by such forward-looking statements. These statements include EPS guidance and are generally identified by the use of such terms as "may," "could," "expect," "intend," "believe," "plan," "estimate," "forecast," "project," "anticipate," "to be," "to make" or other comparable terms. A fuller discussion of our operations, financial condition and status of litigation matters, including factors that may affect our business and future prospects, is contained in documents we have filed with the United States Securities and Exchange Commission, or SEC, including our Annual Report on Form 10-K, and will be contained in all subsequent periodic filings we make with the SEC. These documents identify in detail important risk factors that could cause our real performance to differ materially from current expectations. Forward looking statements include the overall impact of the Novel Coronavirus Disease 2019 (COVID-19) on the Company, its results of operations, liquidity and financial condition (including any estimates of the impact on these items), the rate and consistency with which dental and other practices resume or maintain normal operations in the United States and internationally, expectations regarding PPE and COVID-19 related product sales and inventory levels, whether additional resurgences or variants of the virus will adversely impact the resumption of normal operations, whether vaccine mandates will adversely impact the Company (by disrupting our workforce and/or business), whether supply chain disruptions will adversely impact our business, the impact of restructuring programs as well as of any future acquisitions, and more generally current expectations regarding performance in current and future periods. Forward looking statements also include the (i) ability of the Company to have continued access to a variety of COVID-19 test types, expectations regarding COVID-19 test sales, demand and inventory levels, as well as the efficacy or relative efficacy of the test results given that the test efficacy has not been, or will not have been, independently Verified under normal FDA procedures and (ii) potential for the Company to distribute the COVID-19 vaccines and ancillary supplies.

Risk factors and uncertainties that could cause real results to differ materially from current and historical results include, but are not limited to: risks associated with COVID-19 and any variants thereof, as well as other disease outbreaks, epidemics, pandemics, or similar wide-spread public health concerns and other natural disasters; our dependence on third parties for the manufacture and supply of our products; our ability to develop or acquire and maintain and protect new products (particularly technology products) and technologies that achieve market acceptance with acceptable margins; transitional challenges associated with acquisitions, dispositions and joint ventures, including the failure to achieve anticipated synergies/benefits; financial and tax risks associated with acquisitions, dispositions and joint ventures; certain provisions in our governing documents that may discourage third-party acquisitions of us; effects of a highly competitive (including, without limitation, competition from third-party online commerce sites) and consolidating market; the repeal or judicial prohibition on implementation of the Affordable Care Act; changes in the health care industry; risks from expansion of customer purchasing power and multi-tiered costing structures; increases in shipping costs for our products or other service issues with our third-party shippers; general global and domestic macro-economic and political conditions, including inflation, deflation and changes to other economic indicators, international trade agreements, potential trade barriers and terrorism; failure to comply with existing and future regulatory requirements; risks associated with the EU Medical Device Regulation; failure to comply with laws and regulations relating to health care fraud or other laws and regulations; failure to comply with laws and regulations relating to the collection, storage and processing of sensitive personal information or standards in electronic health records or transmissions; changes in tax legislation; risks related to product liability, intellectual property and other claims; litigation risks; new or unanticipated litigation developments and the status of litigation matters; risks associated with customs policies or legislative import restrictions; cyberattacks or other privacy or data security breaches; risks associated with our global operations; our dependence on our senior management, employee hiring and retention, and our relationships with customers, suppliers and manufacturers; and disruptions in financial markets. The order in which these factors appear should not be construed to indicate their relative importance or priority.

We caution that these factors may not be exhaustive and that many of these factors are beyond our ability to control or predict. Accordingly, any forward-looking statements contained herein should not be relied upon as a prediction of real results. We undertake no duty and have no obligation to update forward-looking statements.

© 2022 Benzinga.com. Benzinga does not provide investment advice. All rights reserved.

Wed, 06 Jul 2022 22:54:00 -0500 text/html https://www.benzinga.com/pressreleases/22/07/b27982960/henry-schein-completes-acquisition-of-condor-dental
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