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NCEES-PE Topics - NCEES - PE Civil Engineering Updated: 2024

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Exam Code: NCEES-PE NCEES - PE Civil Engineering Topics January 2024 by Killexams.com team

NCEES-PE NCEES - PE Civil Engineering

The Principles and Practice of Engineering (PE) test tests for a minimum level of competency in a particular engineering discipline. It is designed for engineers who have gained a minimum of four years post-college work experience in their chosen engineering discipline.



The PE Civil test is an 8-hour test with 80 questions. It is administered in pencil-and-paper format twice per year in April and October. See the test schedule for specific dates.



Reviewing the PE test specifications and design standardsReading the reference materials and examinee guideUnderstanding scoring and reportingViewing the most up-to-date PE test pass rates



I. Project Planning

A. Quantity take-off methods

B. Cost estimating

C. Project schedules

D. Activity identification and sequencing

II. Means and Methods

A. Construction loads

B. Construction methods

C. Temporary structures and facilities

III. Soil Mechanics

A. Lateral earth pressure

B. Soil consolidation

C. Effective and total stresses

D. Bearing capacity

E. Foundation settlement

F. Slope stability

Civil Breadth test Specifications Continued

IV. Structural Mechanics

A. Dead and live loads

B. Trusses

C. Bending (e.g., moments and stresses)

D. Shear (e.g., forces and stresses)

E. Axial (e.g., forces and stresses)

F. Combined stresses

G. Deflection

H. Beams

I. Columns

J. Slabs

K. Footings

L. Retaining walls

V. Hydraulics and Hydrology

A. Open-channel flow

B. Stormwater collection and drainage (e.g., culvert, stormwater inlets, gutter flow, street flow, storm sewer pipes)

C. Storm characteristics (e.g., storm frequency, rainfall measurement and distribution)

D. Runoff analysis (e.g., Rational and SCS/NRCS methods, hydrographic application, runoff time of concentration)

E. Detention/retention ponds

F. Pressure conduit (e.g., single pipe, force mains, Hazen-Williams, Darcy-Weisbach, major and minor losses)

G. Energy and/or continuity equation (e.g., Bernoulli)

VI. Geometrics

A. Basic circular curve elements (e.g., middle ordinate, length, chord, radius)

B. Basic vertical curve elements

C. Traffic volume (e.g., vehicle mix, flow, and speed)

VII. Materials

A. Soil classification and boring log interpretation

B. Soil properties (e.g., strength, permeability, compressibility, phase relationships)

C. Concrete (e.g., nonreinforced, reinforced)

D. Structural steel

E. Material test methods and specification conformance

F. Compaction

VIII. Site Development

A. Excavation and embankment (e.g., cut and fill)

B. Construction site layout and control

C. Temporary and permanent soil erosion and sediment control (e.g., construction erosion control and permits, sediment transport, channel/outlet protection)

D. Impact of construction on adjacent facilities

E. Safety (e.g., construction, roadside, work zone)

CIVIL–CONSTRUCTION DEPTH test Specifications

I. Earthwork Construction and Layout

A. Excavation and embankment (e.g., cut and fill)

B. Borrow pit volumes

C. Site layout and control

D. Earthwork mass diagrams and haul distance

E. Site and subsurface investigations

II. Estimating Quantities and Costs

A. Quantity take-off methods

B. Cost estimating

C. Cost analysis for resource selection

D. Work measurement and productivity

III. Construction Operations and Methods

A. Lifting and rigging

B. Crane stability

C. Dewatering and pumping

D. Equipment operations (e.g., selection, production, economics)

E. Deep foundation installation

IV. Scheduling

A. Construction sequencing

B. Activity time analysis

C. Critical path method (CPM) network analysis

D. Resource scheduling and leveling

E. Time-cost trade-off

V. Material Quality Control and Production

A. Material properties and testing (e.g., soils, concrete, asphalt)

B. Weld and bolt installation

C. Quality control process (QA/QC)

D. Concrete proportioning and placement

E. Concrete maturity and early strength evaluation

VI. Temporary Structures

A. Construction loads, codes, and standards

B. Formwork

C. Falsework and scaffolding

D. Shoring and reshoring

E. Bracing and anchorage for stability

F. Temporary support of excavation

VII. Health and Safety

A. OSHA regulations and hazard identification/abatement

B. Safety management and statistics

C. Work zone and public safety
NCEES - PE Civil Engineering
NCEES Engineering Topics

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Question: 35
Which of the following assumptions regarding the compression strength of
concrete used in reinforced concrete beam design is valid?
A. The American Concrete Institute (ACI) recommends that all beams be
designed using high strength concrete
B. High strength concrete compression strengths range from 3,000 to 7,000
pounds per square inch
C. Compression strength of normal concrete ranges from 3,000 to 7,000 pounds
per square inch
D. None of the above
Answer: C
The assumption “compression strength of normal concrete ranges from 3,000 to
7,000 pounds per square inch” for the concrete used in reinforced concrete beam
design is valid. ACI does not recommend that high strength concrete be used in
the design of all beams. The compression strength of high strength concrete
ranges from 7,000 - 15,000 pounds per square inch.
Question: 36
What is the velocity (in ft/sec) in a rectangular concrete channel with a width of 3
feet (ft), a hydraulic grade line slope of 0.002 ft/ft, a flow depth of 1.5 ft and an
assumed Manning's coefficient n = 0.014?
A. 0.15 ft/sec
B. 1.50 ft/sec
C. 3.92 ft/sec
D. None of the above
Answer: C
the velocity in a rectangular channel with the given dimensions is 3.92 ft/sec.
Solution: Use Manning's Equation and solve for V V = (K/n) R2/3 Sf1/2 Where:
K = conversion coefficient (1.486 for English units, 1.0 for SI) n = 0.014, the
Manning coefficient d = depth of flow = 1.5 ft w = width of channel = 3.0 ft Sf=
channel slope = 0.002 ft/ft A = Area = d x w = 1.5 ft x 3 ft = 4.5 ft2 P = wetted
perimeter = w + 2d = 3 ft + 3 ft = 6 ft R = hydraulic radius = A/P = (4.5 ft2)/ (6 ft)
= 0.75 ft V = (1.486/0.014) x (0.75 ft)2/3 x (0.002 ft/ft)1/2 = 3.92 ft/sec
Question: 37
The hydraulic radius of a sewer refers to which of the following?
A. The diameter
B. Channel perimeter
C. One-half the diameter
D. The ratio of the cross-sectional area of flow to the wetted perimeter
Answer: D
The hydraulic radius of a sewer refers to the ratio of the cross-sectional area of
flow to the wetted perimeter. (The wetted perimeter is the portion of a cross-
section’s perimeter that is “wet.”) The equation that describes the hydraulic radius
of a channel, Rh, is expressed as follows: Rh = A/P = cross sectional area of flow
/ wetted perimeter
Question: 38
For most proposed land development projects, pre- and post-development
watershed drainage patterns are typically evaluated to determine if substantial
hydrologic alterations are proposed that will result in which of the following?
A. Changes to groundwater recharge
B. Changes to water regime within a given resource area
C. Increase runoff from the area
D. All of the above
Answer: D
For most proposed land development projects, pre- and post-development
watershed drainage patterns are compared to determine if substantial hydrologic
alterations will be made to the watershed’s groundwater recharge, water regime,
and area runoff. The drainage patterns reviewed include the surface and
subsurface paths of water entering, crossing, and leaving the site. Additionally,
areas where water is stored within the project site are also evaluated for pre- and
post-construction conditions.
Question: 39
Euler’s Formula is used to determine which of the following properties related to
a simply-supported column?
A. Maximum bending moment
B. Critical buckling load
C. Shear stress
D. None of the above
Answer: B
Euler’s Formula is used to determine the critical buckling load of a simply-
supported column. Euler’s Formula is expressed as follows: Fcr = [(E x I)(p2)]/L2
Where: - E = Young’s modulus of the material used to construct the column - I =
cross-sectional area moment of inertia - L = column length
Question: 40
What is the composite C value for the following drainage area for a 10-year storm
recurrence interval?Drainage area: 0.25 acres of residential lots with 40%
imperviousness (C = 0.49) 0.25 acres of lawn with 0.95% slope with 0%
imperviousness (C = 0.22) 0.10 acres of impervious pavement (C = 0.95)
A. 0.20
B. 0.45
C. 0.55
D. Not enough information provided
Answer: B
The composite C value for the given drainage area for a 10-year storm recurrence
interval is 0.45. Solution: Calculate composite C by using the following equation:
C = (C1A1 + C2A2 + C3A3) / (A1 + A2 + A3) C = [(0.25 acres x 0.49) + (0.25
acres x 0.22) + (0.10 acres x 0.95)]/ (0.25+0.25+0.10) C = 0.45
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NCEES Engineering Topics - BingNews https://killexams.com/pass4sure/exam-detail/NCEES-PE Search results NCEES Engineering Topics - BingNews https://killexams.com/pass4sure/exam-detail/NCEES-PE https://killexams.com/exam_list/NCEES Civil Engineer License test Update Focuses on Specializations Civil Engineer License test Update Focuses on Specializations | Engineering News-Record Wed, 27 Dec 2023 07:34:00 -0600 en text/html https://www.enr.com/articles/57928-civil-engineer-license-exam-update-focuses-on-specializations Civil & Environmental Engineering Course Listing Introduction to Engineering for Civil and Environmental (Formerly 25.107/14.107)

Description

This course provides an introduction to the elements of computer aided design using AutoCAD. Through assignments and projects, students learn various AutoCAD principles, i.e., graphic entities, hatch patterns, layering, and dimensioning, with special emphasis on completing a design project. Two-dimensional drafting and three-dimensional modeling and surface revolution are also discussed. This course is intended for freshmen in civil and environmental engineering majors.

Surveying I (Formerly 14.225)

Description

A presentation of the basic instruments used in survey processes including distance, angle and level measurements. Analysis and adjustment of random errors. Principles of closed and open traverses. Fieldwork practice in instrument use and office-type projects in contour mapping and the application of contoured topography to highway and water-control projects.

Prerequisites

MATH 1320 Calc II or Co-Req MATH 1320 Calc II or Pre-Req MATH 1420 Honors Cal II or Co-Req MATH 1420 Honors Calc II or Pre-Req Calc ABC, and Co-Req CIVE 2860 Prob and Stats for Engineers or Pre-Req CIVE 2860 or Pre or Co-req Math.2830.

Geomatics (Formerly 14.226)

Description

Principles and practice of route surveys and designs. Topics include simple and compound circular curves, intersections of straight and curved baselines, vertical alignment principles including parabolic easement curves, earthwork operations and determination of volumes. Includes office-type projects illustrative of the application of surveying information to Civil Engineering projects such as water resources, sanitary sewers and property subdivision. Fieldwork instruction in basic traverse surveys, gathering of topographic information, and the staking-out of buildings and circular curves.

Prerequisites

Pre-Req: CIVE.2250 Surveying I.

Probability and Statistics for Engineers (Formerly 14.286)

Description

Probability, statistics, reliability and decision with applications in engineering. Probability of events, discrete and continuous random variables, probability density functions and distributions, estimation, regression and correlation techniques, risk and reliability concepts.

Prerequisites

Pre-Req or Co-Req: MATH 1320 Calculus II.

Fluid Mechanics (Formerly 14.301)

Description

Fluid properties, fluid statics, fluid dynamics including continuity, impulse-momentum and energy equations. Pipe flow, turbomachinery, similitude and modeling, laminar and turbulent flow, boundary layer and closed conduct design.

Prerequisites

Pre-req: MATH 2310 Calculus III, ENGN 2070 Dynamics, MATH 2340 Differential Equations, or MATH.2360 Eng.Differential Equations.

Engineering Materials (Formerly 14.310)

Description

A treatment of the properties of engineering materials that influence the design, construction and maintenance of Civil Engineering works. Included are such materials as ferrous and non-ferrous metals, timber, asphalt, and cementitious materials. Supplemented by laboratory testing of various engineering materials.

Prerequisites

Pre-Reqs: CHEM 1220 Chemistry II or CHEM 1360 Honors Chemistry II and ENGN 2060 Strength of Materials.

Engineering Materials Laboratory (Formerly 14.311)

Description

Experiments and written reports. Testing and measurement techniques and material standards illustrating behavior of materials, including metals, wood, and Portland cement concrete.

Prerequisites

Pre-req: ENGN.2060 Strength of Materials.

Soil Mechanics (Formerly 14.330)

Description

Development of the fundamental principles of soil mechanics as utilized in soil and foundation engineering. Topics include: classification, index properties, strength and stress-strain behavior, effective stress principle, permeability, flow and consolidation. Introduction to basic soil mechanics laboratory practice.

Prerequisites

Pre and Co-requisites: CIVE.3100 (pre-requisite), CIVE.3330 (co-requisite), and CIVE.3010 or MECH.3810 or CHEN.3030 (co-requisite)

Environmental Engineering Laboratory (Formerly 14.332)

Description

Laboratory experiments to illustrate analysis of environmental samples and experimental techniques, normally used in support of water and wastewater treatment facilities. Course emphasizes data acquisition and analysis, and engineering report writing.

Prerequisites

Co-Req: CIVE.3620 Environmental Engineering.

Geotechnical Laboratory (Formerly 14.333)

Description

Laboratory experience that illustrates soil mechanics and fluid flow theory. Experiments are conducted in the soils and hydraulics laboratories. Course emphasizes data acquisition and analysis and writing engineering reports.

Prerequisites

Co-Req: 14.330 Soil Mechanics.

Transportation Engineering (Formerly 14.340)

Description

Development of the basic principles pertaining to the movement of people and goods by modern transportation systems. Techno-economic characteristics of the various transportation modes. Aspects of planning, design and operation of land, air and water transportation facilities. Development, structure and function of the U.S. transportation system.

Prerequisites

Pre-req: MATH.1320 Calculus II, and Pre-req or Co-req: CIVE.2860 Prob & Stats for Engineers, or MATH.2830 Intro to Stats or MATH.3860 Prob & Stats I.

Transportation Engineering Laboratory (Formerly 14.341)

Description

Practice techniques of data collection, analysis and presentation that are commonly used in the planning, design and operation of transportation facilities with primary emphasis on highway systems.

Structural Analysis I (Formerly 14.350)

Description

Principles of structural analysis applied to typical civil engineering structures as the initial step in the total design concept. Emphasis on he classical methods of analysis of statically determinate and indeterminate structures. The personal computer as an analytical tool.

Prerequisites

Pre-Req: ENGN.2060 Strength of Materials.

Reinforced Concrete (Formerly 14.352)

Description

Ultimate strength and elastic behavior of reinforced concrete structural members, continuity in building frames, deflections, shear reinforcement, development length and bar cutoffs, columns and footings.

Prerequisites

Pre-Req: CIVE 3100 Engineering Materials and CIVE 3500 Structural Analysis l.

Environmental Engineering (Formerly 14.362)

Description

Physical, chemical and biological principles of the treatment of water and wastewater are considered along with their application to treatment systems. The system components of wastewater and water treatment plants are studied to provide a basic design capability. Hazardous waste site remediation is also discussed."

Prerequisites

Pre-req: CHEM.1220 Chemistry II, and CHEM.1240L Chemistry II Lab, and Co-req: CIVE.3320 Environmental Engineering Lab, and ENGN.2070 Dynamics.

Civil Engineering Systems (Formerly 14.372)

Description

Introduction to methods of operations research, management science and economic analysis used in the design, planning and managing of engineering systems. Main Topics covered: systems modeling, optimization concepts, network analysis, mathematical programming, critical path analysis, decision analysis, economic consideration.

Prerequisites

Pre-Req: MATH 1320 Calculus II and MATH 2310 Calculus III or Co-Req: MATH 2310 Calculus III, pre-req CIVE 2860.

Foundation and Soil Engineering (Formerly 14.431)

Description

The application of soil mechanics to the design and analysis of foundations and soil structures. Topics include: soil origin and deposition, subsurface exploration, bearing capacity and settlement analyses, design of shallow foundations, earth pressures, retaining structures, and slope stability.

Prerequisites

Pre-req: CIVE.3300 Soil Mechanics.

Steel Design (Formerly 14.452)

Description

An introduction to structural steel design with emphasis on use and interpretation of the AISC Manual and LRFD Specifications. Subjects include design of tension, compression, beams, and beam-column members, plus bolted and welded connections. Other Topics may include composite beams, plate girders, building connections and plastic analysis and design.

Prerequisites

Pre-Req: CIVE.3500 Structural Analysis l.

Water Resources Engineering (Formerly 14.460)

Description

This course is a continuation and extension of Fluid Mechanics, with a focus on engineering applications of hydraulic and hydrologic engineering. This course covers fundamental concepts of open-channel flow, hydraulic structures, design of open channels, surface-water hydrology, and groundwater hydrology.

Prerequisites

Pre-req: CIVE.3010 Fluid Mechanics, or CHEN.3030 Fluid Mechanics, or MECH.3810 Fluid Mechanics.

Introduction to LEED (Formerly 14.466)

Description

This course examines the principles of sustainability and how they are applied to engineering and the built environment. Areas covered include energy, water, materials, transportation, and green building principles. Issues of evaluation of sustainability, including life cycle analysis and rating systems, are also discussed. This course fulfills the educational requirements for eligibility to take the LEED (Leadership in Energy and Environmental Design) Green Associate exam.

Engineering Economics (Formerly 14.470)

Description

Presentation of mathematical principles of economic analysis, with emphasis on defining alternatives and predicting consequences of proposed investments. Emphasis is placed on the economic, social and environmental impacts of proposed Civil Engineering projects. The attractiveness of investments is judged by present worth, annual worth, rate of return, and benefit-cost ratio techniques. Sensitivity analysis, depreciation and tax impacts in economic studies are also discussed.

Construction Management I (Formerly 14.475)

Description

Development of management skills and techniques to plan, schedule, supervise, and control construction projects. Project estimating; labor costs and productivity; construction plans, specifications and contracts; labor relations; time, cost and quality control; construction equipment and project decision making and financing.

Prerequisites

Pre-req or Co-req: CIVE.3720 Civil Engineering Systems.

Special Topics in Civil Engineering (Formerly 14.480)

Description

Contemporary Topics in selected areas of study within civil engineering. Course content is chosen by the instructor to meet the interests of the students.

Special Topics (Formerly 14.481)

Description

Contemporary Topics in selected areas of study within civil engineering. Course content is chosen by the instructor to meet the interests of the students.

Spec Topics: Civil Engineering (Formerly 14.483)

Description

Contemporary Topics in selected areas of study within civil engineering. Course content is chosen by the instructor to meet the interests of the students.

Capstone Design (Formerly 14.485)

Description

Introduction to the essentials of engineering design and a forum for practicing the design process. Integrates many elements of the curriculum through a comprehensive design project to professional standards. Projects includes the use of open-ended problems, feasibility analysis, complete design process, consideration of alternative solutions, and cost estimation. Students practice team effort, development of a system perspective, communication skills, reporting, and presentations.

Prerequisites

Pre-Req: Senior Status.

Industrial Experience I (Formerly 14.491)

Description

The new Cooperative Education program for undergraduates combines academic studies with work experience in appropriate positions in the public or private sectors. It permits students to participate in the flexible schedule of study and work that is related to their academic fields of study and to receive academic credit for the work experience. Requires 500 hours of cooperative education engineering experiences, on a full-time or part-time basis, during any academic semester or summer. All co-op work must be pre-approved by the Co-op Coordinator. (Effective with Class of 2001-02, students in CEE are able to earn three credits after the successful completion of both Industrial Experience I and II). "Variable credit course, student chooses appropriate amount of credits when registering."

Prerequisites

Junior level and 2.0 GPA or higher.

Industrial Experience II (Formerly 14.492)

Description

The new Cooperative Education program for undergraduates combines academic studies with work experience in appropriate positions in the public or private sectors. It permits students to participate in the flexible schedule of study and work that is related to their academic fields of study and to receive academic credit for the work experience. Requires 500 hours of cooperative education engineering experiences, on a full-time or part-time basis, during any academic semester or summer. All co-op work must be pre-approved by the Co-op Coordinator. (Effective with Class of 2001-02, students in CEE are able to earn three credits after the successful completion of both Industrial Experience I and II).

Prerequisites

Pre-req or Co-req: CIVE.4910 Industrial Experience I, and Junior level and 2.0 GPA or higher.

Industrial Experience III (Formerly 14.493)

Description

There is currently no description available for this course.

Environmental Engineering Chemistry

Description

Overview of fundamental chemistry related to the source, fate and reactivity of compounds in the atmosphere, hydrosphere, and lithosphere. Topics include reaction kinetics, chemical equilibrium, redox reactions, chemical thermodynamics, carbonate systems, environmental fate of chemicals in natural and polluted environments, anthropogenic and natural pollution.

Prerequisites

Pre-Req: CHEM.1220 Chemistry II OR equivalent course.

Fluid Mechanics Laboratory

Description

Laboratory and field experiments on fluid mechanics including measurement of fluid properties, analysis of fluid flow patterns and fluid flow in closed conduits, and flow measurements. Course emphasizes data acquisition and analysis, and report writing.

Prerequisites

Pre-req: MATH.2310 Calculus III, and ENGN.2070 Dynamics, and MATH.2360/2340 Differential Equations, and Co-req: CIVE.3010 Fluid Mechanics.

Material Science for Environmental Engineering

Description

A treatment of the properties of engineering materials that influence the design, construction and maintenance of Civil Engineering works. Included are such materials as ferrous and non-ferrous metals.

Prerequisites

Pre-req: CHEM.1220 Chemistry II, or CHEM.1360 Honors Chemistry II, and ENGN.2070 Dynamics.

Environmental Engineering II

Description

This course emphasizes the ecology and physical-chemical processes used in water and wastewater treatment. Topics covered include Streeter-Phelps model, coagulation, flocculation, water softening, precipitation, filtration, activated carbon adsorption, and disinfection.

Prerequisites

Pre-req: CIVE.3620 Environmental Engineering I, and ENVE.2010 Environmental Engineering Chemistry.

Energy and the Sustainable Environment

Description

Thermodynamic laws, energy balance, conservation of energy, heat transfer, energy conversion and efficiency, ideal and non-ideal gas and gas mixtures, design and evaluation of renewable energy systems.

Prerequisites

Pre-req: PHYS.1410 Physics I, and CHEM.1220 Chemistry II, and MATH.1320 Calculus II.

Groundwater Hydrogeology and Remediation

Description

Groundwater flow and aquifer behavior in response to pumping will be addressed. Analysis of contaminant transport and the formation of multi-dimensional contaminant plume formation will be conducted. Physical, chemical and biological based technologies for contaminated aquifer remediation are covered.

Prerequisites

Pre-req: BIOL.2100 Biology for Engineers, and CIVE.3010 Fluid Mechanics, and CIVE.3620 Environmental Engineering I.

Biological Processes in Environmental Engineering

Description

This course focuses on the fundamental aspects of biological processes that are commonly used in water and wastewater treatment. Topics covered include: the mechanisms and kinetics of biological reactions, mass balances of biological reactors, biological reactor design and diagnosis, and aeration and gas transfer.

Prerequisites

Pre-req: CIVE.3620 Environmental Engineering I, and BIOL.2100 Biology for Engineers.

Chemical Fate and Transport in the Environment

Description

The properties of organic chemicals and equilibrium chemistry controlling the distribution of these chemicals between air, water and soil will be studied. Transport processes and the lifetime of chemicals in the environment will be investigated. Risk assessment for the exposure to chemical contaminants will be addressed.

Prerequisites

Pre-req: ENVE.3650 Groundwater Hydrogeology and Remediation.

Air Quality

Description

Review of gaseous pollutants, their chemistry and properties. Emissions of air pollutants (mass balances) and atmospheric sciences related to air pollution. Gas and particulate handling and treatment technologies are addressed.

Prerequisites

Pre-req:CIVE.3010 Fluid Mechanics, and CIVE.3620 Environmental Engineering I.

Environmental Eng. Ethics and Professional Practice

Description

This course introduces students to the American Society of Civil Engineers (ASCE) code of ethics and standards of practice for environmental professionals. Topics include codes of ethics, agreements and contracts, ethical and legal considerations, professional liability, public protection issues, environmental regulations, and environmental sustainability considerations. It prepares students to think critically while working with complex environmental issues.

Prerequisites

Pre-req: CIVE.3620 Environmental Engineering I.

Solid Waste Engineering and Management

Description

Generation, storage, collection, transfer and transport, processing and disposal of municipal solid wastes; treatment and disposal of water and wastewater treatment sludge; landfill design; alternative waste management and disposal strategies.

Prerequisites

Pre-req: ENVE.3630 Environmental Engineering II, and ENVE,3660 Biological Processes in Environmental Engineering, and CIVE.3720 Civil Engineering Systems.

Capstone Design

Description

Introduction to the essentials of engineering design and a forum for practicing the design process. Integrates many elements of the curriculum through a comprehensive design project to professional standards. Project includes the use of open-ended design problems, feasibility and impact analysis, complete design process, consideration of alternative solutions, and cost estimation and scheduling. Students practice team effort, development of a system perspective, communication skills, reporting, and presentations. The course is fast paced and covers new design elements in each module.

Prerequisites

Pre-Req: Senior Status.

Fri, 04 Aug 2023 07:38:00 -0500 en text/html https://www.uml.edu/Catalog/Undergraduate/Engineering/Departments/Civil-Environmental/Course-listing.aspx
Professional Engineering Exam

As a licensed Professional Engineer, or PE, you can expect many more benefits when compared to other engineers; most employers offer higher salaries and greater opportunities for advancement to PE's. Only PE's can consult in private practice, and seal company documents to be sent to the government. PEs also have more credibility as expert witnesses in court than most engineers.

Steps in obtaining a PE license:

  • Pass the Fundamentals of Engineering (FE) Exam.
  • Graduate with a bachelor's degree from an ABET accredited engineering curriculum (all Engineering curricula at Michigan Tech except Robotics Engineering).
  • Gain four years of engineering experience under the supervision of a registered professional engineer.
  • Pass the Principles and Practice of Engineering (PE) Exam.

During your senior year you should take the Fundamentals of Engineering (FE) exam, which is required prior to sitting for the Professional Engineers (PE) Exam. Some requirements vary by state.

Sun, 04 Sep 2011 15:27:00 -0500 en text/html https://www.mtu.edu/engineering/undergraduate/professional/
Program History
1979: First Engineering class offered

Engineering courses have been offered at Hope College since 1979. Initial offerings were instituted by the Department of Physics in response to academic interests of students who were majoring in physics but whose career goals were in engineering. At that time, two faculty members, with interests and training in engineering, began offering a limited number of courses in basic mechanical and electrical engineering topics. During the decade of the 1980s, these courses included Solid Mechanics, Electronics, Thermodynamics, Fluid Mechanics, Material Science and Vibrations. This curriculum was designed and intended to prepare students for graduate study in engineering.

Another option for engineering students was the Hope College Engineering 3-2 Program, in which students combined three years of study at Hope College with two years at a traditional engineering school. Upon successful completion of this program, students received a Bachelor of Science degree from Hope College and a Bachelor of Engineering degree from the engineering school.

1989: A major in Engineering Physics offered

During the mid to late 1980s, the Department of Physics recognized that the current engineering offerings were not providing enough depth of coverage to ensure student success in graduate engineering studies. For this reason, a Bachelor of Science degree with a major in Engineering Physics was established in 1989. The objective of this degree program was to Excellerate the preparation of physics students for continuing on in engineering graduate school. In order to meet the requirements of this new major, the curriculum was modified to offer engineering courses on an alternate year basis. This arrangement allowed efficient use of the existing engineering faculty to provide students with a course pattern which more closely resembled that of a traditional four-year engineering school.

As a result of these improvements to the engineering curriculum, the popularity of the 3-2 Program diminished as a majority of engineering students decided to remain at Hope College for four years to pursue a major in Engineering Physics. Most of these students continued their studies in engineering graduate school, although a fair number of students began pursuing employment in industry directly from Hope College.

1992: Lab courses were added to better prepare students for engineering graduate school
In order to provide the students with an introductory engineering laboratory experience in strength of materials, mechanical testing laboratory equipment was purchased. A laboratory component to the solid mechanics and materials courses was added in 1992.
1994:  Number of engineering faculty doubled to four

In 1994, the engineering faculty increased to four members through the addition of two new hires. This growth was partially supported by a grant from the Fund for the Improvement of Post-Secondary Education (FIPSE, administered by the Department of Education), which was granted to the college to develop a model for engineering programs at liberal arts colleges. The educational objectives of this expansion were to implement a capstone engineering design experience, provide core engineering classes on an every-year basis, and to increase the number of engineering Topics courses offered. These objectives were successfully achieved with the implementation of several changes, including:

  • The development of a two-course capstone sequence in engineering design (ENGS 451, 452)
  • The switch of core engineering classes (ENGS 345, 346) from alternate year to every year basis
  • The development of a freshmen engineering course (ENGS 100)
  • The offering of Topics courses in engineering (Finite Element Analysis, Multi-body Dynamics, Advanced CAD/CAE)
1994-1997: External reviewers encouraged pursuit of accredited program 

From 1994 to 1997, as part of the FIPSE-sponsored study of the Engineering Program, a number of external reviewers from both small and large engineering colleges served as external advisors to the Engineering Program. Reviewers completed campus visits in order to assess the Engineering Program. Based partly on the largely positive reviews of the Engineering Program, the department requested permission from the administration of Hope College to pursue an accredited engineering degree. The motivation for pursuing accreditation was to further Excellerate the quality of engineering education at Hope College by formally implementing a system of continuous improvement via both internal and external review and assessment.

The Administration of Hope College approved the pursuit of an accredited engineering program in 1997, and the department established a new degree designation: the Bachelor of Science with a Major in Engineering. This new engineering major was designed and intended to fulfill the degree requirements as specified by the ABET 2000 criteria.

It was decided to retain the less rigorous engineering degree (which is not accredited and for which no accreditation is sought) the Bachelor of Science with a major in Engineering Science. This degree provides engineering education for students who have other interests, such as a second major in another degree program, that preclude their ability to complete the engineering major requirements within their time at Hope College.

Also in 1997, a fifth engineering faculty member was hired to continue building ties with local industry, to increase offerings in engineering Topics courses (heat transfer and a thermofluids laboratory) and to provide necessary support for implementing assessment and outcomes instruments as required by ABET 2000 criteria. In 1998, the Hope College Curriculum Committee officially approved the new engineering major, and the Department of Physics changed its name to the Department of Physics and Engineering.

2000: Hope Engineering degree received ABET accredidation
The engineering program completed and submitted a self-study and underwent an accreditation visit and review during the fall 1999 semester. In 2000, the Bachelor of Science with a major in Engineering was accredited by the Engineering Commission of ABET (111 Market Place, Suite 1050, Baltimore, MD 21202-4012; telephone: (410) 347-7700).
Mid-2000s:  Additional faculty added and Engineering department separated from Physics
As more faculty were hired and a wider ranger of courses were offered, the engineering department started to work toward forming their own department.  In 2006, engineering and physics offically split, with Dr. John Krupczak serving as the first chair of the Department of Engineering. This added visibility likely contributed to the steady rise in majors over the next several years.
2016: Largest senior class ever  
In the fall of 2012, Hope College enrolled its largest ever freshmen class, which corresponded to a large increase in the number of engineering majors. The growth of interest in engineering allowed the department to increase the number of faculty, and to offer more concentrations to deliver students more career choices.
Fri, 16 Jun 2017 03:22:00 -0500 en text/html https://hope.edu/academics/engineering/program-history.html
Environmental Resources Engineering, Department of

Developing engineering skills today for a more sustainable tomorrow.

ESF Home > Environmental Resources Engineering

Our departmental mission is to engage in teaching, research, and service to advance environmental resources engineering practices and meet the needs of the world. Our faculty strengths are in ecological engineering, geospatial engineering, water resources engineering, and the broader field of environmental resources engineering.

Teaching includes innovative class, lab, and field exercises in foundational and advanced engineering topics, where our flexible curriculum allows students to focus on traditional or novel engineering practices. Students receive a well-balanced education, including courses that consider the social, economic, and environmental impacts of engineering practice, fundamental engineering and environmental engineering courses, and specialized courses that capture the breadth of their field of study.

The ERE department is internationally recognized for coupling research and service, and many of our courses address community needs. We provide unparalleled mentoring to train students in engineering science and design so they can join our alumni as leaders in professional practice and research.

Explore ERE's Mission Statement, Educational Objectives, and Student Outcomes

Undergraduate Degree Program

Environmental Resources Engineering

Preparing qualified engineers to operate with professional competence.

Learn More
Students working in the field

Student Clubs and Organizations

ERE Club

This club familiarizes members with current developments and events in the field of environmental resource engineering. There is an emphasis on professional development and enhancing student-student and student-faculty relationships among those in the ERE curriculum.

Engineering for a Sustainable Society

Engineering for a Sustainable Society (ESS) is a student-initiated university chapter of the national organization. This organization is devoted to implementing low-tech, high-impact, engineering projects as a means of improving the quality of life and environment all over the world.

Engineers Without Borders

The ERE Department maintains a student chapter with the national Engineers without Borders organization, organized by the ESS officers. The ESF EWB club has been coordinating international projects since 2003 and is active with the local professional EWB chapter.

NY Water Environment Association

The New York Water Environment Association Student Chapter engages students in the water resources profession, with an emphasis on water supply and wastewater systems. The student chapter participates in service activities, professional meetings, seminars and conferences to promote sustainable water quality management in order to create an environmentally sound future.

More ESF Clubs and Organizations

Thu, 13 Aug 2020 09:37:00 -0500 en text/html https://www.esf.edu/ere/index.php Engineering The Less Boring Way

We have to admire a YouTube channel with the name [Less Boring Lectures]. After all, he isn’t promising they won’t be boring, just less boring. Actually though, we found quite a few of the videos pretty interesting and not boring at all. The channel features videos about mechanical engineering and related subjects like statics and math. While your typical electronics project doesn’t always need that kind of knowledge, some of them do and the mental exercise is good for you regardless. A case in point: spend seven minutes and learn about 2D and 3D vectors in two short videos (see below). Or spend 11 minutes and do the whole vector video in one gulp.

These reminded us of Kahn Academy videos, although the Topics are pretty hardcore. For example, if you want to know about axial loading, shear strain, or free body diagrams, this is a good place to look.

There are a lot of things we tend to just guess at when doing projects, like what kind of bolts to use to hold things together. Usually, we overdesign and use our experience, but if you really want to optimize what you are doing or you need to be absolutely sure, there are Topics on bolt tension and failure theories.

There are also good videos about gears and bearings and other traditional mechanical engineering topics. Will you get as much out of these videos as you would taking some engineering classes at the local university? Maybe not. But you might remember about the same amount of things in six months. Funny how that works.

We find we’ve been much more interested in mechanics since we’ve been 3D printing. Some of that is because we want to design better models, but sometimes we are more interested in the machine itself.

Fri, 09 Apr 2021 15:35:00 -0500 Al Williams en-US text/html https://hackaday.com/2021/04/09/engineering-the-less-boring-way/
FE Review Sessions

FE Exam

Prepare for the Fundamentals of Engineering (FE) exam, taken in your fourth year. The FE test is generally the first step in the process to becoming a professional licensed engineer (PE).

The FE test is administered by NCEES, the National Council of Examiners for Engineering and Surveying.

It is designed for latest graduates and students who are close to finishing an undergraduate engineering degree from an EAC/ABET-accredited program. The FE test is a computer-based test administered year-round at NCEES-approved Pearson VUE test centers.

Review Session Videos

Michigan Tech offers lecture review sessions on civil and environmental engineering topics.

Hydrogeology/Water Resources Review Notes

Download Review Notes

NRCS (SCS) Rainfall-Runoff

Equations

  • runoff
  • maximum basin retention
  • curve number

Variables

  • precipitation
  • maximum basin retention
  • runoff
  • curve number

Rational Formula

Equations

Variables

  • watershed area
  • runoff coefficient
  • rainfall intensity
  • peak discharge

Darcy’s Law

Equations

  • discharge rate
  • specific discharge
  • average seepage velocity

Variables

  • discharge rate
  • hydraulic conductivity
  • hydraulic head
  • cross-sectional area of flow
  • specific discharge (also called Darcy velocity or superficial velocity)
  • average seepage velocity
  • effective porosity

Definitions

  • Unit hydrograph
  • Transmissivity
  • Storativity or storage coefficient of an aquifer

Well Drawdown

Illustration

  • Unconfined aquifer on an impermeable layer

Dupuit’s Formula

Equations

  • flow rate of water drawn from well

Variables

  • flow rate of water drawn from well
  • coefficient of permeability of soil
  • height of water surface above bottom of aquifer at perimeter of well
  • height h of water surface above bottom of aquifer as a distance r from well centerline
  • radius to well at perimeter of well, ie, radius of well
  • r which is the radius to water surface whose height is h above the bottom of the aquifer
  • specific capacity
  • well drawdown

Illustration

  • Confined aquifer on an impermeable layer

Equations

  • flow rate of water drawn from well
  • transmissivity

Variables

  • flow rate of water drawn from well
  • transmissivity
  • thickness of confined aquifer
  • heights of piezometric surface above bottom of aquifer
  • radii from pumping well

Groundwater Flow

  • Flows in pores and fractures of aquifers
  • Flow is induced by hydraulic gradients
  • Flow is in direction of decreasing head
  • Flow velocity is proportional to the hydraulic gradient

Equations

  • head
  • hydraulic gradient
  • groundwater flow
  • hydraulic conductivity

Variables

  • groundwater flow
  • area perpendicular to flow
  • specific discharge
  • Darcy velocity
  • hydraulic conductivity
  • intrinsic permeability (properties of the geologic formation)
  • fluid properties
  • mass density of the fluid
  • gravitational acceleration
  • dynamic viscosity of the fluid
  • length
  • time
  • mass

Notes

  • Limitation: applies for laminar flow
  • The negative sign is because flow is in the direction of decreasing head (ie, a negative hydraulic gradient)

Intrinsic Permeability

Most important properties affecting the magnitude of intrinsic permeability include:

  1. Sizes and numbers of pores
  2. Pore shape and “connectedness” (packing)
  3. Surface texture

Intrinsic permeability is proportional to the square of the grain diameter. A table is given for the median size of fine, medium, and course sand to show the difference by orders of magnitude in the intrinsic permeability.

Seepage Velocity

Darcy velocity or specific discharge (ie, flow rate per total area) is used for water supply (volume).

Average pore or seepage velocity, which reflects the average velocity of groundwater in pore spaces, is of interest for contaminant transport and geotechnical problems.

Aquifers

Aquifers are geological formations that are saturated with water.

Equations

  • degree of saturation
  • porosity

Variables

  • degree of saturation
  • volume of water
  • volume of voids
  • porosity
  • total (bulk) volume

Notes

  • Volumetric water content will equal porosity when the degree of saturation is 100% (saturated).
  • Groundwater flow occurs in pores and fractures
    • Unconsolidated systems are composed of broken rock pieces, and pores are the spaces between the grains/pieces.
    • Consolidated systems are whole rock formations, and pores can exist among the cemented grains that form rocks or as fractures/cracks that subsequently occur as a result of tectonics and/or weathering.
    • Unconsolidated formates are usually more porous and more permeable. Darcy’s Law often applies.
    • Flows in many consolidated formations occur primarily in fractures/conduits. Darcy’s Law often does NOT apply.

Well Hydraulics (Ideal)

Equations

  • governing equation for groundwater flow for a confined aquifer
  • groundwater flow under steady state conditions

Variables

  • governing equation for groundwater flow for a confined aquifer
  • distance from the center of the pumping well
  • aquifer thickness
  • aquifer compressibility
  • fluid (water) compressibility

Aquifer Behavior

Unconfined aquifers have a “free” water surface or groundwater table, which is at atmospheric pressure and below which the pressures are normally hydrostatic.

Confined aquifers are overpressured, and the potentiometric surface is above the top of the aquifer. The top of the aquifer is a confining unit (aquitard or aquiclude).

Illustrations

  • Unconfined (phreatic)
  • Confined (artesian)
  • Special case: flowing well

Confined

Solutions to the groundwater flow equation for a single pumping well in a fully confined aquifer:

Equations

drawdown, a potentiometric surface from static (unpumped, initial) level

Assumptions

  • homogeneous, isotropic properties
  • no boundaries
  • uniform thickness
  • constant pumping rate
  • fully confined
  • fully penetrating
  • flat SWL
  • Solutions for Theis and Cooper-Jacob approximations

Solutions

  • Theis solution is valid for all t
  • Cooper-Jacob solution error diminishes as t goes up

Example

  • Fully confined aquifer pumped @ 1 cubic meter per minute
  • Given:
    • porosity
    • aquifer thickness
    • aquifer compressibility
    • water compressibility
    • intrinsic permeability
    • water density
    • water viscosity
    • flow rate
  • Calculate T, S, s(r,t) @ r = 100 m, t = 1000 min
  • Use the Theis approach and then the Cooper-Jacob approximation

Special Condition: Steady State (Equilibrium)

In addition to the assumptions for the Theis solution (ie, ideal aquifer and pumping conditions), assume that the potentiometric surface has stabilized. In this case, the Theim solution applies, which comes from integrating Darcy’s Law for axisymmetric flow to the pumping well.

Unconfined

Application of the Thiem solution to an unconfined aquifer:

Equations

  • Darcy’s Law
  • Dupuit’s Formula

Special case for a pumping well.

Example of Steady State Well Hydraulics

Calculate the specific capacity for confined and unconfined.

Soil and Groundwater Remediation

Contaminant Phases

  1. Pure or “neat” or “free” or “nonaqueous” (eg, gasoline or fuel oil)
  2. Dissolved or aqueous
  3. Vapor or gaseous (for volatile contaminants)
  4. Sorbed

Sites that pose a threat to people, either because concentrations exceed drinking water standards (MCLs or max contaminant levels) or other exposures (eg, contact, inhalation, etc.), or to the environment, such as discharge to surface water, must undergo corrective action (remediation or “plume control”).

Plumes can be captured (“pump and treat”).

Source zones can be cleaned up (source control) using flushing or enhanced flushing techniques and/or chemical treatment (eg, advanced oxidation) and bioremediation.

Sun, 13 Oct 2019 00:54:00 -0500 en text/html https://www.mtu.edu/cege/undergraduate/advising/fe-review-videos.html
Course Listing for Plastics Engineering Advanced Project In Plastics I (Formerly 26.500)

Description

A laboratory course for advanced projects in the areas of plastics materials, design, processing, elastomers, coatings, adhesives, or medical plastics.

Graduate Plastics Safety Lecture I

Description

All Plastics Engineering stiudents enrolled in a plastics laboratory course are required to attend a one hour per week safety lecture for safety training.

Prerequisites

Co-req: PLAS.5730 Graduate Polymer Laboratory, or PLAS.5732 Graduate Polymer Lab II.

Graduate Plastics Safety Lecture 2

Description

All Plastics Engineering students enrolled in a plastics laboratory course are required to attend a one hour per week safety lecture for safety training.

Prerequisites

Co-req: PLAS.5730 Graduate Polymer Laboratory.

Advanced Project In Plastics II (Formerly 26.501)

Description

Continuation of 26.500.

Medical Device Development Regulation (Formerly 26.602 and PLAS.6020)

Description

Comprehensive and in-depth analysis of US medical device diagnostics development and approval requirements. Detailed analysis of quality assurance issues and regulatory reforms implemented under the Food and Drug Administration. Provides a step-by-step guide through the Center for Devices and Radiological Health (CRDH) investigational device exemptions, premarket approval, 510 (k) application process, and product development protocol and review processes.

Mechanical Behavior of Polymers (Formerly 26.403/503)

Description

Topics covered in this course include linear viscoelasticity, creep, stress relaxation, dynamic behavior, hysteresis, stress-strain response phenomena, principles of time-temperature superposition, rubber elasticity, failure and fracture mechanisms for polymers, and the effect of additives on mechanical behavior. Real life design examples are used to demonstrate the Topics and concepts as much as possible.

Prerequisites

Pre-Reqs: MECH.2110 Engin. Mechanics, MECH.2150 Plastics Process Engin. Lab I, MATH.2340 Diff Eq.s or MATH.2360 Engin. Diff Eq. or Grad. career students. (Pre-reqs are enforced only for undergrad plastics engineering students).

Polymer Structure Properties & Applications (Formerly 26.506)

Description

Relationships between polymer structure (chemical composition, molecular weight and flexibility, intermolecular order and bonding, supermolecular structure) and practical properties (processability, mechanical, acoustic, thermal, electrical, optical, and chemical) and applications.

Prerequisites

Pre-Req: 26.202 Polymeric Materials II or Graduate career students. (Pre-requisites are enforced only for undergraduate plastics engineering students).

Plastics Processing Theory I (Formerly 26.509)

Description

Principles of Rheology and continuum mechanics involved in the processing of plastics, and their applications in plastics process engineering including flows in standard geometries and extrusion applications.

Polymer Blends (Formerly 26.511)

Description

Physical, mechanical, and thermal properties, preparation, and testing of polymer blends, alloys, and multiphase systems. Thermodynamic theories and experimental determination of miscibility of polymer blends. Structure property relationships for multiphase systems and interpenetrating networks.

Foams (Formerly 26.512)

Description

This course covers the fundamentals of polymer foaming, processing methods, latest technologies, foam characteristics, and applications. Fundamentals cover the cell nucleation and growth mechanisms in foaming and the role of thermodynamics and kinetics. Batch foaming, extrusion foaming, foam injection molding, and bead foaming are discussed as the common processing methods. The characteristics and performance of polymeric foams, process-structure-property relationships, and the relevant applications in various industries also are presented.

New Plastics Materials (Formerly 26.513)

Description

Critical examination of the new plastics appearing in the research literature and being field-tested for commercialization in the plastics industry.

Statistics for Six Sigma (Formerly 26.514)

Description

A review of statistical techniques for Six Sigma with Applications specifically designed for the plastics processing industry. Those completing the course should be at the Six Sigma green belt level or better.

Lean Plastics Manufacturing (Formerly 26.515)

Description

Methods of analysis and operation of plastics manufacturing facilities. Topics include: performance measurement, inventory control, forecasting, production planning, scheduling, resource management, supply chains, various technologies for improved productivity.

Plastics Product Design (Formerly 26.518)

Description

This course reviews the theoretical principles and the engineering practice associated with the development of new plastic products. The course focuses on design practices for products that will be produced by conventional and advanced injection molding processes. Topics include design methodology, plastic materials selection, design for manufacturing, computer aided engineering, mechanical behavior of plastics, structural design of plastic parts, prototyping techniques, experimental stress analysis, and assembly techniques for plastic parts.

Prerequisites

Pre-Reqs: 26.211 Engineering Mechanics, 26.218 Introduction to Design or Graduate career students. (Pre-requisites are enforced only for undergraduate plastics engineering students).

Polymers in Sports

Description

This course introduces the polymers (type and properties), designs, and manufacturing methods used for a wide range of sports applications. Specific products include sneakers, golf balls, helmets, riding gear, sports gear such as skis, snow boards and surf boards, protective equipment like hockey pads, and workout clothing.

Prerequisites

Pre-req: CHEM.1210 Chemistry I, and PLAS.2010 Polymer Materials I, and PLAS.2020 Polymers Materials II, or PLAS.5440 Advanced Plastics Materials.

Screw Design Principles (Last Term 2007 Spring)(Formerly 26.523)

Description

Energy balances, energy efficiency for extrusion and injection molding, application of energy equation (conduction, convection, viscous dissipation), equations of state, melt conveying in simple and compound screws, screw scale up, plastication.

Process Analysis Instrument and Control (Formerly 26.524)

Description

Industrial instruments for measurement and control of plastics processes. Design of experiments. Analysis of plastics forming operations. Dynamic testing techniques. Automatic plastics process control. Data acquisition systems, SPC/SQC and Taguchi methods.

Synthetic Fibers: Processing-Structure-Properties (Formerly 26.525)

Description

An introduction to processing-structure-properties of fibers and its significance to modern advanced materials. This course coves both traditional and emerging fiber spinning methods (ex. solution spinning, melt extrusion, gel-spinning, and electrospinning), post-processing techniques (ex. yarns, weaving), and the resulting multi-scale structures and properties. The unique physical and chemical properties of fibers and its application as past and emerging advanced materials will be discussed.

Plastics Information Data Bases (Formerly 26.528)

Description

Review of procedures for literature searching, databases, etc.

Selected Topics (Formerly 26.530)

Description

Topics in various fields of Plastics Engineering. Content may vary from year to year so that students may, by repeated enrollment, acquire a broad knowledge of contemporary Plastics Engineering.

Adhesives and Adhesion (Formerly 26.532)

Description

Adhesive joining of engineering materials. Surface chemistry, theories of adhesion and cohesion, joint design, surface preparation, commercial adhesives, Rheology, equipment, testing, service life, and reliability.

Green Coatings Science and Technology I (Formerly 26.533)

Description

This course reviews the basic principles of design and formulation of water-borne, high-solids and powder resins used for the development of solvent-less "green" coatings and the use of bio-derived resins, mostly based on soybean oil and other renewable raw materials. The mechanisms and methods of curing and of polymerization for polymers used as coatings will also be covered. The basic principles of formulation of coatings will be introduced. Permission of instructor for Plastics Engineering Undergraduates seeking to take course as technical elective.

Coatings Science and Technology II (Formerly 26.534)

Description

A continuation of 26.533. This graduate course reviews the basic principles of design and formulation of waterborne, high-solids, powder resins that meet current manufacturing regulations. Rheology of polymer and pigment dispersion, and their application to coatings, inks and adhesives will be included here..

Rubber Technology (Formerly 26.535)

Description

Polymerization and compounding of the commercial elastomers. Properties and test methods.Leading applications and methods of processing.

Rheology of Polymers (Formerly 26.536)

Description

Rheology of polymer melts, solutions, latexes, and pigment dispersions, and their application to coatings and adhesives.

Business Law for Engineers (Formerly 26.537)

Description

Business legal issues engineers encounter in practice, including contractual, products liability, and intellectual property issues. Business torts relating to product design, manufacturing and inadequate warning defects. Unreasonably dangerous products and strict liability.

Commercial Development of Plastics (Formerly 26.540)

Description

The concepts of industrial marketing will be reviewed for research, pricing strategies, and product planning for market segmentation, place (distribution)-promotional activities. Topics will include creating a demand, selling, and servicing base resins and additives.

Computer Applications in Plastics (Formerly 26.541)

Description

Problem solving in plastics engineering has been dramatically influenced by the computer and innovative software packages. This graduate course will focus on the application and development of software packages for engineering analyses of plastics processes. Specially, the course will cover the basic CAD programs, Pro/ENGINEER, SOLIDWORKS, followed by basic Pre-and-Post processor software, FEMAP, meshing program HYPERMESH, FEMLAB multiphysics, and MATHEMATICA.

Colloidal Nanoscience and Nanoscale Engineering (Formerly 10.542/26.542)

Description

This course will cover the fundamentals of nanoscale colloidal processes, intermolecular forces and electrostatic phenomena at interfaces, boundary tensions and films at interfaces, electrostatic and London forces in disperse systems, interactions and self-assembly of polymer colloids, nanoparticles, surfactants and biomolecules. Applications include microfluidics; lab-on-a-chip; nano-biocolloids, vesicles, colloidosomes, polymersomes and polymer hydrogel microcapsules for drug delivery and nanostructured materials and devices.

Advanced Plastics Materials (Formerly 26.544)

Description

This course reviews the historical developments of polymeric material systems, commodity, engineering, biodegradable, and high performance thermoplastics. Topics include their synthesis, structure, properties, and applications and there is also an overview of typical additives that are used to modify the properties of plastics. Knowledge of general and/or organic chemistry is recommended as a prerequisite for this course. .

Additives for Polymer Materials (Formerly 26.545)

Description

Additives incorporated into polymers to modify processing and end-use properties: reinforcements, plasticizers, stabilizers, flame retardants, colorants, biostats, blowing agents, anti-stats, impact modifiers, and processing aids.

Materials for Renewable Energy and Sustainability (Formerly 26.547)

Description

This course reviews the selection and design of materials for use in energy generation and conservation applications. Both traditional and renewable technologies for energy generation are reviewed, and the differences in materials needs for generation, storage and transmission highlighted. Particular emphasis is placed on organic and polymeric materials technological challenges in solar, wind and hydro/geothermal energy and future transportation fuel production. The concept of life cycle assessment is introduced for the optimization of systems from a materials science perspective. The impacts of global economics, ethics and efficiency are also addressed. The course approaches sustainability as an open-ended, complex engineering problem and introduces students to the broad range of career opportunities for materials engineers in renewable energy.

Prerequisites

Pre-Req: MATH 1310 Calculus I or MATH 1380 Calculus for Life Sciences, or Permission of Instructor/Coordinator or Chair.

Analytical and Numerical Methods in Plastics Processing (Formerly 26.548)

Description

This course covers the use of analytical and numerical methods related to engineering. Topics include ordinary differential equations, linear second order differential equations, matrices, vectors, linear systems of equations, partial differential equations. Use of numerical methods to differential equations, linear algebra, regression, interpolation, data analysis, and partial differential equations.

Product Design for Elastomers (Formerly 26.549)

Description

This course covers the basics of thermoset and thermoplastic elastomer product design. Topics include mechanical behavior, large deformation structural analysis, design for manufacturability, performance limitations, and end use applications for elastomers and assembly considerations.

Processing with Elastomers (Formerly 26.550)

Description

This course covers the basics of elastomer processing. Topics include mixing, Rheology, extrusion, injection molding, compressing molding, and curing as it applies to elastomers.

Extrusion Die Design (Formerly 26.551)

Description

This is a project-oriented course which utilizes current CAE programs to design extruder dies. This course will study the basic principles of extrusion die design and apply these principles in designing extrusion dies. A review of the extrusion process and the flow behavior of various polymers will be studied.

Machine Design (Formerly 26.552)

Description

Hydraulics, machine logic, drives, pumps, motors, heaters, barrel and screw combinations, mechanical design. Hydraulic and electrical control circuits development. A semester project is required.

Medical Device Design I (Formerly 26.553)

Description

A systematic approach to inventing new medical devices. The class details the process of validating medical needs including market assessment and the evaluation of existing technologies; basics of regulatory (FDA) and reimbursement planning; brainstorming and early prototyping for concept creation. Course format includes expert guest lecturers and interactive practical discussions with faculty. Students will prepare a medical device proposal and presentation.

Medical Device Design II (Formerly 26.554)

Description

This course focuses on how to take a medical device invention forward from early concept to technology translation and implementation planning. Topics include technology research & development; patent strategies; techniques for analyzing intellectual property; advanced planning for reimbursement and FDA approval; choosing translation strategies (licensing vs. start-up); ethical issues including conflict of interest; fundraising approaches and cash requirements; essentials of writing a business or research plan; strategies for assembling a development team. Students will prepare a final medical device proposal and presentation.

Prerequisites

Pre-req: 26.553 Medical Device Design I

Medical Device Processing

Description

Critical analysis of current methods of medical device manufacturing, focusing on processing and performance considerations. Includes discussion of different production methods, material selection considerations, biocompatibility, leachables and extractables, device sterilization, and sterile packaging.

Prerequisites

Pre-Req: Graduate level or Instructor permission.

Current Topics in Plastics Materials I (Formerly 26.563)

Description

Individual research and presentation in the field of plastics materials.

Current Topics in Plastics Materials II (Formerly 26.564)

Description

Individual research and presentation in the field of plastics materials.

Thermosets (Formerly 26.565)

Description

Provides an in-depth review of the major families of engineering thermosetting resins: phenolics, aminos, polyesters, epoxies, silicones, and various polyurethanes systems. Emphasis is on the basic chemistry, inherent physical properties and processability, and the effect of polymer modifiers (additives) on the functional properties of molding compounds. Typical market sectors served and related processing/fabrication technologies used in reinforced plastics/composites are reviewed.

Polymer Materials Systems Solution (Formerly 26.566)

Description

This course investigates the selection processes to be followed in screening material candidates, and specifying a material of record. Emphasis is placed on prioritizing performance requirements, contrasting potential candidates, reviewing processing demands, and post-fabrication schemes. The course will be based on genuine case studies.

Dynamic Mechanical Properties II (Formerly 26.568)

Description

Practical review of theoretical concepts of rheological measurements with practical applications of experimental techniques. Emphasis will be on the viscoelastic properties of polymer solutions, melts, and solids with correlation with theoretical dynamic mechanical behavior.

Current Topics in Plastics Design I (Formerly 26.569)

Description

Individual research and presentation in the field of plastics design.

Current Topics in Plastics Processing I (Formerly 26.570)

Description

Individual research and presentation in the field of plastics processing.

Plastics Processing Engineering Laboratory I (Formerly 26.571)

Description

Laboratory study of the interaction between process variables and materials in extrusion, injection molding, blow molding, thermoforming, compounding and mixing.

Advanced Plastics Processing Engineering Laboratory (Formerly 26.572)

Description

There is currently no description available for this course.

Prerequisites

Co-Req: PLAS.0020 Plastics Safety Lecture.

Graduate Polymer Laboratory

Description

This course provides in-coming graduate students hands-on experience with plastics processing and characterization techniques. Students formed parts of products using multiple extrusion processes, injection molding, blow molding, and thermoforming. These products then are characterized for their mechanical, thermal, and other characteristics using standard test methods. A heavy emphasis also is placed on reporting the results in a professional manner.

Prerequisites

Co-req: PLAS.5001 Graduate Plastics Safety Lecture I, or PLAS.5002 Graduate Plastics Safety Lecture 2.

Graduate Polymer Laboratory I

Description

This course provides graduate students hands-on experience with plastics processing and characterization techniques. Students formed parts of products using multiple extrusion processes, injection molding, blow molding, and thermoforming. These products then are characterized for their mechanical, thermal, and other characteristics using standard test methods. This is the first in a series of two courses that, combined, cover the same content as PLAS.5730 Graduate Polymer Laboratory. In this course, students fulfill the hands-on experience portion on an accelerated manner.

Prerequisites

Anti-req: PLAS.5730.

Graduate Polymer Laboratory II

Description

This course provides graduate students experience with reporting results from laboratory processing and characterization in a professional manner. This is the second in a series of two course that, combined, cover the same content as PLAS.5730 graduate Polymer Laboratory. In this course, students take the data collected in the first part of this series and create written reports of the results.

Prerequisites

Co-req: PLAS.5001 Graduate Plastics Safety Lecture I.

Advance Physical Properties Lab (Formerly 26.574)

Description

Measurement of mechanical properties in tension, compression, shear, and flexure; dielectric constant and dissipation factor; thermal behavior under stress; melt rheology.

Prerequisites

Co-Req: PLAS 0010 or PLAS 0020 Plastics Safety Lecture.

Biomaterials in Medical Applications (Formerly 26.575)

Description

A comprehensive study of the history, current and future rents within biomedical devices and their applications. Students will be introduced to research techniques used to analyze the different classes of biomaterials. An overview of typical host reactions such as inflammatory response and their evaluation will be touched upon.

Advanced Mold Design (Formerly 26.576)

Description

This course provides an integrated approach to mold engineering which includes the interrelationships of polymeric materials, engineering principles, processing, and plastics product design. Major Topics include cost estimation, mold layout and feed system design, cooling systems, structural design considerations, and ejector system design. Analytical treatment of the subject matter is given based on the relevant rheology, thermodynamics, heat transfer, fluid flow and strength of materials.

Plastics Process Engineering I (Formerly 26.377/577)

Description

The first course in a two semester sequence to study the fundamental principles of polymer processing, i.e., the conversion of the polymeric materials into useful articles. The course will first study the properties of polymers (bulk and rheological and thermal properties) and why they are important to understanding polymer processing. This course will emphasize the fundamental principles of the extrusion process and examine the correlation between elements of the extruder, polymer properties, and processing variables and why they all must be considered when studying and understandng a plastics processing technique.

Prerequisites

Pre-Reqs: PLAS 2010 Polymer Materials I or PLAS 2020 Polymer Materials II. Pre-Req or Co-Req: PLAS 3140 Fluid Flow. PLAS.3140 is a Co-Req of PLAS.3770.

Advanced Plastics Processing (Formerly 26.578)

Description

This course reviews the common plastics manufacturing processes, including extrusion, injection molding, blow molding, thermoforming, and rotational molding. After the review, the course focus shifts to the impacts of screw design and processing parameters on the conveyance, melting, devolatilization, and mixing with single screws and compounding with twin screw extruders. This course also includes an overview of die designs, multi-shot and gas assist injection molding, film stretching and methods for heating and cooling in plastics processing.

Problems In Biomaterials/Directed Study (Formerly 26.579)

Description

Selection of a current biomaterial problem of interest by the individual student, examination of pertinent literature to determine present knowledge in the area, formulation of an approach to resolve or clarify the issues involved, and (time permitting) work towards the solution of the selected problem.

Current Topics in Plastics Design II (Formerly 26.582)

Description

Individual research and presentation in the field of plastics product or tooling design.

Advanced Research Methodology (Formerly 26.583)

Description

A systematic evaluation of the techniques used in efficient research and development. Experimental data are analyzed and plotted using a mathematical approach. Creative thinking, problem solving, and student presentation of data are stressed. Extensive studying of research papers, analysis of such, and defense of the analysis required.

Computer Aided Engineering I (Formerly 26.585)

Description

This course provides a fundamental approach to computer-aided engineering for plasticsprocessing. Emphasis is upon the theory and techniques of computer aided engineering asapplied to plastics processing problems, allowing students to understand the various assumptions and methods used to create the programs.

Injection Molding (Last Term 2008 Spring)(Formerly 26.588)

Description

Process thermodynamics, energy balances, power requirements. Heat transfer, cooling equations for amorphous and crystalline materials. Equations of state, pvT applications, shrinkage and ejection forces. Isothermal cavity filling, non-isothermal effects. Coupled runner/gate/cavity flow, flow balancing. Shear heating, frozen layer development. Residual stress. Injection/compression flow. Reciprocation effects in screw plastication. Review of specialized injection molding processes. An individual research project, term paper and presentation are required.

Polymer Nanocomposites (Formerly 22.570/26.589)

Description

This course deals with the preparation, characterization, behavior and properties of polymer nanocomposites, with an emphasis on the most commercially relevant systems to date, as well as new developments in the field. The major preparation routes to these materials are discussed, with an emphasis on the importance not only of dispersion but of true thermodynamic compatibility in these systems. From there, the focus shifts to describe the consequences of nanocomposite structure in terms of both molecular behavior and macroscopic properties, as informed by the most up-to-date research literature available. Case studies of specific systems will serve as opportunities to gain deeper understanding, and the safety issues surrounding nanoparticle handling will also be presented. Finally, current research by invited lecturers working in the field will be presented as time permits.

Survey of Intellectual Property (Formerly 26.590)

Description

A review of patents, trademarks, copyrights and their application for protection of technology in the plastics industry. Other Topics to be considered will be employee rights/non-competition agreements, foreign protection, and technology licensing. (in the Plastics Industry)

Industrial Thesis Development I (Formerly 26.591)

Description

Enables graduate students to work part-time to compliment academic studies with practical industrial experience and acquire/enhance expertise in their research as well as thesis investigation.

Additive Manufacturing Engineering Fundamentals

Description

Critical analysis of current methods of additive manufacturing. Materials selection, processing-structure-property relationships, testing, relationship to transport phenomena and/or reaction kinetics.

Prerequisites

Pre-Req: Graduate level or Instructor permission.

Thermoplastic Elastomers (Formerly 26.595)

Description

A comprehensive review of thermoplastic elastomer (TPE) technology. Physical and chemical nature of the various classes of TPE's will be considered with emphasis on mechanical and rheological properties relevant to engineering applications.

Sustainable Polymers and Additives (Formerly 26.596)

Description

This course will provide an overview of polymers and additives that can be obtained or produced partly or entirely from renewable feedstock to create durable, biodegradable, recyclable polymers. The chemistry, structure, properties and processing of natural polymers, additives as well as polymers produced by the conversion of naturally occurring precursors (obtained from renewable resources) will be covered. Brief discussion of challenges in processing of these polymers, additives, their applications, reusability, and end-of -life consideration of these materials will also be included.

Prerequisites

Pre-Req: PLAS 4060 or PLAS 5060 Polymer Struct, Prop and Appl.

Plastics & Environment (Formerly 26.597)

Description

This course investigates the waste management solutions for different types of plastics. Both traditional and emerging recycling methods will be highlighted. Accumulation of plastic waste in the natural environment and the toxicology of plastics as well as their additives will be discussed, Further, analysis methods and instrumentation to characterize recycled plastics, and the differences in virgin polymers and recycled polymers will be introduced. Potential degradable, biodegradable or biobased alternatives will be reviewed along with the concepts of life cycle assessment and Green Chemistry for designing the most sustainable plastic materials.

Rapid Prototyping

Description

Survey of the rapidly expanding technology field of rapid prototyping. Technologies to be considered include stereolithography, laminated object manufacturing, selective laser sintering, fused deposition modeling, and solid ground curing.

Graduate Industrial Coop Education I (Formerly 26.601)

Description

Graduate students interested in developing a practical industrial experience component to complement their academic training may register for this course with advisor's approval. This credit is not applicable to the mandated degree credit hours.

Plastics Manufacturing Systems Engineering (Formerly 26.606)

Description

The course provides guidance about plastics manufacturing as an integrated system with broadly applicable analysis in three areas: 1) machinery, 2) controls, and 3) operations. The machinery Topics include heating/cooling, hydraulics/pneumatics, electric drives, and sensors. The controls Topics include signal conditioning, data acquisition, machine controllers, and related control laws. The operations Topics include process characterization, process optimization, quality control, and automation. The course is developed to support plastics processing engineers and others involved with plastics manufacturing who are performing process development, research, and machine design.

Supply Chain Management for Engineers (Formerly 26.607)

Description

This course focuses on design, development, and planning supply chain networks while examining the product's life cycle with an emphasis of the manufacturing processes. Throughout the course, global supply chain management, supply chain drivers, distribution networks, network design under uncertainty, supply-demand cycle, demand forecasting, inventory management, supply chain performance, end -of-life, cradle-grave and cradle-cradle products, along with supply chain decision-making Topics will be covered. These Topics will be demonstrated with the implementation of examples, and case studies.

Plastics Industry Development (Formerly 26.610)

Description

The goals of this course are numerous. In the large sense, the primary focus of this course will be to review many of the major technological developments and discoveries that have helped make the plastics industry what it is today. Having a thorough understanding of how these developments were implemented commercially can help us implement modern day technologies in a more efficient and productive manner.

Coloration of Engineering Thermoplastics

Description

A comprehensive approach to all elements of Color Technology focused on needs for future plastics engineers. The course includes theory of color vision, instrumental color measurement and tolerancing, chemistry and processes of commercial dyes and pigments, their testing in polymers, failure modes and elements of industrial color matching. Special attention will be given to weatherability of color formulations.

Structural Product Design (Formerly 26.618)

Description

Design of plastic and composite products to meet structural requirements including strength, stiffness, impact, fatigue, and creep while remaining low weight, low cost, and easy to manufacture. The course will include an overview of structural properties of polymeric materials as well as application of finite element analysis to homework and project assignments.

Prerequisites

Pre-req: PLAS.4180 Product & Process Design or PLAS 5180 Plastics Product Design and PLAS 4030 or PLAS.5030 Mechanical Behavior of Polymers.

Characterization of Polymers and Plastics (Formerly 26.642)

Description

This course provides an in-depth review of the various means by which important properties of polymers and plastics are determined. Lectures will cover analysis of composition and structure (including deformulation techniques) as well as measurements of common physical, mechanical, thermal, barrier, fire and optical properties. Coverage will include both the fundamental basis for the techniques and their practical applications, strengths and weaknesses. Time and resources allowing, selected techniques will be demonstrated in the lab as well.

Nanoscale Transport Phenomena for Manufacturing Nanodevices (Formerly 26.650)

Description

An interdisciplinary course taught by faculty from the Chemical, Mechanical and Plastics Engineering Department, who have special knowledge in nanoscale fluid mechanics and heat transfer.The course on nanoscale transport phenomena constitutes a bridge between existing fluid and heat transfer courses in multiple disciplines and emerging nanoscale science and engineering concepts to reflect the forefront of nanomanufacturing. The course is designed to incorporate latest advances in manufacturing polymer based nanodevices. Key issues of the implementation and maintenance cost for fabrication will be addressed. Hands-on laboratory experiments will be performed to complement the lectures with the ultimate goal of designing and building a complete nanodevice at the end of the course. The course will prepare graduates for employment focused on designing and manufacturing nano/microfluidic systems, lab on ship devices, electronic devices, medical devices and other emerging technologies.

Biomaterials II (Formerly 26.675)

Description

The degradation of biomaterials in the biological environment for applications such as sutures, orthopedic implants, dental implants, etc. will be reviewed. Students will analyze issues unique to the field of implants, devices and biomaterials. While reviewing new products and standards, the prospective and possibilities of biomaterials will be studied.

New Developments in Polymer Manufacturing

Description

This course explores advanced concepts and new developments in polymer manufacturing. It is designed for students with prior courses and/or experience in polymer processing.

Prerequisites

Pre-req: PLAS.3780 Plastics Process Eng II, or PLAS.5780 Advanced Plastics Processing.

Physical Polymer Science

Description

Comprehensive course covering physical polymer science and engineering. The role of molecular conformation and configuration in determining the physical behavior of polymers. The amorphous and crystalline states of polymers; polymer/polymer phase diagrams; glass-rubber transition and polymer viscoelastic behavior.

Prerequisites

Pre-req: PLAS.4030 Mechanical Behavior Polymers, and PLAS.5060 Polymer structure and Props, and PLAS.5440 Adv. Plastics Materials, or PLAS.3820 Polymer Science II.

Master's Thesis - Plastics Engineering (Formerly 26.741)

Description

There is currently no description available for this course.

Masters Thesis Plastics Engineering (Formerly 26.743)

Description

Individual research projects in plastics.

Master's Thesis - Plastics Engineering (Formerly 26.746)

Description

Individual research projects in plastics.

M S Grad Res Plastics (Formerly 26.749)

Description

Individual research projects in plastics.

Doctoral Thesis Research (Formerly 26.751)

Description

There is currently no description available for this course.

Doctoral Thesis Research (Formerly 26.752)

Description

There is currently no description available for this course.

Doctoral Dissertation/Plastics Engineering (Formerly 26.753)

Description

Individual research projects in plastics.

Doctoral Dissertation/Plastics Engineering (Formerly 26.756)

Description

Individual research projects in plastics.

Doctoral Dissertation/Plastics Engineering (Formerly 26.759)

Description

Individual research projects in plastics.

Continued Graduate Research (Formerly 26.763)

Description

Individual research projects in plastics.

Continued Graduate Research (Formerly 26.766)

Description

Individual research projects in plastics.

Continued Graduate Research (Formerly 26.769)

Description

Individual research projects in plastics.

Curricular Practical Training for Engineering Doctoral Candidates

Description

Curricular Practical Training (CPT) is a training program for doctoral students in Engineering. Participation in CPT acknowledges that this an integral part of an established curriculum and directly related to the major area of study or thesis.

Tue, 16 Feb 2016 21:29:00 -0600 en text/html https://www.uml.edu/Catalog/Graduate/Engineering/Plastics-Engineering/Course-listing.aspx
Aerospace engineer, physicist, and author, Sideena Grace can do it all

A Minnesota woman is using her life experience of becoming an aerospace engineer and showing kids a fun way to get interested in science.

BROOKLYN PARK, Minn. — For a woman who has her head in the clouds, 24-year-old Sideena Grace is anything but a daydreamer.

"I loved space as a kid, but I think when I wanted to do engineering and what kind of engineering I wanted to do, then that's what helped me narrow it down to-- what's the closest thing to space?" Grace said.

Grace graduated from Hamline as the first Black woman to have a degree in Applied Physics. She did research for Harvard while she was there. Then, she finished her grad program at MIT to become an aerospace engineer.

Calling it hard work, doesn't cut it.

"I was discouraged, like a lot," Grace said with a laugh. "I think discouragement can come from many different things, especially if you're a woman and if you're a person of color. You kind of deal with all those things and juggle and navigate those emotions."

To be a pioneer, can be lonely. So in the hopes of encouraging more children to get into STEAM (science, technology, engineering, art and math) topics, she decided to invest in the future, via Adventures with Sideena.

"Adventures with Sideena is a book that teaches kids concepts about space using poetry," Grace explained. "What I wanted to do was introduce kids to cool concepts while also having an adventurous enjoyable way of learning."

The book goes through the ABCs, each letter accompanied by a scientific concept written in a poem. Grace said she also wanted kids to know that poetry and the arts are important too--especially if they are passionate about that field.

Plus, the book is filled with beautiful illustrations of the cartoon Sideena, as an astronaut in space. She said that was important to her

"[To] provide representation for them, because when I was younger, I didn't get to see books that had characters that looked like me let alone about space," she said.

At 24 years old, Grace had the whole world in front of her. So why is she investing in the upbringing of others?

"I realized in school that it wasn't always the problem sets that were hard-- it was wondering if I belonged," she said. "I think that a lot of people, especially people of color or women or other marginalized groups get that experience of not feeling included."

Turns out, she is working for a future in which kids feel that whatever they're dreaming about is already written in the stars. Whether that's STEAM topics, exploring space, or the arts, she said she wants kids to feel empowered. 

"To see themselves in science, to be able to see representation and to not make it that's something so distant or unrealistic," Grace said.

Adventures with Sideena is available for purchase here. You can also find her books at most Hennepin County libraries and other county libraries around the metro. 

Grace said she's now focused on her start-up, Grace Innovations LLC, with which she is working on a wearable pain relief device for astronauts. You can find out more about her project here.

Wed, 03 Jan 2024 19:25:00 -0600 en-US text/html https://www.kare11.com/article/news/community/lifting-voices/aerospace-engineer-physicist-and-author-sideena-grace-can-do-it-all/89-152ca269-391d-4d7b-94dc-fcb3b4be18f0
Graduate & Undergraduate Information

Electrical Engineers design systems that generate, transmit and distribute electricity. Electronic engineers design electronic devices which perform computation, communication, or control robots and machines. Electrical and electronic engineers work with technologies ranging from large power lines and generators to tiny integrated circuits containing billions of transistors.

EEE Bachelor of Science Degree

The B.S. degree in Electrical & Electronic Engineering prepares students for a careers in a dynamic field - with more than half of electrical engineering specialties developed during the last twenty years. Ongoing contributions of electrical engineers include:

  • Robotics
  • Consumer Product Development - home entertainment and personal communications market
  • Wireless and Fiber Optics
  • Electric Vehicles
  • Signal Acquisition and Control
  • Power Engineering

Students receive a comprehensive background in mathematics, physics, chemistry, computer science and engineering science during their first few semesters. Engineering design and application are stressed in upper-division courses. Our curriculum also emphasizes hands-on experience through laboratory courses.

EEE Bachelors of Science Degree

EEE Master of Science Degree

The Master of Science degree program in Electrical and Electronic Engineering is designed to provide students with advanced study in a variety of Electrical and Electronic Engineering topics, and opportunities to conduct independent research to broaden their professional scope.

Graduate Advisor

Preetham Kumar
EEE Graduate Coordinator
Riverside Hall 3018B

EEE Masters Degree

Graduate Admissions & Financial Assistance

Sat, 03 Aug 2019 08:26:00 -0500 en text/html https://www.csus.edu/college/engineering-computer-science/electrical-engineering/information-students.html




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