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Exam Code: 200-901 Practice test 2022 by Killexams.com team
200-901 DevNet Associate (DEVASC)

Exam Number : 200-901
Exam Name : DevNet Associate (DEVASC)
Duration: 120 minutes
Available languages: English, Japanese

This test tests your knowledge of software development and design, including:
- Understanding and using APIs
- Cisco platforms and development
- Application development and security
- Infrastructure and automation

The DevNet Associate test v1.0 (DEVASC 200-901) test is a 120-minute test associated with the Cisco Certified DevNet Associate certification. This test tests a candidate's knowledge of software development and design including understanding and using APIs, Cisco platforms and development, application development and security, and infrastructure and automation. The course, Developing Applications and Automating Workflows Using Cisco Core Platforms, helps candidates to prepare for this exam.

15% 1.0 Software Development and Design
1.1 Compare data formats (XML, JSON, and YAML)
1.2 Describe parsing of common data format (XML, JSON, and YAML) to Python data structures
1.3 Describe the concepts of test-driven development
1.4 Compare software development methods (agile, lean, and waterfall)
1.5 Explain the benefits of organizing code into methods / functions, classes, and modules
1.6 Identify the advantages of common design patterns (MVC and Observer)
1.7 Explain the advantages of version control
1.8 Utilize common version control operations with Git
1.8.a Clone
1.8.b Add/remove
1.8.c Commit
1.8.d Push / pull
1.8.e Branch
1.8.f Merge and handling conflicts
1.8.g diff
20% 2.0 Understanding and Using APIs
2.1 Construct a REST API request to accomplish a task given API documentation
2.2 Describe common usage patterns related to webhooks
2.3 Identify the constraints when consuming APIs
2.4 Explain common HTTP response codes associated with REST APIs
2.5 Troubleshoot a problem given the HTTP response code, request and API documentation
2.6 Identify the parts of an HTTP response (response code, headers, body)
2.7 Utilize common API authentication mechanisms: basic, custom token, and API keys
2.8 Compare common API styles (REST, RPC, synchronous, and asynchronous)
2.9 Construct a Python script that calls a REST API using the requests library
15% 3.0 Cisco Platforms and Development
3.1 Construct a Python script that uses a Cisco SDK given SDK documentation
3.2 Describe the capabilities of Cisco network management platforms and APIs (Meraki, Cisco DNA Center, ACI, Cisco SD-WAN, and NSO)
3.3 Describe the capabilities of Cisco compute management platforms and APIs (UCS Manager, UCS Director, and Intersight)
3.4 Describe the capabilities of Cisco collaboration platforms and APIs (Webex Teams, Webex devices, Cisco Unified Communication Manager including AXL and UDS interfaces, and Finesse)
3.5 Describe the capabilities of Cisco security platforms and APIs (Firepower, Umbrella, AMP, ISE, and ThreatGrid)
3.6 Describe the device level APIs and dynamic interfaces for IOS XE and NX-OS
3.7 Identify the appropriate DevNet resource for a given scenario (Sandbox, Code Exchange, support, forums, Learning Labs, and API documentation)
3.8 Apply concepts of model driven programmability (YANG, RESTCONF, and NETCONF) in a Cisco environment
3.9 Construct code to perform a specific operation based on a set of requirements and given API reference documentation such as these:
3.9.a Obtain a list of network devices by using Meraki, Cisco DNA Center, ACI, Cisco SD-WAN, or NSO
3.9.b Manage spaces, participants, and messages in Webex Teams
3.9.c Obtain a list of clients / hosts seen on a network using Meraki or Cisco DNA Center
15% 4.0 Application Deployment and Security
4.1 Describe benefits of edge computing
4.2 Identify attributes of different application deployment models (private cloud, public cloud, hybrid cloud, and edge)
4.3 Identify the attributes of these application deployment types
4.3.a Virtual machines
4.3.b Bare metal
4.3.c Containers
4.4 Describe components for a CI/CD pipeline in application deployments
4.5 Construct a Python unit test
4.6 Interpret contents of a Dockerfile
4.7 Utilize Docker images in local developer environment
4.8 Identify application security issues related to secret protection, encryption (storage and transport), and data handling
4.9 Explain how firewall, DNS, load balancers, and reverse proxy in application deployment
4.10 Describe top OWASP threats (such as XSS, SQL injections, and CSRF)
4.11 Utilize Bash commands (file management, directory navigation, and environmental variables)
4.12 Identify the principles of DevOps practices
20% 5.0 Infrastructure and Automation
5.1 Describe the value of model driven programmability for infrastructure automation
5.2 Compare controller-level to device-level management
5.3 Describe the use and roles of network simulation and test tools (such as VIRL and pyATS)
5.4 Describe the components and benefits of CI/CD pipeline in infrastructure automation
5.5 Describe principles of infrastructure as code
5.6 Describe the capabilities of automation tools such as Ansible, Puppet, Chef, and Cisco NSO
5.7 Identify the workflow being automated by a Python script that uses Cisco APIs including ACI, Meraki, Cisco DNA Center, or RESTCONF
5.8 Identify the workflow being automated by an Ansible playbook (management packages, user management related to services, basic service configuration, and start/stop)
5.9 Identify the workflow being automated by a bash script (such as file management, app install, user management, directory navigation)
5.10 Interpret the results of a RESTCONF or NETCONF query
5.11 Interpret basic YANG models
5.12 Interpret a unified diff
5.13 Describe the principles and benefits of a code review process
5.14 Interpret sequence diagram that includes API calls
15% 6.0 Network Fundamentals
6.1 Describe the purpose and usage of MAC addresses and VLANs
6.2 Describe the purpose and usage of IP addresses, routes, subnet mask / prefix, and gateways
6.3 Describe the function of common networking components (such as switches, routers, firewalls, and load balancers)
6.4 Interpret a basic network topology diagram with elements such as switches, routers, firewalls, load balancers, and port values
6.5 Describe the function of management, data, and control planes in a network device
6.6 Describe the functionality of these IP Services: DHCP, DNS, NAT, SNMP, NTP
6.7 Recognize common protocol port values (such as, SSH, Telnet, HTTP, HTTPS, and NETCONF)
6.8 Identify cause of application connectivity issues (NAT problem, Transport Port blocked, proxy, and VPN)
6.9 Explain the impacts of network constraints on applications

DevNet Associate (DEVASC)
Cisco Associate information
Killexams : Cisco Associate information - BingNews https://killexams.com/pass4sure/exam-detail/200-901 Search results Killexams : Cisco Associate information - BingNews https://killexams.com/pass4sure/exam-detail/200-901 https://killexams.com/exam_list/Cisco Killexams : The new Cisco Enterprise Certification – Everything you need to know

The CCNA Enterprise (Cisco Certified Network Associate) is an IT certification from Cisco Systems.

CCNA 200-301 Certification

  1. The CCNA Enterprise (Cisco Certified Network Associate) is an IT certification from Cisco Systems. The CCNA program began in 1998 with a basic certificate focusing on Routing and Switching. Since then, Cisco has expanded the program to cover many facets of computer networking and network administration, offering certifications at five increasingly demanding levels: Entry, Associate, Professional, Expert, and Architect. Among Cisco’s five-level network certification system, the CCNA family belongs to the Associate level, which is one step above the Entry level. Socheck this link right here nowfor more information.

As of February 24, 2020, Cisco has upgraded its certifications. The new Cisco certifications will now come in 4 skill levels (CCNA, Specialist, CCNP, and CCIE) in 6 specialty areas (Enterprise, Security, Service Provider, Collaboration, Data Center).

CCNA certification: The 200-301 takes the place of the 200-125

This is the significant change in the update, where the Special CCNAs (CCNA Security, Wireless, Voice, etc.) give way to a single CCNA which will be the starting point for all certification courses. We went from CCNA 200-125 to CCNA 200-301. syllabus removed will be Models, EIGRP, OSPFv3, BGP, VTP, and APIC-EM, as well as WAN syllabus like PPP, PPPoE, or GRE. The automation and programmability of networks are becoming a new field of purely theoretical knowledge. According to Cisco Press author Wendell Odom, the new CCNA 200-301 test is 25% less dense than its predecessor CCNA 200-125.

The CCENT level and the ICND1 and ICND2 exams are disappearing in favor of a single, generic CCNA 200-301 Implementing and Administering Cisco Solutions exam.

  1. The Enterprise 200-301 is delivered in 5 days + 3 days of Self-study. Click here to view official content.

For its academic version, the CCNA1, CCNA2, CCNA3, and CCNA4 give way to:

  1. CCNA Enterprise I: Introduction to Networks (17 modules)
  2. CCNA Enterprise II: Fundamentals of Switching, Routing, and Wireless (16 modules)
  3. CCNA Enterprise III: Enterprise Networks, Security and Authorization (14 modules)

Add an alternative

Are youa networkengineer,system engineer,network administrator,and systems technician? Want to boost your career and take it to the next level?

  1. It is essential to know that the Cisco Enterprise certification is among the most demanded and valued major computer science certifications today. Today, most companies require IT certificates. Day by day, with technological advancements, businesses need skilled human resources to manage their network and security.
  2. That’s why investing in Enterprise 200-301 certification is one of the best decisions you can make. It is the starting point for Enterprise, Security, Data Center, Collaboration, and Service Provider courses.

By getting certified, you will be able to discover and deepen the knowledge and skills necessary to install, configure, and troubleshoot enterprise network infrastructures and thus climb the ladder with the most advanced Certifications.

Here’s a look at the six Cisco training courses you’ll get on offer today:

  1. Cisco Certified Technician CCT Routing and Switching 100-490:This course is not intended for novices. Instead, it is aimed at people who are already working in the networking industry and want to deepen their knowledge. It covers switching and routing technologies, remote device configuration, complex connectivity issues, and visiting thecompany websitefor more updates.
  2. Cisco Enterprise 200-301:This course will teach you how to pass the new CCNA certification, which Cisco introduced in February 2020. For those who don’t know, Enterprise 200-301 is the latest network certification for network administrators, engineer support, and data center operations. It covers automation, programmability, SDN, and wireless and security fundamentals.
  3. Cisco CCNP Enterprise ENARSI test 300-410:If you want to work with routers and their associated technologies, you will need the Cisco CCNP Enterprise ENARSI certificate.

Press Release Distributed by The Express Wire

To view the original version on The Express Wire visit The new Cisco Enterprise Certification – Everything you need to know

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Killexams : Computing and Information Technologies Bachelor of Science Degree Course Sem. Cr. Hrs. First Year COMM-142

General Education – Elective: Introduction to Technical Communication (WI-GE)

This course introduces students to current best practices in written and visual technical communication including writing effective email, short and long technical reports and presentations, developing instructional material, and learning the principles and practices of ethical technical communication. Course activities focus on engineering and scientific technical documents. Lab (Fall).

3 CSEC-102

Information Assurance and Security

Computer-based information processing is a foundation of contemporary society. As such, the protection of digital information, and the protection of systems that process this information has become a strategic priority for both the public and private sectors. This course provides an overview of information assurance and security concepts, practices, and trends. syllabus include computing and networking infrastructures, risk, threats and vulnerabilities, legal and industry requirements for protecting information, access control models, encryption, critical national infrastructure, industrial espionage, enterprise backup, recovery, and business continuity, personal system security, and current trends and futures. Lecture 3 (Fall, Spring).

3 GCIS-123

General Education – Elective: Software Development and Problem Solving I

A first course introducing students to the fundamentals of computational problem solving. Students will learn a systematic approach to problem solving, including how to frame a problem in computational terms, how to decompose larger problems into smaller components, how to implement innovative software solutions using a contemporary programming language, how to critically debug their solutions, and how to assess the adequacy of the software solution. Additional syllabus include an introduction to object-oriented programming and data structures such as arrays and stacks. Students will complete both in-class and out-of-class assignments. Lab 6 (Fall, Spring).

4 GCIS-124

General Education – Elective: Software Development and Problem Solving II

A second course that delves further into computational problem solving, now with a focus on an object-oriented perspective. There is a continued emphasis on basic software design, testing & verification, and incremental development. Key syllabus include theoretical abstractions such as classes, objects, encapsulation, inheritance, interfaces, polymorphism, software design comprising multiple classes with UML, data structures (e.g. lists, trees, sets, maps, and graphs), exception/error handling, I/O including files and networking, concurrency, and graphical user interfaces. Additional syllabus include basic software design principles (coupling, cohesion, information expert, open-closed principle, etc.), test driven development, design patterns, data integrity, and data security. (Prerequisite: C- or better in SWEN-123 or CSEC-123 or GCIS-123 or equivalent course.) Lab 6 (Fall, Spring, Summer).

4 MATH-131

General Education – Mathematical Perspective A: Discrete Mathematics

This course is an introduction to the syllabus of discrete mathematics, including number systems, sets and logic, relations, combinatorial methods, graph theory, regular sets, vectors, and matrices. (Prerequisites: MATH-101, MATH-111, NMTH-260, NMTH-272 or NMTH-275 or a Math Placement test score of at least 35.) Lecture 4 (Fall, Spring).

4 MATH-161

General Education – Mathematical Perspective B: Applied Calculus

This course is an introduction to the study of differential and integral calculus, including the study of functions and graphs, limits, continuity, the derivative, derivative formulas, applications of derivatives, the definite integral, the fundamental theorem of calculus, basic techniques of integral approximation, exponential and logarithmic functions, basic techniques of integration, an introduction to differential equations, and geometric series. Applications in business, management sciences, and life sciences will be included with an emphasis on manipulative skills. (Prerequisite: C- or better in MATH-101, MATH-111, MATH-131, NMTH-260, NMTH-272 or NMTH-275 or Math Placement test score greater than or equal to 45.) Lecture 4 (Fall, Spring).

4 NSSA-102

Computer System Concepts

This course teaches the student the essential technologies needed by NSSA majors, focused on PC and mainframe hardware topics. They include how those platforms operate, how they are configured, and the operation of their major internal components. Also covered are the basic operating system interactions with those platforms, physical security of assets, and computing-centric mathematical concepts. Lab 2 (Fall, Spring).

3 YOPS-10

RIT 365: RIT Connections

RIT 365 students participate in experiential learning opportunities designed to launch them into their career at RIT, support them in making multiple and varied connections across the university, and immerse them in processes of competency development. Students will plan for and reflect on their first-year experiences, receive feedback, and develop a personal plan for future action in order to develop foundational self-awareness and recognize broad-based professional competencies. Lecture 1 (Fall, Spring).

0  

General Education – First Year Writing (WI)

3  

General Education – Ethical Perspective

3  

General Education – Global Perspective

3 Second Year ISTE-99

School of Information Second Year Seminar

This course helps students prepare for cooperative employment by developing job search approaches and material. Students will explore current and emerging aspects of IST fields to help focus their skill development strategies. Students are introduced to the Office of Career Services and Cooperative Education, and learn about their professional and ethical responsibilities for their co-op and subsequent professional experiences. Students will work collaboratively to build résumés, cover letters, and prepare for interviewing. (Prerequisites: This class is restricted to HCC-BS or CMIT-BS or WMC-BS or COMPEX-UND Major students with at least 2nd year standing.) Lecture 1 (Fall, Spring).

0 ISTE-140

Web & Mobile I

This course provides students with an introduction to internet and web technologies, and to development on Macintosh/UNIX computer platforms. syllabus include HTML and CSS, CSS3 features, digital images, web page design and website publishing. Emphasis is placed on fundamentals, concepts and standards. Additional syllabus include the user experience, mobile design issues, and copyright/intellectual property considerations. Exercises and projects are required. Lec/Lab 3 (Fall, Spring).

3 ISTE-230

General Education – Elective: Introduction to Database and Data Modeling

A presentation of the fundamental concepts and theories used in organizing and structuring data. Coverage includes the data modeling process, basic relational model, normalization theory, relational algebra, and mapping a data model into a database schema. Structured Query Language is used to illustrate the translation of a data model to physical data organization. Modeling and programming assignments will be required. Note: students should have one course in object-oriented programming. (Prerequisites: ISTE-120 or ISTE-200 or IGME-101 or IGME-105 or CSCI-140 or CSCI-142 or NACA-161 or NMAD-180 or BIOL-135 or GCIS-123 or equivalent course.) Lec/Lab 3 (Fall, Spring).

3 ISTE-240

Web & Mobile II

This course builds on the basics of web page development that are presented in Web and Mobile I and extends that knowledge to focus on theories, issues, and technologies related to the design and development of web sites. An overview of web design concepts, including usability, accessibility, information architecture, and graphic design in the context of the web will be covered. Introduction to web site technologies, including HTTP, web client and server programming, and dynamic page generation from a database also will be explored. Development exercises are required. (Prerequisites: (ISTE-120 or CSCI-140 or CSCI-141 or NACA-161 or IGME-105 or IGME-101 or NMAD-180 or GCIS-123) and (ISTE-140 or NACA-172 or IGME-230 or IGME-235) or equivalent course.) Lec/Lab 3 (Fall, Spring).

3 ISTE-499

Undergraduate Co-op (summer)

Students perform paid, professional work related to their program of study. Students work full-time during the term they are registered for co-op. Students must complete a student co-op work report for each term they are registered; students also are evaluated each term by their employer. A satisfactory grade is given for co-op when both a completed student co-op report and a corresponding employer report that indicates satisfactory student performance are received. (Enrollment in this course requires permission from the department offering the course.) CO OP (Fall, Spring, Summer).

0 NSSA-220

Task Automation Using Interpretive Languages

An introduction to the Unix operating system and scripting in the Perl and Unix shell languages. The course will cover basic user-level commands to the Unix operating system, followed by basic control structures, and data structures in Perl. Examples will include GUI programming, and interfacing to an underlying operating system. Following Perl, students will be introduced to the basics of shell programming using the Unix bash shell. Students will need one year of programming in an object-oriented language. (Prerequisite: GCIS-124 or ISTE-121 or ISTE -200 or CSCI-142 or CSCI-140 or CSCI-242 or equivalent course.) Lecture 4 (Fall, Spring).

3 NSSA-221

System Administration I

This course is designed to give students an understanding of the role of the system administrator in large organizations. This will be accomplished through a discussion of many of the tasks and tools of system administration. Students will participate in both a lecture section and a separate lab section. The technologies discussed in this class include: operating systems, system security, and service deployment strategies. (Prerequisites: NSSA-241 and (NSSA-220 or CSCI-141 or GCIS-123) or equivalent courses.) Lab 2 (Fall, Spring).

3 NSSA-241

Introduction to Routing and Switching

This course provides an introduction to wired network infrastructures, topologies, technologies, and the protocols required for effective end-to-end communication. Basic security concepts for TCP/IP based technologies are introduced. Networking layers 1, 2, and 3 are examined in-depth using the International Standards Organization’s Open Systems Interconnection and TCP/IP models as reference. Course syllabus focus on the TCP/IP protocol suite, the Ethernet LAN protocol, switching technology, and routed and routing protocols common in TCP/IP networks. The lab assignments mirror the lecture content , providing an experiential learning component for each syllabu covered. (Prerequisites: NSSA-102 or CSEC-101 or CSEC-140 or NACT-151 or CSCI-250 or equivalent courses.) Lab 2 (Fall, Spring).

3 STAT-145

General Education – Elective: Introduction to Statistics I

This course introduces statistical methods of extracting meaning from data, and basic inferential statistics. syllabus covered include data and data integrity, exploratory data analysis, data visualization, numeric summary measures, the normal distribution, sampling distributions, confidence intervals, and hypothesis testing. The emphasis of the course is on statistical thinking rather than computation. Statistical software is used. (Prerequisite: MATH-101 or MATH-111 or NMTH-260 or NMTH-272 or NMTH-275 or a math placement test score of at least 35.) Lecture 3 (Fall, Spring, Summer).

3  

General Education – Artistic Perspective

3  

General Education – Natural Science Inquiry Perspective

4  

General Education – Elective

3 Third Year ISTE-260

Designing the User Experience

The user experience is an important design element in the development of interactive systems. This course presents the foundations of user-centered design principles within the context of human-computer interaction (HCI). Students will explore and practice HCI methods that span the development lifecycle from requirements analysis and creating the product/service vision through system prototyping and usability testing. Leading edge interface technologies are examined. Group-based exercises and design projects are required. (Prerequisite: ISTE-140 or IGME-230 or NACA-172 or equivalent course.) Lec/Lab 3 (Fall, Spring).

3 ISTE-430

Information Requirements Modeling

Students will survey and apply contemporary techniques used in analyzing and modeling information requirements. Requirements will be elicited in a variety of domains and abstracted at conceptual, logical, and physical levels of detail. Process, data, and state modeling will be applied in projects that follow a systems development lifecycle. Object-oriented modeling will be explored and contrasted with data and process oriented modeling. Individual and team modeling assignments will be required. (Prerequisites: ISTE-230 or CSCI-320 or equivalent course.) Lecture 3 (Fall, Spring).

3 ISTE-499

Undergraduate Co-op (summer)

Students perform paid, professional work related to their program of study. Students work full-time during the term they are registered for co-op. Students must complete a student co-op work report for each term they are registered; students also are evaluated each term by their employer. A satisfactory grade is given for co-op when both a completed student co-op report and a corresponding employer report that indicates satisfactory student performance are received. (Enrollment in this course requires permission from the department offering the course.) CO OP (Fall, Spring, Summer).

0  

CIT Concentration Courses

9  

General Education – Social Perspective

3  

General Education – Scientific Principles Perspective

4  

General Education – Immersion 1

3  

Open Electives

6 Fourth Year ISTE-500

Senior Development Project I

The first course in a two-course, senior level, system development capstone project. Students form project teams and work with sponsors to define system requirements. Teams then create architectures and designs, and depending on the project, also may begin software development. Requirements elicitation and development practices introduced in prior coursework are reviewed, and additional methods and processes are introduced. Student teams are given considerable latitude in how they organize and conduct project work. (This course is restricted to WMC-BS, HCC-BS, CMIT-BS, and 2 ISTE-499 completed or (1 ISTE-498 completed and 1 ISTE-499 completed).) Lecture 3 (Fall, Spring).

3 ISTE-501

Senior Development Project II (WI-PR)

The second course in a two-course, senior level, system development capstone project. Student teams complete development of their system project and package the software and documentation for deployment. Usability testing practices introduced in prior course work are reviewed, and additional methods and processes are introduced. Teams present their developed system and discuss lessons learned at the completion of the course. (Prerequisites: ISTE-500 or equivalent course.) Lecture 3 (Fall, Spring).

3  

CIT Concentration Courses

9  

General Education – Immersion 2, 3

6  

Open Electives

9 Total Semester Credit Hours

126

Thu, 28 Jul 2022 12:00:00 -0500 en text/html https://www.rit.edu/computing/study/computing-and-information-technologies-bs
Killexams : What is Cyber Security and Why is it Important?

A student exploring what cyber security is, holding a tablet and standing in front of large machines at his internship.

In latest years, headlines about cyber security have become increasingly common. Thieves steal customer social security numbers from corporations’ computer systems. Unscrupulous hackers grab passwords and personal information from social media sites or pluck company secrets from the cloud. For companies of all sizes, keeping information safe is a growing concern.

What Is Cyber Security?

Cyber security consists of all the technologies and practices that keep computer systems and electronic data safe. And, in a world where more and more of our business and social lives are online, it’s an enormous and growing field with many types of job roles.

According to the Cyber Security & Infrastructure Security Agency (CISA), "Cyber security is the art of protecting networks, devices and data from unauthorized access or criminal use and the practice of ensuring confidentiality, integrity and availability of information."

What Is Information Security?

Information security is the processes and tools designed and used to protect sensitive business information from modification, disruption, destruction and inspection, according to CISCO.

Information security and cyber security are often confused. According to CISCO, information security is a crucial part of cyber security but is used exclusively to ensure data security.

Everything is connected by computers and the internet now, including communication, entertainment, transportation, shopping, medicine and more. A copious amount of personal information is stored among these various services and apps, which is why information security is critical.

Why Is Cyber Security Increasingly Important?

Getting hacked isn’t just a direct threat to the confidential data companies need. It can also ruin their relationships with customers and even place them in significant legal jeopardy. With new technology, from self-driving cars to internet-enabled home security systems, the dangers of cybercrime become even more serious.

So, it’s no wonder that international research and advisory firm Gartner Inc. predicts worldwide security spending will hit $170 billion in 2022, an 8% increase in just a year.

Jonathan Kamyck with text Jonathan Kamyck“We’re seeing a tremendous demand for cyber security practitioners,” said Jonathan Kamyck, associate dean of cyber security at Southern New Hampshire University (SNHU). “Most businesses, whether they’re large or small, will have an online presence, for example. Some of the things you would do in the old days with a phone call or face-to-face now happen through email or teleconference, and that introduces lots of complicated questions with regard to information.”

These days, the need to protect confidential information is a pressing concern at the highest levels of government and industry. State secrets can be stolen from the other side of the world. Companies whose whole business models depend on control of customer data can find their databases compromised. In just one high-profile 2017 case, personal information for 147.9 million people – about half the United States – was compromised in a breach of credit reporting company Equifax.

What Are Cyber Attacks?

Infographic with the text Common Cyber Attack Threats: Malware, Phising, Ransomware, VirusesA cyber attack is an unwelcomed attempt to steal, expose, alter, disable or destroy information through unauthorized access to computer systems, according to the International Business Machines (IBM).

There are many reasons behind a cyber attack, such as cyber warfare, cyber terrorism and even hacktivists, but these actions fall into three main categories: criminal, political and personal.

Attackers motivated by crime typically seek financial gain through money theft, data theft or business disruption. Similarly, personal attackers include disgruntled current or former employees who will take money or data in an attempt to attack a company's systems.  Socio-political motivated attackers desire attention for their cause, resulting in their attacks being known to the public, and this is a form of hacktivism. Other forms of cyber attacks include espionage, or spying to gain an unfair advantage over the competition, and intellectual challenging.

According to CISA, as of 2021, there is a ransomware attack every 11 seconds – a dramatic rise from every 39 seconds in 2019 (CISA PDF Source). In addition, small businesses are the target of nearly 43% of all cyber attacks, which is up 400%.

The Small Business Association (SBA) reports that small businesses make attractive targets and are typically attacked due to their lack of security infrastructure. The SBA also reports that a majority of small business owners felt their business was vulnerable to an attack. This is because many of these businesses:

  • Can't afford professional IT solutions
  • Have limited time to devote to cyber security
  • Don't know where to begin

What Are Types of Cyber Attacks and Threats?

Here are some of the most common threats among cyber attacks:

  • Malware: Malware, also known as malicious software, is intrusive software developed by cyber criminals to steal data or to damage and destroy computers and computer systems, according to CISCO. Malware has the capability of exfiltrating massive amounts of data. Examples of common malware are viruses, worms, trojan viruses, spyware, adware and ransomware.
  • Phishing: Phishing attacks are the practice of sending fraudulent communications while appearing to be a reputable source, according to CISCO. This is typically performed via email or on the phone. The goal is to steal sensitive information such as financial or login information – or to install malware onto a target's device.
  • Ransomware: Ransomware is a form of malware designed to encrypt files on a target device, rendering those files and the systems they rely on unusable, according to the CISA. Once the system has been encrypted, actors demand ransom in exchange for decryption.
  • Viruses: A virus is a harmful program intended to spread from computer to computer, as well as other connected devices, according to the SBA. The object of a virus is to give the attacker access to the infected systems. Many viruses pretend to be legitimate applications but then cause damage to the systems, steal data, interrupt services or obtain additional malware, according to Proofpoint.

Who Is Behind Cyber Attacks?

Attacks against enterprises can come from a variety of sources such as criminal organizations, state actors and private persons, according to IBM. An easy way to classify these attacks is by outsider versus insider threats.

Outsider or external threats include organized criminals, professional hackers and amateur hackers (like hacktivists).

Insider threats are typically those who have authorized access to a company's assets and abuse them deliberately or accidentally. These threats include employees who are careless of security procedures, disgruntled current or former employees and business partners or clients with system access.

Developing Cyber Awareness

Infographic with the text Good Security Measures: Downloading the latest patches and software updates, Ensuring data is secure, Make sure employees use strong passwordsCyber security awareness month takes place every October and encourages individuals and organizations to own their role in protecting their cyberspace, according to Forbes, although anyone can practice being mindful of cyber security at any time. Awareness of the dangers of browsing the web, checking emails and interacting online in general are all part of developing cyber security awareness.

Cyber security awareness can mean different things to different people depending on their technical knowledge. Ensuring appropriate training is available to individuals is a great way to motivate lasting behavioral changes.

While cyber security awareness is the first step, employees and individuals must embrace and proactively use effective practices both professionally and personally for it to truly be effective, according to Forbes.

Getting started with cyber security awareness is easy, and many resources are readily available on the CISA government website based on your needs. Whether you need formal training or a monthly email with cyber security tips and tricks, any awareness and training can impact behavior and create a positive change in how you view cyber security.

What Are the Types of Cyber Security?

Here are the most common types of cyber security available:

  • Application Security: Application security describes security used by applications to prevent data or code within the app from being stolen or hijacked. These security systems are implemented during application development but are designed to protect the application after deployment, according to VMWare.
  • Cloud Security: Cloud security involves the technology and procedures that secure cloud computing environments against internal and external threats. These security systems are designed to prevent unauthorized access and keep data and applications in the cloud secure from cyber security threats, according to McAfee.
  • Infrastructure Security: Critical infrastructure security describes the physical and cyber systems that are so vital to society that their incapacity would have a debilitating impact on our physical, economic or public health and safety, according to CISA.
  • Internet of Things (IoT) Security: IoT is the concept of connecting any device to the Internet and other connected devices. The IoT is a network of connected things and people, all of which share data about the way they are used and their environments, according to IBM. These devices include appliances, sensors, televisions, routers, printers and countless other home network devices. Securing these devices is important, and according to a study by Bloomberg, security is one of the biggest barriers to widespread IoT adaption.
  • Network Security: Network security is the protection of network infrastructure from unauthorized access, abuse or theft. These security systems involve creating a secure infrastructure for devices, applications and users to work together, according to CISCO.

Do You Need a Degree To Be a Cyber Security Professional?

A cyber security degree provides an opportunity for students to develop skills and a mindset that empowers them to begin a career in securing systems, protecting information assets and managing organizational risks.

Alex Pettito with the text Alex PettitoAlex Petitto ’21 earned his bachelor’s in cyber security. Petitto always wanted to work within the IT sector, and he chose cyber security because it’s an exponentially growing field. He transferred credits from a community college through a U.S. Air Force program and finished his bachelor's in under two years. "It was much quicker than I thought it would be,” he said.

It didn't take long for Petitto to begin exploring his career options. "Even before finishing (my) degree, I … received multiple invites to interview for entry-level positions within the industry and received three job offers," said Petitto. He decided to remain within the Air Force and transfer to a cyber security unit as opposed to joining the private sector.

Petitto said his cyber security degree opened doors for him in the field – “a monumental goal for me," he said. "This degree was a critical first step for breaking into the industry."

Your cyber security degree program can also connect you with experiential learning opportunities to further your growth as a cyber security professional. For example, the annual National Cyber League (NCL) has a competition wherein students from across the U.S. practice real-world cyber security tasks and skills. SNHU recently placed 9th out of over 500 colleges participating in the NCL competition.

Career Opportunity and Salary Potential in Cyber Security

As companies large and small scramble to respond to the growing threats, jobs in the cyber security field are growing fast. The U.S. Bureau of Labor Statistics (BLS) predicts that employment for information security analysts will grow by 33% through 2030. That’s more than twice as fast as the average computer-related occupation and four times as fast as American jobs in general.

To help fill the need for more professionals in the cyber security world, CyberSeek, a project funded by the federal government and supported by industry partners, provides detailed information on the demand for these workers by state. The tool shows that, across the country, there were 180,000 job openings for information security analysts between May 2021 and April 2022, with only 141,000 professionals holding jobs in the role, reflecting an unfilled demand of 39,000 workers.

“There’s a huge shortfall right now in entry-level and midlevel cyber security roles,” Kamyck said. “You’re looking at demand across all business sectors, with companies of all sizes.

CyberSeek lists the following entry-mid-and advanced-level roles available in the field. Average salaries are based on job openings posted between May 2021 and April 2022.

Entry-level Cyber Security Roles

  • Cyber Crime Analyst: Cyber crime analysts make an average salary of $100,000, and common skills necessary for the role include computer forensics, information security and malware engineering.
  • Cyber Security Specialist: Cyber security specialists make an average salary of $104,482, and important skills for the role include information security, network security and information assurance.
  • Incident and Intrusion Analyst: Incident analysts make an average salary of $88,226, and common skills needed include project management, network security and intrusion detection.
  • IT Auditor: Information technology auditors make an average salary of $110,000, and common skills for the role include internal auditing and audit planning, accounting and risk assessment.

Mid-level Cyber Security Roles

  • Cyber Security Analyst: Cybersecurity analysts make an average of $107,500, and the top skills required include information security and systems, network security and threat analysis.
  • Cyber Security Consultant: Consultants in cyber security make an average salary of $92,504 and need skills in information security and surveillance, asset protection and security operations.
  • Penetration and Vulnerability Tester: Penetration testers make an average salary of $101,091 and need skills in penetration testing, Java, vulnerability assessment and software development.

Advanced-level Cyber Security Roles

  • Cyber Security Architect: Cyber security architects make an average salary of $159,752, and top skills for the role include software development, network and information security and authentication.
  • Cyber Security Engineer: Cyber security engineers make an average of $117,510 a year and need cryptography, authentication and network security skills.
  • Cyber Security Manager:  Managers in this field earn an average salary of $130,000, and top skills include project management, network security and risk management.

What Does a Cyber Security Professional Do?

Infographic with the text Types of Cyber Security: Application security, cloud security, infastructure security, internet of things (IOT) security, network securityKamyck said cyber security professionals could play a wide range of roles in a modern company. For example, some small businesses may hire a single person to handle all kinds of work protecting data. Others contract with consultants who can offer a variety of targeted services. Meanwhile, larger firms may have whole departments dedicated to protecting information and chasing down threats.

While companies define roles related to information security in a variety of ways, Kamyck said there are some specific tasks that these employees are commonly called on to do. In many cases, they must analyze threats and gather information from a company’s servers, cloud services and employee computers and mobile devices.

“An analyst’s job is to find meaning in all of that data, see what’s concerning,” he said. “Is there a breach? Is someone violating a policy?”

In many cases, Kamyck said, security specialists work with other information technology professionals to ensure a company’s systems are secure. That involves not just technical know-how but also people-oriented skills.

But breaches don’t just take the form of someone hacking into a server. They can also involve customer lists sent through unencrypted email, a password written on a sticky note in a cubicle or a company laptop stolen from an employee’s car.

Depending on their specific role, cyber security professionals must also think strategically. In many industries, companies rely on employees having quick access to highly sensitive data, such as medical records or bank account information.

“The goal is to balance the needs of the company or the organization you’re working for with the need to protect the confidentiality of customer data and trade secrets,” Kamyck said.

Kamyck said people who do well in these jobs tend to be curious, competitive and willing to keep learning to stay up to date with rapidly changing technology. The work draws on multidisciplinary knowledge, and people who continue with the work find there are a variety of directions they can take in their careers.

For example, Kamyck said, if you're interested in the business side, you might become a manager or run audits that let companies know where they need to Boost to meet compliance. If you love the adversarial part of the job, you might become a penetration tester, essentially an “ethical hacker” who tests for system vulnerabilities by trying to get through them.

How To Get Into Cyber Security

If you’re wondering how to get into cyber security, it’s clear there are many positions out there. The question is how to make sure you’re a good fit for them. According to BLS, most information security analyst jobs require at least a bachelor’s degree in computer science, information assurance, programming or another related field.

In some cases, the work calls for a Master of Business Administration (MBA) in Information Systems. That degree typically takes an additional two years of study and involves both technical and business management courses.

Cyber security job requirements also sometimes include related work experience. Rather than jumping right into the security side of information technology, you can start as a network or computer systems administrator. Depending on the specific cyber security position, employers may have other job requirements. For instance, keeping databases secure might be an ideal job for someone who’s spent time as a database administrator and is also well-versed in security issues.

Aside from work experience and college degrees, some employers also prefer job candidates who have received certifications demonstrating their understanding of best practices in the field. For example, the Certified Information Systems Security Professional (CISSP) credential validates a professional’s general knowledge and abilities in information security. There are also more specific certificates, which can highlight specialized knowledge of computer architecture, engineering or management.

Whatever path new employees in cyber security want to follow, Kamyck said, those who are willing to make an effort to learn the field will find abundant opportunities.

“There’s needs in government. There’s needs in finance. There’s needs in education,” Kamyck said. “There’s a tremendous unfilled need.”

Discover more about SNHU's online cyber security degree: Find out what courses you'll take, skills you'll learn and how to request information about the program.

Nicholas Patterson is a writer at Southern New Hampshire University. Connect with him on LinkedIn.

Wed, 20 Jul 2022 12:00:00 -0500 en text/html https://www.snhu.edu/about-us/newsroom/stem/what-is-cyber-security
Killexams : Students in 180 Countries Benefitted from Cisco Academy in 20yrs

Emma Okonji

In celebrating its 20 years of operation in Nigerian, the Cisco Networking Academy, which is an initiative of Cisco to develop people in technology education, said it has trained over 7.8 million students in 180 countries, including Nigeria.

The Cisco Networking Academy (NetAcad) is the world’s largest technology classroom, partnering closely with 22,000 educators to deliver a curriculum that gives students digital, problem-solving and entrepreneurial skills needed to get a job, promotion or start entrepreneurial businesses.

In Nigeria alone, the NetAcad has trained over 101,000 students of which 41 per cent are female in the past 20 years and currently has over 32, 000 active students and an instructor population of 218 in 167 Academies, seven Academy Support Center (ASCs) and nine Instructor Training Center (ITCs).

With many industries experiencing a shortage of Information Technology (IT) talent, Cisco Networking Academy is developing a pipeline of IT talent to support digitisation in Nigeria.

Speaking at a press conference in Lagos recently, Cisco Regional Manager, Corporate Affairs, sub-Saharan Africa, Alfie Hamid said: “Cisco Networking Academy plays an essential role in Cisco’s commitment to positively impact over one billion people by 2025 through digitisation. For 20 years, Cisco Networking Academy has enabled people from all works of life to form part of the digital economy, positively changing the lives, incomes, and narratives of their families.”

Cisco General Manager in Nigeria, Olakunle Oloruntimehin, expressed Cisco Nigeria’s commitment to advancing skills in ICT saying, “As we celebrate 20 years of innovative IT teaching, we are proud that the Cisco Networking Academy has contributed to the growth of the Nigerian economy.

The crown jewel of Cisco Systems’ offerings is their Cisco Certified Network Associate curriculum (CCNA), which includes basic mitigation of security threats, introduction to wireless networking concepts and terminology, and performance-based skills. It’s aligns to industry recognised certification, which is what potential employers are looking for.
The curriculum, according to Oloruntimehin, could be a gateway to a number of careers—network technician, support engineer, network administrator, network designer, network engineer, amongst others.

Students who have benefitted from the initiative, are now gainfully employed as technology experts, while majority have set up their own businesses, employing young school graduates.

Bello Fathia, an SS 3 students of Federal Government College, Yaba, Lagos, who is currently taking some courses at the NetAcad, was able to design Smart School Solution that address security challenges schools. She was able to demonstrate how the solution works, during the press conference to celebrate the 20 years anniversary of NetAcad in Nigeria.

The Networking Academy learning experience includes e-learning curricula; personalised assessments; and hands-on opportunities such as labs, networking simulation software, competitions, and hackathons.

Mon, 11 Jul 2022 12:01:00 -0500 en-US text/html https://www.thisdaylive.com/index.php/2017/11/20/students-in-180-countries-benefitted-from-cisco-academy-in-20yrs/
Killexams : Prepare for a Career in IT With This Discounted Certification Bundle

As an IT professional, understanding multiple technologies is crucial to keep your skill set relevant. One way to prepare is with The 2022 CompTIA & AWS, Cisco Certification Paths Bundle, available now for 94% off the list price.

The bundle, presented by e-learning course provider CramWise, features 30 hours of test prep for 13 different certification paths in the CompTIA, AWS, and Cisco families. What sets this course package apart, though, is its entry-level material. If you want a well-rounded education, the CompTIA A+ 220-1001 and 220-1002 lessons should help; those interested in vendor-specific technology can tap into content for Cisco's entry-level CCNA certification. Finally, you'll find CLF-C01 training for AWS Certified Cloud Practitioner, one of Amazon's foundational certs.

From there, you'll progress to CompTIA or Amazon's higher-level training. CompTIA, being vendor-neutral, offers certifications for a wide range of uses, from cybersecurity to virtualization. The bundle's remaining AWS lesson options, meanwhile, cover associate-level designations aimed toward IT professionals with at least one year of work experience.

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Wed, 13 Jul 2022 02:07:00 -0500 en text/html https://www.pcmag.com/deals/prepare-for-a-career-in-it-with-this-discounted-certification-bundle
Killexams : Ex-Cisco, Duo Lawyer Joins Secureframe as Cybersecurity Startup's Legal Chief

A former in-house legal leader for Cisco Systems Inc. and Duo Security Inc., who served a key role in the former company’s $2.35 billion acquisition of the latter, has taken a new general counsel role at San Francisco-based security compliance tech firm Secureframe. 

Kyle McLaughlin now leads all legal, risk and privacy functions at Secureframe, which has raised $79 million since its 2020 launch and has been on a bit of a hiring spree. The company offers automated security and compliance solutions for businesses. 

Wed, 20 Jul 2022 05:23:00 -0500 en text/html https://www.law.com/corpcounsel/2022/07/19/ex-cisco-duo-lawyer-joins-secureframe-as-cybersecurity-startups-legal-chief/?slreturn=20220707084241
Killexams : Global Serious Game Market (2022 to 2027) - Players Include CCS Digital Education, Cisco Systems, Grendel Games and IBM Among Others

Company Logo

Global Serious Game Market

Global Serious Game Market

Dublin, July 07, 2022 (GLOBE NEWSWIRE) -- The "Global Serious Game Market (2022-2027) by Application, Platform, Vertical, End User, Geography, Competitive Analysis, and the Impact of Covid-19 with Ansoff Analysis" report has been added to ResearchAndMarkets.com's offering.

The Global Serious Game Market is estimated to be USD 8.18 Bn in 2022 and is projected to reach USD 15.99 Bn by 2027, growing at a CAGR of 14.35%.

Market Dynamics

Market dynamics are forces that impact the prices and behaviors of the Global Serious Game Market stakeholders. These forces create pricing signals which result from the changes in the supply and demand curves for a given product or service. Forces of Market Dynamics may be related to macro-economic and micro-economic factors. There are dynamic market forces other than price, demand, and supply. Human emotions can also drive decisions, influence the market, and create price signals.

As the market dynamics impact the supply and demand curves, decision-makers aim to determine the best way to use various financial tools to stem various strategies for speeding the growth and reducing the risks.

Company Profiles

The report provides a detailed analysis of the competitors in the market. It covers the financial performance analysis for the publicly listed companies in the market. The report also offers detailed information on the companies' latest development and competitive scenario. Some of the companies covered in this report are Applied Research Associate, Breakaway, CCS Digital Education, Cisco Systems, Designing Digitally, Grendel Games, IBM, Microsoft, Nintendo, Serious Game International, Promotion Software, Serious Game Interactive, Tata Interactive Systems, Triseum, Tygron BV, Virtual Heroes, etc.

Countries Studied

  • America (Argentina, Brazil, Canada, Chile, Colombia, Mexico, Peru, United States, Rest of Americas)

  • Europe (Austria, Belgium, Denmark, Finland, France, Germany, Italy, Netherlands, Norway, Poland, Russia, Spain, Sweden, Switzerland, United Kingdom, Rest of Europe)

  • Middle-East and Africa (Egypt, Israel, Qatar, Saudi Arabia, South Africa, United Arab Emirates, Rest of MEA)

  • Asia-Pacific (Australia, Bangladesh, China, India, Indonesia, Japan, Malaysia, Philippines, Singapore, South Korea, Sri Lanka, Thailand, Taiwan, Rest of Asia-Pacific)

Competitive Quadrant

The report includes Competitive Quadrant, a proprietary tool to analyze and evaluate the position of companies based on their Industry Position score and Market Performance score. The tool uses various factors for categorizing the players into four categories. Some of these factors considered for analysis are financial performance over the last 3 years, growth strategies, innovation score, new product launches, investments, growth in market share, etc.

Ansoff Analysis

  • The report presents a detailed Ansoff matrix analysis for the Global Serious Game Market. Ansoff Matrix, also known as Product/Market Expansion Grid, is a strategic tool used to design strategies for the growth of the company. The matrix can be used to evaluate approaches in four strategies viz. Market Development, Market Penetration, Product Development and Diversification. The matrix is also used for risk analysis to understand the risk involved with each approach.

  • The report analyses the Global Serious Game Market using the Ansoff Matrix to provide the best approaches a company can take to Boost its market position.

  • Based on the SWOT analysis conducted on the industry and industry players, the analyst has devised suitable strategies for market growth.

Why buy this report?

  • The report offers a comprehensive evaluation of the Global Serious Game Market. The report includes in-depth qualitative analysis, verifiable data from authentic sources, and projections about market size. The projections are calculated using proven research methodologies.

  • The report has been compiled through extensive primary and secondary research. The primary research is done through interviews, surveys, and observation of renowned personnel in the industry.

  • The report includes an in-depth market analysis using Porter's 5 forces model and the Ansoff Matrix. In addition, the impact of Covid-19 on the market is also featured in the report.

  • The report also includes the regulatory scenario in the industry, which will help you make a well-informed decision. The report discusses major regulatory bodies and major rules and regulations imposed on this sector across various geographies.

  • The report also contains the competitive analysis using Positioning Quadrants, the analyst's Proprietary competitive positioning tool.

Key syllabus Covered:

1 Report Description

2 Research Methodology

3 Executive Summary

4 Market Dynamics
4.1 Drivers
4.1.1 Growing Usage of Mobile-Based Educational Games
4.1.2 Improved Learning Outcomes
4.1.3 Serious Game Drives Real ROI (Return on Investment)
4.1.4 Increased Need for User Engagement Across Enterprises and Consumer Brands
4.2 Restraints
4.2.1 Improper Game Design
4.2.2 Lack of Awareness About Serious Game
4.2.3 Lack of Assessment Tools to Measure Serious Game Effectiveness
4.3 Opportunities
4.3.1 Explosion of the Digital World
4.3.2 Emergence of Social Networks to Pave New Growth Avenues
4.4 Challenges
4.4.1 Unavailability of Direct-To-Consumer Based Serious Game

5 Market Analysis
5.1 Regulatory Scenario
5.2 Porter's Five Forces Analysis
5.3 Impact of COVID-19
5.4 Ansoff Matrix Analysis

6 Global Serious Game Market, By Application
6.1 Introduction
6.2 Emergency Services
6.3 Human Resources
6.4 Marketing
6.5 Product Development
6.6 Sales
6.7 Training
6.8 Support

7 Global Serious Game Market, By Platform
7.1 Introduction
7.2 Hand-Held
7.3 Mobile-Based
7.4 PC-Based
7.5 Web-Based

8 Global Serious Game Market, By Vertical
8.1 Introduction
8.2 Aerospace and Defence
8.3 Automotive
8.4 Corporate
8.5 Education
8.6 Energy
8.7 Government
8.8 Healthcare
8.9 Retail
8.10 Media and Advertising
8.11 Others

9 Global Serious Game Market, By End User
9.1 Introduction
9.2 Consumer
9.3 Enterprise

10 Americas' Serious Game Market
10.1 Introduction
10.2 Argentina
10.3 Brazil
10.4 Canada
10.5 Chile
10.6 Colombia
10.7 Mexico
10.8 Peru
10.9 United States
10.10 Rest of Americas

11 Europe's Serious Game Market
11.1 Introduction
11.2 Austria
11.3 Belgium
11.4 Denmark
11.5 Finland
11.6 France
11.7 Germany
11.8 Italy
11.9 Netherlands
11.10 Norway
11.11 Poland
11.12 Russia
11.13 Spain
11.14 Sweden
11.15 Switzerland
11.16 United Kingdom
11.17 Rest of Europe

12 Middle East and Africa's Serious Game Market
12.1 Introduction
12.2 Egypt
12.3 Israel
12.4 Qatar
12.5 Saudi Arabia
12.6 South Africa
12.7 United Arab Emirates
12.8 Rest of MEA

13 APAC's Serious Game Market
13.1 Introduction
13.2 Australia
13.3 Bangladesh
13.4 China
13.5 India
13.6 Indonesia
13.7 Japan
13.8 Malaysia
13.9 Philippines
13.10 Singapore
13.11 South Korea
13.12 Sri Lanka
13.13 Thailand
13.14 Taiwan
13.15 Rest of Asia-Pacific

14 Competitive Landscape
14.1 Competitive Quadrant
14.2 Market Share Analysis
14.3 Strategic Initiatives
14.3.1 M&A and Investments
14.3.2 Partnerships and Collaborations
14.3.3 Product Developments and Improvements

15 Company Profiles
15.1 Applied Research Associate
15.2 Breakaway
15.3 CCS Digital Education
15.4 Cisco Systems
15.5 Designing Digitally
15.6 Grendel Games
15.7 IBM
15.8 Microsoft
15.9 Nintendo
15.10 Serious Game International
15.11 Promotion Software
15.12 Serious Game Interactive
15.13 Tata Interactive Systems
15.14 Triseum
15.15 Tygron BV
15.16 Virtual Heroes

16 Appendix

For more information about this report visit https://www.researchandmarkets.com/r/97b9jq

Attachment

CONTACT: CONTACT: ResearchAndMarkets.com Laura Wood, Senior Press Manager press@researchandmarkets.com For E.S.T Office Hours Call 1-917-300-0470 For U.S./CAN Toll Free Call 1-800-526-8630 For GMT Office Hours Call +353-1-416-8900
Mon, 11 Jul 2022 16:53:00 -0500 en-US text/html https://finance.yahoo.com/news/global-serious-game-market-2022-103800417.html
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