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Killexams : Medical Technician VCE exam - BingNews https://killexams.com/pass4sure/exam-detail/DTR Search results Killexams : Medical Technician VCE exam - BingNews https://killexams.com/pass4sure/exam-detail/DTR https://killexams.com/exam_list/Medical Killexams : EMS Training

Ella Chiasson works on treating a patient as students in the Emergency Medical Technician Initial Basic Training class at New London Adult & Continuing Education work on an emergency drill at the school Wednesday, Aug. 3, 2022. This is the final week of the seven-week course that typically sees mainly high school and college students taking the class for credit or to work with various local departments, said Steve Christina, Instructor of Emergency Training Services. “We wanted to get them out of the classroom, into the field today,” he said of the staged mass casualty incident. Students were working on using triage, treatment and transportation skills in preparation for the National Registry of Emergency Medical Technicians exam on Saturday, Aug. 6, 2022. (Sarah Gordon/The Day)

Jillian Vichi, left, and Falens Joseph work on putting a patient on a backboard as students in the Emergency Medical Technician Initial Basic Training class at New London Adult & Continuing Education work on an emergency drill at the school Wednesday, Aug. 3, 2022. This is the final week of the seven-week course that typically sees mainly high school and college students taking the class for credit or to work with various local departments, said Steve Christina, Instructor of Emergency Training Services. “We wanted to get them out of the classroom, into the field today,” he said of the staged mass casualty incident. Students were working on using triage, treatment and transportation skills in preparation for the National Registry of Emergency Medical Technicians exam on Saturday, Aug. 6, 2022. (Sarah Gordon/The Day)

Lily Zhang talks to classmates about treatments as students in the Emergency Medical Technician Initial Basic Training class at New London Adult & Continuing Education work on an emergency drill at the school Wednesday, Aug. 3, 2022. This is the final week of the seven-week course that typically sees mainly high school and college students taking the class for credit or to work with various local departments, said Steve Christina, Instructor of Emergency Training Services. “We wanted to get them out of the classroom, into the field today,” he said of the staged mass casualty incident. Students were working on using triage, treatment and transportation skills in preparation for the National Registry of Emergency Medical Technicians exam on Saturday, Aug. 6, 2022. (Sarah Gordon/The Day)

Katie Kydd works on treating a mannequin, as students in the Emergency Medical Technician Initial Basic Training class at New London Adult & Continuing Education work on an emergency drill at the school Wednesday, Aug. 3, 2022. This is the final week of the seven-week course that typically sees mainly high school and college students taking the class for credit or to work with various local departments, said Steve Christina, Instructor of Emergency Training Services. “We wanted to get them out of the classroom, into the field today,” he said of the staged mass casualty incident. Students were working on using triage, treatment and transportation skills in preparation for the National Registry of Emergency Medical Technicians exam on Saturday, Aug. 6, 2022. (Sarah Gordon/The Day)

Drew Sager works on triaging patients, as students in the Emergency Medical Technician Initial Basic Training class at New London Adult & Continuing Education work on an emergency drill at the school Wednesday, Aug. 3, 2022. This is the final week of the seven-week course that typically sees mainly high school and college students taking the class for credit or to work with various local departments, said Steve Christina, Instructor of Emergency Training Services. “We wanted to get them out of the classroom, into the field today,” he said of the staged mass casualty incident. Students were working on using triage, treatment and transportation skills in preparation for the National Registry of Emergency Medical Technicians exam on Saturday, Aug. 6, 2022. (Sarah Gordon/The Day)

Anna Limburg, left, and Katie Kydd work on setting up oxygen tanks for patients, as students in the Emergency Medical Technician Initial Basic Training class at New London Adult & Continuing Education work on an emergency drill at the school Wednesday, Aug. 3, 2022. This is the final week of the seven-week course that typically sees mainly high school and college students taking the class for credit or to work with various local departments, said Steve Christina, Instructor of Emergency Training Services. “We wanted to get them out of the classroom, into the field today,” he said of the staged mass casualty incident. Students were working on using triage, treatment and transportation skills in preparation for the National Registry of Emergency Medical Technicians exam on Saturday, Aug. 6, 2022. (Sarah Gordon/The Day)

Chris Mandelburg works on preparing a patient for treatment, as students in the Emergency Medical Technician Initial Basic Training class at New London Adult & Continuing Education work on an emergency drill at the school Wednesday, Aug. 3, 2022. This is the final week of the seven-week course that typically sees mainly high school and college students taking the class for credit or to work with various local departments, said Steve Christina, Instructor of Emergency Training Services. “We wanted to get them out of the classroom, into the field today,” he said of the staged mass casualty incident. Students were working on using triage, treatment and transportation skills in preparation for the National Registry of Emergency Medical Technicians exam on Saturday, Aug. 6, 2022. (Sarah Gordon/The Day)

Students in the Emergency Medical Technician Initial Basic Training class at New London Adult & Continuing Education work on an emergency drill outside the school Wednesday, Aug. 3, 2022. This is the final week of the seven-week course that typically sees mainly high school and college students taking the class for credit or to work with various local departments, said Steve Christina, Instructor of Emergency Training Services. “We wanted to get them out of the classroom, into the field today,” he said of the staged mass casualty incident. Students were working on using triage, treatment and transportation skills in preparation for the National Registry of Emergency Medical Technicians exam they are taking on Saturday, Aug. 6, 2022.

Wed, 03 Aug 2022 10:43:00 -0500 en-US text/html https://www.theday.com/local-news/20220803/ems-training/
Killexams : At 15, she knew heart disease lurked in her genes. At 37, it caught up to this mom.

When a medical technician demonstrating to a high school class how to check blood pressure asked for a volunteer, 15-year-old Katie Moegenberg got the nod.

The man took the reading, then told her, "Whoa, your blood pressure is kind of high. We'll need to tell your parents."

A doctor's visit confirmed she had high blood pressure, also called hypertension. A cardiologist said it was likely genetic.

Katie's paternal grandfather died of a massive heart attack at age 38. An uncle had his first heart attack at age 25; he later died from a heart attack at age 52.

Katie was put on medication and told to see a primary care physician and cardiologist annually. That's all the advice she remembers getting.

In her late teens, Katie started experiencing what she thought were fierce bouts of anxiety. She often felt physically tense, with burning in her shoulders and neck and a feeling of impending doom.

In her 20s and early 30s, she frequently had what seemed like panic attacks. These resulted in dozens of trips to the emergency room. Each time, the diagnosis was always the same: anxiety.

As a young woman who appeared healthy, Katie felt that doctors were not taking her symptoms seriously. Along the way, she became a licensed practical nurse and worked in a hospital.

"I knew something was not right with me," she said. "I felt like they were thinking, 'Here she goes again.'"

In December 2019, Katie, then 37 and living in Suffolk, Virginia, was feeling particularly tired and out of sorts.

She had stopped working several years earlier to raise a family. She had two children of her own and helped raise two others from her second husband, Matthew Moegenberg.

That winter, she had been dieting to shed a few pounds, but the scale didn't budge. She also had what she thought was indigestion, even though antacids didn't provide any relief.

If she felt particularly stressed, her chest hurt. The pain subsided when she relaxed. For several months, she had episodes of escalating chest pain and nausea, but they always went away.

"You just had a stress test the previous year, and it was fine," her primary care doctor told her. "I think you're just having anxiety and indigestion."

Katie wasn't convinced, but she also wanted to believe it was nothing worse.

One day in March 2020, she woke up feeling more pressure on her heart than ever before. It was as if the muscle was cramping. She again felt nauseous and went to her cardiologist's office.

After 2 minutes of administering a treadmill stress test, the doctor stopped it.

"Your main artery is blocked, and you need to go to the hospital now," he told her. He said she was not having a heart attack, but one was likely on its way.

At the hospital, the cardiologist told Katie that one of her heart's arteries was 99% blocked and that the blockage was too tight to insert a stent. She needed emergency open-heart surgery.

"I can't do it," she said to the doctor.

"You're not going to make it if you don't," he told her.

Matthew arrived to find Katie wracked with fear. Through tears, she asked him to take care of the children.

"Everything's going to be fine," he told her. Although now two years later, he admits that "in the back of my mind, I didn't believe it."

Katie underwent a bypass operation to restore blood flow to her heart. When she woke up the next day, COVID-19 pandemic restrictions had just gone into place, which meant she could not have visitors.

After a week in the hospital, Katie went home to recover.

"It was the hardest thing I've ever been through," she said. "Not only was it painful, but I had a lot of guilt that I did this to myself and anger toward doctors. But as time went on and my body started going back to normal – my new normal – my feelings turned more toward gratitude."

Katie said it took about half a year to feel like herself again. Because of the pandemic, she couldn't do in-person physical therapy. So she slowly increased her physical activities on her own.

She also drastically changed her lifestyle. She quit smoking and cleaned up her diet, cutting out red meat, snack foods and sodas.

However, in part because of the heart medication she was on, she gained 80 pounds within a year, straining her heart. This past March, she had gastric bypass surgery.

She's now lost most of the weight she had gained, and her blood pressure is under control. She eats a strict diet of lean protein and vegetables. For exercise, she walks, swims and lifts weights.

"I don't have panic attacks or that tense feeling in my body anymore," she said. "That feels amazing."

It's probably not a coincidence that fixing her heart solved her anxiety. Doctors said the panicky sensations likely were caused by her body working on overdrive to compensate for her heart condition.

Matthew jokes that now he's the one with anxiety.

"I don't want her out without me," he said. "I'm always saying, 'Where are you going, what are you doing? Don't lift this, don't lift that.' One thing it did teach me is that not one thing in life is guaranteed."

Katie hopes that women especially will remember to take care of themselves along with taking care of others.

"Heart disease is the No. 1 killer of women, and you don't have to be old to have it," she said. "I am certainly an example of that. Now I am thankful every single day that I'm here."

Stories From the Heart chronicles the inspiring journeys of heart disease and stroke survivors, caregivers and advocates.

If you have questions or comments about this American Heart Association News story, please email editor@heart.org.

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HEALTH CARE DISCLAIMER: This site and its services do not constitute the practice of medical advice, diagnosis or treatment. Always talk to your health care provider for diagnosis and treatment, including your specific medical needs. If you have or suspect that you have a medical problem or condition, please contact a qualified health care professional immediately. If you are in the United States and experiencing a medical emergency, call 911 or call for emergency medical help immediately.

Fri, 29 Jul 2022 06:04:00 -0500 en-US text/html https://www.ctpost.com/news/article/At-15-she-knew-heart-disease-lurked-in-her-17338106.php
Killexams : Medical professionals discuss opioid use disorder in area

By Rodrigo Hernandez 

State Senator Robert Peters (D-13th) introduced a recently passed law that allows medical professionals to get more fentanyl test strips for individuals who use opioids. The law supports the Overdose Prevention and Harm Reduction Act of 2019. The State also now requires that medical offices allow only designated employees such as physician assistants and advanced practice registered nurses to access medical supplies. Gov. JB Pritzker signed the bill into law June 9.

HB 4556 promotes getting test strips into the hands of any Illinoisan who needs them to detect the presence of fentanyl and prevent accidental overdose deaths.

“This reform will help save lives,” Peters said. “We still have a long way to go, but removing penalties organizations face when they have access to test strips is a responsible way to address the opioid crisis and to create real public safety for all instead of continuing the misguided policies of the past.”

Medical staff from the Chicago Department Public Health (CDPH) and an assistant professor of pharmacy practice discussed opioid use disorder and the effects of providing additional fentanyl test strips.

Wilnise Jasmin, MD, CDPH medical director of behavioral health, defined fentanyl as “a type of synthetic opioid that is a prescription medication and is also illicitly manufactured in unregulated settings,” noting that fentanyl is approximately 50 to 100 times more potent than heroin and morphine, making it highly addictive. 

Reversing fentanyl overdose

She stressed that fentanyl can be lethal. “Its high potency can easily cause a person to experience an overdose and die from an overdose,” said Jasmin, adding that, if administered in time, naloxone or Narcan is effective in reversing a fentanyl overdose.

Sarah Richardson, grants research specialist in CDPH’s office of substance use, explained CDPH’s role and current initiatives, noting the department is investing in programs to address substance use disorder, including activities that address harm reduction for opioid use. Richardson also noted CDPH offers harm reduction interventions to prevent opioid overdose. 

“CDPH distributes naloxone, the opioid overdose reversal medication, to community partners and individuals citywide,” she said. “We partner with Chicago Public Library to make Narcan (naloxone) available at libraries in communities most impacted by overdose.”

CDPH offers fentanyl test strip training and education to distributing agencies and partner organizations and has begun holding community test kit building events to engage community members across the city around this issue. Community members at the events help distribute test kits while learning about opioids, overdose, and the co-occurrence of mental health conditions and substance use disorders. 

Richardson stressed that anyone who needs Narcan can visit selected Chicago Public Libraries. Also, “CDPH funds several organizations to offer street outreach in these areas of high overdose, responding rapidly to changes in overdose trends and overdose spikes to get people Narcan [naloxone] and link them to needed substance use treatment and medical care,” she explained.

CDPH also funds the Chicago Recovery Alliance (CRA) for operating a drug testing program. Richardson stated individuals can bring their drugs to CRA’s expert drug testing technician to test for an array of substances, including fentanyl and many fentanyl analogues.

In addition, CDPH and the Illinois Department of Human Services recently launched MAR NOW (Medication Assisted Recovery NOW), an innovative treatment program that takes advantage of newly loosened restrictions around medication access to offer telephonic prescription of medications to treat opioid use disorder. MAR NOW provides a treatment hotline, available 24/7, through the Illinois Helpline for Opioids and Other Substances. Anyone in Chicago can call the hotline and be connected immediately to a provider who can prescribe medication over the phone or connect the caller to same-day in-person treatment. Call (833) 234-6343 and ask for MAR NOW.

Such cooperative efforts are helping more people get the support they need while revealing additional ways to Strengthen access to treatment. As Richardson said, “Together with these community organizations, we examine trends in opioid overdose and discuss ways to Strengthen low-barrier linkages to treatment across organizations.”

Expanding access to fentanyl strips

Expanding access to fentanyl test strips is a “key harm reduction initiative,” she continued. “Fentanyl test strips allow people who use drugs to test the substances that they are using for the presence of fentanyl and make informed decisions to keep themselves safe based on the results of the test.” Fentanyl is being found increasingly not only in heroin but cocaine and illicitly produced benzodiazepines. 

Education outreach helps communities stay up to date about opioid use disorder, treatment, and related topics. “As CDPH distributes fentanyl test strips to the community, we have opportunities to discuss opioid use disorder, educate on the signs of an opioid overdose, train individuals on Narcan [naloxone] administration, and dissuade myths about fentanyl,” Richardson noted. 

“Overdose is preventable, and there are many resources available in Chicago for individuals that are struggling with opioid addiction,” she concluded. 

Busting a myth

Jennie B. Jarrett, PharmD, clinical pharmacist at Community Outreach Intervention Projects, and assistant professor at the University of Illinois Chicago College of Pharmacy, dispelled the myth of passive fentanyl overdose, noting some people believe “the idea that if you touch fentanyl, you can overdose with fentanyl. There’s lots of literature and evidence out there that does not support this.”

Jarrett emphasized how harmful spreading misinformation can be. “I think it is a scare tactic reinforcing negative stigma regarding drug use for people to talk about how potentially someone in the community touched fentanyl and then died of a fentanyl overdose,” she said. “That just doesn’t happen, and passive fentanyl absorption is truly not possible.” 

She supports educating the community about fentanyl, treatments, and reversal agents. “I think that’s something of note to make sure that the community knows that, just because someone they know may be using fentanyl, doesn’t mean that if they touch it they would be at risk as well,” Jarrett said. 

Jarrett agreed with her colleague, Jasmin, saying, “Naloxone is the reversal agent for fentanyl, and it is an excellent way to help support people who potentially are overdosing…[with this antidote], the community can really be prepared and help keep people safe.” 

For more information on Narcan and fentanyl test strips, email osu.cdph@cityofchicago.org. To access immediate treatment through the Illinois Helpline, call (833) 234-6343 and ask for MAR NOW. To learn more about opioids, addiction, and available resources, visit https://overcomeopioids.org/. For information on Chicago opioid data, visit the Chicago Health Atlas at https://chicagohealthatlas.org/

For Jarrett, email jarrett8@uic.edu. For Jasmin, call (312) 747-9762. For Richardson, email sarah.richardson@cityofchicago.org.

For the Federal Substance Abuse and Mental Health website, log on to www.samhsa.gov/find-help/national-helpline.

Editor’s note: If you have a health-related issue you would like Gazette Chicago to cover as part of its participation in the DePaul University/Chicago Independent Media Alliance Chicago HealthText project, text (773) 969-9443.

Thu, 04 Aug 2022 03:20:00 -0500 en-US text/html https://gazettechicago.com/2022/08/medical-professionals-discuss-opioid-use-disorder-in-area/
Killexams : Monkeypox isn't going away any time soon. Here are signs to look for and how to avoid it CATHY WURZER: Well, monkeypox infections are continuing to climb in the United States. Illinois and California declared states of emergency yesterday. And the World Health Organization says the outbreak is a global health emergency. So what does the disease look like here in Minnesota? Who is at risk?

Dr. Beth Thielen is on the line. She's an Assistant Professor in the Department of Pediatrics at the University of Minnesota, who studies infectious diseases. Welcome, Doctor.

BETH THIELEN: Yeah. Thanks for having me, Cathy.

CATHY WURZER: Glad you're with us. Now, remind folks-- what is monkeypox?

BETH THIELEN: Yeah, so monkeypox is a viral infection. Historically, meaning over the last few decades we've known about this virus, it has circulated primarily in Africa, although we've seen cases that have resulted from export of animals or travel in parts of the world that don't typically have monkeypox. I think what's really unique about this current outbreak is that we're seeing many cases in parts of the world that don't traditionally have monkeypox all occurring simultaneously.

And so I think right now, we're, I think, over 21,000 cases globally and nearly 6,000 cases in the United States. So this is larger than any outbreak we've seen previously.

CATHY WURZER: Industry reports the disease said it was spread through sexual contact, but it's not an STD, right?

BETH THIELEN: Correct. So it's really close physical contact that spreads it. And I think many people will know that it's hard to have sexual contact without a component of close physical contact. So it certainly can spread through sexual activity, but the message we want to get out to people is that it doesn't necessarily have to be sexual activity. It can just other forms of close contact, or even contact with bedding or other cloths, fabric, things like that that have been contact with someone who has monkeypox.

CATHY WURZER: Initially, LGBTQ organizations were warning about the risk of exposure. And there seems to have been a lot of misinformation out there about who can be infected, that kind of thing. Are you concerned that this might be fueling some backlash or discrimination against the LGBTQ community?

BETH THIELEN: Certainly that's the concern based on experiences that we've had with other outbreaks. I mean, I think there's certain risks that do seem to be more common amongst men who have sex with men is the primarily the population where we've seen this infection thus far. And certainly, we want to get the word out to those communities so that they can take appropriate precautions, and we want to be aware that this actually isn't spread just through sexual contact and we want to be looking and getting protective messages out to other communities as well. So I think vigilance, not panic, is kind of what we're aiming for.

CATHY WURZER: With kids going back to school soon, are they at risk?

BETH THIELEN: Well, I think your listeners may be aware we have seen some pediatric cases. And certainly historically and in some of the early outbreaks, we did see infections among children, and some severe infections among children. So I don't want to downplay that risk.

But at the same time, we have really not seen a large number of cases in the general population. And it's really been relatively rare cases amongst children. Certainly, there are other infections of children-- things like hand foot and mouth disease-- that are more common. And so I think any rash illness, I think, should be evaluated. But I think the chances that it is monkeypox at this point is less likely than it is one of the more common childhood infectious illnesses.

CATHY WURZER: By the way, how are case counts looking like in Minnesota? How are they trending?

BETH THIELEN: Yeah. So as of the new data from that was announced this morning by our state health department, we have 38 confirmed cases here in Minnesota. It, was I think, maybe around 33 or so late last week. And it's really been over the last few weeks that we've had cases coming up.

So adding a few new cases a day, but we haven't really taken off to the same extent where we are seeing 800 or so cases in New York and 500 cases-- over 500 cases in Illinois. So we're not kind of on the same scale as some of the states with larger outbreaks, but we are steadily accumulating cases here in Minnesota.

CATHY WURZER: And how does someone know if they have it? Is it pretty obvious?

BETH THIELEN: Well, yes and no. So, really, the key feature that we're having people kind of are keying in on is the rash. And it typically-- it changes over time over the course of the illness. So it may start as little as small sort of spots on the skin and then progress to more blister-like spots or spots filled with pus.

The issue is that in some of these rash illnesses can be fairly limited to small areas of the body. So particularly early in infection or if there's a very limited spread of the infection on the body, it may be possible that people may miss those signs of rash. So I think, really, rash illness is something for people to check in with their health care provider about, and particularly if they've had known exposures to someone with the disease or have engaged in types of activities that are known to be risk factors.

So fevers and general malaise, these are symptoms that were historically really thought to precede the rash. I think what we're learning with this current outbreak is that they may come later. And so I think the rash is probably the most important unique feature that people can kind of focus in on.

CATHY WURZER: Best advice for how people can protect themselves.

BETH THIELEN: Yeah. So I think being aware of where the disease is circulating and taking precautions that are proportionate to the level of risk. So I think right now, we do know that this is spreading through sexual activity, and particularly sexual activity with multiple partners, and partners met through apps, and websites, and things like that. And so I think mitigating those risks at this point as much as possible while this is circulating I think is generally good practice.

We do have vaccine available. And that vaccine has been fairly limited in its supply. So I think for people who are identifying as high risk, some of the typical locations where people seek sexual health care are really good places to check in with about vaccines and talk to the health care providers. I think the situation is evolving so quickly that I think many community practitioners may feel a bit lost and sort of have a hard time keeping up.

And that's really why infectious disease doctors, like myself, exist. So many of the health systems will have an infectious disease specialist, and I think we're paying particularly close attention to how this is evolving and making sure that we're getting accurate, timely information out to folks. I will say that testing is really important. And I think we've really scaled up our testing capacity.

And so if people have rash illnesses, even if they don't have traditional risk factors, I think it is very important to test for monkeypox so we really get a handle on how many cases are out there and how this disease circulation is changing over time so we can supply people the most accurate, up to date information about this outbreak.

CATHY WURZER: And before you go, how effective are treatments if you are diagnosed with monkeypox?

BETH THIELEN: Yeah. So we have a treatment that's available. It's something called tecovirimat, or TPOXX. Because this is such a new outbreak, we don't have a lot of data about how this works. But certainly, it's something that's available for people with severe disease. And that could be just skin rashes that are limiting the ability of people to function.

So particularly, we're seeing in the mouth and genital area, and that can be quite painful. And so people can get that treatment in consultation with their doctors who consult with the public health authorities were making decisions about getting treatment out to folks. So I think the most important thing is to seek medical attention if people are concerned. Not all people with monkeypox will require treatment, but certainly, it's available if people need it.

CATHY WURZER: All right, a lot of good information you have here. Thank you so much.

BETH THIELEN: Thanks so much for having me, Cathy.

CATHY WURZER: Have a good day. Dr. Beth Thielen is an Infectious Disease Physician and Scientist at the University of Minnesota.

Tue, 02 Aug 2022 04:25:00 -0500 en text/html https://www.mprnews.org/episode/2022/08/02/monkeypox-isnt-going-away-any-time-soon
Killexams : New law opens path for Brevard pharmacies to test and treat some diseases

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Wed, 20 Jul 2022 05:11:00 -0500 en-US text/html https://www.floridatoday.com/story/news/2022/07/20/brevard-florida-pharmacists-can-test-and-treat-some-illness-under-pandemic-law/7754836001/
Killexams : Be the first to know

BATON ROUGE (AP) — Abortion-rights advocates hope Louisiana’s near-total ban of the procedure will soon be blocked again, after plaintiffs in an ongoing legal challenge filed an appeal with the state Supreme Court Thursday.

Access to abortion in Louisiana has been back-and-forth for weeks, with the state’s three clinics relying on court rulings and temporary restraining orders to continue operations. Louisiana’s abortion law, which does not have exceptions for rape or incest, is currently in effect. However, if the Louisiana Supreme Court sides with the plaintiffs in their appeal, then enforcement of the ban will once again be blocked.

“We hope the Louisiana Supreme Court will rule that district courts have the power to block unconstitutional criminal statutes, including the trigger bans in question," Joanna Wright, an attorney for the plaintiffs, said in a written statement Thursday afternoon. "Louisiana women must have access to critical and sometimes lifesaving healthcare, and we will continue challenging the Attorney General’s attempts to undermine that access through unconstitutionally vague statutes. This fight is far from over—we are not going anywhere.”

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The back-and-forth battle over Louisiana’s ban began in June when the U.S. Supreme Court ended constitutional protections for abortion. While the plaintiffs don’t deny the state can now ban abortion, they argue that the law’s provisions are contradictory and unconstitutionally vague. The legislation bans all abortions except if there is substantial risk of death or impairment to the patient if they continue with the pregnancy and in the case of “medically futile” pregnancies — when the fetus has a fatal abnormality.

At issue is a legal question over whether district courts must put their rulings on hold while their decisions are appealed.

On July 21, Baton Rouge Judge Donald Johnson issued a preliminary injunction that allowed clinics to continue providing abortions while a lawsuit over the ban plays out.

But procedures came to a screeching halt last Friday when a state appeals court ruled in favor of Louisiana Attorney General Jeff Landry, granting a “suspensive” appeal and ordering Johnson to reinstate enforcement of the ban.

Following the decision, Wright said it was disappointing that the First Circuit ruled without first allowing plaintiffs an opportunity to file opposition to the motion. She said the court “essentially eliminated critical health care services in the state.”

The plaintiffs are now challenging the appeals court's decision in the Louisiana Supreme Court. If the court rules in favor of the plaintiffs — which includes a northern Louisiana abortion clinic — the ban would be blocked for the third time since the U.S. Supreme Court overturned Roe v. Wade.

The plaintiffs argue in their appeal of the First Circuit decision that providers don’t know what medical care they can perform under the law, and therefore “are forced, in tragic instances, to choose between engaging in potentially illegal conduct or refusing to provide critical healthcare to their patients with potentially grave results.”

The law states that doctors and others who perform abortions could face up to 15 years in prison.

Former Louisiana Attorney General Buddy Caldwell and 22 law professors in the state filed amicus briefs in support of the plaintiffs' appeal. The briefs focus on the legal arguments of the filing and not the “merits in the underlying lawsuit.”

Abortion providers and advocates say each day of the ban being blocked has been extremely valuable. Since Roe v. Wade was overturned, there have been at least 249 abortions in Louisiana, according to data from the state’s department of health.

Copyright 2022 The Associated Press. All rights reserved. This material may not be published, broadcast, rewritten or redistributed without permission.

Thu, 04 Aug 2022 08:53:00 -0500 en text/html https://omaha.com/news/national/louisiana-abortion-providers-file-appeal-hope-to-block-ban/article_e10f90e5-dbb9-5e55-8b2d-30f23e175aae.html
Killexams : New Erie nurse waits months, battles bureaucrats for permit to start first job

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Thu, 21 Jul 2022 00:25:00 -0500 en-US text/html https://www.goerie.com/story/news/healthcare/2022/07/20/statewide-pa-nursing-permits-are-delayed-in-harrisburg/65372554007/
Killexams : Drug Topics® Announces the Addition of The National Pharmacy Technician Association to its Strategic Alliance Partnership Program

ISELIN, N.J., Aug. 03, 2022 (GLOBE NEWSWIRE) -- Drug Topics®, the leading multimedia resource for pharmacy professionals, today announced that it has added the National Pharmacy Technician Association (NPTA) to its Strategic Alliance Partnership (SAP) program.

“We are excited about this important opportunity to partner with NPTA,” said William Mulderry, vice president, group publisher of Drug Topics® and Total Pharmacy®. “It’s clear from the current trends in U.S. health care that the role of the pharmacy technician continues to grow in key areas within retail pharmacies, testing and disease prevention to name two. NPTA is the largest professional trade association for pharmacy technicians in the world. Working together, NPTA and Drug Topics® can accelerate more efficiently the shared knowledge amongst the busiest patient-facing pharmacists and pharmacy technicians in the country.”

Founded in 1999, NPTA represents over 80,000 individuals practicing in a diverse variety of practice settings, including community pharmacy, health-system pharmacy, federal pharmacy services, purchasing and education, among others.

“We are thrilled to partner with Drug Topics®,” said Mike Johnston, CPhT-Adv, founder and CEO of NPTA. “Drug Topics® has an unmatched record in serving pharmacists with insights on the latest issues in pharmacy practice, and NPTA is excited to help extend their focus and impact to pharmacy technicians.”

The Drug Topics® SAP program is a community of medical associations, societies and advocacy groups that foster collaboration and an open exchange of information among trusted peers for the benefit of patients and their families. As part of this joint effort, Drug Topics® will work with the Association of Community Cancer Centers (ACCC) to inform and educate practicing pharmacists in Directions in Oncology Pharmacy™ and Directions in Health Systems™ publications.

For more information about the Drug Topics® SAP program, visit its website.

About The National Pharmacy Technician Association

The National Pharmacy Technician Association (NPTA), which was founded in 1999, is the largest professional trade association for pharmacy technicians in the world. The association represents over 80,000 individuals practicing in a diverse variety of practice settings, including community pharmacy, health-system pharmacy, federal pharmacy services, purchasing and education, among others. NPTA is committed to advancing the pharmacy technician career through education, advocacy and support. www.pharmacytechnician.org

About Drug Topics®

Founded in 1857, Drug Topics® is a valued content resource amongst the busiest, patient-facing pharmacists in the United States. The publication provides regular news, expert opinion, industry analysis, career guidance and peer perspectives. Drug Topics® continuing education, powered by AdvanCE™, is accredited by the Accreditation Council for Pharmacy Education as a provider of continuing pharmacy education. Drug Topics® is a brand of MJH Life Sciences™, the largest privately held, independent, full-service medical media company in North America dedicated to delivering trusted health care news across multiple channels.

About Total Pharmacy®

Designed specifically for entrepreneurial pharmacists and independent pharmacy market stakeholders, Total Pharmacy® delivers resources to effectively maximize profits, minimize costs and Strengthen the overall patient experience. Our mission is to redefine the value and standards of community pharmacy by providing trusted content and business solutions that drive measurable change in healthcare delivery. Total Pharmacy® is a brand of MJH Life Sciences™, the largest privately held, independent, full-service medical media company in North America dedicated to delivering trusted health care news across multiple channels.

Drug Topics® Media Contact
Lauren Biscaldi
lbiscaldi@mjhlifesciences.com


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Wed, 03 Aug 2022 05:47:00 -0500 en-US text/html https://kfor.com/business/press-releases/globenewswire/8611715/drug-topics-announces-the-addition-of-the-national-pharmacy-technician-association-to-its-strategic-alliance-partnership-program/
Killexams : RRB NTPC Typing Test 2022: Check Your CBTS exam City Here

RRB NTPC Typing Test 2022: Railway Recruitment Board (RRB) has released the exam centre details for NTPC Typing Test 2022. Check Details Here.

RRB NTPC Typing Test 2022

RRB NTPC Typing Test 2022: Railway Recruitment Board (RRB) is conducting Computer-Based-Typing-Skill-Test" (CBTS) on 12 August 2022. Candidates who are selected to appear for RRB NTPC Typing Test can check the exam city by login onto the official website of RRBs. We have provided the RRB NTPC Typing Test exam City Link in this article below:

RRB NTPC Typing Test Link

The candidates can check the RRB NTPC Typing Test Admit Card update by clicking on the link provided above.

RRB NTPC Typing Test 2022

The candidate will be required to type a minimum of 300 words either in English or 250 words in Hundis per the option given by them on the RRB websites. Those who have not selected their exam language choice will be required to type in English. Candidates who have chosen Hindi Option should be familiar with the usage of Utkritdev or Mangal fonts.

As per the official notice, “As the skill test is to determine the speed, candidates who have completed the passage can retype passage from the beginning within the duration of test i.e. 10 minutes. Candidates who do not type the whole passage at least once in 10 minutes will be treated as disqualified. The transcripts of those candidates who do not type 300 words in English or 250 words in Hindi within the prescribed time will not be evaluated.”

The recruitment is being done to fill up 35277 vacant posts of Non-Technical Popular Categories. Out of total 15131 posts are for the general category, 8712 reserved for the OBC category, 3510 for EWS category, 527 for SC and 2787 for ST category.

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Thu, 04 Aug 2022 00:33:00 -0500 text/html https://www.jagranjosh.com/articles/rrb-ntpc-typing-test-2022-1659615962-1
Killexams : Be the first to know

BATON ROUGE (AP) — Staff at Louisiana’s abortion clinics spent Monday calling patients to cancel procedures and direct them to resources in other states as Louisiana’s near total abortion ban is once-again in effect.

For weeks, access to abortion in Louisiana has been flickering — with the state’s three clinics relying on rulings and temporary restraining orders, that allowed them to continue operations. But procedures came to a screeching halt Friday afternoon after an appeals court ruled that Louisiana Attorney General Jeff Landry can enforce the ban while ongoing legal challenges play out in court.

“Once again, politics has superseded medical expertise and commonsense,” Amy Irvin, a spokeswoman for abortion clinics in New Orleans and Baton Rouge, said Monday. “We remain hopeful that the Court will ultimately act with compassion and empathy on behalf of women seeking abortion in Louisiana.”

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Staff at the clinics in southern Louisiana were working to notify 120 patients, scheduled for appointments this week, about the ban being enforced once again. Not only are patients being directed to clinics outside of the state, but Irvin said the clinics also are looking to relocate to a state “that respects and values women’s bodily autonomy.”

Additionally, staff at Hope Medical Group for Women in Shreveport — which is at the center of the legal challenge — are still providing help.

“We are not providing abortions, but we are not closed,” Kathaleen Pittman, director of the northern Louisiana clinic, said Monday. “We are manning the phones and trying to help people navigate care as best we can within the limits of the law as we consider our options.”

Following the U.S. Supreme Court’s decision last month to end constitutional protections for abortion, Louisiana’s ban has taken effect and been blocked multiple times. Since then, 249 abortions have been reported to the Louisiana Department of Health, according to data released last week.

On July 21, state Judge Donald Johnson issued a preliminary injunction that allowed clinics to continue providing abortions while a lawsuit over the ban continued. However, just eight days later, Landry took the fight to enforce the ban to a state appeals court - which ruled in his favor.

The ban went into effect later that same day, the third time the ban has gone into effect. It does not have exceptions for rape or incest.

Joanna Wright, an attorney for the plaintiffs, said it was “disappointing” that the First Circuit ruled without first allowing plaintiffs an opportunity to file opposition to the motion. She said the court “essentially eliminated critical health care services in the state.”

While the plaintiffs don’t deny the state can now ban abortion, they argue that the law’s provisions are contradictory and unconstitutionally vague.

Copyright 2022 The Associated Press. All rights reserved. This material may not be published, broadcast, rewritten or redistributed without permission.

Mon, 01 Aug 2022 08:49:00 -0500 en text/html https://omaha.com/news/national/louisiana-abortion-ban-reinstated-clinics-halt-procedures/article_9d65b05f-c8ab-5b93-bdd8-3e300c2b7059.html
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