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Killexams : Medical Technician learner - BingNews https://killexams.com/pass4sure/exam-detail/NCCT-TSC Search results Killexams : Medical Technician learner - BingNews https://killexams.com/pass4sure/exam-detail/NCCT-TSC https://killexams.com/exam_list/Medical Killexams : 10 fastest-growing jobs in education

Curious about the fastest-growing jobs in education? HeyTutor analyzed data from the Bureau of Labor Statistics to compile this list of the top 10.    - Krakenimages.com // Shutterstock

Annalise Mantz

For lovers of learning, pursuing a career in education remains highly appealing. While every town has at least one school needing teachers, the job possibilities within the field stretch far beyond the standard grade-school subjects.

To discover the fastest-growing jobs in education, HeyTutor analyzed the Bureau of Labor Statistics’ Employment Projections data to find the occupations with the largest projected increase in jobs from 2021 to 2031. This analysis ranks occupations by percentage employment increase in that timeframe. Overall, the BLS data projects employment to grow about 5.3% from 2021 to 2031. According to BLS data, employment at educational institutions and library jobs is projected to grow by 7.2%. The data set also shows that employees in educational instruction and library jobs earn a median of $57,220 per year.

Jobs within this sector include educators at the preschool, elementary, middle, and high school levels and postsecondary educators at colleges, universities, trade schools, and other graduate-level institutions. Whether you’re just considering your future job or hoping to make a mid-life career change, let this list of the 10 fastest-growing jobs in education serve as inspiration.

UNLV Department of Criminal Justice chairman and professor Dr. Joel Lieberman teaching Jury Decision Making, a criminal justice class

Ethan Miller // Getty Images

#10. Criminal justice and law enforcement teachers (postsecondary)

– Projected employment increase from 2021 to 2031: 9.8% (+1,600 jobs)
— Employment in 2021: 16,500 jobs

To teach criminal justice or law enforcement at the postsecondary level, you’ll likely need a master’s degree, if not further education such as a Ph.D. in criminology or a law degree. Someone in this role might have the title of professor, adjunct professor, or visiting instructor.

You’ll also likely need to stay up to date on the latest trends in the field. Trends might include technological innovations like computer vision and robotics and societal changes like the shift toward community-based policing and the prison reform movement. Criminal justice and law enforcement teachers in California, New York, and Connecticut earn the highest annual mean wages in the country—upwards of $144,000, in California.

A college professor teaching an anatomy class to nursing students

Canva

#9. Biological science teachers (postsecondary)

– Projected employment increase from 2021 to 2031: 12.4% (+7,500 jobs)
— Employment in 2021: 60,200 jobs

Whether or not biological science teachers strictly teach classes or also conduct their research, they’ll likely need at least a master’s degree, if not a doctorate. Subject matters within the biological sciences field include anatomy, physiology, and biology. Most professionals in this job category work at colleges and universities, although some jobs also exist at hospitals, trade schools, and scientific research facilities. Teaching roles in this subject matter at general medical and surgical hospitals pay the most, on average: The annual mean wage is $184,620, which is upwards of $80,000 more than the annual mean wage for colleges and universities.

Lance Retallick, a technician with Weiss Theatrical Solutions, securing a safety line as a World War II SBD Dauntless dive bomber is craned into position at the National Museum of the Marine Corps in Triangle

JIM WATSON // Getty Images

#8. Museum technicians and conservators

– Projected employment increase from 2021 to 2031: 12.7% (+1,600 jobs)
— Employment in 2021: 12,700 jobs

Museum technicians and conservators care for the items within a museum’s collection, whether that means fossils, gemstones, and botanicals or art, textiles, and historical artifacts. Technicians and conservators both restore and prepare collections for storage and documentation and prepare them for exhibition and arrange displays. Most jobs in this category require at least a bachelor’s degree and considerable museum experience.

Museums and historical sites employ the largest number of technicians and conservators; the federal executive branch offers the second-highest number of jobs—likely to care for historic government buildings such as the White House. However, professionals with this job aren’t well paid. Museum technicians and conservators in the District of Columbia earn the highest annual mean wages in the country, at just over $73,000.

A college engineering professor lecturing students

Gorodenkoff // Shutterstock

#7. Engineering teachers (postsecondary)

– Projected employment increase from 2021 to 2031: 13.3% (+6,100 jobs)
— Employment in 2021: 45,800 jobs

Postsecondary engineering teachers might teach subjects including chemical, civil, electrical, industrial, mechanical, mineral, and petroleum engineering. Most of these jobs are at colleges and universities, with fewer jobs available at junior colleges and trade and technical schools. Engineering teachers at colleges and universities can also expect to earn more money than their counterparts at other institutions.

The Philadelphia and New York City metropolitan areas employ the highest concentration of engineering teachers of any metro in the country. In addition to attaining at least a master’s degree or doctorate, many of these jobs demand knowledge of computer-aided design software such as Autodesk and AutoCAD or development languages like Java or C++.

A museum curator greeting guests at an exhibit

Canva

#6. Curators

– Projected employment increase from 2021 to 2031: 14.4% (+1,900 jobs)
— Employment in 2021: 12,900 jobs

If you’re interested in a higher-level, more strategic role in the museum world, you might want to become a curator. Like museum technicians and conservators, curators work with a museum’s collections—but instead of maintaining the artifacts and objects, they might plan the acquisition of future items, theme and create exhibitions around them, or conduct special research projects. Curators can also work to educate the public on a museum’s collection and participate in visitor events.

You often need a master’s degree or doctorate in a relevant subject matter to become a curator. With fewer curator jobs available nationwide, you might face steeper competition from other candidates. The annual mean wage for curators ranges between $72,000 and $100,000.

A tutor working with a student at their home

Canva

#5. Tutors

– Projected employment increase from 2021 to 2031: 14.5% (+29,500 jobs)
— Employment in 2021: 203,400 jobs

Tutors, also known as academic coaches, work with students outside of the primary instruction class time to support their learning comprehension or prepare them for standardized tests. Unsurprisingly, the most populous states like New York, California, Illinois, Texas, and Florida have the highest numbers of tutor jobs. Tutors might cover a variety of subject matters, including math, reading, and SAT prep.

Educational requirements similarly vary: Some tutor jobs might want a bachelor’s degree, while others might look for current college students. The mean hourly wage varies from $16 per hour in Hawaii to over $28 per hour in New York.

A preschool teacher playing with their students

Monkey Business Images // Shutterstock

#4. Preschool teachers (note: excludes special education)

– Projected employment increase from 2021 to 2031: 15.1% (+72,900 jobs)
— Employment in 2021: 483,100 jobs

Although the Biden administration and Congressional Democrats removed funding from the Inflation Reduction Act for universal preschool, state funding for preschool programs has increased in recent years. The increased focus on early childhood education could have contributed to the projected growth of preschool teacher jobs, a role that often only requires a high school diploma.

Whether they’re employed at daycare centers or elementary schools, preschool teachers focus on the social, emotional, physical, and intellectual growth of children ages 3 and 4. Elementary school jobs typically pay more than similar jobs at daycare centers, religious institutions, or other nonprofit settings. The annual mean wage for preschool teachers in elementary schools is more than $52,000, while annual mean wages for preschool teachers in other settings fluctuate between $32,000 and $41,000.

A piano teacher and their pupil during a lesson

Canva

#3. Self-enrichment teachers

– Projected employment increase from 2021 to 2031: 17.6% (+61,300 jobs)
— Employment in 2021: 347,100 jobs

Whether they teach dance, art, music, martial arts, or even driving, self-enrichment teachers instruct their pupils in subject matters they simply wish to learn for personal enjoyment—not to advance to a higher education level or attain a job. Because these jobs vary widely based on the setting and subject, some might only require a bachelor’s degree, while others require a master’s or doctorate. Most self-enrichment teacher jobs are offered at educational institutions classified by the BLS as “Other Schools and Instruction,” a category that excludes elementary and secondary schools, technical and trade schools, junior colleges, and colleges and universities.

Think of small businesses such as a local dance studio, dojo, or even piano classes running out of an instructor’s home. States with higher living costs, such as New York, California, and Massachusetts, offer the highest mean hourly wages for self-enrichment teachers.

A nursing instructor with a group of nursing students in a hospital with a patient

Canva

#2. Nursing instructors and teachers (postsecondary)

– Projected employment increase from 2021 to 2031: 21.5% (+18,700 jobs)
— Employment in 2021: 87,000 jobs

If the current trend of nurses leaving the profession continues without government intervention, the United States could face a shortage of between 200,000 and 450,000 nurses by 2025, according to a 2022 McKinsey & Company report. With a growing number of current nurses burnt out by the COVID-19 pandemic considering a new career path, the country will need more nurses—and more nursing instructors and teachers to train them.

This job typically requires at least a master’s degree, if not a doctorate, and teaching expertise. Colleges, universities, junior colleges, general medical and surgical hospitals, and technical and trade schools employ nursing instructors and teachers. Annual mean wages range from around $75,000 to more than $99,000, depending on the setting.

A dentistry student practicing on a dummy at a medical school as a qualified teacher demonstrates the technique to her from behind

Frame Stock Footage // Shutterstock

#1. Health specialties teachers (postsecondary)

– Projected employment increase from 2021 to 2031: 24.1% (+59,400 jobs)
— Employment in 2021: 246,700 jobs

Health specialties teachers can include instructors in dentistry, laboratory technology, medicine, pharmacy, public health, therapy, and even veterinary medicine. These roles are available at colleges and universities, junior colleges, technical and trade schools, and various types of hospitals. A master’s or doctorate is typically required, but health specialties teachers can expect to earn anywhere from $60,000 to more than $234,000 in mean annual wages, depending on the role.

The projected employment increase for health specialties teachers could be due in part to current or future shortages in these fields. The American Medical Association estimates the United States could face a shortage of between 37,800 and 124,000 physicians by 2034. The U.S. health system is already facing shortages of pharmacy technicians, medical laboratory technicians, psychologists, mental health professionals, and dental hygienists.

This story originally appeared on HeyTutor and was produced and
distributed in partnership with Stacker Studio.

Thu, 06 Oct 2022 12:00:00 -0500 Stacker en-US text/html https://www.digitaljournal.com/business/10-fastest-growing-jobs-in-education/article
Killexams : Deep Learning Makes 3D-Printed Part Inspection Faster

A new deep-learning framework developed at the Department of Energy’s Oak Ridge National Laboratory is speeding up the process of inspecting additively manufactured metal parts using X-ray computed tomography, or CT, while increasing the accuracy of the results. The reduced costs for time, labor, maintenance and energy are expected to accelerate expansion of additive manufacturing, or 3D printing.

“The scan speed reduces costs significantly,” said ORNL lead researcher Amir Ziabari. “And the quality is higher, so the post-processing analysis becomes much simpler.”

The framework is already being incorporated into software used by commercial partner ZEISS within its machines at DOE’s Manufacturing Demonstration Facility at ORNL, where companies hone 3D-printing methods.

ORNL researchers had previously developed technology that can analyze the quality of a part while it is being printed. Adding a high level of imaging accuracy after printing provides an additional level of trust in additive manufacturing while potentially increasing production.

“With this, we can inspect every single part coming out of 3D-printing machines,” said Pradeep Bhattad, ZEISS business development manager for additive manufacturing. “Currently CT is limited to prototyping. But this one tool can propel additive manufacturing toward industrialization.”

X-ray CT scanning is important for certifying the soundness of a 3D-printed part without damaging it. The process is similar to medical X-ray CT. In this case, an object set inside a cabinet is slowly rotated and scanned at each angle by powerful X-rays. Computer algorithms use the resulting stack of two-dimensional projections to construct a 3D image showing the density of the object’s internal structure. X-ray CT can be used to detect defects, analyze failures or certify that a product matches the intended composition and quality.

However, X-ray CT is not used at large scale in additive manufacturing because current methods of scanning and analysis are time-intensive and imprecise. Metals can totally absorb the lower-energy X-rays in the X-ray beam, creating image inaccuracies that can be further multiplied if the object has a complex shape. The resulting flaws in the image can obscure cracks or pores the scan is intended to reveal. A trained technician can correct for these problems during analysis, but the process is time- and labor-intensive.

Ziabari and his team developed a deep-learning framework that rapidly provides a clearer, more accurate reconstruction and an automated analysis. He will present the process his team developed during the Institute of Electrical and Electronics Engineers International Conference on Image Processing in October.

Training a supervised deep-learning network for CT usually requires many expensive measurements. Because metal parts pose additional challenges, getting the appropriate training data can be difficult. Ziabari’s approach provides a leap forward by generating realistic training data without requiring extensive experiments to gather it.

A generative adversarial network, or GAN, method is used to synthetically create a realistic-looking data set for training a neural network, leveraging physics-based simulations and computer-aided design. GAN is a class of machine learning that utilizes neural networks competing with each other as in a game. It has rarely been used for practical applications like this, Ziabari said.

Because this X-ray CT framework needs scans with fewer angles to achieve accuracy, it has reduced imaging time by a factor of six, Ziabari said — from about one hour to 10 minutes or less. Working that quickly with so few viewing angles would normally add significant “noise” to the 3D image. But the ORNL algorithm taught on the training data corrects this, even enhancing small flaw detection by a factor of four or more.

The framework developed by Ziabari’s team would allow manufacturers to rapidly fine-tune their builds, even while changing designs or materials. With this approach, demo analysis can be completed in a day instead of six to eight weeks, Bhattad said.

“If I can very rapidly inspect the whole part in a very cost-effective way, then we have 100% confidence,” he said. “We are partnering with ORNL to make CT an accessible and reliable industry inspection tool.”

ORNL researchers evaluated the performance of the new framework on hundreds of samples printed with different scan parameters, using complicated, dense materials. These results were good, and ongoing trials at MDF are working to verify that the technique is equally effective with any type of metal alloy, Bhattad said.

That’s important, because the approach developed by Ziabari’s team could make it far easier to certify parts made from new metal alloys. “People don’t use novel materials because they don’t know the best printing parameters,” Ziabari said. “Now, if you can characterize these materials so quickly and optimize the parameters, that would help move these novel materials into additive manufacturing.”

In fact, Ziabari said, the technology can be applied in many fields, including defense, auto manufacturing, aerospace and electronics printing, as well as nondestructive evaluation of electric vehicle batteries.

Fri, 14 Oct 2022 02:25:00 -0500 en-us text/html https://www.manufacturing.net/additive-manufacturing/news/22486155/deep-learning-makes-3dprinted-part-inspection-faster
Killexams : Deep learning makes X-ray CT inspection of 3D-printed parts faster, more accurate

A new deep-learning framework developed at the Department of Energy's Oak Ridge National Laboratory is speeding up the process of inspecting additively manufactured metal parts using X-ray computed tomography, or CT, while increasing the accuracy of the results. The reduced costs for time, labor, maintenance and energy are expected to accelerate expansion of additive manufacturing, or 3D printing.

"The scan speed reduces costs significantly," said ORNL lead researcher Amir Ziabari. "And the quality is higher, so the post-processing analysis becomes much simpler."

The framework is already being incorporated into software used by commercial partner ZEISS within its machines at DOE's Manufacturing Demonstration Facility at ORNL, where companies hone 3D-printing methods.

ORNL researchers had previously developed technology that can analyze the quality of a part while it is being printed. Adding a high level of imaging accuracy after printing provides an additional level of trust in additive manufacturing while potentially increasing production.

"With this, we can inspect every single part coming out of 3D-printing machines," said Pradeep Bhattad, ZEISS business development manager for additive manufacturing. "Currently CT is limited to prototyping. But this one tool can propel additive manufacturing toward industrialization."

X-ray CT scanning is important for certifying the soundness of a 3D-printed part without damaging it. The process is similar to medical X-ray CT. In this case, an object set inside a cabinet is slowly rotated and scanned at each angle by powerful X-rays. Computer algorithms use the resulting stack of two-dimensional projections to construct a 3D image showing the density of the object's internal structure. X-ray CT can be used to detect defects, analyze failures or certify that a product matches the intended composition and quality.

However, X-ray CT is not used at large scale in additive manufacturing because current methods of scanning and analysis are time-intensive and imprecise. Metals can totally absorb the lower-energy X-rays in the X-ray beam, creating image inaccuracies that can be further multiplied if the object has a complex shape. The resulting flaws in the image can obscure cracks or pores the scan is intended to reveal. A trained technician can correct for these problems during analysis, but the process is time- and labor-intensive.

Ziabari and his team developed a deep-learning framework that rapidly provides a clearer, more accurate reconstruction and an automated analysis. He will present the process his team developed during the Institute of Electrical and Electronics Engineers International Conference on Image Processing in October.

Training a supervised deep-learning network for CT usually requires many expensive measurements. Because metal parts pose additional challenges, getting the appropriate training data can be difficult. Ziabari's approach provides a leap forward by generating realistic training data without requiring extensive experiments to gather it.

A generative adversarial network, or GAN, method is used to synthetically create a realistic-looking data set for training a neural network, leveraging physics-based simulations and computer-aided design. GAN is a class of machine learning that utilizes neural networks competing with each other as in a game. It has rarely been used for practical applications like this, Ziabari said.

Because this X-ray CT framework needs scans with fewer angles to achieve accuracy, it has reduced imaging time by a factor of six, Ziabari said -- from about one hour to 10 minutes or less. Working that quickly with so few viewing angles would normally add significant "noise" to the 3D image. But the ORNL algorithm taught on the training data corrects this, even enhancing small flaw detection by a factor of four or more.

The framework developed by Ziabari's team would allow manufacturers to rapidly fine-tune their builds, even while changing designs or materials. With this approach, demo analysis can be completed in a day instead of six to eight weeks, Bhattad said.

"If I can very rapidly inspect the whole part in a very cost-effective way, then we have 100% confidence," he said. "We are partnering with ORNL to make CT an accessible and reliable industry inspection tool."

ORNL researchers evaluated the performance of the new framework on hundreds of samples printed with different scan parameters, using complicated, dense materials. These results were good, and ongoing trials at MDF are working to verify that the technique is equally effective with any type of metal alloy, Bhattad said.

That's important, because the approach developed by Ziabari's team could make it far easier to certify parts made from new metal alloys. "People don't use novel materials because they don't know the best printing parameters," Ziabari said. "Now, if you can characterize these materials so quickly and optimize the parameters, that would help move these novel materials into additive manufacturing."

In fact, Ziabari said, the technology can be applied in many fields, including defense, auto manufacturing, aerospace and electronics printing, as well as nondestructive evaluation of electric vehicle batteries.

Sat, 15 Oct 2022 16:23:00 -0500 en text/html https://www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2022/10/221014135712.htm
Killexams : 27 children, 5 adults hospitalized after carbon monoxide leak at Pa. daycare

Officials declared a mass casualty incident, bringing every ambulance in Allentown and more from surrounding municipalities

UPDATE: (5:30 p.m. CDT)

Daniel Patrick Sheehan, Molly Bilinski
The Morning Call

ALLENTOWN, Pa. — The first sign anything was amiss Tuesday morning at Happy Smiles Learning Center in Allentown came when a boy got up from his seat in what’s known as the “cozy area” and collapsed mid-stride as he ran across the room.

Firefighters, EMS providers and police officers responded to the carbon monoxide leak Tuesday morning at the Happy Smiles Learning Center in Allentown, Pa. Children and adults were transported to area hospitals. (Photo/Zach DeWever/WFMZ-TV via AP)

Employees of the daycare at 471 Wabash St. tried to revive him as they called 911 for help. When emergency medical technicians arrived, monitors connected to their medical bags sounded, alerting them to the presence of carbon monoxide, a colorless, odorless and potentially deadly gas. Further testing with a carbon monoxide gas meter showed it was present in a concentration of 700 parts per million, more than three times the threshold that can cause death.

EMTs evacuated the 25 children and eight employees, ultimately taking 27 of them to four area hospitals to be checked. Other children were taken for treatment by their parents, Allentown fire Capt. John Christopher said.

While some patients have been discharged, others were sent to the University of Pennsylvania Hospital and Children’s Hospital of Philadelphia because they had especially high levels of CO in their blood, according to a statement from Dr. Andrew Miller, chief of pediatric emergency medicine for Lehigh Valley Health Network.

They are undergoing hyperbaric treatment, which involves breathing pure oxygen in a pressurized environment. Replacing CO in the blood with oxygen quickly is essential because excessive levels of the gas can cause damage to the brain and heart, Miller said.

Lehigh Valley Hospital-Cedar Crest received 14 children and two adult patients and Lehigh Valley Hospital-17th Street received three children, Miller said. The children, several of whom were unresponsive, ranged in age from several months to 10 years, he said. Their symptoms included headaches, dizziness and nausea.

“All the patients had elevated levels of CO in their blood,” Miller said. “The levels ranged from three to 10 times higher than what’s deemed normal. All were treated with 100% oxygen for at least four to six hours while their CO levels were closely monitored.”

Four children and one adult were taken to St. Luke’s Hospital-Sacred Heart in Allentown, where all were in stable condition, St. Luke’s spokesperson Sam Kennedy said. Six children and two adults were taken to St. Luke’s- Allentown and were also in stable condition.

The call for help came at 7:30 a.m. Given the number of people affected, officials declared a mass casualty incident, bringing every ambulance in Allentown and many more from surrounding municipalities.

Happy Smiles owner Jesenia Gautreaux, who founded the center four years ago, was at home when staff called and told her the boy collapsed. When she reached the daycare minutes later, he was in an ambulance. He looked ill but gave her a thumbs-up, she said.

“He was a little dizzy and out of it,” she said, adding other children were crying as they were evacuated from the building.

“I believe they were scared and thinking about their friends, ” she said.

Carbon monoxide exceeding 70 parts per million can cause headaches, fatigue and nausea, according to the U.S. Consumer Product Safety Commission. At concentrations above 150-200 parts per million, disorientation, unconsciousness and death are possible.

Natural gas provider UGI Utilities arrived shortly after 7:45 a.m., company spokesperson Joe Swope said. The investigation determined the leak was caused by a malfunctioning heating unit and a blocked venting system. Multiple workers responded from the utility and shut down the system, Swope said.

“That will need to be repaired,” he said, adding that no odor of natural gas was detected.

Christopher said the center does not have carbon monoxide detectors, though it is not required to. In response to the incident, Pittsburgh-area state Sen. Wayne Fontana sent a message to the state House urging it to pass Senate Bill 129, currently in the House Health Committee. The legislation would require battery-operated carbon monoxide detectors in childcare facilities.

Gautreaux said she plans to have such detectors installed.

“We recommend everyone has them,” Christopher said. “We’ve been pushing that for years.”

In a Facebook post, the Allentown Fire Department said it has an uptick in calls every year as people start to run their furnaces in cold weather. Oil and gas furnaces should be checked every year to make sure they are running properly, the post said.

A sign on the daycare’s door said operations are suspended. Gautreaux said she plans to have the furnace repaired and will reopen as soon as possible.

The daycare generally has about 40 children each day, ranging in ages from 9 months to 12 years, Gautreaux said. It had been closed since Friday for the Columbus Day holiday.

A Pennsylvania Department of Human Services inspection conducted last fall when the center renewed its license found only one problem regarding fire safety — a door that remained locked when the fire alarm sounded. The center had the door repaired. There were no sanctions imposed for any issues, the report shows.

Staff writer Anthony Salamone contributed to this report.

This story has been updated to reflect that legislation requiring carbon monoxide detectors in childcare facilities is still in the House committee and has not been passed.

___

©2022 The Morning Call. Visit mcall.com. Distributed by Tribune Content Agency, LLC.

___

EARLIER: 

By Peter Sblendorio
New York Daily News

ALLENTOWN, Pa. — A scary situation unfolded at an eastern Pennsylvania daycare center Tuesday morning when a carbon monoxide leak caused at least 27 people to be hospitalized, officials said.

An undisclosed number of children were among those taken to four area hospitals from the Happy Smiles Learning Center in Allentown, local news station WFMZ reported, citing the city’s fire department.

The victims were all said to be stable following an incident that reportedly required every ambulance in Allentown to respond to the daycare.

Officials arrived at the scene after receiving a call about an unconscious child, and detected that carbon monoxide was prevalent, said Capt. John Christopher of the Allentown Fire Department.

Other victims also showed symptoms, leading to a mass evacuation and for some children to be carried on stretchers, WFMZ reported.

An investigation into what caused the leak is now open.

Authorities say parents have been informed of the issue, while another daycare center reportedly offered to take in some of the Happy Smiles Learning Center’s children following the incident.

Allentown is part of Lehigh County, Pa., and is located about 100 miles west of New York City. It’s the third-biggest city in Pennsylvania after Philadelphia and Pittsburgh.

___

©2022 New York Daily News. Visit nydailynews.com. Distributed by Tribune Content Agency, LLC.

Tue, 11 Oct 2022 10:29:00 -0500 en text/html https://www.ems1.com/carbon-monoxide/articles/27-children-5-adults-hospitalized-after-carbon-monoxide-leak-at-pa-daycare-9NBLvzlAWGHV4m8H/
Killexams : Students will gather in Fontana to learn about manufacturing careers

Hundreds of San Bernardino County high school students will gather Oct. 14 at the Chaffey College Industrial Technical Learning Center in Fontana for “Manufacturing Day” — an event that showcases rewarding manufacturing careers.

Organizers hold the event annually to show students and educators that well-paying jobs exist in manufacturing and logistics, as well as low and no-cost training options. The event will be from 8 a.m. to 2 p.m. at 9400 Cherry Avenue.

“Events like this are important not only for students, but also our regional workforce,” said Chaffey College Superintendent/President Henry D. Shannon. “This is a great opportunity to deliver our area high school students a glimpse of career paths they can consider.”

Students will tour manufacturing facilities, interact with local employers and get hands-on exposure to training equipment such as welding simulators, robotics and more.

Manufacturing involves the mechanical, physical or chemical transformation of materials, substances or components into new products, according to the Bureau of Labor Statistics. Various positions exist for industrial maintenance technicians, machinists, welders, woodworkers, medical appliance technicians and more.

About four million manufacturing jobs will need to be filled in the U.S. during the next decade, according to the National Association of Manufacturers. Chaffey College hosts the event to contribute to the future of the industry by creating partnerships and providing a pipeline of skilled workers.

For regional employers, Manufacturing Day is the industry’s biggest annual opportunity to positively change perceptions about advanced manufacturing jobs. Students will tour facilities such as California Steel Industries, Garner Holt, Ventura Foods, Target distribution, Walmart and more.

Thu, 13 Oct 2022 07:52:00 -0500 en text/html https://www.fontanaheraldnews.com/business/students-will-gather-in-fontana-to-learn-about-manufacturing-careers/article_4c36d808-4b30-11ed-b0fa-43f2e3ec8617.html
Killexams : Carbon monoxide poisoning is preventable

Everything was perfectly normal at the Happy Smiles Learning Center in Allentown just before 7:30 a.m. Tuesday.

That’s about the time a young boy attending the day care center suddenly collapsed mid-stride as he ran across the room.

Employees called 911 and tried to revive him. When the emergency medical technicians arrived, monitors connected to their medical bags sounded, alerting them to the presence of carbon monoxide (CO), a colorless, odorless and potentially deadly gas,” the Allentown Morning Call reported.

Immediate testing showed a carbon monoxide concentration of 700 parts per million, more than three times the threshold that can cause death.

Ambulance personnel and first responders from several regional departments rushed to the scene and evacuated 25 children — ranging in age from from less than one year to 10 years old — and eight employees.

At least 27 of them were taken to four hospitals. Some were discharged after being checked, but others were sent to the University of Pennsylvania Hospital and Children’s Hospital of Philadelphia for further treatment because they had high levels of carbon monoxide in their blood.

As investigators sifted through the sequence of events, one thing became clear — the entire scary and potentially deadly event could have been prevented by implementing just one or two of the recommended safety measures related to CO poisoning, in homes or businesses.

One is tied directly to the source of the carbon monoxide.

A spokesman for the natural gas provider, UGI Utilities, said an investigation at the day care center found a malfunctioning heating unit and a blocked venting system. The source of the carbon monoxide would likely have been prevented with one of the common CO safety measures — an annual check by a qualified technician of any existing heating system that burns gas, oil or coal. Carbon monoxide is a byproduct of the burning process.

The other safety measure is a CO detector, a device that the day care center did not have in this case, to sound an alarm as soon as the dangerous gas is detected.

Carbon monoxide detectors currently are not required for day care centers, but they should be.

In fact, Pennsylvania Senate Bill 129, which was unanimously adopted in the Senate and referred to the state House in September, would require CO detectors in all child care centers that use any fossil-fuel-burning heating systems or appliances or have an attached garage where carbon monoxide could be generated by a vehicle, other motors or equipment.

Obviously, all of these safety measures apply to our homes as well. CO detectors cost as little as $20. That and the fee for a qualified technician to check a fossil-fuel heating system or similar appliance every year are worth every penny if they prevent carbon monoxide from causing any harm.

NOTE: Opinions expressed in The Daily Item’s editorials are the consensus of the publisher, top newsroom executives and community members of the editorial board. Today’s was written by Digital Editor Dave Hilliard.

Thu, 13 Oct 2022 02:28:00 -0500 en text/html https://www.dailyitem.com/opinion/carbon-monoxide-poisoning-is-preventable/article_92596d58-4a42-11ed-9835-673a75fee1cd.html
Killexams : The Learning Network No result found, try new keyword!“Make a plan first.” “If the weather permits, wear velvet.” And more. By The Learning Network A NASA spacecraft successfully smashed into a small asteroid and changed its orbit: Should we ... Thu, 13 Oct 2022 19:40:00 -0500 en text/html https://www.nytimes.com/section/learning Killexams : How MNPS Is Investing in Its English Learners, and How It Could Do Better

Maria Paula Zapata

According to Metro Nashville Public Schools’ open data portal, of Nashville’s roughly 82,600 students, 22,069 — about 27 percent — are active English learners or have transitioned out of the district’s English Learners program within the past four years. These students bring 129 languages to the district and represent 145 countries. The top five most-spoken non-English languages are Spanish, Arabic, Kurdish, Somali and Burmese. 

But multilingual students represent much more than numbers and data points. They and their families have a lot to offer to the district. Former English learners include MNPS student board member Abenezer Haile and former student board member Angelie Quimbo. Quimbo was also a co-valedictorian at Hillwood High School — one of the 18 2021-22 valedictorians and salutatorians who, at some point in their education, received services through MNPS’ Office of English Learners. MNPS’ executive director of English Learners Molly Hegwood tells the Scene that many students who exit the EL program outperform their peers whose primary language is English.

Audrey Sika Mvibudulu-Feruzi was an EL student who later became an EL teacher, though she’s since moved out of the district. “Initially, when I went to college, I just wanted to be a general teacher,” Mvibudulu-Feruzi tells the Scene via Zoom. “After two years and a half in, I just told myself, ‘No, let me work with the EL population, that’s where my heart is at, that’s where I came from.’ ” Drawing from needs she had as a student, Mvibudulu-Feruzi created an afterschool program that helped EL students take charge of their education. 

There are many roles within the district that support EL students, from immigrant youth transition certified to EL teachers, parent outreach translators, student ambassadors and more. There’s also the more targeted Students With Interrupted Formal Education program for those who have large gaps in their education — typically refugees or asylees. The state requires a ratio of one EL teacher for every 35 students. MNPS has only 67 in-person interpreters to serve the thousands of students who are active or recent English learners — along with their families — but the district also utilizes an over-the-phone interpretation service, which it was able to expand using federal COVID-19 relief money. Those dollars also provided more opportunities for teachers to get EL certifications, but whether those resources will continue at this level when those dollars run out remains to be seen.

As is the case throughout MNPS, EL students could certainly benefit from more staff support. Though the district was not able to provide exact vacancy numbers in time for the publication of this article, Hegwood tells the Scene: “I wouldn’t say our staffing is any better or worse than any of the other areas. It’s very similar in the sense of trends across the district.” Efat Welson is an MNPS interpreter and a translator for the special education department. She tells the Scene she’d still like to see the district hire more interpreters — a request she made directly to the board of education in April.

EL teachers who work with students are not interpreters, and they don’t necessarily speak the languages of the students they serve. “Teacher fluency in the students’ native language is not required for strong English language instruction, but it certainly is a plus,” says former school board member Gini Pupo-Walker, who directs equitable-education advocacy group Education Trust in Tennessee. “That said, hiring bilingual staff at all levels is important and should be a priority for districts.” 

Serving multilingual families means more than providing interpreters and classroom assistance. It takes a spectrum of wraparound services to truly support students — EL and otherwise — but those services aren’t always executed perfectly. While the district has interpretation services, for example, it can be difficult for some families to know how to access them.

“I think there’s a lot of information that’s available — I don’t think there’s enough information that’s accessible,” says Maria Paula Zapata, director of programs at community nonprofit Conexión Américas. “And that point of, ‘How does it become accessible?’ I think is a greater question that we would need to involve families to really get at, like what does that mean?”

Conexión Américas has a Parents as Partners program that allows Spanish-speaking parents to connect with one another and learn about the school district. Zapata describes the program as a “really beautiful peer-to-peer model, where it’s not just a staff member saying, ‘Here’s what you need to do.’ But it’s real parents saying, ‘Hey, I’ve gone through this program as well. I’ve had children in the school system … and here’s some things that we think can be helpful.’ ”

While programs like these are often helpful, they don’t exist in all languages spoken in the district. 

MNPS leverages outside support through its Community Achieves initiative, which connects students and their families with services that can tend to a range of needs. There’s also a collaborative effort from local organizations, led by Nashville’s teachers’ union, the Metropolitan Nashville Education Association, to implement their own community schools model.

Zapata notes that details matter. Bilingual signage and friendly staff can be the difference between a positive experience with the district or a negative one. “The warmth of your front office? It is a really big indicator of whether families feel included in your school,” she says. 

Like many students, English learners could benefit from more support. This can mean donating resources, donating money to organizations that support them, tutoring kids and responding to schools’ specific needs. Also, as Mvibudulu-Feruzi points out, “Just take the time to learn where children are coming from. … I know that when I was younger, when I had an educator … who was interested in my culture or interested in where I came from, or even interested in me having a different accent than the Southern accent … that brightened my day. That made me feel safer at school. [It’s also important to make sure you’re not] looping everyone into one culture because we don’t all have one culture, and even within a culture, there are subcultures.”

“We need to start seeing EL students not for the additional supports that they may need, but how much potential they have to shape and contribute to our community — if we deliver them all the things they need to be successful,” says Zapata. “If you want [a] multicultural, multilingual, diverse workforce … you need to invest in them now. Otherwise, we’re losing out on everything that we say we want for the future. And I think that that’s the most important [thing]. We’re not talking about poor little kids who don’t speak English now, we’re talking about the future of a multicultural workforce.”

Fri, 14 Oct 2022 05:52:00 -0500 en text/html https://www.nashvillescene.com/news/citylimits/how-mnps-is-investing-in-its-english-learners-and-how-it-could-do-better/article_63b4a83a-4684-11ed-a2e0-83a106c4a33c.html
Killexams : Can You Get Car Insurance With A Learner’s Permit?

Editorial Note: We earn a commission from partner links on Forbes Advisor. Commissions do not affect our editors' opinions or evaluations.

New drivers with a learner’s permit should have car insurance while learning to drive, even though they are not yet fully licensed.

The good news is that teenage drivers with a permit may already be covered by a parent’s car insurance policy. If you are the parent of a freshly minted driver with a permit, adding them to your policy likely will not cost you anything. The rate increase will come later when the young driver gets their license.

Do You Need Auto Insurance With a Learner’s Permit?

Every driver on the road should have car insurance, including those driving with a learner’s permit.

Depending on the state, a teenager with a learner’s permit may not be legally required to have car insurance. But insurers typically require all drivers in your household to be listed on your insurance policy.

If someone with a learner’s permit is driving your car, it’s best to inform your insurance company. If you don’t inform your insurer and your teen gets in an accident, the insurance company could deny your claim.

When your child is ready to get their learner’s permit, call your insurance company to let them know. If, however, you do not want your teen on your policy, you should exclude the driver from coverage.

How Can You Get Insurance with a Permit?

Drivers with a permit can be added to a parent’s car insurance policy or they can buy their own.

Adding a permit holder to a parent policy

If your teen is a new driver who still lives at home, adding them to your car insurance policy is the easiest way to secure coverage.

Adding a driver with a permit to your existing policy likely won’t cost you anything until the driver gets their license. So, if your teen takes two years to learn how to drive with a permit, you can enjoy that time without an increase in your car insurance rate.

Related: Best cheap car insurance for teens

Buying your own car insurance policy

First-time drivers can buy their own car insurance policy, but this is usually more expensive than adding them to an existing parent’s policy.

Buying your own car insurance policy may be your only option if:

  • You are an adult driver with a permit
  • You are a teenage driver whose parents do not have car insurance
  • You are a young driver who does not share a permanent address with your parents
  • You are an emancipated minor
  • You’ve bought your own car

How Much Car Insurance Do Learner’s Permit Drivers Need?

Drivers who are learning with a permit will need to meet state minimum car insurance requirements, either through their parent’s policy or their own. Most states require a minimum amount of liability auto insurance, and some have additional requirements, such as personal injury protection coverage.

For instance, Florida requires drivers to have at least:

  • $10,000 in liability coverage for bodily injury damages for one person
  • $20,000 in bodily injury coverage per accident
  • $10,000 in liability coverage for property damage
  • $10,000 in personal injury protection coverage

If a new driver causes an accident, having only the state minimum amount of car insurance will likely not be enough. As a good rule of thumb, you should make sure to have enough liability insurance to cover what you could lose in a lawsuit after a car accident.

Related: How much car insurance do I need?

How Much Is Car Insurance for New Drivers with a Permit?

If you’re a parent, it likely won’t cost anything to add a new driver with a permit to your car insurance policy. But, once the driver becomes fully licensed, your car insurance premium will increase significantly.

Average rate increase to add a teen driver to a parent policy

How Can Parents Save on Car Insurance?

Parents adding a teen driver to their policy can save on car insurance by:

  • Shopping around. To find the best deal, take the time to compare auto insurance quotes from at least three or four different companies.
  • Signing up for a driver’s education program. Some insurers offer programs that help teen drivers and offer discounts for the teens who complete them.
  • Checking for discounts. Many insurers offer car insurance discounts that apply to teen drivers, such as good grade discounts and student away from home discounts.
  • Bundling your policies. You could save on premiums by buying auto insurance and homeowners insurance (or renter’s insurance) from the same insurer.
  • Driving safely. Insurance rates tend to go up after a speeding ticket or accident, so encourage safe driving habits for the whole family.

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Car Insurance for Permit Drivers FAQ

Does it make sense for a permit holder to buy their own car insurance?

No, it does not make sense for a permit holder to buy their own car insurance unless they have to.

Scenarios where a permit holder may be required to buy their own policy include if they don’t have a parent or guardian with auto insurance, they no longer live with a parent or they buy their own car.

Related: Tips for first-time car insurance buyers

When should a permit holder be added to a parent’s car insurance policy?

When your child gets their learner’s permit, you should notify your insurance company. As a driver using your car with your permission, they may be covered under your policy at no charge.

Once your child gets their driver’s license, you can add them to your car insurance policy as a listed operator. At that point, your insurance rate will increase.

Related: Best car insurance for teens

How much will a policy increase by adding a teen driver?

The average cost of adding a young driver—age 16 to 21—to a married couple’s car insurance policy is $1,951 a year, according to a Forbes Advisor analysis of rates from top 11 insurance companies across the nation.

With that in mind, those hoping to find the best cheap car insurance for teens should shop around and compare premiums with at least three or four different insurance companies.

Tue, 11 Oct 2022 01:52:00 -0500 Holly Johnson en-US text/html https://www.forbes.com/advisor/car-insurance/can-you-get-insurance-with-a-permit/
Killexams : 5 Ways Teachers Can Collaborate to Support English Learners

When it comes to providing English learners with an equitable education, some researchers point to the need for more-strategic collaboration between general classroom and content teachers and multilingual specialists.

About 10 percent of all public school students were classified as English learners in 2019. While only 2 percent of all public school teachers teach English as a Second Language as their main assignment, 64 percent of all public school teachers have at least one English learner in their class, according to the latest federal data available , which is from the 2017-18 school year.

At the Sept. 28 to 30 conference of the WIDA consortium—which offers language assessments for English learners in 36 states, several U.S. territories, and federal agencies such as the Bureau of Indian Education—tips and tricks were shared on how to best meet the needs of this growing student population, including the call for collaboration among educators.

Andrea Honigsfeld, a professor of teacher education for teachers of English to speakers of other languages, or TESOL, at Molloy University in New York, and Valentina Gonzalez, an educational consultant and author for Seidlitz Education, a consulting group for those working with multilingual learners, presented actionable practices that teachers can use when working with English learners and multilingual certified in their districts.

The hope is that if all educators in a district view multilingual learners as their students, rather than just the responsibility of certified or an add-on to their already packed workload, it prevents marginalization of these students and benefits teachers as well.

“When we collaborate with one another, we’re reducing the workload we have,” Gonzalez said.

The co-presenters shared the following five key strategies to bring about effective collaboration.

Collaborative planning

Collaboration starts at planning meetings. Schools should create opportunities for at least a weekly common planning time where grade-level teams at the elementary level, or content-area certified at the secondary level, can work together with the English language development team or specialists. They would examine the curriculum and plan out how they will scaffold and differentiate instruction for multilingual learners and others who need the extra support, Honigsfeld said.

In an ideal world, she added, administrators would set up two of these weekly planning periods so that one could be a larger group or team meeting to focus on questions such as what are the curricular goals and grade-level standards. The second meeting would dive deeper into students’ individual and group needs.

Questions in these collaborative planning meetings should also consider: what type of academic language and literacy opportunities are embedded in the lesson; how can teachers ensure all students can be successful and participate fully; and how to use scaffolding to ensure students understand the content while being appropriately challenged.

Intentional partnership building

At some point during the school week there may be teachers who are doing exemplary work when it comes to supporting multilingual learners alongside their peers and others who are still learning what strategies work best. This is where educators can intentionally build bridges by, for example, inviting colleagues to visit during certain class periods to either observe or offer feedback, Honigsfeld said.

“Many seasoned teachers might have started out their careers with the notion of ‘my classroom, my kids, I close the door and behind the door it’s my way of reaching these students,’ ” Honigsfeld said. “And with the best of intentions, we’re creating silos or pockets of excellence.”

In cases of resistance to such partnerships or to partnerships with a specialist within the classroom, finding ways to build trust among colleagues is key, Gonzalez said.

“Sometimes just talking less and listening more offers the other partner space to contribute, aiming for parity in the lesson, aiming for parity in the classroom, or in planning, and sharing the spotlight with one another,” she added.

Content and language integration

The ability to incorporate academic language lessons into a multitude of subjects is key for supporting multilingual learners and their peers.

For instance, in math class, teachers can think about typical sentence structures that the students use in a math lesson, such as the comparative forms of “less than” or “greater than.” Within the math lesson, teachers can explore these language forms and other nuances of academic language (such as using “than” rather than “then”) as part of the content area, Honigsfeld said.

Integrating content and language also means coming up with creative opportunities for class participation like a talking activity where students articulate the thinking that goes beyond solving a math problem.

And teachers must remember that “every student, even your highly gifted monolingual, English-speaking student will be an academic language learner,” Honigsfeld added. “It’s not an add on, it is not something that now we’re taking away time from all the other students. Instead, we’re supporting all students in their academic language development.”

Technology integration

Honigsfeld and Gonzalez advocate for teachers to use technology as a tool both for collaborating with fellow colleagues (such as sharing resources on Padlet), and for better engaging all students, and particularly English learners.

Multilingual learners, for instance, can benefit from watching prerecorded lectures they can pause and rewind and then dig deeper into with the teacher in class. This is something that can benefit their monolingual peers as well, Honigsfeld said.

Tools like Flipgrid can also allow students to record themselves, so they respond orally rather than in writing and practice that aspect of language acquisition.

Coaching and consultation

Recognizing that there are school districts that struggle to recruit and retain enough certified to support their English learners and the heavy workloads teachers already have, coaching and consultation among educators in a school is helpful, Honigsfeld said.

This can look like teachers across class periods sharing materials and strategies to support multilingual learners since they each only get about 15 or 30 minutes to work directly with these students, she added.

It goes back to the importance of all educators thinking of themselves as the teachers of multilingual learners even when that student population isn’t as sizable in their school as other groups. And district and school administrators play their own role by giving teachers the time and resources needed to make all five of these strategies work, Honigsfeld said.

Fri, 07 Oct 2022 10:59:00 -0500 en text/html https://www.edweek.org/teaching-learning/5-ways-teachers-can-collaborate-to-support-english-learners/2022/10
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