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Exam Code: CRRN Practice test 2022 by Killexams.com team
CRRN Certified Rehabilitation Registered Nurse

1. Rehabilitation nursing models and theories (6%)
2. Functional health patterns (theories, physiology, assessment, standards of care, and interventions in individuals with injury, chronic illness, and disability across the lifespan) (58%)
3. The function of the rehabilitation team and community reintegration (13%)
4. Legislative, economic, ethical, and legal issues (23%).

The CRRN test Content Outline lists each domain with related tasks, knowledge, and skill statements. It is the best source of information for test content.

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Domain I: Rehabilitation Nursing Models and Theories (6%)
Task 1: Incorporate evidence-based practice, models, and theories into patient-centered care.
Knowledge of:
a. Evidence-based practice
b. Nursing theories and models significant to rehabilitation (e.g., King, Rogers, Neuman, Orem)
c. Nursing process (i.e., assessment, diagnosis, outcomes identification, planning, implementation, evaluation)
d. Rehabilitation standards and scope of practice
e. Related theories and models (e.g., developmental, behavioral, cognitive, moral, personality, caregiver development and function)
f. Patient-centered care Skill in:
a. Applying nursing models and theories
b. Applying rehabilitation scope of practice
c. Applying the nursing process
d. Incorporating evidence-based practice
Domain II: Functional Health Patterns (theories, physiology, assessment, standards of care, and interventions in individuals with injury, chronic illness, and disability across the lifespan) (58%)
Task 1: Apply the nursing process to optimize the restoration and preservation of the individual's health and wellbeing.
Knowledge of:
a. Physiology and management of health, injury, acute and chronic illness, and adaptability
b. Pharmacology
c. Rehabilitation standards and scope of practice
d. Technology (e.g., smart devices, internet sources, personal response devices, and telehealth)
e. Alterations in sexual function and reproduction
Skill in:
a. Assessing health status and health practices
b. Teaching interventions to manage health and wellness
c. Using rehabilitation standards and scope of practice
d. Using technology
e. Assessing goals related to sexuality and reproduction
f. Teaching interventions and technology related to sexuality and reproduction (e.g., body positioning, mirrors, adaptive equipment, medication)
Task 2: Apply the nursing process to promote optimal nutrition.
Knowledge of:
a. Adaptive equipment and feeding techniques (e.g., modified utensils, scoop plates, positioning)
b. Anatomy and physiology related to nutritional and metabolic patterns (e.g., endocrine, obesity, swallowing)
c. Diagnostic testing
d. Diet types (e.g., cardiac, diabetic, renal, dysphagia)
e. Fluid and electrolyte balance
f. Nutritional requirements
g. Skin integrity (e.g., Braden scale, pressure ulcer staging)
h. Pharmacology (e.g., anticholinergics, opioids, antidepressants)
i. Safety concerns and interventions (e.g., swallowing, positioning, food textures, fluid consistency)
Skill in:
a. Assessing nutritional and metabolic patterns (e.g., nutritional intake, fluid volume deficits, skin integrity, metabolic functions, feeding and swallowing)
b. Implementing and evaluating interventions for nutrition
c. Implementing and evaluating interventions for skin integrity (e.g., skin assessment, pressure relief, moisture reduction, nutrition and hydration)
d. Teaching interventions for swallowing deficits
e. Using adaptive equipment
Task 3: Apply the nursing process to optimize the individual's elimination patterns.
Knowledge of:
a. Anatomy and physiology of altered bowel and bladder function
b. Bladder and bowel adaptive equipment and technology (e.g., bladder scan, types of catheters, suppository inserter)
c. Bladder and bowel training (e.g., scheduled self -catheterization, timed voiding, elimination programs)
d. Pharmacologic and non-pharmacological interventions
Skill in:
a. Assessing elimination patterns (e.g., elimination diary, patients history)
b. Implementing and evaluating interventions for bladder and bowel management (e.g., nutrition, exercise, pharmacological, adaptive equipment)
c. Teaching interventions to prevent complications (e.g., constipation, urinary tract infections, autonomic dysreflexia)
d. Providing patient and caregiver education related to bowel and bladder management
e. Using adaptive equipment and technology
Task 4: Apply the nursing process to optimize the individuals highest level of functional ability.
Knowledge of:
a. Anatomy, physiology, and interventions related to musculoskeletal, respiratory, cardiovascular, and neurological function
b. Assistive devices and technology (e.g., mobility aids, orthostatic devices, orthotic devices)
c. Clinical signs of sensorimotor deficits
d. Activity tolerance and energy conservation
e. Pharmacology (e.g., antispasmodics, vasopressors, analgesics)
f. Safety concerns (e.g., falls, burns, skin integrity, infection prevention)
g. Self-care activities (e.g., activities of daily living, instrumental activities of daily living)
Skill in:
a. Assessing and implementing interventions to prevent musculoskeletal, respiratory, cardiovascular, and neurological complications (e.g., motor and sensory impairments, contractures, heterotrophic ossification, aspiration, pain)
b. Assessing, implementing, and evaluating interventions for self-care ability and mobility
c. Implementing safety interventions (e.g., sitters, reorientation, environment, redirection, nonbehavioral restraints)
d. Using technology (e.g., mobility aids, pressure relief devices, informatics, assistive software)
e. Teaching interventions to prevent complications of immobility (e.g., skin integrity, DVT prevention)
Task 5: Apply the nursing process to optimize the individual's sleep and rest patterns.
Knowledge in:
a. Factors affecting sleep and rest (e.g., diet, sleep habits, alcohol, pain, environment)
b. Pharmacology
c. Physiology of sleep and rest cycles
d. Technology
Skill in:
a. Assessing sleep and rest patterns
b. Evaluating effectiveness of sleep and rest interventions
c. Teaching interventions and strategies to promote sleep and rest (e.g., energy conversation, environmental modifications)
d. Using technology (e.g., sleep study, CPAP, BiPAP, relaxation technology)
Task 6: Apply the nursing process to optimize the individual's neurological function.
Knowledge of:
a. Measurement tools (e.g., Rancho Los Amigos, Glasgow, Mini Mental State Examination, ASIA, pain analog scales)
b. Neuroanatomy and physiology (e.g., cognition, judgment, sensation, perception)
c. Pain (e.g., receptors, acute, chronic, theories)
d. Pharmacology
e. Safety concerns (e.g., seizure precautions, fall precautions, impaired judgment)
f. Technology
Skill in:
a. Assessing cognition, perception, sensation, apraxia, perseveration, and pain
b. Implementing and evaluating strategies for safety (e.g., personal response devices, alarms, helmets, padding)
c. Teaching strategies for neurological deficits
d. Teaching strategies for pain and comfort management (e.g., pharmacological, non-pharmacological)
e. Using technology (e.g., TENS unit, baclofen pump)
f. Implementing behavioral management strategies (e.g., contracts, positive reinforcement, rule setting)
Task 7: Apply the nursing process to promote the individuals optimal psychosocial patterns and holistic wellbeing.
Knowledge of:
a. Individual roles and relationships (e.g., cultural, environmental, societal, familial, gender, age)
b. Role alterations
c. Psychosocial disorders (e.g., substance abuse, anxiety, depression, bipolar, PTSD, psychosis)
d. Theories (e.g., self-concept, role, relationship, interaction, developmental, human behaviors)
e. Traditional and alternative modalities (e.g., medications, healing touch, botanicals)
f. Cultural competence
Skill in:
a. Assessing and promoting self-efficacy, self-care, and self-concept
b. Accessing supportive team resources and services (e.g., psychologist, clergy, peer support, community support)
c. Promoting strategies to cope with role and relationship changes (e.g., individual and caregiver counseling, peer support, education)
d. Including the individual and caregiver in the plan of care
e. Incorporating cultural and spiritual values
f. Promoting positive interaction among individual and caregivers
g. Evaluating the effects of values, belief systems, and spirituality of the individual
Task 8: Apply the nursing process to optimize coping and stress management skills of the individual and
caregivers.
Knowledge of:
a. Community resources (e.g., face-to-face support groups, internet, respite care, clergy)
b. Coping and stress management strategies for individuals and support systems
c. Cultural competence
d. Physiology of the stress response
e. Safety concerns regarding harm to self and others
f. Technology for self-management
g. Theories (e.g., developmental, coping, stress, grief and loss, self-esteem, self-concept)
h. Types of stress and stressors
i. Stages of grief and loss
Skill in:
a. Assessing potential for harm to self and others
b. Assessing the ability to cope and manage stress
c. Facilitating appropriate referrals
d. Implementing and evaluating strategies to reduce stress and Excellerate coping (e.g., biofeedback, cognitive behavioral therapy, complementary alternative medicine, pharmacology)
e. Using therapeutic communication
Task 9: Apply the nursing process to optimize the individual's ability to communicate effectively.
Knowledge of:
a. Anatomy and physiology (e.g., cognition, comprehension, sensory deficits)
b. Communication techniques (e.g., active listening, anger management, reflection)
c. Cultural competence
d. Developmental factors
e. Linguistic deficits (e.g., aphasia, dysarthria, language barriers)
f. Assistive technology and adaptive equipment
Skill in:
a. Assessing comprehension and communication (e.g., oral, written, auditory, visual)
b. Implementing and evaluating communication interventions
c. Involving and educating support systems
d. Using assistive technology and adaptive equipment
e. Using communication techniques
Domain III: The Function of the Rehabilitation Team and Community Reintegration (13%)
Task 1: Collaborate with the interdisciplinary/interprofessional team to achieve patient-
centered goals. Knowledge of:
a. Goal setting and expected outcomes (e.g., SMART goals, functional independence measures [FIM], WeeFIM)
b. Types of healthcare teams (e.g., interdisciplinary/ interprofessional, multidisciplinary, transdisciplinary)
c. Rehabilitation philosophy and definition
d. Roles and responsibilities of team members
e. Theory (e.g., change, leadership, communication, team function, organizational)
Skill in:
a. Advocating for inclusion of appropriate team members
b. Applying appropriate theories (e.g., change, leadership, communication, team function, organizational)
c. Communicating and collaborating with the interdisciplinary/ interprofessional team
d. Developing and documenting plans of care to attain patient-centered goals
Task 2: Apply the nursing process to promote the individual's community reintegration.
Knowledge of:
a. Technology and adaptive equipment (e.g., electronic hand-held devices, electrical simulation, service animals, equipment to support activities of daily living)
b. Community resources (e.g., housing, transportation, community support systems, social services, recreation, CPS, APS)
c. Personal resources (e.g., financial, caregiver support systems, caregivers, spiritual, cultural)
d. Professional resources (e.g., psychologist, neurologist, clergy, teacher, case manager, vocational rehabilitation counselor, home health, outpatient therapy)
e. Teaching and learning strategies for self-advocacy
Skill in:
a. Accessing community resources
b. Assessing readiness for discharge
c. Assessing barriers to community reintegration
d. Evaluating outcomes and adjusting goals (e.g., interdisciplinary/interprofessional team and patientcentered)
e. Identifying financial barriers and providing appropriate resources
f. Initiating referrals
g. Participating in team and patient caregiver conferences
h. Planning discharge (e.g., home visits, caregiver teaching)
i. Teaching health and wellness maintenance
j. Teaching life skills
k. Using adaptive equipment and technology (e.g., voice activated call systems, computer supported prosthetics)
Domain IV: Legislative, Economic, Ethical, and Legal Issues (23%)
Task 1: Integrate legislation and regulations to guide management of care.
Knowledge of:
a. Agencies related to regulatory, disability, and rehabilitation (e.g., CARF, The Joint Commission, APS, CPS, CMS, SSA, OSHA)
b. Specific legislation related to disability and rehabilitation (e.g., Medicare, Medicaid, ADA, rehabilitation acts, HIPAA, Affordable Care Act, workers compensation, IDEA, Vocational, IMPACT Act)
Skill in:
a. Accessing, interpreting, and applying legal, regulatory, and accreditation information
b. Using assessment, measurement, and reporting tools (e.g., functional independence measures [FIM], patient satisfaction, IRF-PAI)
Task 2: Use the nursing process to deliver cost effective patient-centered care.
Knowledge of:
a. Clinical practice guidelines
b. Community and public resources
c. Insurance and reimbursement (e.g., PPS, workers compensation)
d. Regulatory agency audit process
e. Staffing patterns and policies
f. Utilization review processes
Skill in:
a. Analyzing quality and utilization data
b. Collaborating with private, community, and public resources
c. Incorporating clinical practice guidelines
d. Managing current and projected resources in a cost effective manner
Task 3: Integrate ethical considerations and legal obligations that affect nursing practice.
Knowledge of:
a. Ethical theories and resources (e.g., deontology, ombudsperson, ethics committee)
b. Legal implications of healthcare related policies and documents (e.g., HIPAA, advance directives, powers of attorney, POLST/MOLST, informed consent)
Skill in:
a. Advocating for the individual
b. Documenting services provided
c. Identifying appropriate resources to assist with legal documents
d. Implementing strategies to resolve ethical dilemmas
e. Applying ethics in the delivery of care
Task 4: Integrate quality and safety in patient-centered care.
Knowledge of:
a. Quality measurement and performance improvement processes (e.g., Agency for Healthcare Research and Quality; Institute of Medicine; National Database of Nursing Quality Indicators)
b. Models and tools used in process improvement (e.g., Plan, Do, Check, Act; Six Sigma; Lean approach)
c. Federal quality measurement efforts
d. Reporting requirements (e.g., infection rates, healthcare acquired pressure injury, sentinel events, discharge to community, readmission rates)
Skill in:
a. Assessing safety risks
b. Minimizing safety risk factors
c. Implementing safety prevention measures
d. Utilizing assessment, measurement, and reporting tools (e.g., functional independence measurement; patient satisfaction)
e. Incorporating standards of professional performance

Certified Rehabilitation Registered Nurse
Medical Rehabilitation student
Killexams : Medical Rehabilitation student - BingNews https://killexams.com/pass4sure/exam-detail/CRRN Search results Killexams : Medical Rehabilitation student - BingNews https://killexams.com/pass4sure/exam-detail/CRRN https://killexams.com/exam_list/Medical Killexams : Top 10 rehabilitation residency programs, ranked by physicians

The University of Washington in Seattle offers the best clinical training in physical medicine and rehabilitation, according to Doximity's 2022 to 2023 Residency Navigator.

The ranking system, released July 25, gives medical students insights from physicians on residency programs nationwide and consists of over 300,000 reviews and ratings from more than 125,000 Checked residents and alumni. 

Physicians contribute nominations, ratings and handwritten reviews. Ratings comprise three major parts: current resident and exact alumni satisfaction data, reputation data, and objective data. 

Here are the top 10 residency programs for family medicine, based on reputation scores:

1. University of Washington (Seattle)

2. McGaw Medical Center of Northwestern University (Chicago)

3. Spaulding Rehabilitation Hospital/Harvard Medical School (Charlestown, Mass.)

4. UPMC Medical Education (Pittsburgh)

5. Rutgers Health/New Jersey Medical School (Newark)

6. Mayo Clinic College of Medicine and Science (Rochester, Minn.)

7. Baylor College of Medicine (Houston)

8. Icahn School of Medicine at Mount Sinai (New York City)

9. University of Texas Health Science Center at Houston

10. NewYork-Presbyterian Hospital Columbia and Cornell Campus (New York City)

Mon, 03 Oct 2022 08:50:00 -0500 en-gb text/html https://www.beckershospitalreview.com/rankings-and-ratings/top-10-rehabilitation-residency-programs-ranked-by-physicians.html
Killexams : MIT researchers seek to ‘see’ inside the body during rehab
MIT MuscleRehab system

[Image from MIT]

Researchers at the Massachusetts Institute of Technology (MIT) developed an unsupervised physical rehabilitation system.

MuscleRehab came from researchers at MIT’s Computer Science and Artificial Intelligence Laboratory (CSAIL) and Massachusetts General Hospital (MGH).

Together, they combined three ingredients: motion tracking, imaging and virtual reality (VR). The motion tracking captures motion activity. The electrical impedance tomography (EIT) imaging technique measures what muscles are doing. Finally, a VR headset and tracking suit lets users watch themselves perform alongside a physical therapist.

In a news release, MIT described its all-black tracking suit as “sleek” and “ninja-esque.” The VR captures 3D movement data. The user performs various exercises that measure the activity of their quadriceps, sartorius, hamstrings, and adductors.

The researchers provided two conditions in a virtual environment. Both featured exercise performance alongside a physical therapist. In the first situation, only motion tracking data overlays onto the patient avatar. In the second, the patient uses EIT sensing straps and they have all information for their motion and muscle engagement.

In comparing the exercise accuracy between both conditions, a professional therapist received the results and explained which muscle groups were supposed to be engaged during each of the exercises. By visualizing both muscle engagement and motion data instead of motion alone, the overall accuracy of exercises improved by 15%, MIT said.

The team also conducted a cross-comparison of how much time during the exercises the correct muscle group was triggered between the two conditions. By monitoring and recording most engagement data, physical therapists reported a “much better understanding” of the quality of the patient’s exercise. This helped to better evaluate their current regime and exercise based on the stats.

“We wanted our sensing scenario to not be limited to a clinical setting, to better enable data-driven unsupervised rehabilitation for athletes in injury recovery, patients currently in physical therapy, or those with physical limiting ailments, to ultimately see if we can assist with not only recovery, but perhaps prevention,” said Junyi Zhu, MIT CSAIL PhD student and lead author on a paper about MuscleRehab. “By actively measuring deep muscle engagement, we can observe if the data is abnormal compared to a patient’s baseline, to provide insight into the potential muscle trajectory.”

According to MIT, current sensing technologies mostly focus on tracking behaviors and heart rates. Zhu and the team aimed to find a better way to sense engagement in different layers of the muscles compared to electromyography (EMG). EMG only captures muscle activity right beneath the skin unless done invasively, MIT noted.

EIT, usually used for monitoring lung function, detecting chest tumors and diagnosing pulmonary embolism, hadn’t been used for this purpose before, Zhu found.

Now, the EIT sensing board serves as the “brains” behind the MuscleRehab system. Two straps filled with electrodes slip onto a user’s upper thigh to capture 3D volumetric data. Motion capturing, using OptiTrack, utilizes 39 markers and a handful of cameras to sense high frame rates per second. The data showed actively triggered muscles highlighted on the display, with a given muscle growing darker with more engagement.

Currently, MuscleRehab focuses on the upper thigh and the major muscle groups inside. The researchers aim to expand to the glutes.

“This work advances EIT, a sensing approach conventionally used in clinical settings, with an ingenious and unique combination with virtual reality,” said Yang Zhang, assistant professor in electrical & computer engineering, UCLA Samueli School of Engineering. “The enabled application that facilitates rehabilitation potentially has a wide impact across society to help patients conduct physical rehabilitation safely and effectively at home. Such tools to eliminate the need for clinical resources and personnel have long been needed for the lack of workforce in healthcare.”

Fri, 14 Oct 2022 04:23:00 -0500 Sean Whooley en-US text/html https://www.medicaldesignandoutsourcing.com/mit-researchers-seek-to-see-inside-the-body-during-rehab/
Killexams : Parents Demand Rehabilitation of 27 Forestry Students

John Shiklam in Kaduna

Parents of the 27 students of Federal College of Forestry Mechanisation, Afaka, Kaduna, who were freed on Wednesday after 56 days in kidnappers’ den, have called for the rehabilitation of their children to enable them to overcome possible post-traumatic stress disorder.

The parents, in a statement yesterday, also appealed to the federal government to aggressively pursue safe schooling as an agenda so as to provide parents the confidence to send their children to school.

The statement, jointly signed by the Chairman and Secretary of the Forum of Parents of Afaka Abducted Students, Abdullahi Usman and Catherine Saleh, respectively, urged the Minister of Environment, Dr. Mohammad Mahmood Abubakar, and the management of the school, to ensure that all the students are rehabilitated to live a normal life and continue with their education.

“The journey is not yet over because our children will definitely require rehabilitation to overcome the trauma that accompanies such ugly experiences,” the parents said.
They prayed for the repose of the soul of one of the parents, Malam Ibrahim, who died as a result of the trauma from the abduction of his daughter.

The statement also prayed for the souls of the five students of Greenfield University, Kaduna, who were killed by their abductors and asked God to grant the remaining students’ speedy release.
“We call on the government to get more serious and aggressively pursue safe schooling as a pertinent agenda so as to provide parents the confidence to send their children to school because if the schools remain as porous as they now are, many may not find it worth the trouble to enrol their children in schools anymore,” the parents added.

The statement expressed gratitude to former President Olusegun Obasanjo, former military Head of State, Gen. Abubakar Abdulsalami (rtd); Sheikh Ahmad Gumi and the Provost of the Forestry College, Dr Usman Bello, as well as other Nigerians and the media for their roles in securing the release of the students.

The parents added that although 39 students were abducted, two of them escaped while the bandits released 10, leaving 27 in captivity.
“First and foremost, it is pertinent for us to effect an important correction on the number of the released students.

“They are 27, not 29, as reported by some media. The total abducted students were 39, out of which two escaped not long after the abduction.
“Ten of them were released in two batches of five each, leaving the remaining 27, who were released yesterday, Wednesday, May 5, 2021, after 56 days of their abduction”, the statement said.
It added that on arrival in Kaduna on Wednesday, the students were taken to the Police College Clinic for medical checkup.

“We, as parents, made several efforts to secure the release of the students. We even took our peaceful march to the National Assembly on Tuesday, 4th May, 2021, presented our plight and prayed for the intervention of the lawmakers in securing the release of our children.

“We are grateful that we did not leave any stone unturned on the path to where we have arrived today.
“We most especially register our immense gratitude to former Presidents Olusegun Obasanjo, Abubakar Abdulsalami, Sheikh Ahmad Gumi and the Provost of the College, Dr Usman, for the various roles they played in securing the release of our children.

“We appreciate immensely the students and staff of the Institution for their relentless solidarity.
“We call on the government to get more serious and aggressively pursue safe schooling as a pertinent agenda so as to provide parents the confidence to send their children to school because if the schools remain as security porous as they now are, many may not find it worth the trouble to enrol their children in schools anymore”, the statement said.
Usman also told THISDAY in an interview that the students were expected to be handed over to their parents yesterday, but the event was postponed till today.

Sat, 15 Oct 2022 12:00:00 -0500 en-US text/html https://www.thisdaylive.com/index.php/2021/05/07/parents-demand-rehabilitation-of-27-forestry-students/
Killexams : Fake student disability scheme | Ex-husband of former Georgia state employee pleads guilty to stealing $1.3M © Provided by WXIA-TV Atlanta

The ex-husband of a former state of Georgia employee recently pleaded guilty to a sophisticated embezzlement scheme in which the two walked away with over 1.3 million, according to prosecutors.

The 40-year-old man was formerly married to a Georgia Vocational Rehabilitation Agency counselor accused of creating fake students with non-existent disabilities and forging educational records to steal the funds. 

The two are facing charges for forging medical, education and financial reports, exploiting state resources and taxpayers and keeping funds from vulnerable Georgians working toward their goals, according to a news release.

“Their greedy actions also impact every taxpayer,” Keri Farley, special agent in charge of FBI Atlanta, said in a news release. “The FBI, alongside our law enforcement partners, will continue to work tirelessly to hold accountable those who steal taxpayer funds.”

RELATED: Former state of Georgia employee charged in elaborate scheme to steal $1.3 million, FBI says

According to investigators, the scheming duo conspired to steal money from the agency between May 2016 through November 2020. They claimed educational expenses for around 13 fakes students, using the names of actual friends and relatives. These supposed students suffered from disabilities or illnesses like AIDS, cancer, psychosocial impairments or muscular dystrophy, law enforcement said.

Using photo-editing software, the two also altered authentic college transcripts, financial aid reports and proofs of registration to support their claims for the fake students. The supposed students attended popular in-state institutions like Georgia Tech, Georgia State University and the University of Georgia. The two uploaded the fake documentation into GVRA’s electronic database. 

Throughout the scheme, the two prompted over 230 checks to be mailed to the 13 friends and relatives, which were actually directed to post office boxes in the former couple’s names. The two would either deposit the checks into their bank accounts or ask the friends or relatives’, whose names they used, to cash the checks to be funneled back to the former couple, investigators said.

The woman left the GVRA in March 2019 but continued their scheme for more than a year longer. She used the funds to pay for cars, jewelry, high-end guitars and even a down payment on a new home, according to prosecutors. 

Since his arrest, the man has pleaded guilty to a charge of criminal information with one count of conspiracy to commit federal program theft. Meantime, the woman pleaded guilty to one count of conspiracy to commit federal program theft on Sept. 1.

Tue, 04 Oct 2022 06:27:37 -0500 en-US text/html https://www.msn.com/en-us/news/crime/fake-student-disability-scheme-ex-husband-of-former-georgia-state-employee-pleads-guilty-to-stealing-1-3m/ar-AA12Bidz
Killexams : West Ottawa High School students fundraise for classmate recovering after crash

'He's a good friend to have'; West Ottawa High School students fundraise for classmate recovering after crash

UP NEXT

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A West Ottawa High School student is still in the hospital after a car crash last month. His mom says he's on the road to recovery, and his friends are showing their support to help get him there. 

16-year-old Sam Smalldon is a junior in school, as well as a football and baseball player. Jill Smalldon, his mother, says he's making good progress at Mary Free Bed Rehabilitation Hospital. 

His friends hope to soon see him enjoying some of his favorite things, like fishing and spike ball. 

"It's a long road, that's for sure. It's a lesson in patience," Jill says.

The crash happened on Sept. 9 in Park Township. Sam was driving and lost control of his car, hitting some trees. He was in critical condition and suffered multiple skull fractures, two brain bleeds, as well as broken bones and bruises.

"He's actually doing well, given the circumstances. He has multiple therapies throughout the day, physical and occupational and music and speech and all of that," Jill says.

After surgeries and therapy, Sam is now minimally conscious. He's not able to communicate verbally but he can follow commands.

Jill says he was able to take some steps a few days ago.

"It's been a five week journey, sometimes feels like it's been six months already, to me," she says. "The support and the follow up is much appreciated."

"He's a good friend to have. He's nice all around," Tyler Kastens, a junior at the high school, says.

He's a friend of Sam's, as well as a teammate on the baseball team. But what they really enjoy is playing spike ball on the beach during summer.

That was the inspiration to this weekend's spike ball tournament at the high school to raise money for Sam's medical bills. 

Tyler also wants to raise awareness on safe driving for teenagers.

"Maybe driving fast is kind of fun, but when stuff like this happens, it can change in an instant, like anything can happen to anybody at any time," he says.

All of his friends are looking forward to Sam's recovery.

"I want to just see him again see him when he's fully recovered and just like meet the old Sam again," Carson Morely, a junior at the high school, says.

"Then hopefully, he'll be playing spike ball again with me," Tyler says.

The tournament starts at 11 a.m. Saturday, Oct. 15. It'll be at the field behind the West Ottawa High School's south campus building. While only students in the district can play, anyone is encouraged to come by and show their support.

They'll be taking cash and mobile app donations at the tournament, as well as directing those interested to the family's GoFundMe page.

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Fri, 14 Oct 2022 15:52:00 -0500 en-US text/html https://www.msn.com/en-us/lifestyle/parenting/west-ottawa-high-school-students-fundraise-for-classmate-recovering-after-crash/ar-AA12YAWs
Killexams : Senators call for stronger rules for students with disabilities

Two Democratic senators urged the Education Department on Wednesday to strengthen regulations against quietly excluding kids from class because of behaviors related to a disability — a practice known as informal removal.

Since the pandemic began, parents of children with disabilities say the practice is on the rise, denying their kids the legal right to an education. Disability rights advocates and legal experts say the removals likely circumvent protections for these children, who are not supposed to be disciplined because of their disability.

In a report Tuesday, the Associated Press and the Hechinger Report documented the effect of these informal removals on children and families. In interviews with 20 families in 10 states, parents said they were called repeatedly, sometimes less than an hour into the school day, to pick up their children. Some said they left work so frequently they lost their jobs.

The Education Department in May said it intended to strengthen protections for students with disabilities. It’s considering regulatory amendments to Section 504 of the Rehabilitation Act of 1973, which protects people from being discriminated against based on their disability.

The department also issued guidance to schools in July advising against discriminatory practices in discipline for students with disabilities. That guidance defined informal removals as an action taken by school staff in response to a child’s behavior that removes the child for part or all of the school day, or even indefinitely.

In a letter to the Education Department, U.S. Sens. Richard J. Durbin and Tammy Duckworth, both Democrats from Illinois, urged that the practice be formally defined in regulation and included as a form of prohibited, discriminatory action.

“Informal removals not only restrict children’s personal growth and decrease their likelihood of graduating, but they also are discriminatory,” the letter said. “Federal and state laws and regulations, including Section 504, were intended to eliminate the segregation of students with disabilities.”

Students are protected by federal law from being repeatedly taken out of the classroom for disability-related behaviors. After 10 suspensions, families of disabled children are entitled to a review of whether the behaviors are a result of the child’s disability. If so, schools are supposed to make adjustments, such as providing additional accommodations or considering a change in placement.

But when the removals are not recorded, those protections are not always triggered, and families may not know they have recourse. The department’s July guidance made clear students who are informally removed have the same rights as those who are officially suspended, including to the review process.

The senators noted formal removals, such as documented suspensions and expulsions, lead to a loss of 11 million instructional hours per year. Many schools have promised to cut down on suspensions, since kids can’t learn as well when they aren’t in class.

But because informal removals are not recorded, the full scope of their effect on children remains unclear.

“In some cases, informal removals may result in students with disabilities missing months and even years of classroom instruction,” the senators wrote. “Missing school also deprives children of other important services, such as access to free lunch, referrals to outside services, medical care, evaluation services, access to a library and playground, extracurricular activities, and a sense of community and belonging.”

Wed, 05 Oct 2022 11:13:00 -0500 en-US text/html https://www.latimes.com/world-nation/story/2022-10-05/senators-call-for-stronger-rules-on-off-the-books-suspension
Killexams : Sensor tech visualizes the inner structure of the body during physical rehab

Around three quarters of years lived with disability are conditions that could benefit from physical rehabilitation—but there aren't enough physical therapists (PT) to go around. The growing need is racing alongside population growth, and aging as well as higher rates of severe ailments, even within the same age group, are contributing to the problem.

An upsurge in sensor-based techniques, such as on-body motion sensors, has provided some autonomy and precision for patients. Still, the minimalist watches and rings largely rely on motion data, therefore lacking the more holistic picture a PT pieces together, including muscle engagement and tension, in addition to movement.

This muscle-motion language barrier, so to speak, prompted the creation of an unsupervised system, MuscleRehab by researchers from MIT's Computer Science and Artificial Intelligence Laboratory (CSAIL) and Massachusetts General Hospital (MGH). There's three ingredients: motion tracking that captures—you guessed it—motion activity, an called Electrical Impedance Tomography (EIT) that measures what the muscles are up to, and a (VR) headset and tracking suit that lets you watch yourself perform alongside a physical therapist.

For patients, they simply put on the sleek ninja esq-all black tracking suit and VR that captures 3D movement data, and then perform various exercises such as lunges, knee bends, deadlifts, leg raises, knee extensions, squats, fire hydrants, and bridges that measure activity of quadriceps, sartorius, hamstrings, and adductors.

In the virtual environment, patients were given two conditions. In both cases their avatar performs alongside a physical therapist. In the first situation, just the motion tracking data is overlaid onto their patient avatar. In the second situation, the patient puts on the EIT sensing straps, and then they have all the information of the motion and the muscle engagement.

With these two conditions, the team compared the exercise accuracy and handed the results to a professional therapist, who explained which muscle groups were supposed to be engaged during each of the exercises. By visualizing both muscle engagement and motion data during these unsupervised exercises instead of just motion alone, the overall accuracy of exercises improved by fifteen percent.

The team then did a cross comparison of how much time during the exercises the correct muscle group got triggered between the two conditions. In the condition where we show the muscle engagement data in real time, that's the feedback. By monitoring and recording the most engagement data, the PT's reported a much better understanding of the quality of the patient's exercise, and that it helped to better evaluate their current regime and exercise based on those stats.

"We wanted our sensing scenario to not be limited to a , to better enable data-driven unsupervised rehabilitation for athletes in injury recovery, patients currently in physical therapy, or those with physical limiting ailments, to ultimately see if we can assist with not only recovery, but perhaps prevention, says says Junyi Zhu, MIT CSAIL Ph.D. student and lead author on a paper about MuscleRehab. "By actively measuring deep muscle engagement, we can observe if the data is abnormal compared to a patient's baseline, to provide insight into the potential muscle trajectory."

Credit: MIT Computer Science & Artificial Intelligence Lab

Inside MuscleRehab's core

Current sensing technologies focus mostly on tracking behaviors and heart rates, but Zhu was interested in finding a better way than Electromyography (EMG) to sense the engagement (blood flow, stretching, contracting) of different layers of the muscles. EMG only captures muscle activity right beneath the skin, unless it's done invasively.

Zhu's been digging into the realm of personal health-sensing devices for some time now. He'd been inspired by using EIT, which measures electrical conductivity of muscles, for his project in 2021 that used the non-invasive imaging technique to create a toolkit for designing and fabricating health and motion sensing devices. To his knowledge, EIT, which is usually used for monitoring lung function, detecting chest tumors, and diagnosing pulmonary embolism, hadn't been done before.

With MuscleRehab, the EIT sensing board serves as the "brains" behind the system. It's accompanied by two straps filled with electrodes that are slipped onto a user's upper thigh to capture 3D volumetric data. The motion capturing—they used "OptiTrack"—uses 39 markers and a bunch of cameras that sense super high frame rates per second. The EIT sensing data showed actively triggered muscles highlighted on the display, and a given muscle would become darker with more engagement.

Currently, MuscleRehab focuses on the upper thigh and the major groups inside, but down the line they'd like to expand to the glutes. The team is also exploring potential avenues in using EIT in radiotherapy in collaboration with Piotr Zygmanski, medical physicist at the Brigham and Women's Hospital and Dana-Farber Cancer Institute and Associate Professor of Radiation at Harvard Medical School.

"We are exploring utilization of electrical fields and currents for detection of radiation as well as for imaging of the of dielectric properties of patient anatomy during radiotherapy treatment, or as a result of the treatment," says Dr. Zygmanski. "Radiation induces currents inside tissues and cells and other media (for instance detectors) in addition to making direct damage at the molecular level ( DNA damage). We have found the EIT instrumentation developed by the MIT team to be particularly suitable for exploring such novel applications of EIT in radiotherapy. We are hoping that with the customization of the electronic parameters of the EIT system we can achieve these goals."

"This work advances EIT, a sensing approach conventionally used in clinical settings, with an ingenious and unique combination with virtual reality," says Yang Zhang, Assistant Professor in Electrical & Computer Engineering, UCLA Samueli School of Engineering who was not involved in the paper. "The enabled application that facilitates rehabilitation potentially has a wide impact across society to help patients conduct physical rehabilitation safely and effectively at home. Such tools to eliminate the need for clinical resources and personnel have long been needed for the lack of workforce in health care."



Provided by MIT Computer Science & Artificial Intelligence Lab

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Fri, 07 Oct 2022 03:23:00 -0500 en text/html https://medicalxpress.com/news/2022-10-sensor-tech-visualizes-body-physical.html
Killexams : DFW Healthcare Brief: Nanoscope Therapeutics’ New HQ and Kindred Hospital’s New Rehab Unit

Kindred Hospital Dallas Central opened a new rehabilitation unit inside the hospital that began accepting patients August 22. The 14-bed unit will focus on caring for adults who have experienced a loss of function or disability due to injury or illness and features a gym, rehab equipment, and private rooms.


Nanoscope Therapeutics Inc., a clinical-stage biotechnology company developing gene therapies for retinal degenerative diseases, moved ints headquarters from Bedford to Trinity Towers near the Dallas Medical District. The company currently has multiple therapies in advanced clinical trials working to restore sight to the blind and has received significant cash injections in exact years.


Scottish Rite for Children is a winner in the annual NRC Health Excellence in Patient Experience Awards, which recognizes hospitals for quality care. It is the second year the health system has won the award, and is one of eight organizations to receive the honor this year. The ratings are based on patient surveys. NRC Health is a healthcare data analytics company that help providers Excellerate the quality of their care.


Researchers at the  University of North Texas BioDiscovery Institute have been awarded a $1.4 million grant from the W.M. Keck Foundation to develop pharmaceuticals derived from fungus in plant hosts to create more environmentally sustainable medicine. The hope of the program is to develop drugs that could be delivered in seed form with less processing.


The University of North Texas Health Science Center at Fort Worth will have its first class of students in its

Bachelor of Science in Biomedical Sciences program. The completely online program is an affordable and accessible option for students who have completed 60 hours of core credits to finish their bachelor degree. The accelerated 8-week semesters and asynchronous classes allow students to go as fast or as slow as they please.

Author

Will Maddox

Will is the managing editor for D CEO magazine and the editor of D CEO Healthcare. He's written about healthcare…

Mon, 03 Oct 2022 10:15:00 -0500 en-US text/html https://www.dmagazine.com/healthcare-business/2022/10/dfw-healthcare-brief-nanoscope-therapeutics-new-hq-and-kindred-hospitals-new-rehab-unit/
Killexams : Connect2MyDoctor Inks Pact With University of Sharjah, Opens Office in Dubai

MELBOURNE, Australia, October 17, 2022--(BUSINESS WIRE)--Connect2MyDoctor, the comprehensive virtual care platform which has firmly established itself as a leading online healthcare service provider in Asia and Middle East, has signed a Memorandum of Understanding (MoU) with the University of Sharjah to exchange scientific and medical expertise.

The institutions have agreed to collaborate on research activities that will extend to areas such as data collection, analysis and joint submissions to journals, conferences and scientific venues.

The agreement says tele-rehabilitation of identified patients will happen through Connect2MyDoctor’s OmniROM module. This will enable physiotherapists to remotely monitor and measure a patient’s recovery/rehabilitation.

"We are delighted to have signed this MoU of great significance with Connect2MyDoctor. The two institutions will be working together to broaden the scope of health care research and also advance our educational objectives. We are confident that the partnership will help to provide optimal training programs for students and the well-being of patients. Exploring opportunities to contribute to local health development will be a key aspect of our collaboration," said Prof. Mohamad Alameddine, Dean of College of Health Sciences at the University of Sharjah.

Connect2MyDoctor recently opened its regional headquarters in Dubai to cater the offerings in Remote Patient Management, Home Care, Tele Rehabilitation and more for the region.

Speaking about the company’s plans, Mr. Pramod Kutty, CEO & Co-Founder, said, "This MoU with the University of Sharjah is a significant step for us. We are confident that we will be able to serve the healthcare needs of the region most optimally by utilising our technology capabilities."

About Connect2MyDoctor: Connect2MyDoctor enables healthcare providers to unleash the power of Digital Health. We are democratising the healthcare experience and providing healthcare providers with tools and capabilities in providing better health outcomes. We work with some of the leading multi and super speciality hospitals across the Asia Pacific and the Middle East. Since our launch in 2016, we have helped patients from over 15+ countries access specialists through private and secure virtual consultations. Headquartered in Melbourne the company has local office in India and Dubai. In the region, Connect2MyDoctor works with REEM Hospitals, VPS Group, LifeWorks, FAHR, Royal Bahrain Hospital, Royal Women and Children Hospital, Ithmaar Bank, KIMS Group among others. Connect2MyDoctor is funded by Artesian Investments and private investors from Singapore.

View source version on businesswire.com: https://www.businesswire.com/news/home/20221012005658/en/

Contacts

Manju Cimani
+919986075756
manjucimani@cocoatreecommunications.in

Sun, 16 Oct 2022 17:00:00 -0500 en-US text/html https://www.yahoo.com/now/connect2mydoctor-inks-pact-university-sharjah-050000020.html
Killexams : UH Students to Learn ‘Healing Power of Music’
music therapy

The University of Houston is adding a new degree program focused on the healing power of music. The Bachelor of Music Therapy is a four-year degree program, plus a six-month internship, that will provide graduates a foundation in music as well as clinical experiences enabling them to work in a variety of settings including hospitals, school districts, private practice and other capacities.

Music therapy is an allied health profession that utilizes evidence-based, therapeutic music interventions to affect changes in neurological, physiological or psychological health. Research shows using music as a therapeutic tool can promote wellness, manage stress, alleviate pain, enhance memory, help express feelings, Excellerate communication, promote physical rehabilitation and more.

“This innovative new program will combine research and clinical skills to develop leading clinician-researchers and prepare them to define the scientific connections between music and the human experience,” said Robert McPherson, interim senior vice president for academic affairs and provost.

Research commissioned by the Kathrine G. McGovern College of the Arts found student demand for a music therapy degree in Texas grew faster than demand for other bachelor’s degrees (6.1% to 3.2%). Nationally, demand for a music therapy degree grew more than 11% over the past seven years.

When it comes to job opportunities, Houston employs among the most music therapists in the country. However, demand is outpacing the number graduating from degree programs nationwide. In 2018, there were nearly 10-times as many music therapy-related job postings as music therapy degrees conferred.

“Adding the music therapy degree aligns with our existing strengths in music studies and arts and health. The program will provide students with access to renowned faculty and musical experiences that will serve as a platform for understanding the use of music as a therapeutic tool,” said Andrew Davis, dean of the Kathrine G. McGovern College of the Arts.

The new program is projected to start in fall 2023, pending the hiring of a program director. An anonymous $1 million gift helped establish an endowed professorship to support a full-time, tenure-track faculty member who will serve as the program’s director, lead research and teach courses. The director will hold a joint appointment in the Kathrine G. McGovern College of the Arts and the Tilman J. Fertitta Family College of Medicine. The gift will have a total impact of $3.5 million with matching funds from the “$100 Million Challenge” and the state of Texas.

“We expect to attract high quality students and faculty, offer clinical services to the community, and expand the use of music therapy as a tool for a variety of health care and social settings,” said Steven Block, interim director of the Moores School of Music.

Currently, five other Texas universities offer music therapy degrees, but UH will have a distinct advantage through its collaboration with the Tilman J. Fertitta Family College of Medicine and its proximity to the Texas Medical Center. These relationships ensure the ability to utilize expert clinicians as a part of its teaching workforce and to provide prime opportunities for student internship placements in some of the nation’s leading health care institutions.

“The collaboration between the two colleges will benefit both music therapy majors and students of other health care disciplines through the Fertitta Family College of Medicine’s commitment to community medicine and to the health and well-being of our population,” said Dr. Stephen Spann, founding dean of the Tilman J. Fertitta Family College of Medicine, who noted that after graduation, students may apply for board certification from the American Music Therapy Association.

The new program was approved by the Texas Higher Education Coordinating Board in September, following approval by the UH System Board of Regents in May.


Tue, 04 Oct 2022 06:35:00 -0500 Chris Stipes en text/html https://www.uh.edu/news-events/stories/2022-news-articles/october-2022/10042022-music-therapy.php
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