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Exam Code: ABFM Practice exam 2022 by Killexams.com team
ABFM Family Medicine Board Certification Exam

Number of questions: 200 questions Percent
01. Basic science aspects of vascular neurology 4-6%
02. Risk factors and epidemiology 8-12%
03. Clinical features of cerebrovascular diseases 8-12%
04. Evaluation of the patient with cerebrovascular disease 13-17%
05. Causes of stroke 18-22%
06. Complications of stroke 4-6%
07. Treatment of patients with stroke 28-32%
08. Recovery, regenerative approaches, and rehabilitation 4-6%
TOTAL 100%

Content Areas
01. Basic science aspects of vascular neurology
A. Vascular neuroanatomy
1. Extracranial arterial anatomy
2. Intracranial arterial anatomy
3. Collaterals
4. Alterations of vascular anatomy
5. Venous anatomy
6. Spinal cord vascular anatomy
7. Specific vascular-brain anatomic correlations
8. End vessel syndromes
B. Stroke pathophysiology
1. Cerebral blood flow
a. Vascular smooth muscle control
b. Vasodilation and vasoconstriction
c. Autoregulation
d. Vasospasm
e. Rheology
f. Blood flow in stroke
2. Blood-brain barrier in stroke
3. Coagulation cascade
a. Clotting factors
b. Platelet function
c. Endothelium function
d. Biochemical factors
4. Metabolic and cellular consequences of ischemia
a. Ischemic cascade
b. Reperfusion changes
c. Electrophysiology
d. Gene regulation
5. Inflammation and stroke
6. Brain edema and increased ICP
a. Secondary effects
7. Restoration and recovery following stroke
8. Secondary consequences from intracranial bleeding
C. Neuropathology of stroke
1. Vascular neuropathology
2. Atherosclerosis and atherosclerotic plaque
3. Brain and meningeal biopsy
a. Indications
4. Pathological/imaging/clinical correlations
02. Prevention, risk factors, and epidemiology
A. Populations at risk for stroke
1. Non-modifiable risk factors
2. Age, gender, ethnicity, geography, family history
B. Modifiable risk factors for stroke
1. Hypertension
2. Diabetes mellitus
3. Cholesterol
4. Homocysteine
5. Obesity
6. Alcohol abuse
7. Tobacco use
8. Drug abuse
9. Exercise and other lifestyle factors
C. Infections predisposing to stroke
D. Genetic factors predicting stroke
E. Stroke as a complication of other medical illness
F. Special populations at risk for stroke
1. Children and adolescents
2. Young adults
3. Pregnancy
G. Stroke education programs and regional health services
1. Screening
2. Medical economics
3. Primary versus high risk prevention
4. National stroke programs
H. Concepts of clinical research
1. Use and interpretation of statistics
2. Clinical trial design and methodology
3. Understanding the medical literature
4. Rules of evidence and guidelines
5. Rating instruments and stroke scales
I. Outcomes
1. Prognosis
2. Mortality and morbidity of stroke subtypes
03. Clinical features of cerebrovascular diseases
A. Neuro-otology
1. Head and neck pathology
2. Vertigo and hearing loss in stroke
B. Neuro-ophthalmology
1. Retinal changes of vascular disease, including arterial hypertension
and retinal embolism
2. Other ocular manifestations of vascular disease
a. Ischemic oculopathy
b. Horner syndrome
c. Cavernous sinus syndrome
3. Disorders of ocular motility
4. Visual field defects
C. Transient ischemic attack (TIA)
1. General features of TIA
2. Carotid circulation TIA including amaurosis fugax
3. Vertebrobasilar circulation TIA
4. Asymptomatic carotid bruit or stenosis
5. Differential diagnosis of TIA
D. Ischemic stroke syndromes—cerebral hemispheres
1. Cortical stroke syndromes
a. Branch cortical artery syndromes
b. Watershed syndromes
2. Subcortical stroke syndromes
a. Lacunar strokes
b. Striatocapsular infarctions
c. Multiple lacunar infarcts
3. Major hemispheric syndromes
a. Internal carotid artery occlusion
b. Middle cerebral, anterior cerebral, or posterior cerebral artery
4. Behavioral and cognitive impairments following stroke
5. Bi-hemispheric stroke, including hypotensive events
6. Multifocal or diffuse disease
E. Ischemic stroke syndromes—brainstem and cerebellum
1. Basilar artery occlusion
a. Locked-in syndrome
b. Major brainstem strokes
2. Vertebral artery occlusion
3. Branch brainstem stroke syndromes
4. Syndromes from cerebellar arteries (brainstem/cerebellum)
5. Top-of-the-basilar syndromes
6. Thalamic syndromes
F. Ischemic stroke syndromes of the spinal cord
G. Vascular dementia (vascular cognitive impairment) and vascular cognitive
syndromes
1. Multi-infarction (multiple subcortical infarctions)
2. White matter disease (leukoaraiosis, Binswanger subcortical
leukoencephalopathy)
H. Features differentiating hemorrhagic or ischemic stroke
I. Intracerebral hemorrhage
1. Hypertension
2. Cerebral amyloid angiopathy
3. Coagulopathy/bleeding diatheses
4. Locations
a. Putamen
b. Thalamus
c. Lobar and white matter
d. Brainstem
e. Cerebellum
J. Subarachnoid hemorrhage
1. Saccular aneurysms
2. Other aneurysms
3. Unruptured aneurysm
4. Trauma
K. Vascular malformations
1. Hemorrhage
2. Other presentations
L. Primary intraventricular hemorrhage
M. Subdural or epidural hematoma
N. Venous thrombosis
1. Cavernous sinus
2. Superior sagittal sinus
3. Other sinus
4. Cortical thrombophlebitis
5. Deep cerebral veins
O. Carotid cavernous or dural fistulas
P. Pituitary apoplexy
Q. Hypertensive encephalopathy and eclampsia
R. Clinical presentations of primary and multisystem vasculitides
S. Hypoxia-ischemia
1. Cardiac arrest
2. Carbon monoxide poisoning
3. Cortical laminar necrosis
4. Other
T. Brain death
U. MELAS and metabolic disorders causing neurologic symptoms
V. Nonstroke presentations of vascular disease
W. Cardiovascular diseases
1. Heart disease, including coronary artery disease
2. Cardiac complications of stroke
3. Peripheral arterial disease
4. Aortic disease
5. Venous disease
X. Vascular presentations of other diseases of the central nervous system
Y. Infectious diseases and stroke
Z. Migraine
04. Evaluation of the patient with cerebrovascular disease
A. Evaluation of the brain and spinal cord
1. Computed tomography of brain
a. Acute changes of ischemic stroke
b. Acute changes of hemorrhagic stroke
c. Chronic changes of stroke
d. Complications of stroke
e. Vascular imaging by CT
f. Differential diagnosis by CT
g. CT perfusion
h. MR perfusion
2. Computed tomography of spine and spinal cord
3. Magnetic resonance imaging of brain
a. MRI sequences—T1, T2, FLAIR, DWI, PWI, gradient echo
b. MR spectroscopy
c. Acute changes of ischemic stroke
d. Acute changes of hemorrhagic stroke
i. Changes affected by time
e. Functional MRI
f. Vascular imaging by CT
g. Vascular imaging by MRI
4. PET and SPECT
5. EEG and evoked potentials—stroke
a. Changes in stroke
b. Complications of stroke
c. Monitoring
6. Examination of the CSF
7. ICP monitoring
B. Evaluation of the vasculature—occlusive or non-occlusive
1. Arteriography and venography
a. Cerebral
b. Spinal cord
2. Extracranial ultrasonography
a. Duplex and other imaging
b. Collateral flow challenges
c. Monitoring
3. Intracranial ultrasonography
a. Collateral flow changes
b. Contrast enhancement
c. Monitoring
4. CT angiography and CT venography
5. MR angiography and MR venography
C. Evaluation of the heart and great vessels
1. Electrocardiography
a. Monitoring
b. Holter and event monitors
2. TTE and TEE
a. Contrast-enhanced studies
3. Other chest imaging studies
a. Chest x-ray
b. Chest CT
c. Chest MRI
4. Other studies
a. Blood pressure monitoring
b. Blood cultures
c. Testing for ischemic heart disease
d. Peripheral artery disease
D. Other diagnostic studies
1. Hematologic studies
a. Blood count
b. Platelet count
c. Special coagulation studies
d. Antiplatelet (aspirin, clopidogrel) resistance studies
2. Immunological studies
a. Inflammatory markers
b. Other autoimmune studies (multisystem)
c. Serologic studies
3. Biochemical studies
a. Glucose
b. Cholesterol
c. Blood gases
d. Hepatic and renal tests
4. Urine tests
5. Biopsies
6. Evaluation for the complications of stroke
7. Evaluation for the consequences of stroke
a. Swallowing
b. Orthopedic
c. Other
8. Genetic testing
05. Causes of stroke
A. Atherosclerosis—ischemic stroke
1. Evaluation of patients prior to non-cerebrovascular operations
2. Asymptomatic bruit or stenosis
3. Aortic atherosclerosis
B. Non-atherosclerotic vasculopathies—ischemic stroke
1. Non-inflammatory
a. Dissection
b. Moyamoya disease
c. Fibromuscular dysplasia
d. Trauma
e. Radiation-induced vasculopathy
f. Saccular aneurysm
g. Other
2. Infectious
a. Syphilis
b. Herpes zoster
c. AIDS
d. Cysticercosis
e. Bacterial meningitis
f. Aspergillosis
g. Mucormycosis
h. Cat-scratch disease
i. Behçet syndrome
j. Other
3. Inflammatory, non-infectious (angiitis)
a. Isolated CNS vasculitis
b. Multisystem vasculitis
c. Cogan syndrome
d. Eales disease
e. Polyarteritis nodosa
f. Wegener granulomatosis with polyangiitis
g. Eosinophilic granulomatosis with polyangiitis (Churg-Strauss
syndrome)
h. Takayasu disease
i. Systemic lupus erythematosus
j. Scleroderma
k. Rheumatoid arthritis
l. Mixed connective tissue disease
m. Ulcerative colitis and regional enteritis
n. Sarcoidosis
o. Other
C. Migraine
D. Other causes of ischemic stroke
1. Kawasaki disease
2. Lyme disease
3. Susac syndrome
E. Genetic and metabolic causes of stroke
1. CADASIL
2. MELAS
3. Fabry-Anderson disease
4. Homocystinuria
5. Kearns-Sayre syndrome
6. Myoclonus epilepsy with ragged red fibers
7. Ehlers-Danlos syndrome, type IV
8. Marfan syndrome
9. CARASIL
10. Other monogenetic small vessel brain diseases
11. Other
F. Drugs that cause stroke, including drugs of abuse
G. Cerebral amyloid angiopathy—infarction or hemorrhage
H. Cardioembolic causes of stroke
1. Atrial fibrillation
2. Cardiovascular procedures and operations
3. Acute myocardial infarction
4. Dilated cardiomyopathy
5. Rheumatic mitral or aortic stenosis
6. Infective endocarditis
7. Libman-Sacks endocarditis
8. Non-bacterial thrombotic endocarditis
9. Mechanical or bioprosthetic valves
10. Atrial myxoma
11. Sick sinus syndrome
12. Mitral valve prolapse
13. Patent foramen ovale, including atrial septal aneurysm
14. Congenital heart diseases, including cyanotic heart disease
15. Other
I. Prothrombotic causes of stroke
1. Inherited
a. Sickle cell disease
b. Factor V Leiden—activated protein C resistance
c. Prothrombin gene mutation
d. Protein S, C, antithrombin
e. Thalassemia
f. Iron deficiency anemia
g. Others
2. Acquired
a. Pregnancy
b. Cancer
c. Dehydration
d. Thrombocytosis
e. Thrombotic thrombocytopenic purpura
f. Heparin-induced thrombocytopenia and thrombosis (HITT)
g. Leukemia
h. Disseminated intravascular coagulation
i. Nephrotic syndrome
j. Hemolytic uremic syndrome
k. Sepsis and inflammation
l. Other
3. Autoimmune causes of thrombosis
a. Lupus and lupus anticoagulant, Sneddon syndrome and
antiphospholipid antibodies
b. Others
4. Iatrogenic/drugs/toxins
a. Antineoplastic
b. Prothrombotic agents
c. Others
J. Bleeding diatheses
1. Inherited
a. Hemophilia
b. Sickle cell disease
c. Thalassemia
d. von Willebrands disease
e. Others
2. Acquired
a. Leukemia
b. Thrombocytopenia
c. Disseminated intravascular coagulation
d. Others
3. Systemic diseases
4. Iatrogenic/drugs/toxins
a. Anticoagulants
b. Antiplatelet aggregating agents
c. Thrombolytic agents
d. Drugs of abuse
e. Others
K. Aneurysms
1. Saccular
2. Infected
3. Traumatic
4. Neoplastic
5. Dolichoectatic
6. Dissecting
L. Vascular malformations
1. Arteriovenous
2. Developmental venous anomaly
3. Cavernous
4. Telangiectasia
5. Dural arteriovenous fistula
M. Trauma and intracranial bleeding
N. Moyamoya disease and syndrome
O. Hypertensive hemorrhage
P. Other causes of hemorrhage
1. Vasculitis
2. Tumors
a. Primary
b. Metastatic
3. Iatrogenic
Q. Genetic diseases causing hemorrhagic stroke
06. Complications of stroke
A. Early neurologic complications
1. Brain edema, increased ICP, and herniation
2. Hydrocephalus
3. Seizures
4. Hemorrhagic transformation
5. Recurrent infarction
6. Recurrent hemorrhage
7. Other
B. Early medical complications
1. Cardiac
2. Gastrointestinal
3. Pulmonary
4. Electrolyte
5. Other
C. Chronic neurologic sequelae
D. Chronic medical sequelae
07. Treatment of patients with stroke
A. Outpatient management
1. Patient educational materials
B. Medical therapies to prevent stroke
1. Antiplatelet agents
a. Aspirin
b. Clopidogrel
c. Ticlodipine
d. Dipyridamole
e. Cilostazol
f. Prasugrel
g. Ticagrelor
h. Others
2. Anticoagulant agents
a. Warfarin
b. Heparin
c. LMW heparins
d. Direct thrombin inhibitors
e. Factor X inhibitors
3. Thrombolytic agents
4. Neuroprotective agents and other acute treatments
5. Cardioactive agents
6. Medications to prevent stroke by treating risk factors
a. Hyperlipidemia
b. Diabetes mellitus
c. Hypertension
d. Smoking
e. Hyperhomocysteinemia
f. Antiinflammatory
g. Alcohol dependence and detoxification
7. Medications to treat autoimmune diseases and vasculitis
8. Medications to treat complications of stroke
a. Anticonvulsants
b. Antidepressants
c. Brain edema and increased ICP
i. Hypertonic saline
ii. Mannitol
9. Medications to Improve or restore neurologic function or to
augment rehabilitation
10. Medications to prevent rebleeding or vasospasm following a
hemorrhage
a. Aminocaproic acid
b. Tranexamic acid
c. Nimodipine
11. Antimigraine medications
12. Vitamins
13. Interactions between medications
C. Hyperacute treatment of ischemic stroke
1. Emergency department
a. Intravenous thrombolytics
b. Intra-arterial thrombolytics
c. Mechanical thrombectomy
d. Anticoagulants and antiplatelet agents
e. Antihypertensives
f. Anticonvulsants
g. Other
2. Hospitalization – general management
a. Prevention of recurrent stroke
b. Prevention of deep vein thrombosis and pulmonary
embolism
c. Blood pressure management
d. Treatment of complications
e. Treatment of comorbid diseases
f. Treatment of risk factors for stroke
g. Other
3. Intensive care unit
a. Osmotic agents
b. Steroids
c. Sedation
d. Blood products
e. Anti-vasospasm therapy
f. Management of ventriculostomy
g. Temperature control
h. Antiarrhythmics
i. Ventilator management
j. Pressors
k. Antibiotics
l. Other
4. Neurosurgical management
a. Hemorrhage
i. Evacuation
ii. Ventriculostomy
b. Ruptured aneurysms
i. Management of vasospasm
c. Vascular malformations
d. Surgical treatment of brain edema – decompressive
craniectomy
e. Other
D. Chronic care
1. Antidepressants
2. Sedatives
3. Stimulants
E. Treatment of venous thrombosis
F. Treatment of spinal cord vascular disease
G. Treatment of pituitary apoplexy
H. Professionalism, ethics, systems-based practice
1. Palliative care
2. End-of-life decisions
3. Advanced directives, informed consent, regulations
4. Other
08. Recovery, regenerative approaches, and rehabilitation
A. Functional assessment
B. Regeneration and plasticity
C. Predicting outcomes
D. Pharmacologic effects on recovery
E. Rehabilitation principles
F. Emerging approaches

Family Medicine Board Certification Exam
Certification-Board Certification pdf
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Nursing Licensure Certification

Bachelor of Nursing (BSN) Programs

It has been determined that graduates of the Bachelor of Nursing (BSN) Programs meets the educational requirements needed to pursue professional licensure in all fifty states and the District of Columbia.  However, each state may have additional requirements that must be satisfied and prospective applicants intending to seek licensure should contact the professional licensing board in the state or territory prior to applying to the BSN program.

Those requirements can be determined by visiting:  National Council of State Boards of Nursing (NCSBN).

 

Bachelor of Nursing Licensure Information (PDF)

Master of Nursing Nurse Practitioner

It has been determined that graduates of the Master of Nursing Nurse Practitioner (MSN NP) Program meets the educational requirements needed to pursue professional licensure in all fifty states and the District of Columbia.  However, each state may have additional requirements that must be satisfied and prospective applicants intending to seek licensure should contact the professional licensing board in the state or territory prior to applying to the MSN NP program. Those requirements can be determined by visiting: National Council of State Boards of Nursing (NCSBN) . In addition, state restrictions may apply for clinical practice within the program. Please visit here for additional information https://www.online.drexel.edu/about/state-regulations.aspx  

Master of Nursing Nurse Practitioner Licensure Information (PDF)

Doctor of Nursing Practice Nurse Anesthesia

It has been determined that graduates of the Doctor of Nursing Practice Nurse Anesthesia (DNP NA) Program meets the educational requirements needed to pursue professional licensure in all fifty states and the District of Columbia.  However, each state may have additional requirements that must be satisfied and prospective applicants intending to seek licensure should contact the professional licensing board in the state or territory prior to applying to the DNP NA program. Those requirements can be determined by visiting: National Council of State Boards of Nursing (NCSBN). In addition, state restrictions may apply for clinical practice within the program. Please visit here for additional information: https://drexel.edu/cnhp/academics/doctoral/DNP-NA/

Doctor of Nursing Practice Nurse Anesthesia (PDF)

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Killexams : Rinker achieves board certification in advanced diabetes management

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The South African Bureau of Standards (SABS) conducts a range of tests against South African National Standards (SANS), as well as customer specific requirements and/or testing against compulsory specifications that may be issued for certain product categories.

SABS offers certification schemes for both products and/or systems that comply with the SANS or a relevant Mark scheme/systems scheme, such as the Scheme for Food Safety Management Systems (FSSC). Additionally, many products undergo more frequent testing and conformity assessments to earn their status which allows them to use the ‘SABS Approved’ mark on their product, says SABS lead administrator Jodi Scholtz.

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She highlights that the SABS’ testing and certification services are offered independently, meaning that the SABS attains and maintains an accreditation status in order to offer the testing and certification services. In some cases, where the SABS uses third party laboratories – the laboratories need to meet stringent requirements and are subject to assessments and inspection by the SABS.

“The SABS is aware that there are numerous manufacturers in possession of SABS test reports which they use as evidence that their products are ‘SABS Approved’ and it is important for consumers to understand that ‘SABS Approved’ can only be claimed by a manufacturer if the products was actually certified by the SABS.

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“The SABS laboratory test report is a report of the performance of that product against requirements of a standard or other client specific requirements, and this does not indicate that the product is ‘SABS Approved’ in any way. A SABS permit to apply the Certification Mark is a more comprehensive statement of quality assurance of the product or system.”

Testing is just one of the requirements in the complete SABS certification process.

Scholtz mentions that the testing of products and systems is essential to determine whether performance meets specified requirements of the standard and this is done in controlled and simulated environments. Test reports provide information about a product at the time of testing and are limited to the very trial tested. Test reports do not imply that all the same/ similar products also comply or would pass the testing requirements.

She highlights that conformity assessment testing assists manufacturers during their product development phases to ensure that relevant modifications or enhancements can be made to meet specified criteria as well as to boost the quality of the product. Retailers and consumers are more likely to sell and buy goods and services that have been tested and have successfully passed testing to SANS or specific requirements.

Thu, 07 Jul 2022 12:00:00 -0500 en text/html https://www.engineeringnews.co.za/article/certification-provides-assurance-and-is-more-than-a-test-report-2022-07-08/rep_id%3A4136
Killexams : Athletic Training, Master of

Program Handbook

Saint Louis University's athletic training program offers an early-assurance 3+2 graduate professional program. Students earn a Bachelor of Science (B.S.) in Exercise Science after the completion of four years and then a Master of Athletic Training (M.A.T.) after successful completion of an additional post-baccalaureate year. Students may also enter the program as undergraduate transfer students or post-baccalaureate. The athletic training program has an interprofessional focus with a curriculum that develops a team approach to health care. 

SLU's athletic training program is the standard of excellence within the field, boasting an outstanding pass rate on the Board of Certification (BOC) exam and excellent job placement rates. SLU students and faculty are engaged regularly in the professions, receiving honors at the national and international levels.

SLU's program has a proven track record of global engagement: the athletic program has a curricular track in which students can attend SLU's campus in Madrid, Spain, for up to four semesters; an international clinical exchange program with universities in Spain and Ireland; and the program is an institutional member of the World Federation of Athletic Training and Therapy (WFATT).

Upon graduation, students are eligible to take the BOC Examination for the Certified Athletic Trainer (ATC) credential.

Program Highlights

Advantages to earning a Master of Athletic Training at Saint Louis University include:

  • Direct admission to the program as a freshman
  • Advancement through the entire athletic training program without additional application processes provided the student remains in good standing
  • Opportunities to pursue additional curricular goals such as minors, certificates and study abroad programs
  • SLU is home to the only NCAA Division I athletic program in the city of St. Louis.
  • Diversity of clinical training sites
  • Highly accessible faculty
  • Classroom technology
  • Interprofessional focus of core curriculum to build a team approach to health care
  • State-of-the-art laboratories and clinical equipment located in the Doisy College of Health Sciences
  • Study-abroad track is available, allowing students to study at SLU's campus in Madrid, Spain, for up to four semesters during the pre-professional phase of the program

Curriculum Overview

Students that begin the program as freshmen spend their first three years completing the required liberal arts and science prerequisite courses. Students who meet academic and professional behavior requirements continue into the two-year professional phase of the program after their junior year.

The two-year professional phase of the program includes coursework in injury and illness prevention, wellness promotion and education, emergent care, examination and clinical diagnosis, therapeutic intervention, and rehabilitation of injuries and medical conditions. Students participate in clinical experiences each semester in a variety of practice settings.

Clinical and Research Opportunities

SLU's athletic training students participate in clinical experiences each semester, and the diversity of clinical sites is a hallmark of the program. In addition to Saint Louis University’s athletic teams, eight other St. Louis-area universities and over 20 high schools serve as clinical sites for the program. Students experience unique networking opportunities such as physician office rotations, NCAA championship events and summer camps.

SLU's program provides opportunities to connect with the AT profession. Students have a chance to be involved in the Annual Athletic Training Speaker Series and National Athletic Training Month each spring. Faculty members serve in prominent roles in state, regional and national organizations in athletic training. Additionally, the program houses the editorial offices of the Journal of Athletic Training and the Athletic Training Education Journal.

Careers

Graduates work in a variety of settings, practicing injury prevention, injury assessment, sports rehabilitation and sport-specific conditioning.

Certified athletic trainers are employed in many settings such as:

  • High schools
  • Colleges and universities
  • Professional sports
  • Sports medicine clinics
  • Military, law enforcement, tactical teams
  • Performing arts
  • Industrial organizations

In addition to providing patient care, athletic trainers also work as clinical researchers, administrators, faculty members and clinical instructors at colleges or universities.

Admission Requirements

Admission consideration for the athletic training program is initially based on a strong overall academic background.

Freshman Requirements

High school seniors applying for admission are reviewed on an individual basis. The best-qualified students are selected from the application pool with a minimum recommended cumulative GPA is a 3.00 on a 4.00 scale.

Standardized test scores are optional. When evaluating whether to apply test-optional or with a test score, applicants should note that students accepted in previous years had an average composite 25 ACT or an average total 1200 SAT.

Recommended high school courses include:

  • Four years of high school English
  • Four years of high school math, with achievement to at least the level of pre-calculus
  • Four years of high school science, including biology and chemistry, with physics encouraged but not required
  • At least two years of a modern foreign language recommended

Transfer Admission Requirements

  • Minimum of 25 hours of college credit
  • Minimum cumulative GPA of a 3.00 on a 4.00 scale with no science grade below a C

Post-Baccalaureate Requirements

Students must have the following prerequisite courses completed prior to beginning the program:

  • Biology with Lab
  • Chemistry I and II with Labs
  • Physics I and II with Labs
  • Basic Anatomy and Human Physiology, or Anatomy & Physiology I and II
  • Exercise Physiology
  • General Psychology
  • Ethics
  • Pre-Calculus
  • Statistics
  • Medical Terminology

Scholarships and Financial Aid

There are two principal ways to help finance a Saint Louis University education:

  • Scholarships: Awarded based on academic achievement, service, leadership and financial need. In addition to University scholarships, the Doisy College of Health Sciences offers a scholarship to sophomores, juniors and seniors.
  • Financial Aid: Provided in the form of grants and loans, some of which require repayment.

For priority consideration for merit-based scholarships, applicants should apply for admission by Dec. 1 and complete a Free Application for Federal Student Aid (FAFSA) by March 1.

For more information, visit SLU's Office of Student Financial Services at www.slu.edu/financial-aid.

Accreditation

SLU's Master of Athletic Training is accredited through the 2024-25 academic year by the Commission on Accreditation of Athletic Training Education (CAATE) as a graduate professional program. The Master of Athletic Training program is one of more than 350 CAATE accredited programs nationally.

Commission on Accreditation of Athletic Training Education
2001 K Street NW, 3rd Floor North
Washington, DC 20006
P: 512-733-9700
844-GO-CAATE | 844-462-2283
http://caate.net

For more information about the SLU athletic training program's outcomes, graduation rates, retention rates, board of certification exam pass rates and job placement rates, please see the program outcomes data reported by CAATE.

View Program Outcomes Data (PDF) 

Bachelor of Science in Exercise Science Requirements

Athletic Training Requirements (for students admitted as freshman or admitted as transfer undergraduate students)

MAT 5550 Rehabilitation in Athletic Training II 3
MAT 5600 Athletic Training Administration 3
MAT 5620 Psychology of Sport and Injury 3
MAT 5650 Research in Athletic Training 2
MAT 5700 AT Clinical Practicum I 3
MAT 5750 AT Clinical Practicum II 3
MAT 5900 AT Field Experience 2
MAT 6010 Contemporary Clinical Practice 2
MAT 6700 AT Clinical Practicum III 4
MAT 6160 Enhancing Human Performance 3
MAT 6960 AT Capstone Project 2
MAT 6750 AT Clinical Practicum IV 4
MAT 6800 Seminar in Athletic Training 3
Total Credits 37

Continuation Standards

Students must maintain a cumulative grade point average (GPA) of 2.70 to remain in good standing.

Roadmaps are recommended semester-by-semester plans of study for programs and assume full-time enrollment unless otherwise noted.  

Courses and milestones designated as critical (marked with !) must be completed in the semester listed to ensure a timely graduation. Transfer credit may change the roadmap.

This roadmap should not be used in the place of regular academic advising appointments. All students are encouraged to meet with their advisor/mentor each semester.  Requirements, course availability and sequencing are subject to change.

Standard Track

Plan of Study Grid
Year One
Fall
BIOL 1260
& BIOL 1265
General Biology: Transformations of Energy and Matter
and Principles of Biology II Laboratory
4
CHEM 1080
& CHEM 1085
Principles of Chemistry 1 Lecture
and Principles of Chemistry 1 Lab ()
4
CORE 1500 Cura Personalis 1: Self in Community 1
ENGL 1900 Advanced Strategies of Rhetoric and Research () 3
3
  Credits 15
Spring
CHEM 1480
& CHEM 1485
Principles of Chemistry 2 Lecture
and Principles of Chemistry 2 Lab
4
CORE 1000 Ignite First Year Seminar 2
CORE 1200 Eloquentia Perfecta 2: Oral and Visual Communication 3
MAT 1000 Intro to Athletic Training 1
MATH 1400 Pre-Calculus 1 3
3
  Credits 16
Year Two
Fall
CORE 1700 Ultimate Questions: Philosophy 3
IPE 2100 Interprofessional Collaboration and Healthcare in Global Context 3
MAT 2000 AT Student Development I 1
PHYS 1220
& PHYS 1235
General Physics I
and General Physics I Lab 1
4
PPY 2540 Human Physiology 4
PSY 1010 General Psychology () 3
  Credits 18
Spring
ANAT 1000 Basic Human Anatomy 3
CORE 1600 Ultimate Questions: Theology 3
CORE 2500 Cura Personalis 2: Self in Contemplation 0
IPE 4200 Applied Decision-Making in Interprofessional Practice 3
PHYS 1240
& PHYS 1255
General Physics II
and General Physics II Lab 1
4
3
  Credits 16
Year Three
Fall
CORE 2800 Eloquentia Perfecta 3: Creative Expression 2-3
CORE 3400 Ways of Thinking: Aesthetics, History, and Culture 3
PHIL 2050 Ethics 3
STAT 1100 Introduction to Statistics () 3
3
3
  Credits 17-18
Spring
IPE 4900 Interprofessional Community Practicum () 2
MAT 3000 Athletic Training Student Development II () 2
MAT 3230 Exercise Physiology 3
3
3
3
  Credits 16
Summer
ANAT 4000 Human Gross Anatomy 6
MAT 5010 Principles of Athletic Training 2
  Credits 8
Year Four
Fall
MAT 5100 Kinesiology 3
MAT 5125 Therapeutic Modalities 3
MAT 5133 Lab Studies and Imaging 2
MAT 5240 Musculoskeletal Assessment & Management I 4
MAT 5700 AT Clinical Practicum I 3
  Credits 15
Spring
 
MAT 5250 Musculoskeletal Assessment and Management II 4
MAT 5500 Rehabilitation in AT I 4
MAT 5650 Research in Athletic Training 2
MAT 5750 AT Clinical Practicum II 3
MAT 5800 Medical Conditions and Physical Activity 3
  Credits 16
Summer
MAT 5900 AT Field Experience 2
  Credits 2
Year Five
Fall
MAT 5160 Aspects of Nutrition 2
MAT 5550 Rehabilitation in Athletic Training II 3
MAT 5600 Athletic Training Administration 3
MAT 5620 Psychology of Sport and Injury 3
MAT 6010 Contemporary Clinical Practice 2
MAT 6700 AT Clinical Practicum III 4
  Credits 17
Spring
MAT 6160 Enhancing Human Performance 3
MAT 6750 AT Clinical Practicum IV 4
MAT 6800 Seminar in Athletic Training 3
MAT 6960 AT Capstone Project 2
  Credits 12
  Total Credits 168-169

SLU-Madrid Track

Plan of Study Grid
Year One
Fall
BIOL 1260
& BIOL 1265
General Biology: Transformations of Energy and Matter
and Principles of Biology II Laboratory
4
CHEM 1110
& CHEM 1115
General Chemistry 1
and General Chemistry 1 Laboratory
4
CORE 1500 Cura Personalis 1: Self in Community 1
ENGL 1900 Advanced Strategies of Rhetoric and Research () 3
3
  Credits 15
Spring
CHEM 1120
& CHEM 1125
General Chemistry 2
and General Chemistry 2 Laboratory
4
CORE 1000 Ignite First Year Seminar 2
CORE 1200 Eloquentia Perfecta 2: Oral and Visual Communication 3
MAT 1000 Intro to Athletic Training 1
MATH 1400 Pre-Calculus 3
3
  Credits 16
Year Two
Fall
CORE 1700 Ultimate Questions: Philosophy 3
IPE 2100 Interprofessional Collaboration and Healthcare in Global Context 3
PHYS 1220
& PHYS 1235
General Physics I
and General Physics I Lab 1
4
PPY 2540 Human Physiology 4
PSY 1010 General Psychology () 3
 
  Credits 17
Spring
ANAT 1000 Basic Human Anatomy 3
CORE 1600 Ultimate Questions: Theology 3
CORE 2500 Cura Personalis 2: Self in Contemplation 0
IPE 4200 Applied Decision-Making in Interprofessional Practice 3
PHYS 1240
& PHYS 1255
General Physics II
and General Physics II Lab 1
4
 
  Credits 13
Year Three
Fall
CORE 2800 Eloquentia Perfecta 3: Creative Expression 2-3
MAT 2000 AT Student Development I 1
IPE 4200 Applied Decision-Making in Interprofessional Practice 3
PHIL 2050

or HCE 2010

Ethics

or Foundations in Clinical Health Care Ethics

3
STAT 1100 Introduction to Statistics () 3
  Credits 12-13
Spring
MAT 3000 Athletic Training Student Development II () 2
MAT 3230 Exercise Physiology 3
IPE 4900 Interprofessional Community Practicum () 2
3
3
3
  Credits 16
Summer
ANAT 4000 Human Gross Anatomy 6
MAT 5010 Principles of Athletic Training 2
  Credits 8
Year Four
Fall
MAT 5100 Kinesiology 3
MAT 5125 Therapeutic Modalities 3
MAT 5133 Lab Studies and Imaging 2
MAT 5240 Musculoskeletal Assessment & Management I 4
MAT 5700 AT Clinical Practicum I 3
  Credits 15
Spring
 
MAT 5250 Musculoskeletal Assessment and Management II 4
MAT 5500 Rehabilitation in AT I 4
MAT 5650 Research in Athletic Training 2
MAT 5750 AT Clinical Practicum II 3
MAT 5800 Medical Conditions and Physical Activity 3
  Credits 16
Summer
MAT 5900 AT Field Experience 2
  Credits 2
Year Five
Fall
MAT 5160 Aspects of Nutrition 2
MAT 5550 Rehabilitation in Athletic Training II 3
MAT 5600 Athletic Training Administration 3
MAT 5620 Psychology of Sport and Injury 3
MAT 6010 Contemporary Clinical Practice 2
MAT 6700 AT Clinical Practicum III 4
  Credits 17
Spring
MAT 6160 Enhancing Human Performance 3
MAT 6750 AT Clinical Practicum IV 4
MAT 6800 Seminar in Athletic Training 3
MAT 6960 AT Capstone Project 2
  Credits 12
  Total Credits 159-160

Program Notes

Freshman and sophomore years are at the SLU-Madrid campus in Madrid, Spain. Junior year and professional year 2 are completed at the SLU campus in St. Louis, Missouri, USA.

Pre-PA and Physician Assistant Scholars Track

Plan of Study Grid
Year One
Fall
BIOL 1240
& BIOL 1245
General Biology: Information Flow and Evolution
and Principles of Biology I Laboratory
4
CHEM 1110
& CHEM 1115
General Chemistry 1
and General Chemistry 1 Laboratory ()
4
CORE 1500 Cura Personalis 1: Self in Community 1
CORE 1600 Ultimate Questions: Theology 3
MATH 1400 Pre-Calculus 1 3
3
  Credits 18
Spring
BIOL 1260
& BIOL 1265
General Biology: Transformations of Energy and Matter
and Principles of Biology II Laboratory
4
CHEM 1120
& CHEM 1125
General Chemistry 2
and General Chemistry 2 Laboratory
4
CORE 1000 Ignite First Year Seminar 2
CORE 1700 Ultimate Questions: Philosophy 3
ENGL 1900 Advanced Strategies of Rhetoric and Research () 3
MAT 1000 Intro to Athletic Training 1
  Credits 17
Year Two
Fall
CHEM 2410
& CHEM 2415
Organic Chemistry 1
and Organic Chemistry 1 Laboratory
4
CORE 1200 Eloquentia Perfecta 2: Oral and Visual Communication 3
IPE 2100 Interprofessional Collaboration and Healthcare in Global Context 3
MAT 2000 AT Student Development I 1
PPY 2540 Human Physiology 4
PSY 1010 General Psychology () 3
  Credits 18
Spring
ANAT 1000 Basic Human Anatomy 3
CHEM 2420
& CHEM 2425
Organic Chemistry 2
and Organic Chemistry 2 Laboratory
4
CORE 2500 Cura Personalis 2: Self in Contemplation 0
HSCI 2200 Medical Terminology 3
IPE 4200 Applied Decision-Making in Interprofessional Practice 3
PHIL 2050 Ethics 3
  Credits 16
Year Three
Fall
BIOL 3020 Biochemistry and Molecular Biology 3
BIOL 4640 General Microbiology 3
CORE 2800 Eloquentia Perfecta 3: Creative Expression 2
PHYS 1310
& PHYS 1320
College Physics I
and College Physics I Laboratory
4
STAT 1100 Introduction to Statistics () 3
3
  Credits 18
Spring
BIOL 3030 Principles of Genetics 3
MAT 3000 Athletic Training Student Development II () 2
PHYS 1330
& PHYS 1340
College Physics II
and College Physics II Laboratory
4
MAT 3230 Exercise Physiology 3
IPE 4900 Interprofessional Community Practicum () 2
  Credits 14
Summer
ANAT 4000 Human Gross Anatomy 6
MAT 5010 Principles of Athletic Training 2
  Credits 8
Year Four
Fall
MAT 5100 Kinesiology 3
MAT 5125 Therapeutic Modalities 3
MAT 5133 Lab Studies and Imaging 2
MAT 5240 Musculoskeletal Assessment & Management I 4
MAT 5700 AT Clinical Practicum I 3
  Credits 15
Spring
 
MAT 5250 Musculoskeletal Assessment and Management II 4
MAT 5500 Rehabilitation in AT I 4
MAT 5650 Research in Athletic Training 2
MAT 5750 AT Clinical Practicum II 3
MAT 5800 Medical Conditions and Physical Activity 3
  Credits 16
Summer
MAT 5900 AT Field Experience 2
  Credits 2
Year Five
Fall
MAT 5160 Aspects of Nutrition 2
MAT 5550 Rehabilitation in Athletic Training II 3
MAT 5600 Athletic Training Administration 3
MAT 5620 Psychology of Sport and Injury 3
MAT 6010 Contemporary Clinical Practice 2
MAT 6700 AT Clinical Practicum III 4
  Credits 17
Spring
MAT 6160 Enhancing Human Performance 3
MAT 6750 AT Clinical Practicum IV 4
MAT 6800 Seminar in Athletic Training 3
MAT 6960 AT Capstone Project 2
  Credits 12
  Total Credits 171

Program Notes

PA Scholars - Students must complete modern foreign language through 1020 level and history course or show equivalent (as approved by program director). Upon completion of the 5-year athletic training program, students will proceed directly into SLU’s graduate-level PA program.
Pre-PA - Students must complete modern foreign language through 1020 level and history course or show equivalent (as approved by program director). Curriculum is designed to address SLU’s PA program requirements and is subject to change. If applying to a PA program at another institution, please consult their website for specific requirements.

Pre-Medicine Track

Plan of Study Grid
Year One
Fall
BIOL 1240
& BIOL 1245
General Biology: Information Flow and Evolution
and Principles of Biology I Laboratory
4
CHEM 1110
& CHEM 1115
General Chemistry 1
and General Chemistry 1 Laboratory ()
4
CORE 1500 Cura Personalis 1: Self in Community 1
MATH 1510 Calculus I 4
3
  Credits 16
Spring
BIOL 1260
& BIOL 1265
General Biology: Transformations of Energy and Matter
and Principles of Biology II Laboratory
4
CHEM 1120
& CHEM 1125
General Chemistry 2
and General Chemistry 2 Laboratory
4
CORE 1000 Ignite First Year Seminar 2
MAT 1000 Intro to Athletic Training 1
ENGL 1900 Advanced Strategies of Rhetoric and Research () 3
3
  Credits 17
Year Two
Fall
CHEM 2410
& CHEM 2415
Organic Chemistry 1
and Organic Chemistry 1 Laboratory
4
CORE 1200 Eloquentia Perfecta 2: Oral and Visual Communication 3
IPE 2100 Interprofessional Collaboration and Healthcare in Global Context 3
MAT 2000 AT Student Development I 1
PPY 2540 Human Physiology 4
PSY 1010 General Psychology () 3
  Credits 18
Spring
ANAT 1000 Basic Human Anatomy 3
CHEM 2420
& CHEM 2425
Organic Chemistry 2
and Organic Chemistry 2 Laboratory
4
CORE 1600 Ultimate Questions: Theology 3
CORE 1700 Ultimate Questions: Philosophy 3
CORE 2500 Cura Personalis 2: Self in Contemplation 0
IPE 4200 Applied Decision-Making in Interprofessional Practice 3
  Credits 16
Year Three
Fall
BIOL 3020 Biochemistry and Molecular Biology 3
PHIL 2050 Ethics 3
PHYS 1310
& PHYS 1320
College Physics I
and College Physics I Laboratory
4
STAT 1100 Introduction to Statistics () 3
3
  Credits 16
Spring
CORE 2800 Eloquentia Perfecta 3: Creative Expression 2-3
CORE 3400 Ways of Thinking: Aesthetics, History, and Culture 3
IPE 4900 Interprofessional Community Practicum () 2
MAT 3000 Athletic Training Student Development II () 2
MAT 3230 Exercise Physiology 3
PHYS 1330
& PHYS 1340
College Physics II
and College Physics II Laboratory
4
  Credits 16-17
Summer
ANAT 4000 Human Gross Anatomy 6
MAT 5010 Principles of Athletic Training 2
  Credits 8
Year Four
Fall
MAT 5100 Kinesiology 3
MAT 5125 Therapeutic Modalities 3
MAT 5133 Lab Studies and Imaging 2
MAT 5240 Musculoskeletal Assessment & Management I 4
MAT 5700 AT Clinical Practicum I 3
  Credits 15
Spring
 
MAT 5250 Musculoskeletal Assessment and Management II 4
MAT 5500 Rehabilitation in AT I 4
MAT 5650 Research in Athletic Training 2
MAT 5750 AT Clinical Practicum II 3
MAT 5800 Medical Conditions and Physical Activity 3
  Credits 16
Summer
MAT 5900 AT Field Experience 2
  Credits 2
Year Five
Fall
MAT 5160 Aspects of Nutrition 2
MAT 5550 Rehabilitation in Athletic Training II 3
MAT 5600 Athletic Training Administration 3
MAT 5620 Psychology of Sport and Injury 3
MAT 6010 Contemporary Clinical Practice 2
MAT 6700 AT Clinical Practicum III 4
  Credits 17
Spring
MAT 6160 Enhancing Human Performance 3
MAT 6750 AT Clinical Practicum IV 4
MAT 6800 Seminar in Athletic Training 3
MAT 6960 AT Capstone Project 2
  Credits 12
  Total Credits 169-170

Program Notes

Curriculum is designed to address SLU School of Medicine requirements and is subject to change. If applying to a medical school at another institution, please consult their website for specific requirements.

Master of Athletic Training – Post-Baccalaureate Applicants

Plan of Study Grid
Year One
Summer
ANAT 4000 Human Gross Anatomy 6
MAT 5010 Principles of Athletic Training 2
  Credits 8
Fall
MAT 4125 3
MAT 5100 Kinesiology 3
MAT 5133 Lab Studies and Imaging 2
MAT 5240 Musculoskeletal Assessment & Management I 4
MAT 5700 AT Clinical Practicum I 3
  Credits 15
Spring
MAT 5250 Musculoskeletal Assessment and Management II 4
MAT 5500 Rehabilitation in AT I 4
MAT 5650 Research in Athletic Training 2
MAT 5750 AT Clinical Practicum II 3
MAT 5800 Medical Conditions and Physical Activity 3
  Credits 16
Year Two
Summer
MAT 5900 AT Field Experience 2
  Credits 2
Fall
MAT 5160 Aspects of Nutrition 2
MAT 5550 Rehabilitation in Athletic Training II 3
MAT 5600 Athletic Training Administration 3
MAT 5620 Psychology of Sport and Injury 3
MAT 6010 Contemporary Clinical Practice 2
MAT 6700 AT Clinical Practicum III 4
  Credits 17
Spring
MAT 6160 Enhancing Human Performance 3
MAT 6750 AT Clinical Practicum IV 4
MAT 6800 Seminar in Athletic Training 3
MAT 6960 AT Capstone Project 2
  Credits 12
  Total Credits 70

Program Notes

Students must have the following pre-requisite courses completed prior to beginning this program:

  • Biology with Lab
  • Chemistry I and II with Lab
  • Physics I and II with Lab
  • Basic Anatomy and Human Physiology, or Anatomy & Physiology I and II
  • Exercise Physiology
  • General Psychology
  • Ethics
  • Pre-Calculus
  • Statistics
  • Medical Terminology
Sun, 17 Jul 2022 21:51:00 -0500 en text/html https://www.slu.edu/doisy/degrees/undergraduate/athletic-training.php
Killexams : SBU grads pass certification exam with distinction

ST. BONAVENTURE, N.Y. — Katie Heitzman and Claire Schaef didn’t just pass the American Society for Biochemistry and Molecular Biology certification exam. They did so with distinction.

Heitzman and Schaef, who graduated from St. Bonaventure University in May with degrees in biochemistry, were among only 12% of graduating seniors nationwide who passed the ASBMB exam with distinction, meaning they attained scores of “proficient or above” on 10 of the 11 exam questions.

Overall, only 43% of the 1,052 students passed the exam to achieve certification (“proficient or above” on at least eight questions).

“Compared to the national average of below 50% for ASBMB certification, this is strong evidence for the preparedness that our biochemistry program provides for our students,” said Dr. Xiaoning Zhang, biology professor and director of the biochemistry program.

“I’m very proud of Katie and Claire. They worked hard and persevered, especially during the pandemic. These are invaluable traits that the workforce is looking for.”

The certificate exam has been offered to graduating biochemistry seniors at St. Bonaventure every year since 2018, when SBU’s program earned ASBMB accreditation. Since then, about 90% of SBU’s students who took the exam achieved certification, almost all with distinction, Zhang said.

The certification exam is designed to test students’ knowledge and understanding of the core competencies in biochemistry and molecular biology developed by the ASBMB and its members. Questions have been structured to assess these concept areas at different levels of cognitive skills and abilities.

Wed, 03 Aug 2022 00:00:00 -0500 en text/html https://www.bradfordera.com/news/sbu-grads-pass-certification-exam-with-distinction/article_ad4f859c-f55d-59e1-a416-1c6b694ef023.html
Killexams : If Employers Test Union Certification and Lose, Will They Have to Pay?

Thursday, July 7, 2022

On June 24, 2022, the NLRB sought an order forcing an employer who refused to negotiate with a certified union to pay back wages and benefits to employees that they allegedly could have earned absent the delay in bargaining during the time the employer appealed the NLRB’s certification of the union as the exclusive bargaining representative in federal court. In Pathway Vet Alliance, LLC, the General Counsel for the NLRB made the common allegation that the employer violated 8(a)(5) and (1) of the NLRA by refusing to recognize and bargain with a disputed but  certified union representative of its employees. What is noteworthy about this case is that Counsel for the General Counsel’s Motion for Summary Judgment urged the NLRB to “use this case as a vehicle to overrule its decision in Ex-Cell-O Corp.” and order the employer to “make the bargaining-unit employees whole for the lost opportunity to engage in collective bargaining.”

Under current Board precedent, the remedy for refusing to recognize and bargain in good faith with a certified union is an order that the employer cease and desist from its refusal to recognize and bargain and prospectively bargain on request. In Pathway Vet Alliance, Counsel for the General Counsel argues that employers “frequently take advantage of the Board’s prospective-only remedy . . . in order to further delay recognition of their employees’ chosen union.” In Counsel for General Counsel’s view, this policy “incentivizes violations of the Act” and does not fully remedy violations of employees’ statutory rights.

Accordingly, the Motion asks the NLRB to overrule its prior decision in Ex-Cell-O, where it declined to order a make-whole remedy when an employer refused to bargain with the certified union. There, the NLRB expressed concern that such a remedy would punish employers legitimately seeking to challenge a union’s certification in federal court by imposing completely speculative and potentially punitive remedies. Counsel for the General Counsel now asks the Board to revisit the precedent set by Ex-Cell-O and order make-whole damages, arguing that it is not unfair for an employer to risk having to pay damages in the event it loses its appeal because all litigants deliberate a risk when they gamble on a favorable decision on appeal and “in the meantime those whose rights have been violated ‘continue [] to suffer injury.”

If adopted, Counsel for the General Counsel asserts that make-whole remedies for a refusal to bargain “would be designed to reasonably approximate the value of the additional compensation that the employer avoided paying as a direct result of its unfair labor practice.” Critics of this remedy scheme note that such make-whole remedies require speculation regarding what terms would have been included in a contract had bargaining occurred (and presume that a contract would be reached) rather than the employer’s challenge to certification. There is no formula to compute what the actual damages would be, and therefore the back wages and benefits awarded are wholly speculative and likely to lead to more litigation.

Under the proposed remedy scheme, if employers are found to have unlawfully delayed or refused to bargain, they will be ordered to pay back wages and benefits – which is significantly more burdensome for employers than the current prospective remedies. Employers currently appealing a certification and refusing to bargain should carefully analyze the risk of continuing not to bargain and continue to monitor these developments, as Counsel for the General Counsel is asking that the proposed change in remedy be applied retroactively.

Copyright © 2022, Hunton Andrews Kurth LLP. All Rights Reserved.National Law Review, Volume XII, Number 188

Thu, 07 Jul 2022 10:11:00 -0500 en text/html https://www.natlawreview.com/article/if-employers-test-union-certification-and-lose-will-they-have-to-pay
Killexams : No reported shortage of NCERT books, Agniveers will be given class 12th certification; says Union edu minister in Lok Sabha

There is no reported shortage of NCERT books in the country, Dharmendra Pradhan, Union Education Minister in a written reply to the Lok Sabha stated at the 17th Lok Sabha monsoon session. The remark was made in response to the questions tabled in Lok Sabha by Ranjanben Dhananjay Bhatt, Member of Parliament. Further, in another response to Abhishek Banerjee, Member of Parliament, on educations schemes for Agniveer students, the education minister replied that  a system would be introduced to deliver enrolled Agniveers, who have qualified class 10, will be provided a certificate for 10+2 (equivalent) on completion of their four year period.

The 17th Lok Sabha monsoon session has started on July 18, 2022 and will continue till August 13, 2022. According to the ministry, 4.25 crore textbooks for the academic session 2022-23 have already been distributed through 950 empanelled vendors all over nation.

In addition, the National Council of Educational Research and Training (NCERT) textbooks are also distributed through its sales counters located at NCERT headquarter, New Delhi, its Regional Institutes of Education (RIEs) at Ajmer, Bhopal, Bhubaneswar, Mysuru and Shillong and its regional centers at Ahmedabad, Bangalore, Kolkata and Guwahati, the response noted.

“The online ordered textbooks are supplied at the doorstep of the customer with the help of Indian Postal Services. All the NCERT textbooks are also made available for free obtain in PDF form through its digital platforms such as E-Pathshala, E-Pub, to facilitate the students across the country,” the minister replied.

“To support the initiative, the Department of School Education and Literacy, through its autonomous institution, the National Institute of Open Schooling, has initiated a special programme in consultation with the Defence Authorities to enable those Agniveers who are 10th pass to further their education and obtain a 12th pass certificate by developing general and customized courses and relevant assessment,” the education minister further added on Agniveer Scheme.

Read Also: NCERT rationalises textbooks for speedy recovery, aims to compensate time loss due to Covid, says MoE

Mon, 18 Jul 2022 14:47:00 -0500 en text/html https://www.financialexpress.com/education-2/no-reported-shortage-of-ncert-books-agniveers-will-be-given-class-12th-certification-says-union-edu-minister-in-lok-sabha/2598018/
Killexams : Ghana National Gas Company unveils ISO 45001 standard certification

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The Ghana National Gas Company (Ghana Gas/GNGC) has distinguished itself again as the first wholly Ghanaian state owned-enterprise in the energy sector to have been awarded the ISO 45001:2018 Certification.

The independent certification audits were carried out by DNV, a globally acclaimed expert in Assurance and Risk Management, with its headquarters in Norway.

ISO 45001:2018 is the highest international accreditation for occupational health and safety management system.

Dr Ben Asante, the Chief Executive Officer, speaking at the unveiling event in Accra, said he launched the ISO 45001 certification project on November 12, 2019 with the aim to benchmark and certify the Company’s Occupational Health and Safety management system to international standards.

He said the attainment of the ISO 45001 certification showed the demonstration of the strong leadership and commitment of the Board and Management to safeguard employees’ health and safety as well as that of all stakeholders.

He said: “The main aim of the ISO 45001 certification is to enable management implement and maintain an up-to-date comprehensive health and safety system, which provides a framework for the prevention of work-related injury and ill health to workers, and to provide safety and healthy workplaces.”

Dr Asante said the certification was also intended to enhance continual improvement in the Company’s operations and processes.

That, he noted, was inspired largely by the nature and fast-space growth of the Company’s business operations and in line with the vision of the Management.

“Ghana Gas remains a trusted and reliable gas company which contributes significantly to the country’s economic development,” he added.

He, therefore, commended the staff, especially the Project Team, Management and Board for their commitment and dedication, which had brought the Company that far.

The Minister of Energy, Mr Matthew Opoku Prempeh, in a speech read on his behalf, said Ghana Gas with the help of the Ministry was exploring more avenues for using natural gas as a feed for fertilizer production in commercial quantity in the country.

The Minister announced that the Company had already identified a partner and they were looking forward to establishing the plant in the Western region.

Mr Prempeh said that would mitigate the shortage of fertilizer in the country.

He, therefore, commended the Company for working hard to attain that enviable mile stone.

Mr Robert Lartey, the General Manager in-charge of Operation, called on all staff to continue to work hard to ensure the sustainability of the achievement.

He said the event could not have been possible without the selflessness, dedication and commitment of the staff and thanked the CEO, Management and Board for their strategic leadership.

He said: “Going forward, the sustainability of this great achievement will be determined by ownership and commitment across all divisions and departments in promoting a strong culture as well as an active participation of all workers at the organisation levels.”

ISO 45001:2018 is the new international standard for Occupational Health and Safety management system published in March 2018.

The standard stipulates the framework and requirements for organisations worldwide seeking to benchmark their health and safety management performance to international standards.

The ISO 45001 certification process has so far enabled the integration of health and safety into the Ghana Gas’ overall business processes at all levels of the organisation, which is reflected in an increased participation of workers.

Source: GNA

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Sun, 17 Jul 2022 22:27:00 -0500 emmakd en-US text/html https://www.ghanabusinessnews.com/2022/07/18/ghana-national-gas-company-unveils-iso-45001-standard-certification/
Killexams : QUADPACK: Quadpack Industries AGM: focus on positive impact and B Corp certification

• Ordinary and extraordinary AGM held at global headquarters on 20 July 2022
• Audited annual accounts for year ended 31 January 2022 approved
• Consolidated financial statements approved
• Remuneration of the members of the Board of Directors ratified
• Changes to the Board's composition approved
• Deloitte, S.L appointed as new auditor

Quadpack Industries (Euronext Growth: ALQP), manufacturer and provider of packaging solutions to the global beauty industry, held its annual general meeting on 20 July 2022. The meeting was chaired by Chairman of the Board Tim Eaves at its headquarters in L'Hospitalet, Barcelona, Spain, and attended by the Board, with shareholders holding over 90.88 per cent of the voting share capital represented in person and by delegation.

The audited annual accounts and consolidated financial statements for the year ended 31 January 2022 were approved. No dividends were declared.

The remuneration of the members of the Board of Directors were also ratified, with €50,000 euros per annum to be paid to the Board Members and Secretary; and €20,000 per annum to the non-director Vice-Secretary, for the following financial year, ending 31 January 2023.

The 2021 Impact Report was presented. The report imparts non-financial information, as part of its adherence to environmental, social and governance (ESG) standards. The presentation highlighted achievements related to the company's 2020-2025 strategy, formulated to ensure resilient performance, as well as a positive impact on the environment and society, through the company's people, processes and products. Chief among these is the certification as a B Corporation. The B Corp movement promotes a new model of companies that balance purpose and profit, considering employees, customers, suppliers, society and environment when making decisions.

Changes in the Board composition comprised the departure of Quadpack's independent members, Chrysoula Zervoudakis and Cheryl Hall. The Board currently consists of Tim Eaves, Chairman; Steven Lewis, Vice-President and Board Member; Patrick McDermott, Board Member; Marc Sahonet, Board Member; Ignacio Martínez, Legal Counsel and Company Secretary; and Beatriz Requena, Legal Advisor and Company Vice-Secretary.

As in the previous two years, the meeting was a closed session for physical safety reasons, with voting carried out by proxy and the session recorded, to be shared shortly with all shareholders.

Quadpack Chairman and CEO Tim Eaves said: "I would like to extend my gratitude to our investors, partners and stakeholders for their continued trust. It is thanks to a robust strategy, combined with the hard work and commitment of the global Quadpack family, that we enter the next financial year with confidence in a strong recovery. As a newly-certified B Corp, we are committed to making a positive impact in every area affected by our business."

-ENDS-

Contact details
Email: investorrelations@quadpack.com

Further information
www.quadpack.com

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Wed, 20 Jul 2022 20:11:00 -0500 de text/html https://www.finanznachrichten.de/nachrichten-2022-07/56604350-quadpack-quadpack-industries-agm-focus-on-positive-impact-and-b-corp-certification-650.htm
Killexams : Asean Chartered Engineers' competency assessment held

The Asean Monitoring Committee of Engineering Services of the Philippines (AMCESP) conducted an assessment on the level of competencies, academic qualification, and professional practices for Asean Chartered Professional Engineers (ACPE).

Some 28 electrical engineers from the Institute of Integrated Electrical Engineers of the Philippines, Qatar Chapter (IIEE-SQC) were assessed to obtain certification in their fields of specialisation.

Members of the Professional Regulation Commission (PRC); AMCESP; Francis V Mapile, chairman of Professional Regulatory Board of Electrical Engineering (PRBEE); Leandro Conti, chairman of the PRB of Mechanical Engineering; Alnar Detalla, chairman of the PRB of ECE; and member of PRBEE Jaime V Mendoza comprised the expert panel.
Engineer Lyndon Bague attended on behalf of the Commission of Higher Education. The Philippine Technological Council (PTC) certified of panelist delegations were Dr Florigo C Varona; Engr Robert U Mabulay, vice-chairman of the IIEE AAPER (Asean and Asia Pacific Engineer Registers) Committee; and engineers Sheila C Cabaraban, Florencio D Berenguel, Rodrigo T Pecolera, and Dr Angel de V Vera, members of the IIEE AAPER Committee.
The Batch 7 ACPE applicants benefited from IIEE-mentoring of SQC’s programme on professional development and career certification for its knowledgeable and experienced electrical practitioners. This was based on their recently completed qualifying online interview to be registered as ACPE.
From July 12 to 15, the candidates gathered in Doha for the AMCESP, organised by PRC’s International Affairs Office in Manila.
The 2022 Board of Directors is led by IIEE-SQC president Lauren M Olivos in helping the organisation's general membership gain professional qualifications and career advancement. The ACPE-AER committee chairman, Erwin S Peniones, along with former presidents' advisers, engineers Edgar B Bernardino, Rudilyn S Reyes, and Teofilo F Tongson, supported the recently finished interview for ACPE applicants.
Engineers would be able to undertake their specialised engineering practice and encourage a simpler free flow of professional services under the Mutual Recognition Arrangements, which is under the Community Council throughout the Asean region if eventual endorsement and approval for the ACPE registration were granted.

Fri, 22 Jul 2022 13:03:00 -0500 ar text/html https://www.gulf-times.com/story/721449/Asean-Chartered-Engineers-competency-assessment-he
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