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Exam Code: CVPM Practice exam 2022 by Killexams.com team
CVPM Certificate of Veterinary Practice Management

To prepare students to seek a Veterinary Practice Manager position by providing them with the education to develop strategies, procedures, policies and management skills to run the daily operations of a veterinary business and to satisfy the college semester hours required for CVPM certification.

Basic Skills Assessment
Applicants are required to complete two Basic Skills Assessments, one in studying and one in math, to determine the level of readiness for beginning their selected program. Additional studies may be required.

Business Orientation
In this course, youll be introduced to distance learning; study skills and techniques; and ways to review for examinations. Youll discover similarities between personal financial goals and business goals and examine how to determine personal financial goals; set up a budget; and recognize the elements of a business.
Principles of Management
This course will review the functions of management and its role in planning, leading, organizing, motivating, and controlling. Basic Accounting
In this course, you'll discover the necessary accounting information to understand the basic accounting information, what it means, and how its used; The course will also cover financial statements, return on investment, bookkeeping process, cost accounting, and report systems.
Veterinary Practice Management
In this course youll learn the importance of understanding and implementing laws and requirements in a veterinary practice. Youll also learn the benefits of developing a professional, efficient, and knowledgeable team that provides exceptional customer service to their clients. Additionally, the course will provide you with instructions and information on how to help your practice to grow financially.
Human Resources Management
In this course, you'll investigate an overview of Human Resources Management (HRM), as its understood today. This course illustrates the dynamic interaction of the personnel functions with each other and with the objectives of an organization. Marketing
In this course, youll discover the principles of marketing. Youll learn how to develop a marketing plan; use social and mobile marketing effectively; integrate ethics into marketing strategies; influence the consumer decision process; perform market research; perform SWOT and STP analyses; make decisions concerning branding, packaging, and developing new products; price products and services fairly; set advertising objectives; and more.
Business Ethics
In this course, youll explore the types of ethical issues you may encounter in your professional life and discover processes to help in determining the best response to the issue. Youll discover how to determine a course of action with various philosophical approaches and business-related approaches to ethical issues in a professional setting; and a process for decision making in balancing different considerations. In addition, discover an overview of selected areas of business that may require particular attention.

Whether you're looking to start a new career as a Vet Practice Manager, or you want to start on a path toward certification, our Veterinary Practice Management undergraduate certificate program can help you achieve these goals. For up to $86 per credit, our Vet Practice Management program fulfills one of the requirements to sit for the Certified Veterinary Practice Manager (CVPM) exam.

Killexams Veterinary Practice Management Certificate online program fulfills the education requirement for certification. After students complete the Vet Practice Management online courses and graduate from the program, they will have met one of the four requirements to sit for the CVPM exam — Certified Veterinary Practice Manager, offered by the Veterinary Hospital Managers Association (VHMA). The CVPM designation is recognized by many veterinary practice leaders as the highest level of credential for professional veterinary managers and is often preferred or required when applying for a veterinary manager position.

Certificate of Veterinary Practice Management
Medical Certificate study help
Killexams : Medical Certificate study help - BingNews https://killexams.com/pass4sure/exam-detail/CVPM Search results Killexams : Medical Certificate study help - BingNews https://killexams.com/pass4sure/exam-detail/CVPM https://killexams.com/exam_list/Medical Killexams : Study: AI Tools More Rapidly Identify Substances Causing Overdose Deaths No result found, try new keyword!An automated process based on computer algorithms that can read text from medical examiners' death certificates can substantially speed up data collection of overdose deaths -- which in turn can ... Mon, 08 Aug 2022 10:40:27 -0500 en-us text/html https://www.msn.com/en-us/health/medical/study-ai-tools-more-rapidly-identify-substances-causing-overdose-deaths/ar-AA10rWS6 Killexams : Researchers use artificial intelligence tools to speed critical information on drug overdose deaths

An automated process based on computer algorithms that can read text from medical examiners' death certificates can substantially speed up data collection of overdose deaths—which in turn can ensure a more rapid public health response time than the system currently used, new UCLA research finds.

The analysis, to be published Aug. 8 in the peer-reviewed JAMA Network Open, used tools from artificial intelligence to rapidly identify substances that caused overdose deaths.

"The overdose crisis in America is the number one cause of death in , but we don't know the actual number of overdose deaths until months after the fact," said study lead Dr. David Goodman-Meza, assistant professor of medicine in the division of infectious diseases at the David Geffen School of Medicine at UCLA. "We also don't know the number of overdoses in our communities, as rapidly released data is only available at the state level, at best. We need systems that get this data out fast and at a local level so public health can respond. Machine learning and can help bridge this gap."

As it now stands, overdose data recording involves several steps, beginning with and coroners, who determine a cause of death and record suspected on , including the drugs that caused the death. The certificates, which include unstructured text, are then sent to local jurisdictions or the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) which code them according to the International Statistical Classification of Diseases and Related Health Problems, Tenth Edition (ICD-10). This coding process is time consuming as it may be done manually. As a result, there is a substantial lag time between the date of death and the reporting of those deaths, which slows the release of surveillance data. This in turn slows the response.

Further complicating matters is that under this system, different drugs with different uses and effects are aggregated under the same code—for instance buprenorphine, a partial opioid used to treat , and the synthetic opioid fentanyl are listed under the same ICD-10 code.

For this study, the researchers used "natural language processing" (NLP) and machine learning to analyze nearly 35,500 death records for all of 2020 from Connecticut and from 9 U.S. counties: Cook (Illinois); Jefferson (Alabama); Johnson, Denton, Tarrant and Parker (Texas), Milwaukee (Wisconsin), and Los Angeles and San Diego. They examined how combining NLP, which uses to understand text, and can automate the deciphering of large amounts of data with precision and accuracy.

They found that of the 8,738 overdose deaths recorded that year the most common specific substances were fentanyl (4758, 54%), alcohol (2866, 33%), cocaine (2247, 26%), methamphetamine (1876, 21%), heroin (1613, 18%), prescription opioids (1197, 14%), and any benzodiazepine (1076, 12%). Of these, only the classification for benzodiazepines was suboptimal under this method and the others were perfect or near perfect.

Most recently the CDC released preliminary overdose data that was no sooner than four months after the deaths, Goodman-Meza said.

"If these algorithms are embedded within medical examiner's offices, the time could be reduced to as early as toxicology testing is completed, which could be about three weeks after the death," he said.

The rest of the were due to other substances such as amphetamines, antidepressants, antipsychotics, antihistamines, anticonvulsants, barbiturates, muscle relaxants, and hallucinogensThe researchers note some limitations to the study, the main one being that the system was not tested on less common substances such as anticonvulsants or other designer drugs, so it is unknown if it would work for these. Also, given that the models need to be trained to rely on a large volume of data to make predictions, the system may be unable to detect emerging trends.

But rapid and are needed to develop and implement interventions to curb overdoses, the researchers write, and "NLP tools such as these should be integrated in data surveillance workflows to increase rapid dissemination of data to the public, researchers, and policy makers."

Study co-authors in addition to Goodman-Meza are Chelsea Shover, Dr. Jesus Medina, Dr. Amber Tang, Steven Shoptaw, and Alex Bui of UCLA.



More information: Development and validation of machine models using natural language processing to classify substances involved in overdose deaths, JAMA Network Open (2022). DOI: 10.1001/jamanetworkopen.2022.25593

Citation: Researchers use artificial intelligence tools to speed critical information on drug overdose deaths (2022, August 8) retrieved 10 August 2022 from https://medicalxpress.com/news/2022-08-artificial-intelligence-tools-critical-drug.html

This document is subject to copyright. Apart from any fair dealing for the purpose of private study or research, no part may be reproduced without the written permission. The content is provided for information purposes only.

Mon, 08 Aug 2022 03:00:00 -0500 en text/html https://medicalxpress.com/news/2022-08-artificial-intelligence-tools-critical-drug.html
Killexams : 8 Remote Jobs That Pay $100K

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Working remotely has many benefits. It can permit a better work-life balance, allow you save on the expenses of commuting and professional clothing, and might even help you be more productive. It looks like remote work, even for those with high-paying jobs, is here to stay as well.

Here It Is: Our 2022 Small Business Spotlight
More: 7 Surprisingly Easy Ways To Reach Retirement Goals

Researchers from Ladders, Inc. found that remote jobs with $100,000 salaries and up represented nearly 15% of all high-paying job listings in Q3 of 2021, up from under 4% before the pandemic. The company also projected that 25% of all professional jobs would be remote by the end of this year.

To supply you an idea of what's out there for higher earners who want to work from home, here are eight remote jobs that pay $100K.

LaylaBird / Getty Images

Clinical Trial Manager

Annual Salary: $100,000 to $130,000

Clinical trials use research-based methods to evaluate the effectiveness of a new drug, device or medical treatment. Clinical trial managers are tasked with managing the standards and clinical operations of assigned trials while meeting all existing compliance measures. They provide clinical trial investigators with the study materials they need to complete the trial, monitor their performance and make sure required duties are completed.

Qualifications for this job include a bachelor's degree, several years of experience managing clinical trials and solid communication and organizational skills.

Casimiro PT / Shutterstock.com

Amazon Web Services Authorized Instructor

Annual Salary: $115,000

Amazon Web Services -- aka AWS -- is the most broadly adopted and comprehensive cloud platform in the world, used by millions of small businesses, large companies and government agencies. An AWS authorized instructor uses official AWS curriculum and content to teach and prepare students for AWS Cloud Practitioner Certification.

Qualifications for this job include various current AWS badges and certifications, including an AWS authorized instructor badge, AWS cloud practitioner certificate, AWS solutions architect certificate and an AWS developer certificate.

Take Our Poll: Do You Think You Will Be Able To Retire at Age 65?

AndreyPopov / Getty Images/iStockphoto

Senior Internal Auditor

Annual Salary: $100,000

A senior internal auditor completes financial audits of businesses within established timelines and budgets and also assists with or completes financial risk assessments. This professional is also tasked with drafting audit reports and meeting with management to discuss the audit's findings.

Qualifications to become a senior internal auditor include at least a bachelor's degree with the appropriate professional certification, such as CPA, certified fraud examiner or certified information systems auditor. Two to four years of internal audit experience and excellent organization, communication and time management skills are also required.

PH888 / Shutterstock.com

Educational Marketing Director

Annual Salary: $100,000 to $110,000

A director of educational marketing works for a company that offers educational products or services to public schools or school districts. This professional is responsible for researching schools and districts that make up the company's target population and also identifying and implementing marketing strategies that will help secure contracts with those schools or districts for educational products or services.

Qualifications to become a director of educational marketing include a bachelor's degree, five years of experience marketing education products or services to target buyers, the ability to work with people of different ethnicities and from various socio-economic backgrounds, and excellent communication and organizational skills.

izusek / iStock.com

Senior Financial Content Writer

Annual Salary: $120,000

A senior financial content writer is well-versed in financial content writing and can easily create concise and compelling copy for a company's blog, website or marketing materials. To qualify for this job, you'll need at least seven years of marketing or journalism experience and at least four years of proven writing experience focused on business, money or finance.

You'll also need to have a solid portfolio of articles that show your ability to analyze finance and money. The capability to write more than blog articles, including marketing materials, headlines, infographics, case studies and white papers, is also important.

mediaphotos / iStock.com

Accounting Manager

Annual Salary: $115,500 to $140,000

Accounting managers coordinate and manage the accounting arm of a business, including maintaining ledger accounts and financial statements and taking the lead on complex accounting projects. They also hire, develop and coach staff and make sure they adhere to accounting control guidelines and task deadlines.

To qualify for an accounting manager's job, you'll likely need to be a CPA or at least have a bachelor's degree in accounting and extensive knowledge of accounting practices and procedures. You'll also need plenty of experience dealing with statutory authorities and matters and compliance issues. The ability to prepare and deliver a formal presentation based on accounting findings to upper management is also necessary.

juststock / Getty Images/iStockphoto

Cybersecurity Analyst

Annual Salary: $115,000 to $125,000

A cybersecurity analyst protects a company's hardware, software and networks from unauthorized access and theft by installing security software, conducting risk assessments and correcting vulnerabilities. This professional also monitors network traffic and investigates any incidences or threats that arise.

To meet the qualifications for a cybersecurity analyst, you'll need at least a bachelor's degree in informatics or engineering. You'll also need at least five years of experience in IT security -- plus broad knowledge about IT and IT security and in-depth knowledge in at least one area, such as application security or cybersecurity operations.

You'll need to know how to extract security data and create security reports. Besides a bachelor's degree and five years of experience, you might also need a certified information systems security professional certification -- aka CISSP.

marvent / Shutterstock.com

Email Marketing Manager

Annual Salary: $100,000 to $105,000

An email marketing manager creates and executes email campaigns to drive sales and is responsible for examining and interpreting data and making recommendations to Improve each campaign's success.

To become an email marketing manager, you'll need several years of experience in email marketing, including experience with email marketing software, such as Salesforce Marketing Cloud or Marketo. Excellent writing and editing skills, project management skills, and experience migrating email platforms is also required.

More From GOBankingRates

This article originally appeared on GOBankingRates.com: 8 Remote Jobs That Pay $100K

Mon, 08 Aug 2022 06:00:00 -0500 en-US text/html https://www.aol.com/finance/8-remote-jobs-pay-100k-180026892.html
Killexams : Experts use tools from artificial intelligence to rapidly identify substances that cause overdose deaths

An automated process based on computer algorithms that can read text from medical examiners' death certificates can substantially speed up data collection of overdose deaths – which in turn can ensure a more rapid public health response time than the system currently used, new UCLA research finds.

The analysis, to be published Aug. 8 in the peer-reviewed JAMA Network Open, used tools from artificial intelligence to rapidly identify substances that caused overdose deaths.

The overdose crisis in America is the number one cause of death in young adults, but we don't know the actual number of overdose deaths until months after the fact. We also don't know the number of overdoses in our communities, as rapidly released data is only available at the state level, at best. We need systems that get this data out fast and at a local level so public health can respond. Machine learning and natural language processing can help bridge this gap."

Dr David Goodman-Meza, Study Lead Author and Assistant Professor, Medicine, Division of Infectious Diseases, David Geffen School of Medicine, University of California - Los Angeles Health Sciences

As it now stands, overdose data recording involves several steps, beginning with medical examiners and coroners, who determine a cause of death and record suspected drug overdoses on death certificates, including the drugs that caused the death. The certificates, which include unstructured text, are then sent to local jurisdictions or the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) which code them according to the International Statistical Classification of Diseases and Related Health Problems, Tenth Edition (ICD-10). This coding process is time consuming as it may be done manually. As a result, there is a substantial lag time between the date of death and the reporting of those deaths, which slows the release of surveillance data. This in turn slows the public health response.

Further complicating matters is that under this system, different drugs with different uses and effects are aggregated under the same code – for instance buprenorphine, a partial opioid used to treat opioid use disorder, and the synthetic opioid fentanyl are listed under the same ICD-10 code.

For this study, the researchers used "natural language processing" (NLP) and machine learning to analyze nearly 35,500 death records for all of 2020 from Connecticut and from 9 U.S. counties: Cook (Illinois); Jefferson (Alabama); Johnson, Denton, Tarrant and Parker (Texas), Milwaukee (Wisconsin), and Los Angeles and San Diego. They examined how combining NLP, which uses computer algorithms to understand text, and machine learning can automate the deciphering of large amounts of data with precision and accuracy.

They found that of the 8,738 overdose deaths recorded that year the most common specific substances were fentanyl (4758, 54%), alcohol (2866, 33%), cocaine (2247, 26%), methamphetamine (1876, 21%), heroin (1613, 18%), prescription opioids (1197, 14%), and any benzodiazepine (1076, 12%). Of these, only the classification for benzodiazepines was suboptimal under this method and the others were perfect or near perfect.

Most recently the CDC released preliminary overdose data that was no sooner than four months after the deaths, Goodman-Meza said.

"If these algorithms are embedded within medical examiner's offices, the time could be reduced to as early as toxicology testing is completed, which could be about three weeks after the death," he said.

The rest of the overdose deaths were due to other substances such as amphetamines, antidepressants, antipsychotics, antihistamines, anticonvulsants, barbiturates, muscle relaxants, and hallucinogensThe researchers note some limitations to the study, the main one being that the system was not tested on less common substances such as anticonvulsants or other designer drugs, so it is unknown if it would work for these. Also, given that the models need to be trained to rely on a large volume of data to make predictions, the system may be unable to detect emerging trends.

But rapid and accurate data are needed to develop and implement interventions to curb overdoses, the researchers write, and "NLP tools such as these should be integrated in data surveillance workflows to increase rapid dissemination of data to the public, researchers, and policy makers."

Study co-authors in addition to Goodman-Meza are Chelsea Shover, Dr. Jesus Medina, Dr. Amber Tang, Steven Shoptaw, and Alex Bui of UCLA.

Source:

Journal reference:

Goodman-Meza, D., et al. (2022) Development and Validation of Machine Models Using Natural Language Processing to Classify Substances Involved in Overdose Deaths. JAMA Network Open. doi.org/10.1001/jamanetworkopen.2022.25593.

Mon, 08 Aug 2022 17:04:00 -0500 en text/html https://www.news-medical.net/news/20220809/Experts-use-tools-from-artificial-intelligence-to-rapidly-identify-substances-that-cause-overdose-deaths.aspx
Killexams : The Experiment: An ‘ethically unjustified’ medical study

Ninety years ago, a study was begun of 600 Black sharecroppers in and around Tuskegee, Alabama, to record and track the natural history of syphilis among the Black male population. Fifteen years later, a cure was found for syphilis. But the U.S. Public Health Service — the agency that conducted the experiment — decided to withhold treatment from the participants. The result is one of the most shameful incidents in U.S. medical history.

The offer seemed too good to be true: The United States Public Health Service asked men ages 25 or older in Macon County, Alabama, to sign up for a medical study.

“Free Blood Test,” the signs said.

“Free treatment by county health department and government doctors. You may feel well and still have bad blood.”

But what was “bad blood”? It was a nonmedical term used at the time to refer to a variety of ailments such as anemia and fatigue.

What the PHS really wanted to study was the history and spread of syphilis — a contagious venereal disease — in Black males and how the disease might differ in white patients. But the men of Macon County weren’t told that.

Participants were promised free medical care — which most had never been able to afford before — as well as rides to and from the clinics, free meals on exam days and a promise that their families would receive money to pay for their burials when the time came.

The original plan was to study the disease for several months and then follow up with treatment. But when funding for the experiment dried up not long after it began, the treatment phase was quietly dropped. Participants were given placebos — fake medicine aimed at making patients feel like they were receiving treatment — but no actual treatment.

When some of the participants enrolled in the Army after the start of World War II and were found to be infected with syphilis, PHS researchers stepped in to prevent military doctors from treating them.

Researchers for the U.S. Public Health Service use an electrocardiogram to check the heart of a participant in the Tuskegee Syphilis Study — most likely in 1932. (National Archives)

Credit: National Archives

Credit: National Archives

Researchers for the U.S. Public Health Service use an electrocardiogram to check the heart of a participant in the Tuskegee Syphilis Study — most likely in 1932. (National Archives)

Credit: National Archives

Credit: National Archives

In 1947, penicillin became the standard treatment for syphilis in the U.S. Again, researchers from the PHS convinced local doctors in Macon County to not treat the participants with the new drug.

It wasn’t until the 1950s that doctors studying published data of the study began raising ethical questions. In 1966, a venereal disease investigator raised concerns with the Communicable Disease Center, now known as thee Centers for Disease Control and Prevention — which, by that time, controlled the experiment.

Getting an unsatisfactory response from the CDC, the investigator took the story to a newspaper reporter.

The Washington Star broke the story on July 25, 1972, and it appeared on the front page of The New York Times the next day.

The media coverage resulted in congressional hearings. The CDC appointed an advisory panel to review the study. The panel determined the study was “ethically unjustified.” The CDC officially halted the study on Nov. 16, 1972.

The next spring, the Department of Health, Education and Welfare ordered that all necessary medical care be provided to survivors of the study. Two years later, that was expanded to wives, widows and children of study participants.

By the numbers

The study included 600 African American men who were told they had “bad blood.”

By 1972, 28 of the men had died from syphilis. 100 of the men had died from complications resulting from their untreated condition. In addition, 40 spouses were infected with syphilis and 19 children were infected with syphilis at birth.

Credit: Charles Apple / The Spokesman-Review

Credit: Charles Apple / The Spokesman-Review

Our Sources

Sources: “Bad Blood: The Scandalous Story of the Tuskegee Experiment” by James H. Jones. Tuskegee University Bioethics Center, Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, National Archives, the Washington Post, Scientific American, History.com, McGill Office for Science and Society.

All photos from the National Archives.

Timeline

Summer 1973: A class action lawsuit is filed on behalf of participants and their families.

1974: The suit is settled out of court, resulting in more than $9 million for study participants.

May 16, 1997: President Bill Clinton issues a formal apology for the study.

January 2004: The last study participant dies. The last widow dies in 2009.

Today: Participants’ children continue to receive medical and health benefits, the CDC says.

Subscribers: Read this story as a full page with graphics in the AJC ePaper

Click or tap to open this page from the Aug. 4, 2022 ePaper

Fri, 05 Aug 2022 05:13:00 -0500 en text/html https://www.ajc.com/news/nation-world/the-experiment-an-ethically-unjustified-medical-study/JJW5JBRYJND3NKZWJOEZ7QVKJU/
Killexams : 78% of Doctors Inflate Estimates of Medical Procedure Success
COVID Infection Doctor Patient

Many medical professionals are simply bad at doing probability calculations.

The success of multi-step medical procedures is often overestimated by doctors.

Medical treatment is seldom simple, whether a woman is giving birth or a man is undergoing a cancer biopsy. An unanticipated problem might happen at any time, especially with treatments that involve numerous steps.

However, accurate research by experts from the University of Utah Health and its partners found that doctors often have unrealistic expectations about the success of complicated medical operations. Inflated success predictions, according to researchers, might have a negative impact on treatment choices and result in unintended harm to patients.

Overall, almost 8 out of 10 doctors who responded to the study thought there was a higher possibility of getting the intended result from an operation than there was of one or more stages leading to that outcome being successful.

According to Scott Aberegg, M.D., a critical care pulmonologist at the University of Utah Health, the study, which was published in JAMA Network Open, exposes a serious logical gap among doctors who fail to recognize that each step in the process carries its own risks that can reduce the likelihood that the desired medical outcome will be achieved.

“All too often, doctors act as though the stars align more frequently than they actually do,” Aberegg says. “They tend to focus on the desired outcome rather than the actual chances of success involved in each intermediary step. We can’t continue making medical decisions that way. We need to base them on more realistic expectations.”

In order to ascertain how often a phenomenon known as conjunction fallacy occurs in medicine, Aberegg, Hal Arkes, Ph.D., of Ohio State University, and Kevin Arpin, Ph.D., a forensic expert at Travelers Insurance in Connecticut, conducted the research.

When a person thinks that a combination of events is more probable than any one of its individual parts, it is known as the conjunction fallacy.

Suppose, for instance, that a doctor notices skin growth on a patient and has 80% suspicion that it is cancerous. There’s also an 80% chance that the pathologist sees cancer on a biopsy specimen in the lab. The false assumption—the conjunction fallacy––would be that there’s more than an 80% chance that the pathologist will see cancer on the patient’s biopsy specimen.

In reality, the probability that the pathologist will see cancer on this patient’s biopsy is 64%, because first the patient actually has to have cancer, and then the pathologist has to see it on the biopsy.

“Many physicians simply aren’t good at calculating probability,” Aberegg says. “As a result, they commonly miss opportunities to make better treatment decisions.”

In their study, Aberegg and colleagues asked 215 obstetricians and pulmonologists to evaluate scenarios that they might encounter while caring for patients.

For example, in one scenario, obstetricians were confronted with a 29-year-old pregnant woman in labor. However, the child is not positioned properly for a vaginal birth. In this case, the doctors were asked to estimate the probability that the child would move into a deliverable position and be born without the need for a C-section.

Overall, 78% of the physicians who evaluated one of three scenarios in the survey estimated that the probability of the desired outcome would be greater than the likelihood of the two individual events required for it to occur. This is a mathematical impossibility, Aberegg says.

“Our study shows that if you poorly estimate the probability of two events needing to happen to get the result you desire, then you could be putting your patients at unnecessary risk,” Aberegg says. “In the case of the childbirth scenario, you could end up waiting around for a long time for that baby and end up having to do a C-section anyway. That delay could be harmful for both mother and child.”

All of the physicians who participated in the surveys had an average of 25 years of experience. Yet this expertise did not appear to prevent them from opting for the conjunction fallacies presented in the study. However, this isn’t too surprising since previous research found that nearly 50% of medical students are prone to these types of probability errors, according to Aberegg.

“There are enormous opportunities in medical education to Improve the curriculum in terms of teaching the importance of probability in medical settings,” Aberegg says. “Numbers are the most reliable source of correct decisions in medicine.”

Aberegg urges practicing physicians to not only rely on their experience but also do their best to stay up-to-date on the latest probability research published in medical journals about various conditions and procedures.

Among the study’s limitations is that the participants were asked for written responses that might have been different had they been providing care to real patients.

However, Aberegg believes the study could have broad implications.

“Our results are very strong,” Aberegg says. “We’re confident that they represent a generalized phenomenon in medicine. I’m interested in further cataloging more examples so that the full breadth of this potential problem can be exposed and hopefully resolved.”

Reference: “Analysis of Physicians’ Probability Estimates of a Medical Outcome Based on a Sequence of Events” by Hal R. Arkes, Ph.D., Scott K. Aberegg, MD, MPH, and Kevin A. Arpin, Ph.D., 27 June 2022, JAMA Network Open.
DOI: 10.1001/jamanetworkopen.2022.18804

The study was self-funded by Aberegg, Arkes, and Aprin.

Mon, 01 Aug 2022 23:20:00 -0500 University of Utah Health en-us text/html https://scitechdaily.com/78-of-doctors-inflate-estimates-of-medical-procedure-success/
Killexams : The 8 Best CBD Gummies for Anxiety in 2022: Ease Stress, Depression, and Pain No result found, try new keyword!While studies are still ongoing about the effects of CBD products on the body and mind, early research suggests CBD can help with anxiety and depression management [1]. In addition, many people have ... Tue, 09 Aug 2022 11:00:00 -0500 text/html https://www.miamiherald.com/health-wellness/article264339176.html Killexams : Access to trauma care is improving across the country, but progress remains uneven

Six years ago, an expert panel made a strong suggestion to the White House: set up a national system to care for patients with traumatic injuries, which lead to about 30,000 deaths every year. “In the civilian sector, where injury is the leading cause of death for Americans under age 46, as many as 1 in 5 deaths from traumatic injuries may be preventable with optimal trauma care,” the authors wrote.

A national system has yet to emerge, but new research published in the Journal of the American Medical Association has found that access to trauma care improved in the 2010s. The study mapped the distance from each census block to the nearest trauma center, taking into account air and land transport. The researchers found that 91% of people in the U.S. could get to a trauma center within 60 minutes by air or land travel, up from 78% in 2013.

“We shouldn’t be applauding that,” said Brian Daley, chief of the trauma division at the University of Tennessee Medical Center, who was not involved in the new research. “We should say we’re still lacking 10%.”

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Trauma centers differ from regular hospitals — they have to meet certain benchmarks on care and have specific staff on call around the clock. “That is the difference oftentimes between surviving a trauma and surviving it well and not having long-term effects from it, and not surviving or having permanent problems from it,” said Elizabeth Benjamin, trauma medical director at Grady Memorial Hospital.

The study, which looked at trauma centers verified by the American College of Surgeons, found that access differed across regions. Native Americans faced the lowest access to trauma care at 70%, as well as the smallest improvement to access among any group. The share of people living in proximity to a trauma center was also lower in rural states like Wyoming, Montana, and South Dakota, and in the South, where it dipped below 50% in two states. “Most in the South still have periods where it takes over an hour to get to a trauma center,” said Daley. “And you would think in the 21st century, even with helicopter access and incredible ground transport, that that would not be a problem. But it is.”

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The study authors and other experts said the study underestimates access to trauma care, however, because certain states have their own programs for accrediting centers, particularly Washington and Pennsylvania.

There are several factors that have driven improvement in access, including an increasing emphasis on national verification in states like Tennessee and Georgia. Georgia has specifically also been encouraging trauma centers in areas that currently need one, according to Regina Medeiros, the trauma program director at the Medical College of Georgia. “Within our state, it was a conscious effort to be able to increase the numbers appropriately to ensure access to all the citizens,” said Medeiros, who is also part of the Georgia Trauma Care Network Commission.

Even when states already have their own programs for designating a trauma center, the field still sees national-level verification as an additional level of assurance.

“We witnessed trauma centers that were state-designated but not nationally verified,” said Oscar Guillamondegui, chief of the trauma division at Vanderbilt University Medical Center. “And as they move to verification, you can actually see their outcomes improve.” At Vanderbilt, which secured national trauma center certification for adult care in 2011, that means he now has a deeper bench of expertise he can call on in an emergency.

“That verification process isn’t just about the trauma surgeon. It’s about the orthopedist. It’s about the neurosurgeon. It’s about the emergency medicine team that’s helping out. It’s about the physical therapists that are going to help manage. It’s about the anesthesiologist,” said Guillamondegui, who was not associated with the study. “All of those aspects come into play and that’s what grows that improvement in outcomes.”

He also pointed to another, more intangible shift that has changed the face of the field — the general growth in awareness of trauma care as a specialty. After the Affordable Care Act passed, he said, there was an increased emphasis on the field. Hospitals started sending patients in need of that level of care out of local ERs and to dedicated trauma centers. The medical education system, too, started producing more and more specialists to treat those patients. “When the tide rises, all boats rise evenly. And I think that’s what you’re seeing as an effect of this process,” Guillamondegui said.

Some experts also said that there has been a growth in new trauma centers, particularly of for-profits. “For-profit hospitals realize that they can make a profit,” said Daley. “In many of those places that expanded Medicaid, the reimbursement improved, and so there were additional resources to put into things like trauma. So I think overall, the financial picture improved for people to take care of trauma patients.”

Jeff Choi, a surgery resident at Stanford and co-first author of the new study, said he and his colleagues became interested in the subject after studying an article last year that suggested a for-profit hospital system was opening new trauma centers to generate profit rather than Improve patient care.

“There’s been this feeling that there’s been an expansion of trauma centers by certain for-profit health care chains where they’re sort of putting trauma centers where they think they can make money, maybe not necessarily where the need is,” said David Spain, trauma chief at Stanford and senior author of the study.

Spain also said that he worried lower-level trauma centers opened by for-profit operators would draw patients away from level 1 trauma centers that offer higher-quality care. In Florida, which saw access rise nearly 60% between 2013 and 2019, all of the level 1 centers Tested during that time were governed by nonprofit systems, while all of the newly credentialed level 2 trauma centers were run by a for-profit company. “There was some data out of Florida that sort of implied that a lot of the new trauma centers were placed, maybe not in areas of high need, but areas where it was a good business venture,” Spain said. “You may decrease the amount of patients that actually come to the level one trauma center, they just all go to these level 2s out in the suburbs.”

Choi said the study authors are examining trauma center verifications and financial incentives more closely in a follow-up analysis. In the meantime, experts hope for more support from the federal government, including the national trauma network proposed in 2016.

“This work was done primarily by states and by organizations outside the federal government,” said Daley, who is chair of the Tennessee Committee on Trauma. “For many years, our trauma organizations have fought for a unified national system with help through the government. And there’s no fancy ribbon for trauma. There’s no National Trauma Month, or anything like that.”

To Guillamondegui, the progress seen so far in improving access to care — and the interest in continuing to Improve access — mirrors the nature of trauma medicine.

“There’s never a time that we’re sitting on our laurels. There is never a time that we’re saying, ‘We’ve done enough. It’s time to stop,’” he said. “The fact is that medicine pushes the boundaries at all times to try and Improve that care for patient populations.”

Mon, 08 Aug 2022 20:35:00 -0500 en-US text/html https://www.statnews.com/2022/08/09/trauma-center-hospitals-health-care/
Killexams : Gaps in Representation of Women and Younger Scholars Among Medical Educators

(WASHINGTON, July 27, 2022) – Women make up just 37.7% of all speakers at hematology and medical oncology board review lectures, according to a study published today in Blood Advances. Its findings call attention to the many barriers people underrepresented in medicine face in obtaining educational opportunities that can be vital to career advancement and job security in academia.

Each year, students, trainees, and practicing physicians attend a collection of lectures given by leading practitioners in their selected medical specialty, in preparation to sit for their boards, a set of exams they must pass to practice medicine in the field. Speakers are selected based on their experience in medicine, interest in education, and professional accomplishments. Through their lectures, they inform their audience on what the board exam will look like, how to tackle varying question styles, review exam content, and offer test-taking strategies.

“Hundreds of people attend these lectures and speaking at them brings faculty tremendous visibility in their field,” said the study author Samer A. Al’Hadidi, MD, MS, a hematology and oncology physician at the Winthrop P. Rockefeller Cancer Institute. “Being selected as a speaker at these lectures is a prestigious opportunity that enhances professional development and advancement.”

Dr. Al’Hadidi and colleagues collected speaker data for all board review lecture series conducted annually or biannually between 2017 through 2021. They analyzed lecture titles, speakers’ names, gender, and institutional affiliation, lecture series location, and whether it was related to board certification in hematology, oncology, or both.

Their results showed that women make up roughly 37.7% of all speakers at hematology and medical oncology board review lectures. Notably, researchers found that these gender disparities only became more pronounced when sorted by subject area, with women representing 24.8% of speakers presenting on malignant hematology, 38.9% of those presenting on solid tumors, and 44.1% of speakers lecturing on classical (benign) hematology.

Investigators did observe an overall increase in female speakers over the years throughout the study period, suggesting that the field is becoming increasingly diverse.  In fact, women constituted over 50% of speakers at ASH’s courses in 2020 and 2021. In accurate years, several institutions and medical societies have aimed to address this disparity by implementing working groups to promote the contributions of underrepresented minorities in hematology and oncology.

Notably, Dr. Al’Hadidi and colleagues also found that most speakers had more than 15 years of field experience since their initial certification. Choosing older and more experienced speakers over junior faculty not only keeps young professionals from engaging in educational opportunities but also poses a disadvantage for lecture attendees. Dr. Al’Hadidi explained that physicians who took their boards more recently are more likely to remember the broad scope of content the exam encompasses. They will also be more familiar with the format of the test and be more likely to anticipate questions or content courses that could appear on the exam.

Limitations of the study include that authors were unable to weigh the perceived prestige of certain conferences over others, and how this may affect the value of lecture opportunities. They also did not factor in the varying levels of institutional support speakers may have been given to leave work and supply the lectures, which may also have been a barrier to entry for those invited who could not take leave.

Looking forward, Dr. Al’Hadidi explained that one way to Improve speaker representation is to work with academic institutions to get more women and junior faculty on lecture organizing and planning committees. He also pointed out that while women make up nearly half of medical students in the U.S., and more than half of physicians in select practices like family medicine and pediatrics, they still face disadvantages in many specialties and in obtaining academic opportunities.

“I’m hopeful that when we reassess these findings five years from now, we’ll continue to see improvements, and hopefully have reached or be close to reaching that 50:50 ratio of male and female lecture speakers,” said Dr. Al’Hadidi. “Increasing female and junior faculty representation in this space will help junior faculty and women obtain academic appointments, stay in academia, and increase career satisfaction.” 

 # # # 

Blood Advances is a peer-reviewed, online only, open access journal of the American Society of Hematology (ASH), the world’s largest professional society concerned with the causes and treatment of blood disorders.

Blood Advances® is a registered trademark of the American Society of Hematology.

Contact:

Kira Sampson, American Society of Hematology

ksampson@hematology.org; 202-499-1796


Disclaimer: AAAS and EurekAlert! are not responsible for the accuracy of news releases posted to EurekAlert! by contributing institutions or for the use of any information through the EurekAlert system.

Wed, 27 Jul 2022 02:12:00 -0500 en text/html https://www.eurekalert.org/news-releases/959667
Killexams : UCLA: AI tools more rapidly identify substances causing overdose deaths No result found, try new keyword!An automated process based on computer algorithms that can read text from medical examiners’ death certificates can substantially speed up data collection of overdose deaths, according to UCLA ... Mon, 08 Aug 2022 04:18:00 -0500 en-us text/html https://www.msn.com/en-us/health/medical/ucla-ai-tools-more-rapidly-identify-substances-causing-overdose-deaths/ar-AA10rzKZ
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