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Exam Code: PCCE Practice test 2022 by Killexams.com team
PCCE NFPA Paralegal CORE Competency Exam

The format of the PCC test follows the proven structure of NFPAs Paralegal Advanced Competency test (PACE).
The exam:
- is two and one-half hours in length;
- consists of 125 multiple choice questions;
- is computer administered with instant preliminary results, followed by official scoring run results provided at least quarterly;
- is widely available at many testing centers with examinations given Monday – Friday, and in some locations, weekends and evenings;
- consists of two domains:
~ Paralegal Practice – 52%
~ Substantive Areas of Law – 48%
- is based on information from coursework in various paralegal programs and basic knowledge all paralegals should possess as well as real skills considered essential to basic paralegal competency;
- is also a test of paralegal ethics, legal technology and key terminology
to provide the groundwork for expanding paralegal roles and responsibilities;
- to provide the public and legal community with a mechanism to gauge the core competencies of paralegals;
- to be used in states considering the regulation of paralegals; and
- to be used by paralegal programs as an exit exam or Assurance of Learning tool.
Bachelors degree in any subject, plus a paralegal certificate;
no experience or CLE required; OR
- Bachelors degree in paralegal studies; no experience or CLE required; OR
- Bachelors degree in any subject, no paralegal certificate, 6 months experience and 1 hour of ethics taken in the year preceding the test application date; OR
- Associates degree in paralegal studies, no experience or CLE required; OR
- Associates degree in any subject, a paralegal certificate, no experience or CLE; OR
- Associates degree in any subject, no paralegal certificate, 1 year experience and 6 hours of CLE, including 1 hour of ethics taken in the year preceding the test application date; OR
- Paralegal certificate from a program that meets or exceeds the requirements set forth in NFPAs Short Term Paralegal Program Position Statement, 1 year experience and 6 hours of CLE, including 1 hour of ethics, taken in the year preceding the test application date; OR
- Active, duty, retired or former military personnel qualified in a military operation specialty as a paralegal and 1.0 hour of ethics CLE within the year preceding the test application; OR
- Candidates who are within two months of graduating and registered for the PCC test by a Director of a paralegal studies program participating in the PCCE Assurance of Learning (AoL) Program at the Partner level; OR
- High school diploma or GED, 5 years experience and 12 hours of CLE, including 1 hour of ethics, taken within 2 years preceding the test application date.

NFPA Paralegal CORE Competency Exam
Social-Work-Board Competency answers
Killexams : Social-Work-Board Competency answers - BingNews https://killexams.com/pass4sure/exam-detail/PCCE Search results Killexams : Social-Work-Board Competency answers - BingNews https://killexams.com/pass4sure/exam-detail/PCCE https://killexams.com/exam_list/Social-Work-Board Killexams : Master of Social Work student handbook

Academic integrity

The School of Social Work adheres to the University of Nevada, Reno Academic Standards Policy for Students concerning issues of academic integrity. Please see the UNR website for a complete description, definitions and policies regarding class conduct and academic dishonesty.

Accommodation for students with disabilities

Students who require additional support due to disabling conditions should discuss their needs with their instructors at the start of each semester. Accommodations for all reasonable requests will be made for documented disabling conditions. In addition, students are encouraged to contact the UNR Disability Resource Center at (775) 784-6000 to access a range of supportive services.

Attendance policy

The faculty of the School of Social Work believe that classroom attendance and participation are critical aspects of professional socialization. Students are responsible for assisting in the creation of a learning environment that promotes such socialization. To do so, students should assume responsibility for their own learning and be engaged within the course room. It is expected for students to log into the online classroom a minimum of three times a week to be successfully engaged. Attendance and participation will be part of grading, as determined by the course instructor. Opportunities for make-up assignments are determined at the discretion of individual instructors.

Confidentiality of case material outside of an agency

NASW Code of Ethics requirements regarding confidentiality of client information extend to the use of confidential information from field work in classes, seminars and in student assignments. Students may not divulge client, collateral or collegial information, disguising all names, demographic information and any case details that might identify a client or co-worker. Client files and records should never be removed from the agency for any purpose.

Nondiscrimination policy

The programs of the School of Social Work are conducted without discrimination on the basis of race, color, gender, creed, ethnic or national origin, disability, political orientation, or sexual orientation. This policy applies to the baccalaureate and master’s programs, the field education program, and all admission, employment, and financial aid decisions.

Retention

In its description of the Social Work major, the University of Nevada, Reno catalog states that:

“The admission and retention of students in the program is subject to the professional judgment of the social work faculty.”

Retention in the MSW Program is based on student performance in two general areas: academics and adherence to professional values and standards of behavior. Retention in the social work major requires students and maintain a 3.0 (B) overall grade point average—with a letter grade of “C” or higher in each of the graduate course, including the required 3 credits of electives. Additionally, students must adhere to the academic and professional standards outlined in UNR’s Student Handbook for Student Code of Conduct, the National Association of Social Workers Code of Ethics and the State Board of Examiners for Social Workers, Nevada Legislature’s Standards of Practice.

Dismissal policy

The School of Social Work adheres to the Dismissal Policy of the Nevada System of Higher Education (NSHE) Code, Title 2, Chapter 11.

Foundation competencies & associated practice behaviors

Competency 1: Demonstrate ethical and professional behavior

Social workers understand the value base of the profession and its ethical standards, as well as relevant laws and regulations that may impact practice at the micro, mezzo, and macro levels. Social workers understand frameworks of ethical decision-making and how to apply principles of critical thinking to those frameworks in practice, research, and policy arenas. Social workers recognize personal values and the distinction between personal and professional values. They also understand how their personal experiences and affective reactions influence their professional judgment and behavior. Social workers understand the profession’s history, its mission, and the roles and responsibilities of the profession. Social Workers also understand the role of other professions when engaged in inter-professional teams. Social workers recognize the importance of life-long learning and are committed to continually updating their skills to ensure they are relevant and effective. Social workers also understand emerging forms of technology and the ethical use of technology in social work practice.

Foundation practice behaviors

  • Make ethical decisions by applying the standards of the NASW Code of Ethics, relevant laws and regulations, models for ethical decision-making, ethical conduct of research, and additional codes of ethics as appropriate to context.
  • Use reflection and self-regulation to manage personal values and maintain professionalism in practice situations.
  • Demonstrate professional demeanor in behavior; appearance; and oral, written, and electronic communication.
  • Use technology ethically and appropriately to facilitate practice outcomes.
  • Use supervision and consultation to guide professional judgment and behavior.

Competency 2: Engage diversity and difference in practice

Social workers understand how diversity and difference characterize and shape the human experience and are critical to the formation of identity. The dimensions of diversity are understood as the intersectionality of multiple factors including but not limited to age, class, color, culture, disability and ability, ethnicity, gender, gender identity and expression, immigration status, marital status, political ideology, race, religion/spirituality, sex, sexual orientation, and tribal sovereign status. Social workers understand that, as a consequence of difference, a person’s life experiences may include oppression, poverty, marginalization, and alienation as well as privilege, power, and acclaim. Social workers also understand the forms and mechanisms of oppression and discrimination and recognize the extent to which a culture’s structures and values, including social, economic, political, and cultural exclusions, may oppress, marginalize, alienate, or create privilege and power.

Foundation practice behaviors

  • Apply and communicate understanding of the importance of diversity and difference in shaping life experiences in practice at the micro, mezzo, and macro levels.
  • Present themselves as learners and engage clients and constituencies as experts of their own experiences.
  • Apply self-awareness and self-regulation to manage the influence of personal biases and values in working with diverse clients and constituencies.

Competency 3: Advance human rights and social, economic, and environmental justice

Social workers understand that every person regardless of position in society has fundamental human rights such as freedom, safety, privacy, an adequate standard of living, health care, and education. Social workers understand the global interconnections of oppression and human rights violations, and are knowledgeable about theories of human need and social justice and strategies to promote social and economic justice and human rights. Social workers understand strategies designed to eliminate oppressive structural barriers to ensure that social goods, rights, and responsibilities are distributed equitably and that civil, political, environmental, economic, social, and cultural human rights are protected.

Foundation practice behaviors

  • Apply their understanding of social, economic, and environmental justice to advocate for human rights at the individual and system levels.
  • Engage in practices that advance social, economic, and environmental justice.

Competency 4: Engage in practice-informed research and research-informed practice

Social workers understand quantitative and qualitative research methods and their respective roles in advancing a science of social work and in evaluating their practice. Social workers know the principles of logic, scientific inquiry, and culturally informed and ethical approaches to building knowledge. Social workers understand that evidence that informs practice derives from multi- disciplinary sources and multiple ways of knowing. They also understand the processes for translating research findings into effective practice.

Foundation practice behaviors

  • Use practice experience and theory to inform scientific inquiry and research.
  • Apply critical thinking to engage in analysis of quantitative and qualitative research methods and research findings.
  • Use and translate research evidence to inform and Boost practice, policy, and service delivery.

Competency 5: Engage in policy practice

Social workers understand that human rights and social justice, as well as social welfare and services, are mediated by policy and its implementation at the federal, state, and local levels. Social workers understand the history and current structures of social policies and services, the role of policy in service delivery, and the role of practice in policy development. Social workers understand their role in policy development and implementation within their practice settings at the micro, mezzo, and macro levels and they actively engage in policy practice to effect change within those settings. Social workers recognize and understand the historical, social, cultural, economic, organizational, environmental, and global influences that affect social policy. They are also knowledgeable about policy formulation, analysis, implementation, and evaluation.

Foundation practice behaviors

  • Identify social policy at the local, state, and federal level that impacts well-being, service delivery, and access to social services.
  • Assess how social welfare and economic policies impact the delivery of and access to social services.
  • Apply critical thinking to analyze, formulate, and advocate for policies that advance human rights and social, economic, and environmental justice.

Competency 6: Engage with individuals, families, groups, organizations, and communities

Social workers understand that engagement is an ongoing component of the dynamic and interactive process of social work practice with, and on behalf of, diverse individuals, families, groups, organizations, and communities. Social workers value the importance of human relationships. Social workers understand theories of human behavior and the social environment, and critically evaluate and apply this knowledge to facilitate engagement with clients and constituencies, including individuals, families, groups, organizations, and communities. Social workers understand strategies to engage diverse clients and constituencies to advance practice effectiveness.

Foundation practice behaviors

  • Apply knowledge of human behavior and the social environment, person-in-environment, and other multidisciplinary theoretical frameworks to engage with clients and constituencies.
  • Use empathy, reflection, and interpersonal skills to effectively engage diverse clients and constituencies.

Competency 7: Assess individuals, families, groups, organizations, and communities

Social workers understand that assessment is an ongoing component of the dynamic and interactive process of social work practice with, and on behalf of, diverse individuals, families, groups, organizations, and communities. Social workers understand theories of human behavior and the social environment, and critically evaluate and apply this knowledge in the assessment of diverse clients and constituencies, including individuals, families, groups, organizations, and communities. Social workers understand methods of assessment with diverse clients and constituencies to advance practice effectiveness. Social workers recognize the implications of the larger practice context in the assessment process and value the importance of inter-professional collaboration in this process. Social workers understand how their personal experiences and affective reactions may affect their assessment and decision-making.

Foundation practice behaviors

  • Collect and organize data, and apply critical thinking to interpret information from clients and constituencies.
  • Apply knowledge of human behavior and the social environment, person-in-environment, and other multidisciplinary theoretical frameworks in the analysis of assessment data from clients and constituencies.
  • Develop mutually agreed-on intervention goals and objectives based on the critical assessment of strengths, needs, and challenges within clients and constituencies.
  • Select appropriate intervention strategies based on the assessment, research knowledge, and values and preferences of clients and constituencies.

Competency 8: Intervene with individuals, families, groups, organizations, and communities

Social workers understand that intervention is an ongoing component of the dynamic and interactive process of social work practice with, and on behalf of, diverse individuals, families, groups, organizations, and communities. Social workers are knowledgeable about evidence-informed interventions to achieve the goals of clients and constituencies, including individuals, families, groups, organizations, and communities. Social workers understand theories of human behavior and the social environment, and critically evaluate and apply this knowledge to effectively intervene with clients and constituencies. Social workers understand methods of identifying, analyzing and implementing evidence-informed interventions to achieve client and constituency goals. Social workers value the importance of interprofessional teamwork and communication in interventions, recognizing that beneficial outcomes may require interdisciplinary, interprofessional, and inter-organizational collaboration.

Foundation practice behaviors

  • Critically choose and implement interventions to achieve practice goals and enhance capacities of clients and constituencies.
  • Apply knowledge of human behavior and the social environment, person-in-environment, and other multidisciplinary theoretical frameworks in interventions with clients and constituencies.
  • Use inter-professional collaboration as appropriate to achieve beneficial practice outcomes.
  • Negotiate, mediate, and advocate with and on behalf of diverse clients and constituencies.
  • Facilitate effective transitions and endings that advance mutually agreed-on goals.

Competency 9: Evaluate practice with individuals, families, groups, organizations, and communities

Social workers understand that evaluation is an ongoing component of the dynamic and interactive process of social work practice with, and on behalf of, diverse individuals, families, groups, organizations and communities. Social workers recognize the importance of evaluating processes and outcomes to advance practice, policy, and service delivery effectiveness. Social workers understand theories of human behavior and the social environment, and critically evaluate and apply this knowledge in evaluating outcomes. Social workers understand qualitative and quantitative methods for evaluating outcomes and practice effectiveness.

Foundation practice behaviors

  • Select and use appropriate methods for evaluation of outcomes.
  • Apply knowledge of human behavior and the social environment, person-in-environment, and other multidisciplinary theoretical frameworks in the evaluation of outcomes.
  • Critically analyze, monitor, and evaluate intervention and program processes and outcomes.
  • Apply evaluation findings to Boost practice effectiveness at the micro, mezzo, and macro levels.

Grievance procedure

Under the remediation policy, there are 4 points at which a student can initiate a grievance: 

  1. If the student believes that the behavior cited in the original concern is unfounded; 
  2. If the student believes that the Remediation Committee's identification of a relevant competency, practice behavior, code of conduct, ethical standard is inaccurate;
  3. If the student believes that the remediation decision or Action Plan does not address the original concern; or
  4. If the student believes they are being held to a higher standard of performance than other students completing the same program of study.

The written grievance should be submitted to the Director of The School of Social Work no later than 10 working days following the decision point in question (see 1-4 above). The burden of proof during the grievance process rests with the student. If the Director determines that the student has provided adequate evidence to support his or her grievance, the Director may dismiss the issue with no further action required. Alternatively, if the Director determines that there is not adequate evidence to support the student’s grievance, he or she will redirect the student to the Remediation Team for further steps/action. The Director will provide his or her decision to the student and Remediation Team in writing within 10 working days of receipt of the student’s written grievance.

Grade appeal policy

The School of Social Work adheres to the University’s policy by which students may appeal a grade. This policy states “…a grade assigned by an instructor is only subject to the appeals procedure if:

  • There was a clerical/administrative error in the calculation and/or assignment of the grade;
  • The grade assignment was based on factors other than the student's performance in the course and/or completion of course requirements; or
  • The grade assignment meant that the student was held to more demanding standards than other students in the same section of the course.

The burden of proof of these conditions rests on the student.” The policy advises students to begin the process by consulting with the course Instructor. If the issue is not resolved at that level students may proceed with filing a Grade Appeal Form. The full policy and procedures for filing a Grade Appeal can be found at under section 3,510 of the University Administrative Manual.

Wed, 23 Dec 2020 09:15:00 -0600 en-us text/html https://www.unr.edu/social-work/degrees-and-programs/master-of-social-work/program-handbook
Killexams : Social Work

Program and Licensure Information

Miami University’s undergraduate program in social work leads to a Bachelor of Social Work (BSW) and prepares students for generalist social work practice. Through classroom instruction and field-based classes, students gain the knowledge and skills to assess the needs and resources of people and their social environment; provide services to individuals, families, groups, organizations and communities; link people with needed resources; and Boost the resources available in the community.

Curriculum

To complete the BSW degree program, students need to successfully complete a variety of traditional courses, field-based classes, and a field practicum. Please note: requirements may be different depending on the year of your enrollment. Please contact your advisor for details.

Course Requirements

BSW Field Practicum

Social work majors are required to complete an internship consisting of 450 hours at one or more agencies over a two-semester period their senior year. Students choose from a variety of field placements.

For more information or questions, please email socialwork@MiamiOH.edu

Thu, 02 Dec 2021 07:25:00 -0600 en-US text/html https://miamioh.edu/ehs/academics/departments/fsw/academics/majors/social-work/index.html
Killexams : Bachelor of Social Work (BSW)

Committed to the social work values, including the values of social justice and the inherent dignity and worth of the person, we reject white supremacy, racism, and all forms of oppression. The BSW program stands in solidarity with the BLM movement and Black leaders who have led the way in the civil rights movement, Indigenous Communities who have consistently resisted colonialism and oppression, Communities of Color and other historically marginalized groups who continue the struggle towards social justice. The BSW program is committed to creating an anti-racist and anti-oppressive environment that is inclusive, respectful, and supportive of all social identities, including race, ethnicity, religion, origin, citizenship status, sexual orientation, gender identity, political affiliation, economic status, veteran status, and ability.

Thu, 22 Jul 2021 18:43:00 -0500 en-us text/html https://www.unr.edu/social-work/degrees-and-programs/bachelor-of-social-work
Killexams : Berea school board gets social-emotional learning update

BEREA, Ohio – Social-emotional learning in public schools is nothing new, having been a state focus for more than 10 years.

That was one of many messages Berea City Schools Director of Pupil Services Lori Sancin conveyed on Sept. 19 to the Berea Board of Education about the district’s ongoing efforts.

SEL centers on positivity in behavior, emotions and interactions with others, she said. The five core competencies are self-awareness, self-management, social awareness, relationship skills and responsible decision making.

“Everything we do (in the BCSD) is basically focused on those five core competencies … which are the skills everyone needs in order to be successful in the trades, the careers, college or whatever you choose to do in life, and in your professions, after your K-12 education,” Sancin said.

The district uses a three-tier concept when teaching academics and also when evaluating behaviors.

She said PBIS – Positive Behavioral Intervention Support – is Tier 1, which focuses on what all district students need from a conceptual standpoint. That includes expectations about behavior in the classroom, hallways, etc.

“PBIS starts with making sure all of our kids know what those expectations are … because it’s about managing their behaviors and self-awareness of what they’re doing,” Sancin said.

For students needing extra support, Tier 2 involves small groups of instruction, with parental consent and check-ins, she said.

At the Tier 3 level, students may receive a more intense small-group intervention, individual counseling with parental consent or a referral to other community resources.

A new pilot program using universal screening tools DESSA and DAP will get under way soon.

“This has been something our team of school counselors, social workers, school psychologists and administrators has researched, with regional support from the Educational Service Center (of Northeast Ohio),” Sancin said, emphasizing the importance of “student voice” in the survey results.

Students will bring home information to their parents in advance of administering the surveys.

Parents will be consulted to obtain consent if screening results show their child would benefit from additional intervention.

The screeners will be administered to grades 1, 5 and 9 during the first two weeks of October. That information will be analyzed through the end of October, and interventions will begin in November.

After the pilot is completed this school year, the information collected will guide the district’s next steps.

“I read a quote this past week … that when kids can’t read, we don’t kick them out of school, but when they can’t behave themselves, there are often negative consequences,” board member Heather Zirke said.

“I see this as an opportunity to do something good for kids that need some help self-regulating.”

Read more stories from the News Sun.

If you purchase a product or register for an account through one of the links on our site, we may receive compensation.

Fri, 23 Sep 2022 03:36:00 -0500 en text/html https://www.cleveland.com/community/2022/09/berea-school-board-gets-social-emotional-learning-update.html
Killexams : Another position comes open on Escambia County Contractor Competency Board No result found, try new keyword!ESCAMBIA COUNTY, Fla. -- Escambia County commissioners are looking to fill another position on the Contractor Competency Board. They're looking for a Division Two Contractor. It comes as the ... Mon, 10 Oct 2022 07:12:00 -0500 en text/html https://weartv.com/news/local/another-position-comes-open-on-escambia-county-contractor-competency-board Killexams : 'I'm trying': Pensacola contractor Jesse LaCoste speaks during competency board meeting

ESCAMBIA COUNTY, Fla. -- Pensacola contractor Jesse LaCoste, who is accused of taking money for jobs he never started or completed, made an appearance during Monday's Escambia County Contractor Competency Board meeting.

Numerous complaints have been filed to the board regarding LaCoste and his brother-in-law Matthew Banks, with many the board has yet to the review due to the large quantity presented. 

LaCoste and Banks had their contractors licenses revoked in Escambia County last month.

LaCoste says the reason for his presence during Monday's meeting is to speak up for himself, claiming in previous hearings he has not been given a fair chance to do so. 

"We got cases, we haven't even gotten to yet, and every time you're up here it's everybody else's fault," a board member told Lacoste. 

While LaCoste was speaking directly to the board, he was asked whether or not he takes responsibility for claims former clients have made against him.

"I accept responsibility for what I got control over and what I am responsible for," LaCoste said. "When other people made decisions without my knowledge and without my part of it, I have no control over it, I can not and will not accept responsibility for that. I will not be the fallman for it."

The board asked LaCoste about what he did with money accepted for jobs that were not finished. Lacoste declined to give specific answers, claiming he did not have documentation to give specific numeric values. 

LaCoste took aim at the board as well as WEAR News for claiming both parties are "sharing misinformation." During the 3-hour period in the meeting surrounding complaints against LaCoste, he did not provide documented details to back up those claims. 

WEAR News has provided a link, here, where you can watch the meeting in its entirety. 

During the meeting, LaCoste blamed the board as the reason his contractors license was revoked and says he has been blackballed from doing work.

"I'm still standing in front of you, I'm still trying to correct the matter," LaCoste said. "I don't not care as you have eluded. I do. I'm still here. I'm trying."

The board sparred with LaCoste on the merits of several complaints filed against him.

In the end, the cases involving LaCste and and his brother-in-law have been moved for forward to disciplinary hearings.

Tue, 11 Oct 2022 20:51:00 -0500 en-US text/html https://www.msn.com/en-us/money/news/im-trying-pensacola-contractor-jesse-lacoste-speaks-during-competency-board-meeting/ar-AA12QM7m
Killexams : Escambia County fires Contractor Competency Board member over recusals in Matt Banks cases

The Escambia County Commission fired a Contractor Competency Board member after he recused himself in cases dealing with contractors Matt Banks and Jesse LaCoste.

The commission voted 4-1 to remove Larry Downs Jr. from the board that oversees construction contractors working in Escambia County.

Banks and LaCoste have multiple cases pending before the competency board alleging they took payments for home remodeling jobs but never completed the work.

Downs, who owns a plumbing business and has served on the board since 2018, recused himself in the cases, citing the appearance of impropriety as he had done plumbing work as a subcontractor for Banks from 2015 to 2017. Downs said he had also supported youth sports activities Banks was involved in.

Larry Downs Jr., an outspoken citizen advocate against government overreach and overregulation, was voted off Escambia County's Contractor Competency Board for recusing himself from the case of controversial contractor Matt Banks.

Latest on Banks: Contractor Matt Banks faces new $540K restitution bill after nine more client complaints

Restitution fund: Florida has $21M to help victims of contractor scams. Few local victims will benefit.

Board faces scrutiny: Escambia County looking to 'reset' Contractor Competency Board after Matt Banks scandal

Downs said he recused himself from LaCoste's cases after he learned that LaCoste was Banks' brother-in-law.

"The only time that I would do something like this is if I feel like that there could be a perception of impropriety," Downs said. "That's the only reason I would do that. I don't want anybody to feel, 'Well, Larry, he should have recused himself because he's friends or I've done work for him."

Downs had previously said at competency board meetings that he recused himself because he could not be objective in Banks' case.

"(I'm) friends with Matt Banks and Jesse LaCoste is brother-in-law to Matt Banks," Downs wrote on his Sept. 7 recusal form explaining his voting conflict. "I decided to recuse myself for both. Like it or not!"

While the attorney advising the competency board told Downs he was allowed to recuse himself, commissioners did not believe recusal was legitimate.

Florida law allows for recusal for "conflicts of interest" or the "appearance of conflicts of interest." Past opinions from Florida attorneys general that cite the Florida Commission on Ethics rulings have tied conflicts of interest to an official's personal economic interests.

"I was frankly quite surprised that the attorney that was helping assist that volunteer board allowed that to happen, that's No. 1," Commission Chairman Jeff Bergosh said. "But No. 2, it's just not something that should happen. I mean, when you volunteer for the board, you got to make tough votes. When you make tough votes sometimes, you got to vote things against people that you know."

Larry Downs Jr. addresses the Escambia County Commission about reopening Pensacola beaches during a meeting April 28, 2020. On Thursday, the commission voted 4-1 to remove Downs from the board that oversees construction contractors working in Escambia County.

Downs regularly attends local government meetings where he advocates for more Libertarian-based policies and against regulations at all levels of government.

"I've nothing against you personally," Bergosh said. "I disagree with some of the things that you've said about no regulation being lawful under the Constitution. I also disagree with the recusals that you made because, again, I don't think they were appropriate. You didn't have something inuring to your private personal gain. You didn't have a conflict of interest that was really legitimate. I just think it was an easy way to get out of a tough vote."

Downs said in a case similar to the one involving Banks and LaCoste, he made a motion to permanently revoke permitting privileges of a state contractor, which was a much harsher penalty than the other board members were willing to support.

"I'm not completely unregulated," Downs said. "I just think that the government goes too far."

Downs said if there is something that needs to change with the competency board, the County Commission should take action to change the ordinances it operates under.

"The protocol, the due process has been implemented by y'all," Downs said. "The board has to follow it. Even the county attorney or the attorney that's assigned to that board now just said at the last meeting and the meeting before, there's nothing more y'all can do."

Commission Doug Underhill, who was the lone no vote on Downs' removal, said he saw nothing inappropriate with Downs' recusal. Downs and Underhill have publicly clashed before, with Downs even going so far as to repeatedly challenge Underhill to fight him in a boxing match.

License revoked: Santa Rosa revokes license of Pensacola contractor Matt Banks amid fraud allegations

Accusations: Banks Construction is accused of scamming over 100 clients. Is their money gone for good?

"It is interesting to me that we are focused on the one guy who recused himself from the vote and not on the eight votes ... that did not hold Banks accountable at the time that they had the opportunity to," Underhill said.

Commissioner Lumon May said when the County Commission found out about the Banks' cases, it acted aggressively as it could.

"When the situation was brought to my attention personally, we got very aggressive in trying to bring resolution," May said. "And it is, you're right, it is a failure of a system when people who put their life savings to get hoodwinked and taken advantage of, and it's quite frankly sickening to me."

The commission voted Thursday to waive all construction and inspection permit fees or refund previous permit fees for the clients of Banks and LaCoste.

The county also announced Thursday a new way for residents to reach county building officials about contractor issues by calling 850-595-3550 and selecting option 6. The new phone line will connect callers with building services staff during regular business hours.

Commissioner Steven Barry said Underhill's view of the recusal law was wrong and the removal of Downs from the board had nothing to do with his political views or statements at public meetings.

"He was voted on the board, I believe, unanimously after that behavior had been for a number of years," Barry said, referring to Downs' appointment to the board after years of public advocacy for deregulation. "So that is irrelevant, and to paint it any other way is just deflecting what the issue is."

With Downs' removal, there are now two vacancies on the Contractor Competency Board.

Jim Little can be reached at jwlittle@pnj.com and 850-208-9827.

This article originally appeared on Pensacola News Journal: Escambia County Contractor Competency Board member fired over recusals

Sun, 25 Sep 2022 01:12:00 -0500 en-US text/html https://www.yahoo.com/lifestyle/escambia-county-fires-contractor-competency-211408355.html
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