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ASVAB Section 6 : Mathematics Knowledge
Military Mathematics study
Killexams : Military Mathematics study - BingNews https://killexams.com/pass4sure/exam-detail/ASVAB-Mathematics-Knowledge Search results Killexams : Military Mathematics study - BingNews https://killexams.com/pass4sure/exam-detail/ASVAB-Mathematics-Knowledge https://killexams.com/exam_list/Military Killexams : Agnipath : The Kindergarten Mathematics

By Lt Gen P R Shankar (R)

The movie ‘Hidden Figures’  recounts the time when NASA was first attempting to put a man in space. Scientists are not sure that the orbit they had figured out would enable them to get their astronaut back to earth. An African American lady who is a whizz at maths and space geometry  is called  upon to work out a safe orbit. She examines the problem and says words to the effect “The answer will be in the maths. Maths cannot be wrong”. In the event, she re-works the orbit mathematically using complex equations (including Euler’s and Navier Stokes equations I guess) and presents a solution. The astronaut is launched into space based on her maths. He completes the space orbit and enters back safely into the earth’s atmosphere. This is a true story. However the hidden truth is in Maths.  

What has this got to do with Agnipath and Agniveers? It’s the maths. Let us not have any doubts. The nation is embarking on a military transformation of a mammoth order. It is similar to entering a space orbit. Full of uncertainties with doubtful outcomes. However as in the movie, if we get the maths right, we can enter the current orbit. Failure to get the “Sahi Ganit” will leave us stranded in no man’s land. Good maths keeps us on our desired orbit with due course corrections. Look at it this way. I have long been of the opinion that the Indian Armed Forces are strong enough to defend the nation but are not modern enough to enable India’s rise, to be a regional power of consequence. Hence we must get the maths right in this transformational orbit. Otherwise we might be left struggling to defend the sovereignty and integrity of the nation. Being a regional power of consequence is a later day story.

As against previous articles, time, more inputs and better understanding,  have led to an evolutionary model based on first principles. The model is in four year blocks from 2022 to 2034. Earlier methods and figures have been applied differently to evolve an easy to understand model with relatable time lines. The focus is on the Army, due to its sheer size, centrality of India’s continental compulsions and its long unresolved land borders with belligerent adversaries. One can never forget that India has always been invaded from its land borders. It has never been invaded from the sea or air. If we get the Indian Army equation right, then we are on our way. Our transformation has to be right from two perspectives. At the top,  we must have the right mix of man and machine in balance. This includes technology, training, age profile, experience, and leadership, in tailormade organisations to meet perceived threats. However all this has to enable the fighting end to execute its tasks. Hence the fighting end, which is represented by units and sub units – companies, squadrons and batteries, must be in harmony and well-honed to face the enemy. After all they are in the business end of “theirs but to do and die, theirs not to reason why”.

In this context, I have heard all the head honchos of India’s military enunciate some issues repetitively. The Agnipath Scheme will stabilise with time…It is a far reaching transformation…It will reduce the age profile of the Army and make it youthful…It will enable better induction of hi-technology…The reduced pension outgo will enable the nation to spend more on modernisation…Those who criticise it cannot understand its vision…Veterans are fixated…This is an era of modern warfare…We have studied models of other armies…so on and so forth. All that is fine. However, we have not seen the maths. The orbit is hazy.

This model analyses  Agnipath quantitatively to identify the problem. Once identified, solutions can be worked out. The model is based on certain assumptions. The four year block principle is based on the four year tenure of the Agniveers. It gives great clarity across time lines. The first and reasonable assumption is that the yearly intake into the Army is 65000 soldiers. This figure has been applied across the entire 17 years of colour service of a soldier in a uniform manner. This intake has stopped for 2020, 2021 and 2022 due to Covid. The resultant shortfall is 65000 x 3 soldiers (which is 1.95 lakhs). This shortfall is not factored for being made up. I think the government will not let this opportunity go. Hence the strength of the Army is being maintained at 10.05 lakhs (12 lakhs – 1.95 lakhs) in the model. If this strength is made up, the imbalances creep up faster. Also,  the government has announced 46000 vacancies for Agniveers. That is for the first six month cycle. The Army share of these vacancies is presumed to be 32500 at present. Over the annual period, it will be 65000. This is assumed to be sustained for the first four year block. After that, it will have to be increased. Incidentally, this model can be tweaked with varying numbers to get different outcomes.   

With these assumptions in place, it is relevant to understand the current structure in the Army. In the basic block of 0-3 years’ service there is no one at present. This three year  block will only go up the ladder without any personnel in that service bracket. In all subsequent blocks, till 17 years of service, there are 65000 personnel per year. Depending upon a two / three year block (as depicted) , each block has 2.6/1.3 L soldiers as can be seen in the graphic below. Once distributed in this fashion there are 0.95 lakhs personnel above the 17 year bracket who are mainly JCOs and senior NCOs. This figure will be constant through time since the highest ranks are always kept filled. It does not mean that there are no JCOs / senior NCOs in lower service blocks.    

In the next four year period, up to 2.6 lakhs Agniveers will be inducted (yellow block AGNI 1 in graphic ). At that time there will be 7.45 lakhs experienced soldiers with more than 4 years’ service. For every three experienced soldiers, there will be one Agniveer. In fact till 2026 there is no adverse effect on the Army. The growth corelationship between the 2022 and 2026 structure is visible through a common colour code for each block and the slanted arrows connecting blocks. This is applicable for all further graphics also     

In the period 2026 – 2030, 75% of the first lot of Agniveers (AGNI 1)would have exited and only 25% (0.65 lakhs) would have been retained. Taking into account the normal exit pattern and the 75% exit of the first lot of Agniveers, there will be a necessity to increase the intake to 4.5 lakhs Agniveers (AGNI 2)in the period up to 2030. If this is not done, the strength of the Army will fall drastically. In this period between 2026 -2030, there will be an ‘experience’ reduction. There will be 5.5 Lakhs experienced soldiers as against 4.5 lakhs experienced soldiers in the system. Experienced vs inexperienced Agniveers will be almost at parity at macro level.        

The period 2030- 2034  there will be an experience inversion. Taking the model forward it can be seen in the graphic that there will be 4.675 Lakhs of experienced soldiers for 5.375 Agniveers (AGNI3). Beyond this period,  the figures tend to stabilise within in a narrow band. By then the situation will almost be stable and largely irreversible.   

Prima facie it will appear that if the experience vs inexperience ratio is 1:1, it is manageable. However, this is at a macro level. The major issue to understand is that what will be the effect on the unit or subunit due to this changing macro profile. The devil is always in the detail. Let’s us look at the devil.

As modelled previously, the rostered strength of a unit is a taken as 500. It implies five hundred people are held on the unit roster.  Of these, 10% , are permanently sent on Extra Regimental Employment like NCC, HQs, R&D establishments, MCOs etc. These 10% vacancies are given to units on a rotational basis. All those sent out have to be above 5 years’ service and are mostly JCOs/NCOs. Hence the residual War Establishment strength of the unit is 450. In this effective strength, those posted in the unit HQs and specialist sub units are taken as around 120 (27%). This is a conservative assumption.  Resultantly, the number of soldiers in  fighting sub units ie coys/btys/sqns is 330. That makes it about 110 soldiers per sub unit, assuming an uniform triangular pattern of three subunits per unit. The composition of these 110 soldiers is the crux of the issue. It is also a common practice in units to keep the youngest soldier in fighting companies / sabre squadrons / gun batteries. Hence all Agniveers will bunch up at the fighting end. That detailing can be seen in the table below.

In 2026, the macro ratio of 75:25 converts into 62 experienced soldiers for 38 Agniveers in a subunit.   That is fine and stable. As per my experience and wisdom of others, serving and retired, there is no way that the number of inexperienced Agniveers can be more than experienced soldiers in a subunit. If the happens, the fighting capability of the sub unit is suspect. However in the period between 2026 and 2030, there is a sharp inversion. By 2030, while the macro ratio will be 55:45; at subunit level, there will be only 32 experienced soldiers and 68 Agniveers  as can be seen in the table. The inversion will happen around 2028 and the kindergarten will be established. Beyond 2030 and specifically in 2034, the number of experienced soldiers in a subunit will further reduce to only 18.  At that time,  the kindergarten will be filled to the brim. The trick and the solution is to ensure that the experience ratio is always maintained in favour of the experienced. It can be done if flexibility is built in the scheme.   

I have been going by numbers and maths in all my analysis. Incidentally, the gross check on my numbers are that the VCOAS has confirmed that by 2032, there will be 50% Agniveers in the Indian Army. When that figure is reached, the experienced people at the subunits will be around 25 only. If this be so, the repeated assertion by the Political, Security and Military leadership that the operational effectiveness of the Indian Army and the Indian Armed Forces will not be adversely affected but will Improve is a mirage in the desert. Further, if we think that by 2028, we will modernise adequately through injection of  high end technology to offset the reduction in quality of manpower as a result of half trained Agniveers; it is being pretty unrealistic. Our track record in modernisation and procurement is rather uninspiring. Hence there is an undeniable need for a tweak to make the Agnipath scheme, workable and successful.    

I would beseech those who think I am being pessimistic or am underestimating the prowess of your youth, to rethink. Overall, the maths does not add up. The Agnipath scheme has not been stress tested by a formal study or trial.  This ‘transformation’ is most likely to enter an orbit without re-entry options. In this article I have dwelt upon numbers only to identify when the problem will occur. There is also a huge qualitative issue related to reduced training and inadequate time for the mental transformation of a village boy to an effective Agniveer. Both these issues compound the problem severely. These issues need to be attended to holistically. It also needs analysis as to why this has happened and what is the stable way forward. Wisdom needs to prevail on cold logic, facts and figures. That is what many of us were taught at DSSC were we not? Good old staff work based on diligence. I will attempt that in my next article.    

(The author is PVSM, AVSM, VSM, and a retired Director General of Artillery. He is currently a Professor in the Aerospace Department of IIT Madras. He writes extensively on defence and strategic affairs @ http://www.gunnersshot.com. Views expressed are personal and do not reflect the official position or policy of Financial Express Online. Reproducing this content without permission is prohibited).

Sun, 26 Jun 2022 00:54:00 -0500 en text/html https://www.financialexpress.com/defence/agnipath-the-kindergarten-mathematics/2573285/
Killexams : These are the 10 states with America's best workers

If you are a good worker with marketable skills, you have never been as much in demand as you are right now.

With 5 million more job openings in the U.S. than there are workers to fill them, companies are desperately seeking talent. And increasingly, they are willing to go where the workers are.

"Workforce is always the single most important factor, regardless of whether it's a manufacturing facility, a corporate office, or something that's creative in the arts," said Tom Stringer, managing director in charge of the national site selection practice at BDO in New York.

In the latest survey of the CNBC CFO Council, respondents overwhelmingly listed workforce as the most important factor in deciding where to locate or expand operations. It is also the most cited selling point among states seeking to attract companies, according to CNBC's 2022 America's Top States for Business study. So, under our methodology, it carries the most weight in our overall rankings.

To determine which states have the best workforces, we look at a variety of factors including the percentage of workers with college degrees, the concentration of high-tech workers, as well as workers with associate degrees and industry-recognized certificates. We also consider right to work laws protecting employees who decline to join a union, as well state worker training programs, and net migration of college-educated workers.

"Everyone is looking for an edge," said Cara Christopher, a senior vice president at Lightcast, a labor market data firm that supplied some data on talent attraction for CNBC's study. "Communities that are doing it right are looking at both attraction and development efforts."

In 2022, these ten states are winning the war for talent.

10. Maryland

Genesis Fuentes, PhD student, watches a simulated encounter at the Lab for Applied Social Science Research at the University of Maryland, where they are developing Virtual Reality in police de-escalation training, in College Park, MD.

Bill O'Leary | The Washington Post | Getty Images

The Old Line State has a line on tech talent, with the second largest concentration of science, technology, engineering and math (STEM) workers after Washington, according to the U.S. Bureau of Labor Statistics. The state is seeking to build on that success with Maryland STEM Connect, linking parents, students and educators with the many federal agencies and military bases in the area.

2022 Workforce Score: 257 out of 410 points (Top States Grade: B+)

Net Migration Rank: No. 28

Adults with Bachelor's Degree or Higher: 40.9%

Career Education Credential: 13.4%

STEM Workers: 10.1%

Right to Work State? No

9. Oregon

University of Oregon Lillis Business Complex building on campus in Eugene Oregon.

Don & Melinda Crawford | Education Images | Universal Images Group | Getty Images

With American workers on the move, The Beaver State is a big beneficiary. The Census Bureau estimates that college educated workers moving to the state outnumber those leaving by nearly two to one. WorkSource Oregon is a statewide partnership between the Oregon Employment Department and state and local nonprofit agencies aimed at retraining workers and connecting them with employers.

2022 Workforce Score: 259 out of 410 points (Top States Grade: B+)

Net Migration Rank: No. 8

Adults with Bachelor's Degree or Higher: 34.4%

Career Education Credential: 15.8%

STEM Workers: 7.5%

Right to Work State? No

8. Utah

A man walks past the Salt Lake Temple, a temple of The Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints, at Temple Square, in Salt Lake City.

Rick Bowmer | AP

The Beehive State gets its nickname from the industriousness of its workers, and that trait is really paying off these days. The vibrant tech scene in the growing Silicon Slopes region near Salt Lake City is attracting lots of STEM workers. But Utah is also big in career education, with a robust community college system. The state slips in the rankings this year because of its unemployment rate — the second lowest in the nation — which limits the pool of available workers.

2022 Workforce Score: 269 out of 410 points (Top State Grade: A-)

Net Migration Rank: No. 33

Adults with Bachelor's Degree or Higher: 34.7%

Career Education Credential: 20.5%

STEM Workers: 7.6%

Right to Work State? Yes

7. Arizona

The historic Route 66. This route originally ran from Chicago (Illinois) to Los Angeles (California) between 1926 and 1985. The highway no longer has an official existence but remains one of the most famous roads in America.

Andia | Universal Images Group | Getty Images

Educated workers are flocking to The Grand Canyon State, and that is making Arizona's workforce smarter. Labor market data firm Lightcast says average educational attainment in the state jumped 16% in the past five years, one of the biggest increases in the nation. The state also has a ready pool of workers with two-year degrees and certificates. But Arizona's workforce development program, known as Arizona@Work, has had mixed results getting participants back into the workforce.

2022 Workforce Score: 273 out of 410 points (Top State Grade: A-)

Net Migration Rank: No. 3

Adults with Bachelor's Degree or Higher: 30.3%

Career Education Credential: 23.8%

STEM Workers: 6.5%

Right to Work State? Yes

6. Florida

Students walking outside the Chemistry and Physics Building at Florida International University.

Jeff Greenberg | Universal Images Group | Getty Images

The Census Bureau estimates some 200,000 college graduates moved to Florida over the past five years, while only around half that amount left. On a percentage basis, it is the strongest migration level in the nation. The state makes up for a relative lack of tech workers by offering a ready supply of employees with industry-recognized certificates. "They are focused. They have a strong workforce development program," said Lightcast's Cara Christopher, who praised the state's partnerships with colleges and universities.

2022 Workforce Score: 274 out of 410 points (Top State Grade: A-)

Net Migration Rank: No. 1

Adults with Bachelor's Degree or Higher: 30.5%

Career Education Credential: 21.4%

STEM Workers: 5%

Right to Work State? Yes

5. Delaware

Bottling station at the Dogfish Head Brewery in Milton, Delaware.

Loop Images | Universal Images Group | Getty Images

Delaware workers are among the nation's most productive, accounting for about $140,218 in economic output per job last year. That is according to U.S. Bureau of Labor Statistics and U.S. Department of Commerce data. The state offers strong worker training programs. And with unemployment above the national average, there are plenty of people here to hire.

2022 Workforce Score: 277 out of 410 points (Top State Grade: A-)

Net Migration Rank: No. 23

Adults with Bachelor's Degree or Higher: 32.7%

Career Education Credential: 13.3%

STEM Workers: 7.2%

Right to Work State? No

4. Washington

The Visitor's Center at Microsoft Headquarters campus in Redmond, Washington.

Stephen Brashear | Getty Images

No state offers a greater concentration of STEM employees than Washington does. It is a longstanding priority in The Evergreen State. In 2013, the state legislature established the Washington State STEM Education Innovation Alliance. Under the direction of the governor's office, the alliance brings together labor, education, government and non-profit leaders to advance STEM education beginning in kindergarten.

2022 Workforce Score: 282 out of 410 points (Top State Grade: A)

Net Migration Rank: No. 2

Adults with Bachelor's Degree or Higher: 36.7%

Career Education Credential: 21.7%

STEM Workers: 10.2%

Right to Work State? No

3. Georgia

Downtown Atlanta skyline, photographed from the Jackson Street bridge in Atlanta, Georgia.

Raymond Boyd | Michael Ochs Archives | Getty Images

The Peach State is a leader in worker training. The state's workforce development program, WorkSource Georgia, is a network of 19 local WorkSource offices overseen by the state's technical college system. The localized focus is a key aspect of the state's effort to align its workforce with the needs of business, and it seems to be working. According to U.S. Department of Labor data, Georgia ranks No. 4 in a key measure of workforce development: moving adults from training to employment.

2022 Workforce Score: 297 out of 410 points (Top State Grade: A+)

Net Migration Rank: No. 7

Adults with Bachelor's Degree or Higher: 32.2%

Career Education Credential: 21.4%

STEM Workers: 6%

Right to Work State? Yes

2. Texas

A giant cowboy boot is on display outside the Tesla Giga Texas manufacturing facility during the "Cyber Rodeo" grand opening party on April 7, 2022 in Austin, Texas.

Suzanne Cordeiro | AFP | Getty Images

Skilled workers are heading to the Lone Star State in droves. And when they get there, they are working hard. Texas is in the top ten for workforce productivity, with $139,549 in economic output per job last year. With unemployment holding above the national average, employers have plenty of those industrious workers to choose from.

2022 Workforce Score: 299 out of 410 points (Top State Grade: A+)

Net Migration Rank: No. 3

Adults with Bachelor's Degree or Higher: 30.7%

Career Education Credential: 16.3%

STEM Workers: 6.6%

Right to Work State? Yes

1. Colorado

Now Hiring sign of Denver Public School placed in front of Bromwell Elementary School in Denver, Colorado on Tuesday, December 7, 2021.

Hyoung Chang | Denver Post | Getty Images

The Centennial State has the second most educated workforce in the nation behind Massachusetts. And those smart workers are staying put. While some other states suffer a brain drain, Colorado is only losing about 10,000 college educated workers per year, far fewer than are migrating there. While not technically a right to work state in which employees cannot be fired for refusing to join a union, the state offers some protections to non-union workers under what it calls a "hybrid" system.

2022 Workforce Score: 302 out of 410 points (Top State Grade: A+)

Net Migration Rank: No. 11

Adults with Bachelor's Degree or Higher: 36.7%

Career Education Credential: 41.6%

STEM Workers: 9.2%

Right to Work State? Hybrid

Sat, 16 Jul 2022 21:39:00 -0500 en text/html https://www.cnbc.com/2022/07/16/these-are-americas-10-best-states-for-workers.html
Killexams : Three esteemed Brown scholars to speak at the International Congress of Mathematicians

Professor of Mathematics Joseph Silverman (left) will present “Arithmetic Dynamics: A Survey” at this year's International Congress of Mathematicians. Photos by Nick Dentamaro / Brown University.

I wish I could go back in time and tell younger versions of myself, who struggled with self-doubt and uncertainty, that I would end up at the ICM twice. I have always been kind of an unusual mathematician. I like to work on individual and not necessarily related problems that attract me because of their beauty, simplicity and mystery. These
ICM invitations make me feel like this approach is a valid way of doing mathematics.

Richard Schwartz Professor of Mathematics

Richard Schwartz

Can you share an overview on the work you’ll speak about and its impact in the field?

Ramanan: Large collections of randomly evolving interacting entities model phenomena in a variety of fields, including magnetization in statistical physics, dynamics of spiking neurons in neuroscience, the spread of diseases in epidemiology, and scheduling in communication networks. Quantities of interest — such as the typical dynamics of a single entity or the dynamics of suitable averages of the system — are hard to analyze (or even numerically simulate) due to the complexity and high-dimensional nature of the dynamics. When interactions between particles are weak, then so-called mean-field approximations that overcome the curse of dimensionality were first mathematically justified over a half-century ago and subsequently spawned a huge body of research on related questions that continues to this day. In contrast, it has been an open problem to develop principled approximations justified by rigorous limit theorems when interactions between particles are strong and mean-field approximations do poorly. In the latter setting, not only was no corresponding analytical characterization known, but there was not even a conjecture of what form it might take.

In my talk, I will first survey classical results in the field and then describe my research, which provides a resolution of this open problem and thereby initiates a new line of inquiry. I hope this will not only spur related fundamental research in the theory of stochastic processes, but also the development of corresponding computational algorithms and the analysis of specific models that shed insight into applications.

Professor of Applied Mathematics Kavita Ramanan (right) on her ICM 2022 invitation: "It is heartening to know that the broader mathematical community finds the new perspectives and methods that my research has developed of sufficient significance and interest to warrant an invited talk at the ICM. It provides further impetus for my research, and I hope it also motivates my Ph.D. students, especially those working on related topics."

Schwartz: I’ll speak about mathematical billiards. In a certain sense, this is just like ordinary billiards, played in a pool hall, except that the game here is completely theoretical. The table might have a different shape, and the ball is just a frictionless point moving around. In ordinary billiards, you could imagine trying to figure out what kinds of trick shots are possible; in mathematical billiards, you want to know similar things. For instance, one problem I worked on is whether for every triangular-shaped table, you can find a way to hit the ball so that it makes a perfect repeating path. I made some progress on it but didn't solve it completely.

Another thing I will speak about is outer billiards. This is a game sort of like billiards, except that a ball slides around the outside of the table somewhat like the Moon orbiting the Earth. I solved the main unsolved problem about this kind of system by constructing a particular table for which the corresponding “billiard path” does not stay in a bounded region of the plane. It keeps making wilder and wilder oscillations. This is probably the best work of my career. Some of my ICM talk is a general survey of developments in mathematical billiards and then some of it focuses on the two problems I personally worked on.

Silverman: I'll be speaking about a relatively new field of mathematics called arithmetic dynamics, which I helped to establish in the 1980s. Arithmetic dynamics is an amalgamation of the ancient field of number theory (the study of whole numbers and their relationships to one another) and the field of discrete dynamical systems (how quantities change when a process is repeatedly applied), which evolved in the 1920s. Since starting work in arithmetic dynamics, I have written dozens of articles and a graduate-level textbook, co-organized many conferences and workshops, and supervised 15 Brown Ph.D. theses in the subject.

What is the significance for you, personally and professionally as a Brown scholar, to be invited to present at ICM?

Ramanan: I feel truly honored. It is heartening to know that the broader mathematical community finds the new perspectives and methods that my research has developed of sufficient significance and interest to warrant an invited talk at the ICM. It provides further impetus for my research, and I hope it also motivates my Ph.D. students, especially those working on related topics. Given that circumstances denied us ICM speakers the exciting opportunity to gather together, interact and supply our talks in front of a live audience, I am also very grateful to Brendan Hassett and the team at ICERM for arranging a live event at ICERM. I enjoyed learning more about what my colleagues are working on.

It’s a great honor to be invited to speak at the ICM. And it is particularly nice to see that this new field that I helped to found in the 1980s has become a central area of mathematical research.

Joseph Silverman Professor of Mathematics

Joseph Silverman

Schwartz: This is the second time I've been invited to speak at the ICM. The first time was in 2002 in Beijing — I was a professor at the University of Maryland then. So I suppose that the most significant thing for me is that I got invited twice in my lifetime. I wish I could go back in time and tell younger versions of myself, who struggled with self-doubt and uncertainty, that I would end up at the ICM twice. I have always been kind of an unusual mathematician. I like to work on things from scratch and often feel like an outsider. I don't feel like I belong to any particular field and I don't really have a big overreaching goal. I like to work on individual and not necessarily related problems that attract me because of their beauty, simplicity and mystery. I usually take an experimental approach, where I play around on the computer and try to find insights into the problem. So these ICM invitations make me feel like this approach is a valid way of doing mathematics.

Silverman: It’s a great honor to be invited to speak at the ICM. And it is particularly nice to see that this new field that I helped to found in the 1980s has become a central area of mathematical research.

Wed, 06 Jul 2022 08:36:00 -0500 en text/html https://www.brown.edu/news/2022-07-06/icm-2022
Killexams : Who’s the oldest of them all? No result found, try new keyword!Two isolated Italian towns have staked rival claims to the title of municipality with the "largest concentration of centenarians." ... Sun, 17 Jul 2022 06:00:00 -0500 text/html https://www.seattletimes.com/nation-world/whos-the-oldest-of-them-all/ Killexams : Summer classes welcome students of all grades No result found, try new keyword!Children nowadays are encouraged by their parents to participate in extracurricular summer classes rather than math, physics or chemistry. Sun, 17 Jul 2022 22:39:00 -0500 https://en.vietnamplus.vn/summer-classes-welcome-students-of-all-grades/233957.vnp Killexams : TEA releases STAAR results for grades 3-8

The Texas Education Agency has released the 2022 State of Texas Assessments of Academic Readiness results for grades 3-8, which showed across-the-board improvements in all grades and subjects, with especially significant gains in reading.

“The investments that the state is making in memorizing academies and accelerated instruction are clearly paying dividends for our students, and the results are a testament to the hard work of teachers across our state,” Texas Education Commissioner Mike Morath said. “While we still have much work to do to recover from COVID-related learning loss in mathematics, the improvements our students have made in memorizing are clear.”

The spring results include exams in mathematics and memorizing for grades 3–8, 5th and 8th grade science, and 8th grade social studies.

Military bases have big impact on state’s economy

A study analyzing the impact on the state’s economy from U.S. military installations concludes they contributed at least $114.1 billion to the Texas economy last year and supported more than 600,000 jobs across the state. Texas is home to 15 military installations and the U.S. Army Futures Command, which is located in Austin and runs modernization projects for the U.S. Army.

The study was completed by the comptroller’s office at the behest of the Texas Military Preparedness Commission.

“It is amazing to see the tremendous economic impact these military installations have in Texas,” said Texas Comptroller Glenn Hegar. “The importance of these bases reaches far beyond direct jobs and personal income. The facilities, and the men and women who work and are stationed at them, form the backbone of communities and support countless businesses and induced jobs throughout the state.”

Former NFL player indicted for bogus medical claims

Former NFL player Narond “Roc” Alexander was indicted recently for submitting fraudulent health reimbursement claims totaling more than $25,000 to a health program for former NFL players. The case was brought by Texas Department of Insurance investigators along with the Bexar County District Attorney’s office.

Alexander allegedly filed the bogus claims between 2014 and 2018 under the Gene Upshaw NFL Player Health Reimbursement Plan, which helps pay certain medical care expenses for former NFL players. He could face up to 10 years in prison and a $10,000 fine if convicted.

“Insurance fraud hurts the people who actually need these funds to cover their health care costs, like the NFL players who benefit from this particular fund,” Bexar County District Attorney Joe Gonzales said. “This indictment allows us to seek justice on behalf of the NFL players with legitimate claims who rely on these funds.”

After playing for the University of Washington, Alexander signed with the Denver Broncos in 2004 and later played for the Houston Texans.

Grant program to benefit travel industry

The travel industry, hard hit by the COVID-19 pandemic, is set to receive $180 million under a grant program funded by the federal American Rescue Plan Act of 2021.The program is designed to provide grants for the recovery of Texas businesses in the tourism, travel, and hospitality industry affected by the pandemic.

“Travel and tourism are critical components to both the state and local economies,” said Gov. Greg Abbott. “Visitor spending at Texas destinations brings new money into communities and spurs local job creation across industries in every region of the state.”

A series of webinars are slated to provide information for specific businesses. To get more information and register, visit https://ttir.gov.texas.gov.

Demographic center analyzes state census results

The U.S. Census Bureau has released its 2021 population estimates, and the Texas Demographic Center has crunched the numbers to determine:

• Texas is growing both older and more diverse. Median age increased to 35.4 years in 2021, up from 33.6 in 2010.

• Texas has more Black residents than any other state.

• All urban core counties in Texas, except for Travis County, lost non-Hispanic white population.

• The state has the third-largest Asian population in the country.

• Harris County has more Black residents than all other counties in the country except Cook County, which includes Chicago.

Sharing the road with large trucks

Anyone who has driven the state’s major highways recently likely has noticed the number of 18-wheelers on the road has risen as businesses and industries work to fill demand in many sectors. The Texas Department of Transportation is reminding motorists to take extra care when driving around big trucks.

Drivers are especially at risk in the state’s energy sectors, according to TxDOT. Last year, more than 79,000 crashes occurred in the state’s five major energy production areas, resulting in 1,119 deaths – a 20% increase over the previous year.

Among the safety tips offered by TxDOT are staying away from a truck’s blind spot; not tailgating; when passing a truck, making sure you can see both of the truck’s headlights before moving back into your lane; and never crossing behind a truck that is backing up, since the driver can’t see you.

COVID-19 cases increase again

The number of new COVID-19 cases reported in Texas during the past week by the Coronavirus Resource Center at Johns Hopkins University rose again to 84,417, with 115 deaths recorded.

Both numbers are up modestly compared to what was reported the previous week. However, lab-confirmed COVID-19 hospitalizations in the state continue to rise steadily, with 3,007 reported by the Department of State Health Services. That’s up 22% from the previous week and more than double what was reported a month ago.

Gary Borders is a veteran award-winning Texas journalist. He published several community newspapers in Texas during a 30-year span, including in Longview, Fort Stockton, Nacogdoches and Cedar Park. Email: gborders@texaspress.com.

Wed, 13 Jul 2022 07:10:00 -0500 en text/html https://www.journal-spectator.com/east_bernard_express/article_6d7c0dd8-02df-11ed-876d-a3123775f4b5.html
Killexams : Russia's war in Ukraine

More than forty towns and villages in Donbas have come under attack in the last 24 hours, the Ukrainian military has reported, acknowledging the "partial success" of a Russian attempt to advance on one front.

The General Staff said that Russian forces were now trying to advance west of the Luhansk-Donetsk border towards the cities of Bakhmut and Sloviansk, and "the enemy led an offensive in the direction of Verkhnokamianske, with partial success." The Russians were also advancing "in the area of ​​the Spirne settlement," it added.

Verkhnokamianske and Spirne are adjacent to the main highway leading westwards from the city of Lysychansk, which fell last week.

The Ukrainians also said that "the occupiers are advancing in the direction of Vesela Dolyna," which is close to Bakhmut. 

The General Staff said the Russians were using artillery, mortars, multiple launch rocket systems and air strikes as they tried to eliminate Ukrainian defenses.

In its analysis of the military situation on Friday, international security consultancy the Cavell Group tweeted:  "Fighting continues to be heavy on many of the roads and settlements around Siversk now with heavy artillery exchanges also in this region. The situation is very fluid here as Russia pushes forces west." Siversk is the last town of any size on the roads west towards Sloviansk and Kramatorsk. 

Cavell added: "A similar situation is occurring towards Bakhmut with Russia making slow gains against heavy resistance, but slowly securing more of the highway to Lysychansk and closing in on Bakhmut defences."

The Institute for the Study of War said: "Russian forces still conducted limited ground offensives and air, artillery, and missile strikes across all axes on July 7, and will likely continue to confine themselves to small-scale offensive actions as they rebuild forces and set conditions for a more significant offensive."

Besides trying to push west from the Luhansk border, the Russians have sustained artillery fire on settlements north of Sloviansk, with the Ukrainian General Staff that saying "our defenders inflicted losses on the enemy during its next offensive attempt and pushed the invaders back near Bohorodychne," some 20 kilometers north of the city.

Serhiy Hayday, head of Luhansk region military administration, said "in order to reach the administrative border of Luhansk region, the Russians are destroying the surrounding villages with artillery....they do not stop firing from all types of heavy weapons " on the few villages not already under their control.

"But our armed forces hold the fort," Hayday said, indicating that resistance continues along the regional border.

Elsewhere, the Ukrainian General Staff reported further artillery attacks against settlements north of Kharkiv, and local authorities said there had been civilian casualties in a rocket attack on the eastern outskirts of the city.

Regional military administrations reported incoming fire in both Sumy, in the north, and against Kryvyi Rih, in the south, without causing casualties. 

Also in the south, Russian forces continue to shell areas of Kherson and Mykolaiv in an effort to retrieve recently lost territory, according to regional administrations, and several villages were on "the verge of destruction."

The Cavell Group assessed that "north of Kherson there were phases of intensive artillery shelling yesterday [Thursday], but no significant changes on the ground. Around Kherson City Ukrainian [forces] fired coordinated artillery onto some Russian fortified defensive positions."

Watch for background here.

Fri, 08 Jul 2022 08:15:00 -0500 en text/html https://edition.cnn.com/europe/live-news/russia-ukraine-war-news-07-08-22/h_8f99ab4616f5770d292f0090108c2f2c
Killexams : Capitol Highlights

The Texas Education Agency has released the 2022 State of Texas Assessments of Academic Readiness Results for grades 3-8, which showed across-the-board improvements in all grades and subjects, with especially significant gains in reading.

“The investments that the state is making in memorizing academies and accelerated instruction are clearly paying dividends for our students, and the results are a testament to the hard work of teachers across our state,” Texas Education Commissioner Mike Morath said. “While we still have much work to do to recover from COVID-related learning loss in mathematics, the improvements our students have made in memorizing are clear.”

The spring results include exams in mathematics and memorizing for grades 3–8, 5th and 8th grade science, and 8th grade social studies.

Military bases have big impact on state’s economy

A study analyzing the impact on the state’s economy from U.S. military installations concludes they contributed at least $114.1 billion to the Texas economy last year and supported more than 600,000 jobs across the state. Texas is home to 15 military installations and the U.S. Army Futures Command, which is located in Austin and runs modernization projects for the U.S. Army.

The study was completed by the comptroller’s office at the behest of the Texas Military Preparedness Commission.

“It is amazing to see the tremendous economic impact these military installations have in Texas,” said Texas Comptroller Glenn Hegar. “The importance of these bases reaches far beyond direct jobs and personal income. The facilities, and the men and women who work and are stationed at them, form the backbone of communities and support countless businesses and induced jobs throughout the state.”

Former NFL player indicted for bogus medical claims

Former NFL player Narond “Roc” Alexander was indicted recently for submitting fraudulent health reimbursement claims totaling more than $25,000 to a health program for former NFL players. The case was brought by Texas Department of Insurance investigators along with the Bexar County District Attorney’s office.

Alexander allegedly filed the bogus claims between 2014 and 2018 under the Gene Upshaw NFL Player Health Reimbursement Plan, which helps pay certain medical care expenses for former NFL players. He could face up to 10 years in prison and a $10,000 fine if convicted.

“Insurance fraud hurts the people who actually need these funds to cover their health care costs, like the NFL players who benefit from this particular fund,” Bexar County District Attorney Joe Gonzales said. “This indictment allows us to seek justice on behalf of the NFL players with legitimate claims who rely on these funds.”

After playing for the University of Washington, Alexander signed with the Denver Broncos in 2004 and later played for the Houston Texans.

Grant program to benefit travel industry

The travel industry, hard hit by the COVID-19 pandemic, is set to receive $180 million of funds under a grant program funded by the federal American Rescue Plan Act of 2021.The program is designed to provide grants for the recovery of Texas businesses in the tourism, travel, and hospitality industry affected by the pandemic.

“Travel and tourism are critical components to both the state and local economies,” said Gov. Greg Abbott. “Visitor spending at Texas destinations brings new money into communities and spurs local job creation across industries in every region of the state.”

A series of webinars are slated to provide information for specific businesses. To get more details and register, go to: https://ttir.gov.texas.gov.

Demographic center analyzes state census results

The U.S. Census Bureau has released its 2021 population estimates, and the Texas Demographic Center has crunched the numbers to determine:

• Texas is growing both older and more diverse. Median age increased to 35.4 years in 2021, up from 33.6 in 2010.

• Texas has more Black residents than any other state.

• All urban core counties in Texas, except for Travis County, lost non-Hispanic white population.

• The state has the third-largest Asian population in the country.

• Harris County has more Black residents than all other counties in the country except Cook County, which includes Chicago.

Sharing the road with large trucks

Anyone who has driven the state’s major highways recently likely has noticed the number of 18-wheelers on the road has risen as businesses and industries work to fill demand in many sectors. The Texas Department of Transportation is reminding motorists to take extra care when driving around big trucks.

Drivers are especially at risk in the state’s energy sectors, according to TxDOT. Last year, more than 79,000 crashes occurred in the state’s five major energy production areas, resulting in 1,119 deaths — a 20% increase over the previous year.

Among the safety tips offered by TxDOT are staying away from a truck’s blind spot; not tailgating; when passing a truck, making sure you can see both of the truck’s headlights before moving back into your lane; and never crossing behind a truck that is backing up, since the driver can’t see you.

COVID-19 cases increase again

The number of new COVID-19 cases reported in Texas during the past week by the Coronavirus Resource Center at Johns Hopkins University rose again to 84,417, with 115 deaths recorded. Both numbers are up modestly compared to what was reported the previous week. However, lab-confirmed COVID-19 hospitalizations in the state continue to rise steadily, with 3,007 reported by the Department of State Health Services. That’s up 22% from the previous week and more than double what was reported a month ago.

Gary Borders is a veteran award-winning Texas journalist. He published a number of community newspapers in Texas during a 30-year span, including in Longview, Fort Stockton, Nacogdoches and Cedar Park. He reports on the state legislature for the Texas Press Association and its member newspapers, including The Herald. Email him at gborders@texaspress.com.

Mon, 11 Jul 2022 05:43:00 -0500 en text/html https://www.fbherald.com/news/tea-releases-staar-results-for-grades-3-8/article_a850f606-0355-50f4-aa4b-c8826be7f3c2.html
Killexams : Tips for Starting the College Search No result found, try new keyword!Beginning the college selection process in ninth grade “gives students four years to research every college that you feel you would like to be a part of,” says Paula Payton, a ... Fri, 08 Jul 2022 05:00:00 -0500 text/html https://www.usnews.com/education/articles/tips-for-starting-the-college-search Killexams : Narrative Science

‘Through a mosaic of case studies from the natural and social sciences, this remarkable collection investigates the many ways in which scientists use narratives as modes and sites of sense-making, representation, and reasoning. The Narrative Science approach imaginatively reconfigures the relationship between philosophy, narratology and scientific practice, enriching each of these fields of inquiry as a result.’

Chiara Ambrosio - University College London

‘This rich collection makes a broad-ranging examination of scientific practices, revealing the ubiquitous presence and diverse functions of narratives. An important and illuminating emphasis is on the key role of narrative as a 'technology of sense-making’. This path-breaking volume will have far-reaching implications for science studies, with deep philosophical implications.’

Hasok Chang - University of Cambridge

‘Narrative Science is an important and original collection of essays which together evidence narrative’s crucial epistemic role within science, and demonstrate the many ways in which narrative is involved in, sometimes integral to, the production of scientific knowledge.’

Sarah Dillon - University of Cambridge

‘Was science ever so austere and self-effacing as its defenders imply by praising it as ‘data-driven’? The chapters of this important collection demonstrate the vital role of narrative not just in popular writing on science, but in creative research, pointing the way to a more encompassing historical philosophy of science.’

Theodore M. Porter - UCLA

‘Narrative Science eloquently parries dismissive, ‘just-so’ critiques of story-telling in science by demonstrating that scientists past and present have used narrative as a way of thinking: that is, a tool for making sense of the natural, human, and social worlds they study, and for creating new knowledge.’

Anne Vila - University of Wisconsin-Madison

Wed, 17 Nov 2021 05:48:00 -0600 en text/html https://www.cambridge.org/core/books/narrative-science/C24469AE3BC2B8EEACF8DE743BB46614
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