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ACT approach - American College Testing: English, Math, Reading, Science, Writing Updated: 2024

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Exam Code: ACT American College Testing: English, Math, Reading, Science, Writing approach January 2024 by Killexams.com team

ACT American College Testing: English, Math, Reading, Science, Writing

Test Detail:
The ACT (American College Testing) is a standardized test designed to assess the readiness of high school students for college-level academics. The test consists of multiple-choice questions in five sections: English, Math, Reading, Science, and an optional Writing section. Here is a detailed overview of the ACT test, including the number of questions and time, course outline, exam objectives, and exam syllabus.

Number of Questions and Time:
The ACT test consists of five sections, each with a different number of questions and time limits:

1. English:
- Number of Questions: 75
- Time Limit: 45 minutes

2. Math:
- Number of Questions: 60
- Time Limit: 60 minutes

3. Reading:
- Number of Questions: 40
- Time Limit: 35 minutes

4. Science:
- Number of Questions: 40
- Time Limit: 35 minutes

5. Writing (Optional):
- Essay Prompt: Provided on the test day
- Time Limit: 40 minutes

Please note that the Writing section is optional, and its inclusion may vary based on the test-taker's preference or the requirements of the colleges or universities they are applying to.

Course Outline:
The ACT does not have a specific course outline, as it is a standardized test aimed at assessing a student's general knowledge and skills. However, test-takers can prepare for the exam by focusing on the following key areas:

1. English:
- Usage/Mechanics: Punctuation, grammar, sentence structure, and usage.
- Rhetorical Skills: Style, organization, and strategy.

2. Math:
- Pre-Algebra/Elementary Algebra: Numbers, operations, equations, and inequalities.
- Intermediate Algebra/Coordinate Geometry: Functions, systems of equations, and conic sections.
- Plane Geometry/Trigonometry: Properties of geometric figures, trigonometric functions, and identities.

3. Reading:
- Comprehension: Understanding main ideas, details, and author's tone.
- Analysis: Analyzing relationships, making inferences, and evaluating arguments.

4. Science:
- Interpretation: Analyzing data, charts, graphs, and experimental scenarios.
- Reasoning: Understanding scientific principles, evaluating hypotheses, and drawing conclusions.

Exam Objectives:
The objectives of the ACT test include:
- Assessing the test-taker's readiness for college-level English, Math, Reading, and Science.
- Evaluating problem-solving skills, critical thinking abilities, and analytical reasoning.
- Providing colleges and universities with a standardized measure for admissions and scholarship decisions.

Exam Syllabus:
The ACT test covers a broad range of content areas. The syllabus includes:

1. English Section:
- Usage/Mechanics: Punctuation, grammar, and sentence structure.
- Rhetorical Skills: Style, organization, and strategy.

2. Math Section:
- Pre-Algebra/Elementary Algebra: Numbers, operations, equations, and inequalities.
- Intermediate Algebra/Coordinate Geometry: Functions, systems of equations, and conic sections.
- Plane Geometry/Trigonometry: Properties of geometric figures, trigonometric functions, and identities.

3. memorizing Section:
- Prose Fiction: Passage-based questions on fictional texts.
- Social Science: Passage-based questions on social science topics.
- Humanities: Passage-based questions on humanities-related subjects.
- Natural Science: Passage-based questions on scientific topics.

4. Science Section:
- Data Representation: Questions based on graphs, charts, and tables.
- Research Summaries: Questions based on scientific experiments and research.

5. Writing Section (Optional):
- Essay Prompt: Writing a well-structured essay on a given topic.
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Question: 1021
DIRECTIONS: In the passage below, certain phrases are underlined and numbered . The question will present alternatives for the underlined part. In
most cases, you are to choose the one that best expresses the idea, makes the statement appropriate for standard written English, or is worded most
consistently with the style and tone of the passage as a whole. If you think the original version is the best, choose "NO CHANGE".
Industrial Revolution
[§1] The Industrial Revolution was essentially a rapid change in the method of production of material goods. <1> Products once made by hand were
now able to be produced by machine or by chemical processes. The Industrial Revolution transformed Western society, creating an international
capitalist economy, urbanization, labor reforms, a system to educate the public, <2> and labor specialization.
[§2] (1) In the first century of the Industrial Revolution, the country undergoing the most dramatic change was England. (2) After 1850, the Industrial
Revolution spread rapidly <3> throughout Europe. (3) While the pace of change during the Industrial Revolution was indeed very rapid, the Industrial
Revolution itself stretched over a rather long period of time – from the middle of the 18th century in the 1700s <4> through World War I (1914).
[§3] Several key discoveries and inventions enabled the Industrial Revolution to take place included <5> machines and tools like the cotton gin, the
radio, the circular saw, the cylindrical press, and the steam engine. Cement, dynamite, and aluminum were invented, as were the bleaching and paper-
making processes. At the same time, there was a tremendous growth in population and urbanization. In fact, the population growth in England was so
dramatic that the country’s population doubled between 1750-1820. This meant a great demand for food, clothing, and shelter, demands that became the
driving force behind <6> the Industrial Revolution.
[§4] Mass production of goods was made possible in large part due to <7> the steam engine. The steam engine enabled factories to move from the
countryside (where they were by bodies of water, their source of power) into cities and towns, which were becoming increasingly crowded. <8> <7>:
A. NO CHANGE
B. by
C. from
D. in regard to
Answer: B
Explanation:
This is the correct prepositional idiom.
Question: 1022
DIRECTIONS: In the passage below, certain phrases are underlined and numbered . The question will present alternatives for the underlined part. In
most cases, you are to choose the one that best expresses the idea, makes the statement appropriate for standard written English, or is worded most
consistently with the style and tone of the passage as a whole. If you think the original version is the best, choose "NO CHANGE".
Industrial Revolution
[§1] The Industrial Revolution was essentially a rapid change in the method of production of material goods. <1> Products once made by hand were
now able to be produced by machine or by chemical processes. The Industrial Revolution transformed Western society, creating an international
capitalist economy, urbanization, labor reforms, a system to educate the public, <2> and labor specialization.
[§2] (1) In the first century of the Industrial Revolution, the country undergoing the most dramatic change was England. (2) After 1850, the Industrial
Revolution spread rapidly <3> throughout Europe. (3) While the pace of change during the Industrial Revolution was indeed very rapid, the Industrial
Revolution itself stretched over a rather long period of time – from the middle of the 18th century in the 1700s <4> through World War I (1914).
[§3] Several key discoveries and inventions enabled the Industrial Revolution to take place included <5> machines and tools like the cotton gin, the
radio, the circular saw, the cylindrical press, and the steam engine. Cement, dynamite, and aluminum were invented, as were the bleaching and paper-
making processes. At the same time, there was a tremendous growth in population and urbanization. In fact, the population growth in England was so
dramatic that the country’s population doubled between 1750-1820. This meant a great demand for food, clothing, and shelter, demands that became the
driving force behind <6> the Industrial Revolution.
[§4] Mass production of goods was made possible in large part due to <7> the steam engine. The steam engine enabled factories to move from the
countryside (where they were by bodies of water, their source of power) into cities and towns, which were becoming increasingly crowded. <8> <6>:
A. NO CHANGE
B. which had become the driving force of
C. that forced the driving of
D. that drove the force behind
Answer: A
Explanation:
This choice presents the correct word order and conveys the correct idea.
Question: 1023
DIRECTIONS: In the passage below, certain phrases are underlined and numbered . The question will present alternatives for the underlined part. In
most cases, you are to choose the one that best expresses the idea, makes the statement appropriate for standard written English, or is worded most
consistently with the style and tone of the passage as a whole. If you think the original version is the best, choose "NO CHANGE".
Industrial Revolution
[§1] The Industrial Revolution was essentially a rapid change in the method of production of material goods. <1> Products once made by hand were
now able to be produced by machine or by chemical processes. The Industrial Revolution transformed Western society, creating an international
capitalist economy, urbanization, labor reforms, a system to educate the public, <2> and labor specialization.
[§2] (1) In the first century of the Industrial Revolution, the country undergoing the most dramatic change was England. (2) After 1850, the Industrial
Revolution spread rapidly <3> throughout Europe. (3) While the pace of change during the Industrial Revolution was indeed very rapid, the Industrial
Revolution itself stretched over a rather long period of time – from the middle of the 18th century in the 1700s <4> through World War I (1914).
[§3] Several key discoveries and inventions enabled the Industrial Revolution to take place included <5> machines and tools like the cotton gin, the
radio, the circular saw, the cylindrical press, and the steam engine. Cement, dynamite, and aluminum were invented, as were the bleaching and paper-
making processes. At the same time, there was a tremendous growth in population and urbanization. In fact, the population growth in England was so
dramatic that the country’s population doubled between 1750-1820. This meant a great demand for food, clothing, and shelter, demands that became the
driving force behind <6> the Industrial Revolution.
[§4] Mass production of goods was made possible in large part due to <7> the steam engine. The steam engine enabled factories to move from the
countryside (where they were by bodies of water, their source of power) into cities and towns, which were becoming increasingly crowded. <8> <5>:
A. NO CHANGE
B. place. These included
C. place. Thus including
D. place, including
Answer: D
Explanation:
This is the best choice. Choice B is grammatically correct, but D combines the sentences for greater sentence variety.
Question: 1024
DIRECTIONS: In the passage below, certain phrases are underlined and numbered . The question will present alternatives for the underlined part. In
most cases, you are to choose the one that best expresses the idea, makes the statement appropriate for standard written English, or is worded most
consistently with the style and tone of the passage as a whole. If you think the original version is the best, choose "NO CHANGE".
Industrial Revolution
[§1] The Industrial Revolution was essentially a rapid change in the method of production of material goods. <1> Products once made by hand were
now able to be produced by machine or by chemical processes. The Industrial Revolution transformed Western society, creating an international
capitalist economy, urbanization, labor reforms, a system to educate the public, <2> and labor specialization.
[§2] (1) In the first century of the Industrial Revolution, the country undergoing the most dramatic change was England. (2) After 1850, the Industrial
Revolution spread rapidly <3> throughout Europe. (3) While the pace of change during the Industrial Revolution was indeed very rapid, the Industrial
Revolution itself stretched over a rather long period of time – from the middle of the 18th century in the 1700s <4> through World War I (1914).
[§3] Several key discoveries and inventions enabled the Industrial Revolution to take place included <5> machines and tools like the cotton gin, the
radio, the circular saw, the cylindrical press, and the steam engine. Cement, dynamite, and aluminum were invented, as were the bleaching and paper-
making processes. At the same time, there was a tremendous growth in population and urbanization. In fact, the population growth in England was so
dramatic that the country’s population doubled between 1750-1820. This meant a great demand for food, clothing, and shelter, demands that became the
driving force behind <6> the Industrial Revolution.
[§4] Mass production of goods was made possible in large part due to <7> the steam engine. The steam engine enabled factories to move from the
countryside (where they were by bodies of water, their source of power) into cities and towns, which were becoming increasingly crowded. <8> <4>:
A. NO CHANGE
B. from the middle of the century eighteen
C. from the mid-1700s
D. beginning in the middle of the 1700s, around 1750,
Answer: C
Explanation:
This is the most concise choice. Choices A and D are redundant; choice B has improper word order.
Question: 1025
DIRECTIONS: In the passage below, certain phrases are underlined and numbered . The question will present alternatives for the underlined part. In
most cases, you are to choose the one that best expresses the idea, makes the statement appropriate for standard written English, or is worded most
consistently with the style and tone of the passage as a whole. If you think the original version is the best, choose "NO CHANGE".
Industrial Revolution
[§1] The Industrial Revolution was essentially a rapid change in the method of production of material goods. <1> Products once made by hand were
now able to be produced by machine or by chemical processes. The Industrial Revolution transformed Western society, creating an international
capitalist economy, urbanization, labor reforms, a system to educate the public, <2> and labor specialization.
[§2] (1) In the first century of the Industrial Revolution, the country undergoing the most dramatic change was England. (2) After 1850, the Industrial
Revolution spread rapidly <3> throughout Europe. (3) While the pace of change during the Industrial Revolution was indeed very rapid, the Industrial
Revolution itself stretched over a rather long period of time – from the middle of the 18th century in the 1700s <4> through World War I (1914).
[§3] Several key discoveries and inventions enabled the Industrial Revolution to take place included <5> machines and tools like the cotton gin, the
radio, the circular saw, the cylindrical press, and the steam engine. Cement, dynamite, and aluminum were invented, as were the bleaching and paper-
making processes. At the same time, there was a tremendous growth in population and urbanization. In fact, the population growth in England was so
dramatic that the country’s population doubled between 1750-1820. This meant a great demand for food, clothing, and shelter, demands that became the
driving force behind <6> the Industrial Revolution.
[§4] Mass production of goods was made possible in large part due to <7> the steam engine. The steam engine enabled factories to move from the
countryside (where they were by bodies of water, their source of power) into cities and towns, which were becoming increasingly crowded. <8> <3>:
A. NO CHANGE
B. was quickly spreading
C. spread with great rapidity
D. spread fast
Answer: A
Explanation:
This is the most correct and concise choice.
Question: 1026
DIRECTIONS: In the passage below, certain phrases are underlined and numbered . The question will present alternatives for the underlined part. In
most cases, you are to choose the one that best expresses the idea, makes the statement appropriate for standard written English, or is worded most
consistently with the style and tone of the passage as a whole. If you think the original version is the best, choose "NO CHANGE".
Industrial Revolution
[§1] The Industrial Revolution was essentially a rapid change in the method of production of material goods. <1> Products once made by hand were
now able to be produced by machine or by chemical processes. The Industrial Revolution transformed Western society, creating an international
capitalist economy, urbanization, labor reforms, a system to educate the public, <2> and labor specialization.
[§2] (1) In the first century of the Industrial Revolution, the country undergoing the most dramatic change was England. (2) After 1850, the Industrial
Revolution spread rapidly <3> throughout Europe. (3) While the pace of change during the Industrial Revolution was indeed very rapid, the Industrial
Revolution itself stretched over a rather long period of time – from the middle of the 18th century in the 1700s <4> through World War I (1914).
[§3] Several key discoveries and inventions enabled the Industrial Revolution to take place included <5> machines and tools like the cotton gin, the
radio, the circular saw, the cylindrical press, and the steam engine. Cement, dynamite, and aluminum were invented, as were the bleaching and paper-
making processes. At the same time, there was a tremendous growth in population and urbanization. In fact, the population growth in England was so
dramatic that the country’s population doubled between 1750-1820. This meant a great demand for food, clothing, and shelter, demands that became the
driving force behind <6> the Industrial Revolution.
[§4] Mass production of goods was made possible in large part due to <7> the steam engine. The steam engine enabled factories to move from the
countryside (where they were by bodies of water, their source of power) into cities and towns, which were becoming increasingly crowded. <8> The
most logical sequence for paragraph 2 is:
A. NO CHANGE
B. (2), (1), (3)
C. (3), (2), (1)
D. (3), (1), (2)
Answer: D
Explanation:
This is the most logical sequence: first, the sentence giving the overall timeline of the revolution, then the next two sentences in chronological order.
Question: 1027
DIRECTIONS: In the passage below, certain phrases are underlined and numbered . The question will present alternatives for the underlined part. In
most cases, you are to choose the one that best expresses the idea, makes the statement appropriate for standard written English, or is worded most
consistently with the style and tone of the passage as a whole. If you think the original version is the best, choose "NO CHANGE".
Industrial Revolution
[§1] The Industrial Revolution was essentially a rapid change in the method of production of material goods. <1> Products once made by hand were
now able to be produced by machine or by chemical processes. The Industrial Revolution transformed Western society, creating an international
capitalist economy, urbanization, labor reforms, a system to educate the public, <2> and labor specialization.
[§2] (1) In the first century of the Industrial Revolution, the country undergoing the most dramatic change was England. (2) After 1850, the Industrial
Revolution spread rapidly <3> throughout Europe. (3) While the pace of change during the Industrial Revolution was indeed very rapid, the Industrial
Revolution itself stretched over a rather long period of time – from the middle of the 18th century in the 1700s <4> through World War I (1914).
[§3] Several key discoveries and inventions enabled the Industrial Revolution to take place included <5> machines and tools like the cotton gin, the
radio, the circular saw, the cylindrical press, and the steam engine. Cement, dynamite, and aluminum were invented, as were the bleaching and paper-
making processes. At the same time, there was a tremendous growth in population and urbanization. In fact, the population growth in England was so
dramatic that the country’s population doubled between 1750-1820. This meant a great demand for food, clothing, and shelter, demands that became the
driving force behind <6> the Industrial Revolution.
[§4] Mass production of goods was made possible in large part due to <7> the steam engine. The steam engine enabled factories to move from the
countryside (where they were by bodies of water, their source of power) into cities and towns, which were becoming increasingly crowded. <8> <2>:
A. NO CHANGE
B. a public education system
C. systematizing education
D. public education
Answer: B
Explanation:
This choice makes the sentence parallel.
Question: 1028
DIRECTIONS: In the passage below, certain phrases are underlined and numbered . The question will present alternatives for the underlined part. In
most cases, you are to choose the one that best expresses the idea, makes the statement appropriate for standard written English, or is worded most
consistently with the style and tone of the passage as a whole. If you think the original version is the best, choose "NO CHANGE".
Industrial Revolution
[§1] The Industrial Revolution was essentially a rapid change in the method of production of material goods. <1> Products once made by hand were
now able to be produced by machine or by chemical processes. The Industrial Revolution transformed Western society, creating an international
capitalist economy, urbanization, labor reforms, a system to educate the public, <2> and labor specialization.
[§2] (1) In the first century of the Industrial Revolution, the country undergoing the most dramatic change was England. (2) After 1850, the Industrial
Revolution spread rapidly <3> throughout Europe. (3) While the pace of change during the Industrial Revolution was indeed very rapid, the Industrial
Revolution itself stretched over a rather long period of time – from the middle of the 18th century in the 1700s <4> through World War I (1914).
[§3] Several key discoveries and inventions enabled the Industrial Revolution to take place included <5> machines and tools like the cotton gin, the
radio, the circular saw, the cylindrical press, and the steam engine. Cement, dynamite, and aluminum were invented, as were the bleaching and paper-
making processes. At the same time, there was a tremendous growth in population and urbanization. In fact, the population growth in England was so
dramatic that the country’s population doubled between 1750-1820. This meant a great demand for food, clothing, and shelter, demands that became the
driving force behind <6> the Industrial Revolution.
[§4] Mass production of goods was made possible in large part due to <7> the steam engine. The steam engine enabled factories to move from the
countryside (where they were by bodies of water, their source of power) into cities and towns, which were becoming increasingly crowded. <8> The
writer changed the underlined text <1> to in how material goods were produced. The result is a sentence that is:
A. more dramatic
B. more concise
C. more complex
D. more accurate
Answer: B
Explanation:
This change would make the sentence more concise.
Question: 1029
DIRECTIONS: In the passage below, certain phrases are underlined and numbered . The question will present alternatives for the underlined part. In
most cases, you are to choose the one that best expresses the idea, makes the statement appropriate for standard written English, or is worded most
consistently with the style and tone of the passage as a whole. If you think the original version is the best, choose "NO CHANGE".
Bicycles
[§1] (1) Today, bicycles are so common that it’s hard to believe they haven’t always been around. (2) But two hundred years ago, bicycles weren’t even
existing, <1> and the first bicycle, invented in Germany in 1818, was nothing like our bicycles today – it was made of wood and didn’t even have
pedals. (3) Since then, however, numerous innovations and improvements in design have made the bicycle one of the most popular means of recreation
and transportation around the world.
[§2] (4) In 1839, Kirkpatrick Macmillan a Scottish blacksmith, <2> dramatically improved upon the original bicycle design. (5) Macmillan’s machine
had tires with iron rims to keep them from getting worn down. (6) He also used foot-operated cranks similar to pedals so his bicycle could be ridden at a
quick pace. <3> (7) It hadn’t looked <4> much like a modern bicycle, though, because its back wheel was substantially larger than its front wheel. (8) In
1861, the French Michaux brothers took the evolution of the bicycle a step further by inventing an improved crank mechanism.
[§3] (9) Ten years later, James Starley, an English inventor, revolutionized bicycle design. (10) He, made <5> the front wheel many times larger than
the back wheel, putting a gear on <6> the pedals to make the bicycle more efficient, and lightened the wheels by using wire spokes. (11) Although this
bicycle was much lighter and less tiring to ride, it was still clumsy, extremely top-heavy, and ridden mostly for entertainment.
[§4] (12) It wasn’t until 1874 that the first truly modern bicycle appeared on the scene. (13) Today their built, <7> used, and enjoyed all over the world.
(14) H. J. Lawson, invented by another Englishman, <8> the “safety bicycle” would look familiar to today’s cyclists. (15) This bicycle had equal sized
wheels, which made it less prone to toppling over. (16) Lawson also attached a chain to the pedals to drive the rear wheel. (17) With these
improvements, the bicycle became extremely popular and useful for transportation.
Which of the following sequences makes paragraph 4 most logical?
A. NO CHANGE
B. (12), (13), (14), (16), (17), (15)
C. (12), (17), (14), (15), (16), (13)
D. (12), (14), (15), (16), (17), (13)
Answer: D
Explanation:
This is the most logical sequence. The sentence about Lawson and naming the safety bicycle must come before the details of the safety bicycle. Sentence
(13) is the best conclusion for the paragraph.
Question: 1030
DIRECTIONS: In the passage below, certain phrases are underlined and numbered . The question will present alternatives for the underlined part. In
most cases, you are to choose the one that best expresses the idea, makes the statement appropriate for standard written English, or is worded most
consistently with the style and tone of the passage as a whole. If you think the original version is the best, choose "NO CHANGE".
Bicycles
[§1] (1) Today, bicycles are so common that it’s hard to believe they haven’t always been around. (2) But two hundred years ago, bicycles weren’t even
existing, <1> and the first bicycle, invented in Germany in 1818, was nothing like our bicycles today – it was made of wood and didn’t even have
pedals. (3) Since then, however, numerous innovations and improvements in design have made the bicycle one of the most popular means of recreation
and transportation around the world.
[§2] (4) In 1839, Kirkpatrick Macmillan a Scottish blacksmith, <2> dramatically improved upon the original bicycle design. (5) Macmillan’s machine
had tires with iron rims to keep them from getting worn down. (6) He also used foot-operated cranks similar to pedals so his bicycle could be ridden at a
quick pace. <3> (7) It hadn’t looked <4> much like a modern bicycle, though, because its back wheel was substantially larger than its front wheel. (8) In
1861, the French Michaux brothers took the evolution of the bicycle a step further by inventing an improved crank mechanism.
[§3] (9) Ten years later, James Starley, an English inventor, revolutionized bicycle design. (10) He, made <5> the front wheel many times larger than
the back wheel, putting a gear on <6> the pedals to make the bicycle more efficient, and lightened the wheels by using wire spokes. (11) Although this
bicycle was much lighter and less tiring to ride, it was still clumsy, extremely top-heavy, and ridden mostly for entertainment.
[§4] (12) It wasn’t until 1874 that the first truly modern bicycle appeared on the scene. (13) Today their built, <7> used, and enjoyed all over the world.
(14) H. J. Lawson, invented by another Englishman, <8> the “safety bicycle” would look familiar to today’s cyclists. (15) This bicycle had equal sized
wheels, which made it less prone to toppling over. (16) Lawson also attached a chain to the pedals to drive the rear wheel. (17) With these
improvements, the bicycle became extremely popular and useful for transportation.
If the writer were trying to convince readers to buy a bicycle, he would:
A. NO CHANGE
B. Add a paragraph describing the health and environmental benefits of riding a bike.
C. Add a paragraph comparing the cost and quality of today’s best-selling bicycles.
D. Add a paragraph about the Tour de France and other bicycle races.
Answer: B
Explanation:
This choice gives readers reasons to buy a bicycle for themselves.
Question: 1031
DIRECTIONS: In the passage below, certain phrases are underlined and numbered . The question will present alternatives for the underlined part. In
most cases, you are to choose the one that best expresses the idea, makes the statement appropriate for standard written English, or is worded most
consistently with the style and tone of the passage as a whole. If you think the original version is the best, choose "NO CHANGE".
Bicycles
[§1] (1) Today, bicycles are so common that it’s hard to believe they haven’t always been around. (2) But two hundred years ago, bicycles weren’t even
existing, <1> and the first bicycle, invented in Germany in 1818, was nothing like our bicycles today – it was made of wood and didn’t even have
pedals. (3) Since then, however, numerous innovations and improvements in design have made the bicycle one of the most popular means of recreation
and transportation around the world.
[§2] (4) In 1839, Kirkpatrick Macmillan a Scottish blacksmith, <2> dramatically improved upon the original bicycle design. (5) Macmillan’s machine
had tires with iron rims to keep them from getting worn down. (6) He also used foot-operated cranks similar to pedals so his bicycle could be ridden at a
quick pace. <3> (7) It hadn’t looked <4> much like a modern bicycle, though, because its back wheel was substantially larger than its front wheel. (8) In
1861, the French Michaux brothers took the evolution of the bicycle a step further by inventing an improved crank mechanism.
[§3] (9) Ten years later, James Starley, an English inventor, revolutionized bicycle design. (10) He, made <5> the front wheel many times larger than
the back wheel, putting a gear on <6> the pedals to make the bicycle more efficient, and lightened the wheels by using wire spokes. (11) Although this
bicycle was much lighter and less tiring to ride, it was still clumsy, extremely top-heavy, and ridden mostly for entertainment.
[§4] (12) It wasn’t until 1874 that the first truly modern bicycle appeared on the scene. (13) Today their built, <7> used, and enjoyed all over the world.
(14) H. J. Lawson, invented by another Englishman, <8> the “safety bicycle” would look familiar to today’s cyclists. (15) This bicycle had equal sized
wheels, which made it less prone to toppling over. (16) Lawson also attached a chain to the pedals to drive the rear wheel. (17) With these
improvements, the bicycle became extremely popular and useful for transportation.
<8>:
A. NO CHANGE
B. H. J. Lawson invented by another Englishman,
C. Invented by another Englishman, H. J. Lawson,
D. Another Englishman inventor, H. J. Lawson,
Answer: C
Explanation:
This choice presents the correct word order.
Question: 1032
DIRECTIONS: In the passage below, certain phrases are underlined and numbered . The question will present alternatives for the underlined part. In
most cases, you are to choose the one that best expresses the idea, makes the statement appropriate for standard written English, or is worded most
consistently with the style and tone of the passage as a whole. If you think the original version is the best, choose "NO CHANGE".
Bicycles
[§1] (1) Today, bicycles are so common that it’s hard to believe they haven’t always been around. (2) But two hundred years ago, bicycles weren’t even
existing, <1> and the first bicycle, invented in Germany in 1818, was nothing like our bicycles today – it was made of wood and didn’t even have
pedals. (3) Since then, however, numerous innovations and improvements in design have made the bicycle one of the most popular means of recreation
and transportation around the world.
[§2] (4) In 1839, Kirkpatrick Macmillan a Scottish blacksmith, <2> dramatically improved upon the original bicycle design. (5) Macmillan’s machine
had tires with iron rims to keep them from getting worn down. (6) He also used foot-operated cranks similar to pedals so his bicycle could be ridden at a
quick pace. <3> (7) It hadn’t looked <4> much like a modern bicycle, though, because its back wheel was substantially larger than its front wheel. (8) In
1861, the French Michaux brothers took the evolution of the bicycle a step further by inventing an improved crank mechanism.
[§3] (9) Ten years later, James Starley, an English inventor, revolutionized bicycle design. (10) He, made <5> the front wheel many times larger than
the back wheel, putting a gear on <6> the pedals to make the bicycle more efficient, and lightened the wheels by using wire spokes. (11) Although this
bicycle was much lighter and less tiring to ride, it was still clumsy, extremely top-heavy, and ridden mostly for entertainment.
[§4] (12) It wasn’t until 1874 that the first truly modern bicycle appeared on the scene. (13) Today their built, <7> used, and enjoyed all over the world.
(14) H. J. Lawson, invented by another Englishman, <8> the “safety bicycle” would look familiar to today’s cyclists. (15) This bicycle had equal sized
wheels, which made it less prone to toppling over. (16) Lawson also attached a chain to the pedals to drive the rear wheel. (17) With these
improvements, the bicycle became extremely popular and useful for transportation.
<7>:
A. NO CHANGE
B. Today there are built,
C. Today they, are built,D. Today, they are built,
Answer: D
Explanation:
Comma after an introductory word or phrase and they + are contraction.
Question: 1033
DIRECTIONS: In the passage below, certain phrases are underlined and numbered . The question will present alternatives for the underlined part. In
most cases, you are to choose the one that best expresses the idea, makes the statement appropriate for standard written English, or is worded most
consistently with the style and tone of the passage as a whole. If you think the original version is the best, choose "NO CHANGE".
Bicycles
[§1] (1) Today, bicycles are so common that it’s hard to believe they haven’t always been around. (2) But two hundred years ago, bicycles weren’t even
existing, <1> and the first bicycle, invented in Germany in 1818, was nothing like our bicycles today – it was made of wood and didn’t even have
pedals. (3) Since then, however, numerous innovations and improvements in design have made the bicycle one of the most popular means of recreation
and transportation around the world.
[§2] (4) In 1839, Kirkpatrick Macmillan a Scottish blacksmith, <2> dramatically improved upon the original bicycle design. (5) Macmillan’s machine
had tires with iron rims to keep them from getting worn down. (6) He also used foot-operated cranks similar to pedals so his bicycle could be ridden at a
quick pace. <3> (7) It hadn’t looked <4> much like a modern bicycle, though, because its back wheel was substantially larger than its front wheel. (8) In
1861, the French Michaux brothers took the evolution of the bicycle a step further by inventing an improved crank mechanism.
[§3] (9) Ten years later, James Starley, an English inventor, revolutionized bicycle design. (10) He, made <5> the front wheel many times larger than
the back wheel, putting a gear on <6> the pedals to make the bicycle more efficient, and lightened the wheels by using wire spokes. (11) Although this
bicycle was much lighter and less tiring to ride, it was still clumsy, extremely top-heavy, and ridden mostly for entertainment.
[§4] (12) It wasn’t until 1874 that the first truly modern bicycle appeared on the scene. (13) Today their built, <7> used, and enjoyed all over the world.
(14) H. J. Lawson, invented by another Englishman, <8> the “safety bicycle” would look familiar to today’s cyclists. (15) This bicycle had equal sized
wheels, which made it less prone to toppling over. (16) Lawson also attached a chain to the pedals to drive the rear wheel. (17) With these
improvements, the bicycle became extremely popular and useful for transportation.
<6>:
A. NO CHANGE
B. putted a gear on
C. put a gear in
D. put a gear on
Answer: D
Explanation:
This choice gives the sentence parallel structure.
Question: 1034
DIRECTIONS: In the passage below, certain phrases are underlined and numbered . The question will present alternatives for the underlined part. In
most cases, you are to choose the one that best expresses the idea, makes the statement appropriate for standard written English, or is worded most
consistently with the style and tone of the passage as a whole. If you think the original version is the best, choose "NO CHANGE".
Bicycles
[§1] (1) Today, bicycles are so common that it’s hard to believe they haven’t always been around. (2) But two hundred years ago, bicycles weren’t even
existing, <1> and the first bicycle, invented in Germany in 1818, was nothing like our bicycles today – it was made of wood and didn’t even have
pedals. (3) Since then, however, numerous innovations and improvements in design have made the bicycle one of the most popular means of recreation
and transportation around the world.
[§2] (4) In 1839, Kirkpatrick Macmillan a Scottish blacksmith, <2> dramatically improved upon the original bicycle design. (5) Macmillan’s machine
had tires with iron rims to keep them from getting worn down. (6) He also used foot-operated cranks similar to pedals so his bicycle could be ridden at a
quick pace. <3> (7) It hadn’t looked <4> much like a modern bicycle, though, because its back wheel was substantially larger than its front wheel. (8) In
1861, the French Michaux brothers took the evolution of the bicycle a step further by inventing an improved crank mechanism.
[§3] (9) Ten years later, James Starley, an English inventor, revolutionized bicycle design. (10) He, made <5> the front wheel many times larger than
the back wheel, putting a gear on <6> the pedals to make the bicycle more efficient, and lightened the wheels by using wire spokes. (11) Although this
bicycle was much lighter and less tiring to ride, it was still clumsy, extremely top-heavy, and ridden mostly for entertainment.
[§4] (12) It wasn’t until 1874 that the first truly modern bicycle appeared on the scene. (13) Today their built, <7> used, and enjoyed all over the world.
(14) H. J. Lawson, invented by another Englishman, <8> the “safety bicycle” would look familiar to today’s cyclists. (15) This bicycle had equal sized
wheels, which made it less prone to toppling over. (16) Lawson also attached a chain to the pedals to drive the rear wheel. (17) With these
improvements, the bicycle became extremely popular and useful for transportation.
<5>:
A. NO CHANGE
B. He made
C. He had made
D. He; made
Answer: B
Explanation:
There should not be a comma between a subject and a verb.
Question: 1035
DIRECTIONS: In the passage below, certain phrases are underlined and numbered . The question will present alternatives for the underlined part. In
most cases, you are to choose the one that best expresses the idea, makes the statement appropriate for standard written English, or is worded most
consistently with the style and tone of the passage as a whole. If you think the original version is the best, choose "NO CHANGE".
Bicycles
[§1] (1) Today, bicycles are so common that it’s hard to believe they haven’t always been around. (2) But two hundred years ago, bicycles weren’t even
existing, <1> and the first bicycle, invented in Germany in 1818, was nothing like our bicycles today – it was made of wood and didn’t even have
pedals. (3) Since then, however, numerous innovations and improvements in design have made the bicycle one of the most popular means of recreation
and transportation around the world.
[§2] (4) In 1839, Kirkpatrick Macmillan a Scottish blacksmith, <2> dramatically improved upon the original bicycle design. (5) Macmillan’s machine
had tires with iron rims to keep them from getting worn down. (6) He also used foot-operated cranks similar to pedals so his bicycle could be ridden at a
quick pace. <3> (7) It hadn’t looked <4> much like a modern bicycle, though, because its back wheel was substantially larger than its front wheel. (8) In
1861, the French Michaux brothers took the evolution of the bicycle a step further by inventing an improved crank mechanism.
[§3] (9) Ten years later, James Starley, an English inventor, revolutionized bicycle design. (10) He, made <5> the front wheel many times larger than
the back wheel, putting a gear on <6> the pedals to make the bicycle more efficient, and lightened the wheels by using wire spokes. (11) Although this
bicycle was much lighter and less tiring to ride, it was still clumsy, extremely top-heavy, and ridden mostly for entertainment.
[§4] (12) It wasn’t until 1874 that the first truly modern bicycle appeared on the scene. (13) Today their built, <7> used, and enjoyed all over the world.
(14) H. J. Lawson, invented by another Englishman, <8> the “safety bicycle” would look familiar to today’s cyclists. (15) This bicycle had equal sized
wheels, which made it less prone to toppling over. (16) Lawson also attached a chain to the pedals to drive the rear wheel. (17) With these
improvements, the bicycle became extremely popular and useful for transportation.
<4>:
A. NO CHANGE
B. looked not
C. didn’t look
D. wasn’t looking
Answer: C
Explanation:
The verb needs to be in the past tense.
Question: 1036
DIRECTIONS: In the passage below, certain phrases are underlined and numbered . The question will present alternatives for the underlined part. In
most cases, you are to choose the one that best expresses the idea, makes the statement appropriate for standard written English, or is worded most
consistently with the style and tone of the passage as a whole. If you think the original version is the best, choose "NO CHANGE".
Bicycles
[§1] (1) Today, bicycles are so common that it’s hard to believe they haven’t always been around. (2) But two hundred years ago, bicycles weren’t even
existing, <1> and the first bicycle, invented in Germany in 1818, was nothing like our bicycles today – it was made of wood and didn’t even have
pedals. (3) Since then, however, numerous innovations and improvements in design have made the bicycle one of the most popular means of recreation
and transportation around the world.
[§2] (4) In 1839, Kirkpatrick Macmillan a Scottish blacksmith, <2> dramatically improved upon the original bicycle design. (5) Macmillan’s machine
had tires with iron rims to keep them from getting worn down. (6) He also used foot-operated cranks similar to pedals so his bicycle could be ridden at a
quick pace. <3> (7) It hadn’t looked <4> much like a modern bicycle, though, because its back wheel was substantially larger than its front wheel. (8) In
1861, the French Michaux brothers took the evolution of the bicycle a step further by inventing an improved crank mechanism.
[§3] (9) Ten years later, James Starley, an English inventor, revolutionized bicycle design. (10) He, made <5> the front wheel many times larger than
the back wheel, putting a gear on <6> the pedals to make the bicycle more efficient, and lightened the wheels by using wire spokes. (11) Although this
bicycle was much lighter and less tiring to ride, it was still clumsy, extremely top-heavy, and ridden mostly for entertainment.
[§4] (12) It wasn’t until 1874 that the first truly modern bicycle appeared on the scene. (13) Today their built, <7> used, and enjoyed all over the world.
(14) H. J. Lawson, invented by another Englishman, <8> the “safety bicycle” would look familiar to today’s cyclists. (15) This bicycle had equal sized
wheels, which made it less prone to toppling over. (16) Lawson also attached a chain to the pedals to drive the rear wheel. (17) With these
improvements, the bicycle became extremely popular and useful for transportation.
<3>:
A. NO CHANGE
B. could be rode quickly
C. could have been ridden fast
D. could ride at a quick pace
Answer: A
Explanation:
This is correct as is.
Question: 1037
DIRECTIONS: In the passage below, certain phrases are underlined and numbered . The question will present alternatives for the underlined part. In
most cases, you are to choose the one that best expresses the idea, makes the statement appropriate for standard written English, or is worded most
consistently with the style and tone of the passage as a whole. If you think the original version is the best, choose "NO CHANGE".
Bicycles
[§1] (1) Today, bicycles are so common that it’s hard to believe they haven’t always been around. (2) But two hundred years ago, bicycles weren’t even
existing, <1> and the first bicycle, invented in Germany in 1818, was nothing like our bicycles today – it was made of wood and didn’t even have
pedals. (3) Since then, however, numerous innovations and improvements in design have made the bicycle one of the most popular means of recreation
and transportation around the world.
[§2] (4) In 1839, Kirkpatrick Macmillan a Scottish blacksmith, <2> dramatically improved upon the original bicycle design. (5) Macmillan’s machine
had tires with iron rims to keep them from getting worn down. (6) He also used foot-operated cranks similar to pedals so his bicycle could be ridden at a
quick pace. <3> (7) It hadn’t looked <4> much like a modern bicycle, though, because its back wheel was substantially larger than its front wheel. (8) In
1861, the French Michaux brothers took the evolution of the bicycle a step further by inventing an improved crank mechanism.
[§3] (9) Ten years later, James Starley, an English inventor, revolutionized bicycle design. (10) He, made <5> the front wheel many times larger than
the back wheel, putting a gear on <6> the pedals to make the bicycle more efficient, and lightened the wheels by using wire spokes. (11) Although this
bicycle was much lighter and less tiring to ride, it was still clumsy, extremely top-heavy, and ridden mostly for entertainment.
[§4] (12) It wasn’t until 1874 that the first truly modern bicycle appeared on the scene. (13) Today their built, <7> used, and enjoyed all over the world.
(14) H. J. Lawson, invented by another Englishman, <8> the “safety bicycle” would look familiar to today’s cyclists. (15) This bicycle had equal sized
wheels, which made it less prone to toppling over. (16) Lawson also attached a chain to the pedals to drive the rear wheel. (17) With these
improvements, the bicycle became extremely popular and useful for transportation.
<2>:
A. NO CHANGE
B. Macmillan was a Scottish blacksmith
C. Macmillan, a Scottish blacksmith,
D. Macmillan, he was a Scottish blacksmith,
Answer: C
Explanation:
The phrase a Scottish blacksmith is relevant but nonessential information and needs to be set off by commas.
Question: 1038
DIRECTIONS: In the passage below, certain phrases are underlined and numbered . The question will present alternatives for the underlined part. In
most cases, you are to choose the one that best expresses the idea, makes the statement appropriate for standard written English, or is worded most
consistently with the style and tone of the passage as a whole. If you think the original version is the best, choose "NO CHANGE".
Bicycles
[§1] (1) Today, bicycles are so common that it’s hard to believe they haven’t always been around. (2) But two hundred years ago, bicycles weren’t even
existing, <1> and the first bicycle, invented in Germany in 1818, was nothing like our bicycles today – it was made of wood and didn’t even have
pedals. (3) Since then, however, numerous innovations and improvements in design have made the bicycle one of the most popular means of recreation
and transportation around the world.
[§2] (4) In 1839, Kirkpatrick Macmillan a Scottish blacksmith, <2> dramatically improved upon the original bicycle design. (5) Macmillan’s machine
had tires with iron rims to keep them from getting worn down. (6) He also used foot-operated cranks similar to pedals so his bicycle could be ridden at a
quick pace. <3> (7) It hadn’t looked <4> much like a modern bicycle, though, because its back wheel was substantially larger than its front wheel. (8) In
1861, the French Michaux brothers took the evolution of the bicycle a step further by inventing an improved crank mechanism.
[§3] (9) Ten years later, James Starley, an English inventor, revolutionized bicycle design. (10) He, made <5> the front wheel many times larger than
the back wheel, putting a gear on <6> the pedals to make the bicycle more efficient, and lightened the wheels by using wire spokes. (11) Although this
bicycle was much lighter and less tiring to ride, it was still clumsy, extremely top-heavy, and ridden mostly for entertainment.
[§4] (12) It wasn’t until 1874 that the first truly modern bicycle appeared on the scene. (13) Today their built, <7> used, and enjoyed all over the world.
(14) H. J. Lawson, invented by another Englishman, <8> the “safety bicycle” would look familiar to today’s cyclists. (15) This bicycle had equal sized
wheels, which made it less prone to toppling over. (16) Lawson also attached a chain to the pedals to drive the rear wheel. (17) With these
improvements, the bicycle became extremely popular and useful for transportation.
<1>:
A. NO CHANGE
B. there was no such thing as a bicycle,
C. bicycles were uninvented,
D. whoever heard of a bicycle,
Answer: B
Explanation:
This choice has the most appropriate and correct usage and word choice.
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Admission-Tests American approach - BingNews https://killexams.com/pass4sure/exam-detail/ACT Search results Admission-Tests American approach - BingNews https://killexams.com/pass4sure/exam-detail/ACT https://killexams.com/exam_list/Admission-Tests College Admission Warped 2023

“It has been a LONG year. A really long year, just escalating as we went along.” This text from a friend who leads admission at a well-known university is just one of the many messages I have received recently from exhausted college admission professionals and high school counselors. 2023 has indeed been a long and complicated year and 2024 promises to be equally as challenging as we attempt to put the pieces back together.

In the spirit of “Spotify Wrapped,” my last piece provided a synopsis of the past 12 months in college admission. As I wrapped up the positive changes and innovations in this space, I was also reminded of the aspects of admission that are warped. While below I offer a year-end overview of what plagues the profession, I also want to emphasize that despite the many challenges facing access and equity in college admission, I remain hopeful because of the dedicated educators who want better.

SCOTUS And Race-Conscious Admission

No review of the year in admission is complete without highlighting the most significant news story in this space. The U.S. Supreme Court’s decision to restrict race-conscious admission hit the profession like a blow to the gut.

The depth of the impact of this decision will not be entirely clear until this spring and beyond when we start to have a more comprehensive picture of enrollment numbers and campus diversity, but early indications are not encouraging. We will also need to wait for some time to see if, and how, student behavior and attitudes toward who is welcome in college shift. Meanwhile, institutions are understandably running scared from litigation and this has created an intensified risk-averse environment. It stifles the ability to reimagine admission policy and practice at a time when it is desperately needed.

Legacy Admission

The idea that applicants whose relatives attended an institution might get a leg up in admission also had renewed scrutiny in 2023. The SCOTUS decision brought increased attention to this issue and some colleges and universities responded with public denouncements of their former policies. Others argued that to eschew legacy admission at a time when historically marginalized groups are just beginning to benefit from it is too little too late.

For sure legacy should be examined and schools should make thoughtful policy decisions based on their institutional values. We also need to acknowledge just how small the numbers are, and that some schools never engaged in this practice and therefore don’t need performative announcements. Sometimes debate around legacy admission can become a red herring. We must focus on equity and access writ large as part of a comprehensive review of the intention and impact of all policies and procedures. It is tempting to make one-off gestures that feed the publicity machine without moving the ball in the way needed. I am all for eliminating preference that favors the wealthy and well connected and ideally 2024 will bring meaningful change.

FAFSA

Even as I write, it is uncertain what will happen with the Free Application for Federal Student Aid (FAFSA). We expect students to adhere to strict deadlines, yet the traditional October availability of these federal forms has come–and long–gone leaving students and their supporters anxious and confused, and colleges and universities powerless.

At a time when we need them the most, many colleges and universities are facing a shortage of financial aid leaders. One can’t blame these professionals for not wanting the job this year. The coming months will require a great deal of patience from everyone involved. The new form is intended to simplify the process and provide more financial support to those who need it most, and all we can do is keep our fingers crossed.

Artificial Intelligence

Artificial intelligence (AI) was easily one of the primary innovations of the year, and, as in most spaces of our society, it has been met in college admission with a mix of excitement and disdain. Deep breaths people. We are right to approach with caution and both protect privacy and ensure human control. We would be foolish, however, to deny the inevitable impact it will have on the way students apply and are assessed for admission.

In the new year, instead of bemoaning the ways AI can be abused, let’s spend our energy on articulating expectations and policies. With thoughtful guardrails and communication about the use of AI, it has the potential to enhance, not detract from, admission. Rather than speculate about how college admission offices might be approaching the use of AI, just ask!

Early Decision

In my opinion, Early Decision (ED) has always been a warped practice that favors the wealthy and contributes to an unhealthy admission process. It encourages the gamification of what should be a developmental experience and is anything but student-centered.

In 2023, ED was once again questioned by researchers and legislators, though the conversation failed to advance very far. Meanwhile, some colleges and universities continued to admit larger percentages of their class through early applications. We are unlikely to see this temper as ED provides financial security and guaranteed “yield” at a time of great uncertainty in admission. James S. Murphy, deputy director of higher education policy at Education Reform Now, offers a more nuanced discussion of this issue and how it might not be as evil as some think. From my perspective as a counselor, however, I believe we need to reset this arms race in selective admission. Though any attempt to do so collaboratively among institutions would surely be met with an antitrust lawsuit, as Murphy suggests, we certainly need more transparency.

Testing

While the shifting role of standardized testing in admission is certainly not unique to 2023, it continued to receive a lot of air time. The digital SAT arrived this year with mixed success and the verdict is still out in many ways. Test-optional policies continue to proliferate and the inequity of access, preparation, and content remains a significant concern that fortunately some colleges appreciate and have responded to. Without an effective alternative for standardized review of applicants, other institutions continue to incorporate tests as one factor, but perhaps not in the draconian ways that some people in front of the “curtain” suspect.

Advanced Placement (AP) classes and tests once again topped the list of admission news in 2023. From controversy around the content, delivery, and political influence (looking at you Florida) on the AP African American Studies course, to the addition of AP Precalculus, the role of the College Board curriculum in admission continues to be fraught. As in years past, assumptions, myths, and realities about the impact of these classes and scores on a student’s candidacy for admission contribute to an unhealthy culture around learning and well-being.

Applicants and their supporters continue to question the role of testing and the legitimacy of optional submission, while debating the approach they should take. I hope that we all keep testing in perspective in the year ahead.

Fear And Loathing In College Admission

2023 brought an increase in what I am going to simply call predatory practices in college admission. Individuals and companies prey on the fear around selective college admission, which is partly fueled by the commercial rankings industry. Social media ads promote webinars promising to unveil the secrets behind “must-have criteria for Ivy League admission” and offer the opportunity to work with “strategists” to gain admission to “top colleges.” The admission industrial complex that seeks to profit from our cultural obsession with elite colleges continues to grow in alarming ways.

This past year especially, the proliferation of pay-to-play research opportunities for high school students was notable. These programs offer the chance to work with researchers and “Ph.D. mentors” from highly selective colleges and promise the ability to be published as a means of boosting admission application credentials. As a high school counselor, I am inundated with daily requests to connect my students with these high-priced boondoggles, as if they are the silver bullet to admission success. Fortunately, my colleagues who work in college admission offices share my disdain for these programs and join me in my eye-rolling at the suggestion that this would move the needle toward an acceptance. I would recommend my college applicants get a job at their local grocery store 100 times over before I ever suggested one of these programs. They are another sad example of how thwarted this experience has become and the rush to make a buck off of fear.

That’s a Wrap

As you review your 2023 Spotify Wrapped list, is it dominated by a small handful of similar artists, perhaps the most mainstream that are played with great frequency in popular culture? Or do you have an eclectic musical medley that includes unique musicians with exceptional talent but less notoriety? In 2023, Harvard and its uber-selective peers remained the Taylor Swifts of colleges. They dominated headlines—and headspace—in ways that warped the narrative around educational opportunity.

My greatest hope for 2024 is that we can collectively start to shift the culture and conversation around what constitutes quality in a college education and have thoughtful dialogue about what investment and engagement really mean. By leaning into these issues, we can combat a warped perspective on success and dial down the noise that prevailed on this list from 2023.

The coming year will be just as long for admission leaders and counselors, but it has the potential to be better. With a collaborative approach and willingness to push back against what doesn’t work while embracing new ideas, we can wrap 2024 in opportunity.

Sat, 30 Dec 2023 00:52:00 -0600 Brennan Barnard en text/html https://www.forbes.com/sites/brennanbarnard/2023/12/30/college-admission-warped-2023/
Which State Has The Best Test Scores? Analyzing Standardized Testing Trends

Editorial Note: We earn a commission from partner links on Forbes Advisor. Commissions do not affect our editors' opinions or evaluations.

As online college and other alternative higher ed options have grown in popularity, standardized testing has become less important at the college level, with many colleges going test-optional. But high school students across the U.S. still take the SAT and ACTÂŽ to prep for college admissions.

At the K-12 level, standardized testing remains a vital metric for measuring students’ comprehension and competency in core subject areas like math, reading, writing and science. Standardized test scores provide primary and secondary school teachers and administrators with data-driven insights that inform curriculum development and shape educational policies and practices. These scores can also impact a school’s funding and resource allocation.

In this article, we rank the states with the highest standardized test scores and discuss the evolving role of standardized testing, including K-12 assessments and college entrance exams.

Why Does Standardized Testing Matter in the U.S.?

Standardized testing assesses the academic performance of students, teachers and schools. Test scores offer a quantitative metric to determine whether schools meet established standards and help educators and policymakers identify areas for improvement.

K-12 Standardized Assessments

At the K-12 level, standardized testing evaluates students’ proficiency in core subject areas at their respective grade levels. Test scores offer insights into the factors affecting a student’s, school’s or state’s performance. They can also inform instructional strategies and shape curriculum development.

The National Assessment of Educational Progress (NAEP) is a comprehensive assessment encompassing print and digital assessments across multiple subject areas, including math, memorizing and science. NAEP is usually administered at the state and district levels among fourth and eighth grades. On this page, we use fourth- and eighth-grade math and memorizing assessments to determine our rankings.

K-12 standardized testing often faces criticism for its testing practices. Teachers, administrators and parents argue that standardized testing doesn’t account for each student’s unique learning style and strengths, instead testing students using a one-size-fits-all approach. Some say the education system’s focus on standardized testing has narrowed the scope and focus of curriculums to accommodate test results.

This criticism drives an ongoing dialogue about the need for more holistic and inclusive testing and assessment practices. Teachers, administrators and curriculum developers continue to propose alternative assessment methods—such as performance tasks, project-based work and portfolios—to better capture the multifaceted nature of student learning.

College Entrance Exams

During their third and fourth years of high school, students often take college entrance exams ahead of submitting their applications for admission. These exam scores measure learners’ academic readiness for higher education. Colleges and universities use standardized tests to inform their admissions decisions.

Colleges and universities also consider several other factors during the admissions process, such as academic performance, extracurricular activities, personal statements and letters of recommendation. Also, many colleges have adopted test-optional admissions policies, which lift entrance exam requirements for first-year applicants.

Though test-optional colleges do not require the ACT or SAT for college admission, most still consider entrance exam scores when applicants choose to submit them.

Our ranking looks at metrics from the following standardized tests.

  • SAT: The SAT is a multiple-choice test that covers math, evidence-based memorizing and writing. Each section of the SAT is scored on a 200- to 800-point scale, making 1600 the highest possible score.
  • ACT: The ACT evaluates students’ knowledge in four areas: English, reading, mathematics and science. There’s also an optional writing section, which does not affect the composite ACT score. Your composite score comprises the average of the four subject scores, rounded to the nearest whole number. Possible ACT scores range from one to 36.
  • MCAT: All medical school programs in the U.S. use the MCAT for medical school admissions. This computer-based, multiple-choice exam evaluates critical thinking, problem-solving, and knowledge of behavioral, natural and social science concepts and principles.

States With the Best Test Scores

Below we rank each U.S. state based on its standardized testing performances. Our methodology uses data from K-12 assessments, focusing on fourth- and eighth-grade math and memorizing assessments and college entrance exam performances.

Top Five States

The top five states in our standardized testing performance ranking are:

  1. Massachusetts
  2. Utah
  3. New Jersey
  4. New Hampshire
  5. Connecticut

Common factors contributing to these states’ strong performances include rigorous academic standards, adequate funding, student-to-teacher ratios, professional development and successful education policies and reforms.

Massachusetts

Massachusetts consistently ranks among the states with the highest standardized test scores in the U.S. and secured the top spot on our list. At the fourth grade level, 42.9% of students demonstrated proficiency or higher in math; 42.61% achieved the same in reading.

In the eighth grade, Massachusetts students maintained their position as top performers among students nationwide, with 35.06% demonstrating proficiency or higher in math and 39.8% achieving the same in reading. While Massachusetts students received slightly lower average SAT scores than students in some other states, they earned the nation’s highest average ACT and MCAT scores.

Utah

Utah ranked second on our list, with 42.9% of NAEP test takers demonstrating proficiency or higher in math and 36.83% achieving the same in reading. Utah students received the highest average SAT score in the nation, with average ACT and MCAT scores trailing just below Massachusetts.

New Jersey

New Jersey placed third in our ranking, with 39.42% of fourth graders performing at or above proficiency in math and 38.02% at or above proficient in reading. New Jersey scored higher average ACT scores than Utah, and its average SAT and MCAT scores ranked just below Massachusetts and Utah.

New Hampshire

New Hampshire’s standardized testing performance ranked fourth, with 39.96% of fourth graders demonstrating proficiency or higher in math and 37.02% achieving the same in reading. These rates dropped slightly through the eighth grade. New Hampshire had the highest average MCAT scores of any U.S. state.

Connecticut

Connecticut claimed the fifth spot in our ranking, where 37.01% of fourth graders demonstrated proficiency or higher in math, and 34.62% showcased the same in reading. Connecticut students maintained their overall performances through eighth grade, though math levels dropped by 7.06%. Connecticut’s average ACT and MCAT scores were on par with those of Massachusetts.

Bottom Five States

Mississippi, Alabama, West Virginia, New Mexico and Oklahoma ranked in the bottom five states for standardized test scores.

Various educational, economic and social factors influence these scores. For example, states with lower socioeconomic status may face challenges such as resource allocation to education or limited resources.

Mississippi

Mississippi ranked fifth-lowest in our ranking, with 32.07% of fourth graders demonstrating proficiency or above in math and 30.64% performing the same in reading. This trend continues through the eighth grade, with the percentages of students performing at this level declining to 17.75% in math and 21.98% in reading.

Alabama

Alabama ranked fourth-lowest on our list, with 27.17% of fourth graders demonstrating proficiency or above in math and 28.26% demonstrating the same in reading. These performance levels persisted through the eighth grade, dropping by 8.48% in math and 6.23% in reading. Notably, Alabama students earned higher average ACT and MCAT scores compared to Mississippi; however, their average SAT scores were lower.

West Virginia

West Virginia placed third from the bottom, with 22.84% of fourth graders demonstrating proficiency or above in math and 22.28% achieving the same in reading. The percentage of students performing at this level dropped slightly through the eighth grade to 15.09% in math and 21.66% in reading.

West Virginia students saw lower average SAT scores than learners in Mississippi and Alabama; however, their average ACT and MCAT scores kept up.

New Mexico

New Mexico ranked second-to-last in terms of standardized testing performance, with just 19.12% of fourth graders demonstrating proficiency or higher in memorizing and 20.97% achieving the same in reading. Performance rates through the eighth grade dropped by 6.43% in math and 2.54% in reading. Students in New Mexico received the lowest average SAT scores of any state. However, their average ACT and MCAT scores were comparable to students in Mississippi, Alabama and West Virginia.

Oklahoma

Oklahoma placed at the bottom of our ranking, with 26.83% of fourth graders demonstrating proficiency or higher in math, and 24.02% performing the same in reading. NAEP performances declined through the eighth grade, falling by 5.55% and 2.74% in math and reading, respectively.

The Bottom Line

Massachusetts, Utah, New Jersey, New Hampshire and Connecticut lead the nation in standardized testing performance. Overall, students in these states maintained strong NAEP performance levels through the eighth grade, with only minimal changes in memorizing and math performances.

Comparatively, the bottom five states—Mississippi, Alabama, West Virginia, New Mexico and Oklahoma—experience a sharper decline in proficiency levels from fourth to eighth grade.

These contrasting performances highlight how various factors may impact standardized testing outcomes at various grade levels, emphasizing the importance of addressing educational disparities.

Methodology

To determine the states with the best test scores, Forbes Advisor Education obtained data on test performance at the elementary, middle, high school and college levels.

At the elementary level, we analyzed the percentage of fourth-grade students who scored at or above grade-appropriate proficiency in the math and memorizing sections of NAEP, according to government data from The Nation’s Report Card. We conducted an identical analysis of eighth-grade student scores.

To measure high school standardized test performance, we looked at the average ACT and SAT scores among test takers who graduated from high school in 2023. This data came from ACT and the College Board, respectively.

Finally, to measure how a state’s college-educated test takers compare, we used the average MCAT scores of medical students expected to earn their MD in 2023–24, separated according to students’ states of legal residence. This data came from the Association of American Medical Colleges.

Frequently Asked Questions (FAQs) About Standardized Testing

What is meant by a standardized test?

A standardized test is an assessment that’s administered and scored in a consistent and uniform manner across a broad population. Standardized tests are designed to measure students’ comprehension and competency in specific subject areas, evaluate overall academic performance and inform educational policies.

What are the problems with standardized testing?

Standardized testing often faces criticism from teachers, administrators and parents. Some argue that the one-size-fits-all approach overlooks students’ diverse learning styles and strengths. Moreover, some say standardized testing includes biases that can influence schools’ curriculums and funding allocations.

What are the pros and cons of standardized testing?

In primary schools, standardized testing offers a quantitative assessment of academic performance, theoretically removing subjective biases that come from individual instructors and district-specific assessments. Some say standardized testing favors certain learning styles and socioeconomic backgrounds and stifles creativity.

Is the SAT a standardized test?

The SAT is a standardized college entrance exam usually taken during the junior or senior year of high school. Many colleges and universities use SAT scores during admissions; however, schools commonly adopt test-optional admissions processes that do not require applicants to submit standardized test scores.

Thu, 04 Jan 2024 04:33:00 -0600 Mariah St John en-US text/html https://www.forbes.com/advisor/education/which-states-have-the-highest-standardized-test-scores/
Affirmative Action Ban Shook Up Law School Admissions In 2023
law school, affirmative action

The ability of law schools to maintain or increase minority enrollment, particularly among Black, Hispanic, and Native American students, in the wake of the affirmative action ban is key for the legal profession's diversity


For years, Andy Cornblatt and his team in the admissions office at Georgetown University Law School and Center would know—by the check of a box—the race of applicants trying to win a spot at the school.

Not anymore.

Georgetown is among the law schools that have decided to mask on paper the racial identities of applicants in the aftermath of the U.S. Supreme Court’s June decision effectively prohibiting affirmative action policies long used to raise the number of underrepresented minority students on campuses. That ruling has made law schools rethink their approach, resulting in an admissions process that so far has been unusually slow and methodical as officials try to both retain the diversity of their student bodies and comply with the law.

“This is the most holistic admissions process we’ve seen in a long time,” said Susan Krinsky, executive vice president of operations at the Law School Admission Council, noting that admissions offices are generally looking deeper into applicant files than in prior years. The council oversees the Law School Admission Test and serves as the national clearinghouse for law school applications.

The ability of law schools to maintain or increase minority enrollment, particularly among Black, Hispanic, and Native American students, in the wake of the affirmative action ban is key for the legal profession’s diversity, where the percentages of attorneys of color lag far behind that of the general U.S. population. American Bar Association data shows that 21% of the nation’s lawyers are people of color, compared with 41% of the U.S. population.

Diversity advocates fear the ruling could set back decades of incremental progress and efforts to increase the number of minority lawyers. Already, conservative groups have used the college admissions ruling to challenge diversity programs at law firms and bar associations.

The Supreme Court’s decision doesn’t bar colleges and universities from knowing applicants’ race, but it prohibits them from using that information in decision-making. Cornblatt said he doesn’t know of any other law schools that have chosen to receive race disclosures, though Krinsky said some are still doing so. (The council did not provide data on how many schools fall into each camp.)

Masking race data can help ward off potential legal challenges, Krinsky added.

Georgetown admissions dean Cornblatt said hiding race disclosures on applications “insulates” his office from the possibility of misuse.

Race and diversity haven’t disappeared from the admissions equation altogether, however. The Supreme Court’s opinion specified that essays and personal statements in which candidates discuss their race or background are acceptable, and many law schools have added essay prompts that are intended to supply admissions offices a deeper understanding of candidates.

Harvard Law School, for example, now requires applicants to submit both a “statement of purpose” covering their motivation to pursue a career in law and a “statement of perspective” explaining how their experiences, backgrounds or interests have shaped them. Those replaced a more generic personal statement and an optional diversity statement.

Also, a growing number of law school admissions offices are interviewing some or all applicants as they try to glean more information about them, Krinsky said.

The addition of more essays, interviews, and the time they require has slowed down this year’s admissions cycle for both applicants and schools, said law school admissions consultant Mike Spivey.

“It takes law school hopefuls more time to apply because they must write more school-specific essays instead of a single personal statement that can be used on multiple applications,” he said. Plus, admissions offices have more material to wade through as they form their classes.

Most law schools begin accepting applications in August or September, with acceptances continuing through late spring and into the summer as people move off wait lists.

Data from the Law School Admission Council reflect this year’s lag: this cycle began with the number of applicants down more than 3% but has since recovered and is up 4%.

“This is the slowest admit cycle than in the 25 years I’ve been doing this,” Spivey said. “It’s because of [the Supreme Court ruling] and all the change. It has become a harder job for admissions offices.”

This story was first reported by Reuters.

RELATED CONTENT: Black-Owned Fund Bridging Gap In Venture Capital Sued For Alleged ‘Discrimination’

Tue, 26 Dec 2023 13:50:00 -0600 en-US text/html https://www.blackenterprise.com/affirmative-action-ban-shook-up-law-school-admissions-2023/
What the MCAT Test Is Like and How to Prepare No result found, try new keyword!senior director of admissions testing service with the Association of American Medical Colleges – the organization that creates and administers MCAT exams – wrote in an email. Critics of the ... Tue, 21 Jun 2022 05:46:00 -0500 https://www.usnews.com/education/best-graduate-schools/top-medical-schools/articles/what-is-the-mcat-test-like-and-how-do-you-prepare-for-it Move over LSAT, there’s a new test in town No result found, try new keyword!the time may be ripe for law schools to try another approach. A new standardized exam is making waves: JD-Next, whose backers say that, unlike the long-dominant Law School Admission Test ... Tue, 19 Dec 2023 06:47:00 -0600 text/html https://www.reuters.com/legal/legalindustry/column-move-over-lsat-theres-new-test-town-2023-12-19/ Hong Kong parents pay me $40,000 to get their kids into top US colleges. Helping families cope with the stress of admissions is a big part of my job. No result found, try new keyword!A private tutor in Hong Kong says his job helping kids abroad with US college admissions includes managing the family stress that comes with it. Sun, 31 Dec 2023 23:14:01 -0600 en-us text/html https://www.msn.com/ Test Preparation Courses

Timothy Porter is an Army veteran of 10 years. He achieved the rank of Sergeant First Class within 7 years. After being involved in a bomb explosion, Porter was medically retired and began pursuing his passion: technology. In 2009, after teaching himself how to develop mobile apps, Appddiction Studio was formed. In 2011, Appddiction Studio was nationally recognized by the USA Network Channel. Porter was one of their USA Character Unite Award winners for developing an award-winning anti-bullying App for schools. Appddiction Studio has developed well over 200 commercial mobile apps and has become a leader in Enterprise transformations focusing on Agile and the SAFe Framework.

Porter has multiple degrees in Management Information Systems and holds an MBA. He is an SPC and RTE and has performed roles for Appddiction Studio as Scaled program Consultant, Enterprise Coach &amp; Trainer, Agile Coach, Release Train Engineer to Scrum Master. Appddiction Studio has been performing for programs supporting Gunter AFB as a Prime Contractor in: Agile Coaching, EODIMS JST &amp; EODIMS Backlog Burndown and now as a subcontractor on ACES FoS.

Porter has taught over 50 public/private SAFe classes and has submitted his packet for consideration to become SPCT Gold Partner. He is certified at all levels of SAFe Framework and teaches Leading SAFe, SAFe Scrum Master, Advanced Scrum Master, Lean Portfolio Management, Product Owner/Product Management, SAFe DevOps, SAFe Architect in addition to Agile courses like ICAgile Agile Fundamentals, ICAgile Agile Team Facilitation, ICAgile Agile Programming &amp; ICAgile DevOps Foundations.

Wed, 20 Dec 2023 05:14:00 -0600 en text/html https://www.utsa.edu/pace/test-prep.html
Arianna Rodriguez: The need for more holistic approach to college admission policies

In June the U.S. Supreme Court ruled against the use of Affirmative Action within college admissions. This ruling came as no surprise, but leads to more uncertainty about the future of college admission for students from minoritized backgrounds. The decision effectively ended the consideration of race as one factor in deciding admission.

Affirmative Action policies were used by many highly selective private colleges and universities. A Pew Research Center analysis of 123 selective schools says it will have a big impact on those institutions. Of 123 colleges and universities defined as those who admit half or fewer applicants, 74% said they consider race and ethnicity. The majority were private, not-for-profit institutions.

Affirmative Action helped supply special consideration to students who were from disadvantaged backgrounds and did not have the same educational opportunities as some white students had. Their lack of an “elite” education should not hinder their chances at attending college. There are now concerns about how students of color will navigate the college admission process if they are not able to disclose their race and ethnicity. Similarly, there are concerns about the use of legacy-based admission, since legacy students are mostly white, according to the American Civil Liberties Union.

When Affirmative Action was first established in Executive Order 10925, the numbers of students of color and women being admitted to universities and colleges increased. However, the use of Affirmative Action within college admissions has not increased the enrollment rates for students from minoritized backgrounds to adequately represent these student populations. With the ruling against the use of Affirmative Action, concerns about how those highly selective universities are going to move forward based on admission practices have increased. Black and other students of color were only welcomed and allowed in Predominantly White Institutions (PWIs) within the last 60 years. With this ban against the use of Affirmative Action, higher education institutions will experience extreme declines in representation of certain identities and populations.

Legacy admissions are often preferences that are given to children of alumni or donors to universities and colleges. More often than not, legacy admissions are predominantly given to white, middle-class and upper-class students, and help in keeping selective institutions white. Admitting a student based on legacy status is often a practice that is done by private, Ivy league institutions. Legacy admissions are only adding to the increasing numbers of white and wealthier students compared to minoritized students, especially at universities such as Harvard University.

My concern with legacy admissions now that the use of affirmative action has been ruled against is what will colleges and universities do to ensure that students of color, low-income students, and other students from marginalized backgrounds have a fair chance during the admissions process. How are they going to meet the needs of these students? What practices and policies are they going to use to ensure fair and equal admission to minoritized students, especially since it’s clear that legacy admissions are helping significantly more white students than students of color.

Now more than ever, universities and colleges need to adjust their admissions process. If universities are no longer allowed to admit students on a race-based level, then we need to adjust the practices for legacy admissions. If students of color are not being given a preference due to their race and ethnicity, the same needs to happen to white legacy students. Administrators need to recognize that the use of legacy admissions is indeed a form of race-conscious admissions. This practice is only perpetuating whiteness within higher education and forms of anti-Blackness and racism. It goes beyond just fairness and equity, but institutions cannot continue to identify themselves as diverse and inclusive campuses, when statistically they are admitting higher numbers of white students compared to students of color. Institutions like Harvard and Yale need to put an end to the use of legacy admissions especially now that they are not able to use practices such as Affirmative Action that supported minoritized students.

All college admission processes must now focus on how to reach minoritized students. There must be a more holistic approach to admission policies, where institutions are acknowledging and supporting the lack of educational experiences minoritized students have compared to white students. Selective institutions need to reconsider the exclusivity of their acceptance pools for their first-year students. Broadening the scope of acceptance pools across the board will allow for more students of color to attend selective institutions.

Arianna Rodriguez is a master’s student at the University of Connecticut in the Higher Education and Student Affairs Program.

Fri, 08 Dec 2023 01:07:00 -0600 Arianna Rodriguez en-US text/html https://www.courant.com/2023/12/08/arianna-rodriguez-the-need-for-more-holistic-approach-to-college-admission-policies/
Test Optional FAQs

Why does Miami University have a test-optional policy for standardized test (ACT/SAT) scores for the undergraduate admission process? 

We recognize changes to test availability and testing environments due to the COVID-19 pandemic left many students with inequitable access to standardized tests. Miami has chosen to make test scores optional for students applying to the university through spring 2026 to ensure equitable opportunity for admission, scholarships, and honors programs. Also, some applicants may feel their standardized test scores do not accurately reflect their academic potential. Our test-optional admission policy allows you to choose whether your SAT or ACT test scores will be considered as part of your application — letting you decide how best to describe your academic history. 

What exactly does test-optional mean?

Miami will review your application WITHOUT test scores and render an admission decision based on the materials we have on file. 

How will Miami review applications that do not include the optional standardized test scores?

Miami has always taken a holistic approach to evaluating students for admission. Standardized test scores have historically been just one indicator, among many, in our application review process. In the absence of a test score, we will review your entire application holistically, including your core high school curriculum (English, math, science, social studies, foreign language, and various electives); grades earned; grade trends; course rigor; application essays; co-curricular and extracurricular activities; talent; and other achievements or mitigating factors. 

Admission to Miami University is selective. Our strongest candidates choose rigorous high school coursework (within the context of their high school’s offerings), and students' academic performance has always been our primary focus in reviewing applications for admission. Our strongest applicants challenge themselves beyond core high school graduation requirements. Because high schools vary by size, academic program, and grading scale, we do not have rigid GPA admission requirements. The large majority of our incoming first-year students receive As and Bs in core classes. A complete list of required application materials can be found on our application information webpage.

How should I decide whether to submit test scores?

Through your application for admission, we will evaluate whether we believe you are well prepared for academic success at a challenging liberal arts university and whether, through your experiences and background, we can expect you to be an active member of the Miami community. Admission to honors programs, Nursing, and the Farmer School of Business will be test optional, but will remain highly competitive, and programs in the College of Creative Arts have talent requirements.

While we recommend students submit as much information as possible with their application, the test score is just one factor in Miami’s overall admission evaluation. If you believe your test scores are indicative of your academic achievement, we will be happy to consider them. However, if you have a strong academic record demonstrated by above-average grades in challenging courses, but do not feel your test results are a good reflection of your academic performance, you can choose not to submit them, or to not have them used in the admission review. You may use the table below for context.

*Middle 50% means 25% of students are above this range and 25% are below. Refer to our admitted student statistics webpage for more information.

Will test scores be required for merit scholarships?

Students who apply test-optional will be considered for merit scholarships based on a holistic review of all other information provided with their application. Students are automatically considered for Miami’s merit scholarships when they apply by our priority deadline of Dec. 1.

Will test scores be required for honors programs? 

Students who apply test-optional will be considered for all honors programs. 

When must I decide whether to submit standardized test scores? Can I change my preference?

Miami's Common Application supplement asks whether you would like Miami to consider your test scores in our evaluation, and we encourage you to make a decision before submitting your application. If you change your mind after submitting your application, you will be able to update your test-score preference through your online Miami application status page. Any changes to your test score preference must be made by the application deadline. If you choose to submit test scores and we do not receive your scores by your application deadline, Miami will review your application WITHOUT test scores and render an admission decision based on the materials we have on file. Scores submitted after the application deadline may not be included in our review.

How are test scores considered during the review process?

If you provide ACT or SAT test scores, we will use them in your candidacy for admission, scholarships, and honors programs. Miami superscores, using the highest test scores submitted. For the ACT, the highest scores for each subscore from different exams will determine a combined highest composite score. For SAT the best Evidence-Based memorizing and Writing (ERW) and Math (M) subscores will be used to calculate a maximum single score. We will use the national concordance table to determine whether the SAT best or ACT best is the better overall score.

Being test-optional, will you consider senior (7th semester) grades in the application review?  

Grades submitted at the time of application will be used to review your application for admission and merit scholarships. Miami does not require a mid-year official high school transcript nor a mid-year school report. We do require an official transcript from students who have confirmed enrollment, following their high school graduation. We reserve the right to rescind an offer of admission due to poor academic performance in senior year courses.

If I confirm my enrollment at Miami, will I need to submit my ACT or SAT scores?

If you have taken the ACT or SAT, yes. Score submission is requested for placement in appropriate first-year coursework and research purposes, but your scores will not negatively impact your admission decision or financial aid. Students who confirm their enrollment should submit scores by May 2 to facilitate course registration during orientation. Confirmed students who do not submit scores will be required to complete Miami's math placement test prior to their orientation session.

How do I submit official scores to Miami - Oxford?

Visit the ACT or College Board (SAT) website(s) to request an official score report for Miami University - Oxford. When requesting scores, please use Miami’s code (listed below). Both testing agencies charge a fee to send score reports, but both offer fee waivers to qualified students. Learn more about ACT fee waivers and College Board (SAT) fee waivers.

  • ACT code for Miami University (Oxford campus): 3294
  • SAT code for Miami University: 1463

Who do I contact if I have questions about this policy?

Please reach out to your Miami admission representative, email admission@MiamiOH.edu, or call the Admission Office at 513-529-2531.

Fri, 25 Nov 2022 20:22:00 -0600 en text/html https://miamioh.edu/admission-aid/apply/first-year-students/test-optional-faqs.html
LSAT 2024 test registration deadline announced

Law aspirants gearing up for the LSAT—India™ 2024 have a crucial date to mark on their calendars as the registration deadline for the January test has been officially announced. The Law School Admission Test (LSAT) —India™, renowned for its global recognition and scientific approach to assessing candidates, is designed by the Law School Admission Council (LSAC) and delivered by Pearson VUE.

The January LSAT—India™ test is scheduled to be administered in multiple slots on 20 January, and the deadline for candidates to register for this administration is set for 10 January. Registration can be completed on the official LSAT—India™ website: https://www.lsatindia.in/.

Professor Anand Prakash Mishra, Associate Dean of Jindal Global Law School (JGLS) and Director of Law Admissions at OP Jindal Global University (JGU), expressed deep satisfaction with the use of LSAT—India™ as the exclusive criterion for student admissions at JGLS.

"Our faith in LSAT—India™score is based on it being globally recognised and accepted, it provides a unique percentile score for every candidate making the admission process easy and smooth, and it is scientific and based on logic not on rote learning," highlighted Professor Anand Prakash Mishra. He appealed to all law aspirants and their parents not to miss the LSAT—India™ January 2024 Test, emphasizing its importance for scholarship decisions at JGLS.

Now in its 15th year, LSAT—India™ remains a leading law entrance exam used by multiple law colleges in the country for both Under-Graduate and Postgraduate programs. The exam assesses candidates' skills in Analytical Reasoning, Logical Reasoning, and memorizing Comprehension, focusing on advanced memorizing skills, critical thinking, and informal and deductive reasoning skills. LSAT—India™ consists of 92 questions to be answered within 2 hours and 20 minutes, with scorecards reporting both a scaled score and a percentile rank.

In a significant update for 2024, LSAT—India™ will be mandatory for admission to both the 3-year LLB and 5-year Integrated law degrees, including BComLLB, BBALLB, and BALLB Hons programs. The exam will be delivered online across India, with remote proctoring to ensure test integrity. Candidates are urged to visit the LSAT—India™ exam website for FAQs, including system requirements and test preparation, to ensure a smooth testing experience.

Thu, 14 Dec 2023 10:00:00 -0600 en text/html https://www.dailypioneer.com/2023/state-editions/lsat-2024-test-registration-deadline-announced.html




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