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ABCTE American Board for Certification of Teacher Excellence Exam

The American Board for Certification of Teacher Excellence believes that highly skilled teachers should possess a
comprehensive body of knowledge that is research-based and promotes student achievement. The Professional Teaching
Knowledge test is designed to assess a new teachers knowledge of teaching-related criteria. Such knowledge is typically
obtained in undergraduate preparation in areas such as human development, classroom management, instructional design and
delivery techniques, assessment, and other professional preparation. This test also contains a writing component that will
evaluate a candidates ability to write to audiences they will most likely address as a teacher: parents, colleagues, and/or
school administrators.



ABCTE CERTIFICATION REQUIREMENTS

Participants must:

1. Hold a bachelors degree.

2. Pass the ABCTE Professional Teaching Knowledge exam.

3. Pass an ABCTE subject area exam.

4. Pass a background check.

TEACH & INSPIRE SCHOLARSHIP PROGRAM ELIGIBILITY

Eligible scholarship applicants must:

• Have completed either 15 college credit hours in your chosen subject
area or have one year of teaching experience in your chosen subject area.

• Hold U.S. Citizenship or permanent residency.

• Not hold a renewable teaching license.

• Commit to teaching for 3 years in a Teach & Inspire partner district.



The right way to get started: using the Standards as your syllabusbr>
The Standards are your study lifeline; you can find them on your Account page under Courses > Review PTK Course. Throughout the course of your study, you will learn all of them. How to begin? Here is the American Boards Standards Stepwise method:br>
br>
Approach in bite-sized chunks: dont be overwhelmed or paralyzed by how many standards there are, simply pick a Topic of a domain and get started.br>
Define the terms: take the first three items in the Topic and make sure you know all the terms. Look up any you are do not recognize. After all, you cannot answer a question definitively if you dont even know the terms.br>
Use the appropriate recommended resources to probe deeper if you need better understanding. Use the Standards to target the sections you need to read.br>
Check for understanding and reflect: think about how you would use this in a classroom or how you would teach the subject. Use your quizzes to check for understanding and move on.br>
Wash, rinse, and repeat: once you finish a chunk of three, go back and attack the next three.br>
American Board for Certification of Teacher Excellence Exam
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ABCTE
American Board for Certification of Teacher Excellence
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Question: 191
The following statements deal with the availability of computers in the classroom. Which statement is false.
A. Numerous federal and state grants have enabled high poverty and minority schools to catch up to high socio-
economic schools in number of students per computer
B. Only one or two computers available in your classroom may limit use to demonstrations and word processing
C. More than two computers in a classroom adds the possibility of doing collaboratives, independent research,
portfolios, and research papers
D. Only about 30% or fewer students will have computers at home unless the family income is $50,000 per year or
more
Answer: A
Explanation:
Despite the large number of federal and state grants to help schools with high poverty and minority populations to
catch up with schools in higher socio-economic areas, the poorer schools still lag behind in technology. Answer B
is a true statement about the limitations placed on the teacher and students if there are not enough computers
available for use in the classroom; not much more can be done than demonstrations and the occasional individual
work. Answer C is true in that having more than two computers in the classroom allows more student access for
collaboratives; allows more time on computers for students since they dont have to share as much; and enables
students to work on more complex projects, such as research and portfolios. Answer D is true and very important
to know; while we assume that all kids are fans of technology, that does not mean that they have access to
technology at home, and the income level for having a home computer is perhaps surprisingly high.
Question: 192
Which of the following is NOT an effective way to deal with a student who has repeatedly broken classroom rules?
A. Moving that student to a desk away from other students
B. Sending that student to a "time out" in another classroom
C. Insulting or demeaning the student
D. Creating a behavior contract with the student
Answer: C
Explanation:
Insulting or demeaning a student is not an effective way to deal with misbehavior, no matter how severe. This
response sets a poor example for other students because the teacher is modeling a behavior that is prohibited in the
classroom (insulting others). In order to ensure adherence to rules, the teacher must follow classroom rules and
model respect for others.
Question: 193
Which of the following students is most likely NOT eligible for special education services?
A. Juanita, an ESOL student who has not been diagnosed with any learning disabilities but struggles academically
B. Victor, who has a cognitive impairment caused by a mild brain injury
C. Sylvia, who has been diagnosed with ADHD
D. All of these students would be eligible for special education services
Answer: A
Explanation:
Juanita, an ESOL student who has not been diagnosed with any learning disabilities but struggles academically, is
unlikely to be eligible for special education services. Students must be diagnosed with a disability that interferes
with their ability to learn in order to be protected by IDEA, and limited English proficiency is not the result of a
learning disability.
Question: 194
In order to meet the needs of ESOL students in mainstream classes, teachers should:
A. incorporate elements related to ESOL students' interests and backgrounds into the curriculum so that they feel
valued and accepted
B. never openly acknowledge any differences between ESOL students and students who are native English
speakers
C. hold ESOL students to lower academic standards than other students
D. sacrifice the academic needs of students who are proficient in English in order to focus on ESOL students
Answer: A
Explanation:
In order to meet the needs of ESOL students in mainstream classes, teachers should incorporate elements related to
ESOL students' interests and backgrounds into the curriculum so that they feel valued and accepted. All students
should be held to high academic standards, and it is important to acknowledge and embrace diversity so that
students from all backgrounds feel accepted.
Question: 195
Which of the following statements about Section 504 of the Americans with Disabilities Act and the Individuals
with Disabilities Education Act (IDEA) is correct?
A. D. Both students who qualify for protection under IDEand those who qualify for protection under Section 504
must receive Individualized Education Plans (IEPs).
B. Both IDEA and Section 504 only provide protection for students who have a disability that interferes with their
learning.
C. IDEA contains procedural safeguards for students with disabilities that interfere with their learning, while
Section 504 is designed to protect all disabled individuals from discrimination.
D. Both students who qualify for protection under IDEA and those who qualify for protection under Section 504
must receive Individualized Education Plans (IEPs).
Answer: C
Explanation:
Section 504 is a general law that is designed to protect disabled individuals from discrimination. It protects all
disabled students from discrimination, regardless of whether their disability interferes with their learning. IDEA is
specifically targeted at children who have disabilities that interfere with their learning. IEPs are only required for
students who qualify for protection under IDEA.
Question: 196
Which graphic organizer would be most helpful for practice with comparison and contrasting of ideas or objects?
A. SQ3R chart
B. Venn diagram
C. Flower diagram for the 5 Ws
D. Bar graph
Answer: B
Explanation:
Graphic organizers and visual displays are vital to reaching all types of learners. Each student learns differently and
some concepts are easier to understand when using two-dimensional organizers. Venn diagrams consist of two
overlapping ovals or circles, creating three separate spaces for students to record ideas. The outer areas can be used
to identify differences in objects or ideas; the overlapping area is intended for their similarities.
Question: 197
When planning lessons, a teacher who incorporates John Dewey's progressive theory of education would be most
likely to:
A. teach students who are struggling separately from the rest of the class
B. encourage problem solving and real-life experience as paths to learning
C. provide material rewards for excellent academic performance
D. encourage competition among students as a means of motivation
Answer: B
Explanation:
When planning lessons, a teacher who values John Dewey's progressive theory of education would be most likely
to encourage problem solving and real-life experience as paths to learning. Dewey also advocated cooperation and
the fostering of democratic values in the educational environment.
Question: 198
When teaching students to use Internet search engines for research, it is most important for the teacher to design a
lesson that covers:
A. how to use search operators such as site: and loc:
B. how to distinguish reliable, authoritative websites from unreliable ones
C. how to get and use antivirus software
D. how to build websites
Answer: B
Explanation:
When teaching students to use Internet search engines for research, it is most important that students learn how to
distinguish reliable, authoritative websites from unreliable ones. This is the most critical skill students need when
using the web for research purposes.
Question: 199
According to the Individuals with Disabilities Education Act (IDEA), students who are diagnosed with learning
disabilities must be placed in the:
A. least restrictive environment possible
B. safest environment possible
C. environment in which they will be least disruptive
D. most beneficial environment possible
Answer: A
Explanation:
According to the Individuals with Disabilities Education Act (IDEA), students who are diagnosed with learning
disabilities must be placed in the least restrictive environment possible. This means they must remain in the general
classroom as much as is practicable, and will only go to the resource room for predetermined periods of time based
upon their demonstrated needs. The priority is to accommodate students with disabilities in the regular classroom as
opposed to isolating them from general education students.
Question: 200
Parents should be informed about students' behavior:
A. only when it is negative
B. as soon as a pattern of problem behavior emerges
C. every time a student breaks a classroom rule
D. only at parent teacher conferences
Answer: B
Explanation:
Parents should be informed about students' behavior as soon as a pattern of problem behavior emerges. While it is
unnecessary to inform parents every single time their child breaks a rule, parents need to be informed if their child
is a "problem student." This should be done as soon as possible so that parents can intervene. Teachers should not
wait until conferences roll around to deal with the problem. It can also be very helpful to tell parents when students
are behaving well because it positively reinforces students' good behavior.
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Certification-Board Certification learner - BingNews https://killexams.com/pass4sure/exam-detail/ABCTE Search results Certification-Board Certification learner - BingNews https://killexams.com/pass4sure/exam-detail/ABCTE https://killexams.com/exam_list/Certification-Board English language learner builds career in engineering at MiraCosta No result found, try new keyword!MiraCosta College is showcasing Marcelo Gonçalves, a former English language student now excelling in the manufacturing and engineering. Fri, 05 Jan 2024 04:45:00 -0600 en-US text/html https://thecoastnews.com/english-language-learner-builds-career-in-engineering-at-miracosta/ Why ISSA’s Corrective Exercise Course Stands Out: A Trainer’s Take No result found, try new keyword!A certified personal trainer tests and reviews the ISSA Corrective Exercise Specialist course to see if it is worth adding to your skill set. Thu, 04 Jan 2024 15:41:00 -0600 text/html https://www.si.com/showcase/fitness/issa-corrective-exercise-review Changes in Board Certification Could Improve Vascular Surgery Training

Certification and Accreditation

Certification in vascular surgery (VS) in the United States is currently the responsibility of the American Board of Surgery (ABS), which is also responsible for certification in general surgery (GS). The ABS is one of 24 certifying boards that are members of the American Board of Medical Specialties (ABMS). As such, it is responsible for certifying those surgeons who are found to be qualified after meeting specific training requirements and completing an examination process. Certification in VS is specifically overseen by the Vascular Surgery Board (VSB), a component board of the ABS. Details of the ABS and VSB structure can be found on their Web site ( www.absurgery.org ). It should be noted that the ABS is responsible for certification of individuals and is not responsible for hospital credentialing or surgeon reimbursement.

Accreditation of VS training programs in the United States is the responsibility of the Accreditation Council for Graduate Medical Education (ACGME), which develops accreditation standards and reviews accredited programs for compliance. In VS and GS, this is done by the Residency Review Committee for Surgery (RRC-S), one of 26 specialty-specific review committees of the ACGME. Details of the ACGME and RRC-Surgery structures can be found on their Web site ( www.acgme.org ). It should be noted that the RRC-S is responsible for establishing minimal training requirements in VS training programs but is not responsible for individual surgeon certification. However, surgeons seeking certification by an ABMS board must successfully complete an ACGME-accredited residency training program.

Currently, VS is a specialty board of the ABS, such that primary certification in GS is required before a secondary certificate in VS can be obtained. Similarly, completion of an ACGME-accredited residency program in GS is a prerequisite for VS training in an ACGME-accredited program. However, recertification in GS is not required to maintain certification in VS.

Fri, 22 Dec 2023 10:00:00 -0600 en text/html https://www.medscape.com/viewarticle/498511
New police board revokes certification for six officers in first meeting

Dec. 13—During their first time meeting as a group Wednesday, members of a newly formed state police board revoked the certification of six officers — and one law enforcement communication worker — from around the state.

The board also issued certification suspensions — from 30 hours to 180 days — to eight officers or dispatchers and dismissed four disciplinary cases.

They were the first steps in a process that could shape law enforcement statewide for years to come — changes that could include the overhaul of rules that govern law enforcement policies, discipline and training.

In the short term, Wednesday's moves cut down some of the backlog in disciplinary cases for the Law Enforcement Certification Board, a product of state legislation earlier this year that split the former Law Enforcement Academy Board into two different groups that each oversee different functions of the state's police academy program.

The other newly formed body — the Standards and Training Council — met in accurate weeks to begin its review of police training around the state.

One of the actions the board took Wednesday was a temporary suspension of certification for Brad Lunsford, a Las Cruces police officer who recently was indicted on a voluntary manslaughter charge after he was accused of shooting and killing a man.

The board requested the academy's staff to expedite an investigation into Lunsford's disciplinary case.

Board members voted on the disciplinary cases after spending more than three hours in private discussions. The closed session also included discussion of four pending court appeals challenging suspensions or revocations by the former board, as well as one pending lawsuit from an Albuquerque Police Department officer whose certification-by-waiver was rejected by the former board in accurate years.

The new certification board is made up of sheriffs and police chiefs from around the state as well as civil rights attorneys and academics.

Board member and attorney Joseph Walsh called the new board structure "effectively a new paradigm that's trying to be implemented to hopefully be a model for law enforcement."

He added the new board structure can bring "true accountability."

The board began a process to hire a CEO for the academy Wednesday with the approval of a job description to be posted for recruiting. Members expressed hope the position would be filled in six months to a year.

A CEO will act as the "enforcement mechanism" of the board's directives at the academy, Walsh said, and make business decisions such as hiring and firing.

Until the position is filled, the board authorized academy director Sonya Chavez to make decisions.

Chavez, who began in the position Oct. 30, previously served as the U.S. Marshal of New Mexico. Before that, she worked as a special agent in the FBI.

"What we're involved in I think is going to be monumental for law enforcement in New Mexico," Chavez told the board Wednesday.

The board's misconduct investigations and hearings are still conducted according to administrative rules set decades ago for the former board, which was for years led by the state Attorney General.

On Wednesday, board members voted to form a four-member working group to draft changes to the rules.

The two members tasked with drafting changes to the rules for the board's disciplinary actions are public defender Julie Ball and Cody Rogers, a Las Cruces-based attorney. Rule changes pertaining to certification qualifications were assigned to be reviewed and redrafted by John Soloman, a criminal justice program director at Central New Mexico Community College, and Carly Lea Huffman, a training coordinator at the Bernalillo County Emergency Communications Center.

The rulemaking process is expected to generate new administrative rules for the board to be in place by the end of 2024.

Wed, 13 Dec 2023 10:01:00 -0600 en-US text/html https://news.yahoo.com/police-board-revokes-certification-six-043300563.html
Waterford Youth Training and Education Centre learners awarded

Learner awards were presented by Deputy Metropolitan Mayor, Cristiona Kiely. The learners here received certificates in Hospitality Skills and Office Skills . Photo: Joe Evans

A Presentation of Certificates ceremony for past and present learners took place in Waterford Youth Training and Education Centre (WYTEC) recently, with awards presented by Deputy Metropolitan Mayor, Cristiona Kiely.

WYTEC provides training and education to young people aged 16-21 years, giving priority to young unemployed people.

QQI major award and component awards were received by 66 past and current learners on the day. Learners received certification in a multitude of areas, including skills in employability, office, retail, catering and hospitality.

The learners here received certificates in Practical Construction and Pathway to Employment. Photo: Joe Evans

Those present on the day included WWETB representatives, Richie Grant, Community Training Officer, and Dr Karina Daly, Acting Chief Executive.

Also attending was WYTEC’s Board of Management, Chairperson Danny Murphy and Mr Martin Stockdale. Pamela Lanigan, School Completion Programme, Mount Sion Secondary School, was also in attendance. Matt Doran, Manager, WYTEC, congratulated all learners who received well deserved awards on the day.

More information is available via www.wytec.ie

Learners who received certificates in Catering Skills and Retail Skills. Photo: Joe Evans

Thu, 04 Jan 2024 22:48:00 -0600 en-GB text/html https://waterford-news.ie/2024/01/05/waterford-youth-training-and-education-centre-learners-awarded/
Here’s a new way to look at the enrollment cliff

Each year, we share our 10 most-read stories. Not surprisingly, many of this year’s Top 10 focused on generative AI, adult learners, and higher-ed trends. This year’s 5th most-read story focuses on how the impending enrollment cliff can impact adult learners.

Rising costs, increasing student debt, the potential effects of AI, questions related to the value of a degree: these and more are contributing to the perfect storm for colleges and universities. An aspect that, perhaps, has the greatest attention from leaders of institutions of higher education, their CFOs, and enrollment managers is that of the enrollment cliff–the potential catastrophic effect of the looming shrinking of the college-age population and the decrease in enrollments seen, or predicted to be seen, across the nation.

Changing demographics, the effects of lower birth rates during the great recession, and decreases in the perceived “value” of a degree, with some states and corporations opening up jobs to those without one, definitely have serious consequences for institutions of higher education, ranging from lower revenues based on enrollment-derived tuition and state funding, decreased use of facilities and consequent decreased revenue from auxiliaries such as residence halls and meal plans, and increased competition for students leading at times to greater investments in non-academic facilities.

National Center for Education Statistics (NCES) data show that between Fall 2010 and Fall 2021, the total undergraduate enrollment in degree-granting post-secondary institutions decreased by 14.6 percent, from 18.1 million to 15.4 million, with the overall college enrollment rate for 18–24-year-olds decreasing from 41 percent to 38 percent.  A accurate analysis of NCES data by Tyton Partners showed that of every 100 students who enter high school, 87 will graduate, 53 will start college, only 33 will earn a degree, and only 22 will get a “good job.”

Looking at it another way, 67 of every 100 students entering high school will not earn a degree, and 78 will not gain from what is often termed the best investment that anyone can make–that of a college degree. Of the 4.2 million students who attended the ninth grade in fall 2021, 2.81 million will not get that ring. Over a decade, that’s more than 28 million–not an insignificant percentage of the population and not one that bodes well for the future. The National Student Clearinghouse (NSC) estimated that as of July 2021 there were 40.4 million Americans with some college and no degree, of which more than 64 percent were between the ages of 20 and 44–the prime period for gaining prosperity and upward social mobility. Combined, that’s tens of millions of students/learners looking at a different enrollment cliff–one that represents the barriers and difficulties in enrolling and progressing, unable to have the opportunity of gaining from the promise of higher education.

Add to that the large number of people with degrees already in the workforce who, now or in the near future, are going to need advanced knowledge, skills, and training to remain relevant in a workplace that is shifting rapidly. Even greater changes are predicted as the increasing use of AI continues to transform the workplace and, consequently, the qualifications that are already needed due to the rapid convergence of information and technology. A recent report from the Pew Center estimated that workers with a bachelor’s degree were more likely than those with only a high school diploma to hold a job with the most exposure to AI, with the exposure and risk of replacement being the highest for those who earned $33 per hour on average, while those in jobs earning $20 per hour had the least amount of exposure. Other studies estimate that the use of AI will take the role of a billion people globally and make 375 million jobs obsolete over the next decade, and that although almost 100 million new jobs will be created, most will need skill sets that could not be obtained by those laid off without significant retraining and reskilling.

While the term “enrollment cliff” has been made popular from the perspective of institutions worrying about a drop in enrollment, there is perhaps a more profound and critical perspective – that of learners who desire to gain from the opportunity of higher education, of gaining knowledge relevant to their progression in careers and to increasing socio-economic mobility. This enrollment cliff is one of barriers and obstacles, of myths and misperceptions regarding the learner’s ability and preparation, of the inability or lack of interest in a significant part of higher education to move beyond “traditional students,” and affects tens of millions of learners. Isn’t that the issue that we should be focused on, and shouldn’t this be the “enrollment cliff” that makes headlines and catalyzes action?

This is not a case of “either-or” in terms of student/learner populations. Rather it is the necessity of focusing through a student-centered lens on removing barriers to access, affirming talent and supporting progression, attainment, and advancement through building scaffolds, steps, and elevators ensuring that every potential learner is given the opportunity of attaining the promise of a better tomorrow, without having to scale the metaphorical cliff of barriers and obstacles to entry and participation. This means re-envisioning focus, structure, and approach. This means engaging not just with the traditional 18- 24-year-olds, but also with adult learners and working professionals, stop-outs, and those with some college and no degree who need a credential to move forward, learners desiring to transfer between 2-year and 4-year institutions, and increasing segments who are precluded from participating because of the decades-old philosophy of the student having to come to college rather than knowledge being taken to the learner wherever they may be. While there are some notable institutions of higher education that are focusing on these learner populations, far more needs to be done–especially at the level of public universities.

In terms of a focus on the adult and returning learner, the student who has faced obstacles in entering, or re-entering, the knowledge enterprise, higher education needs to change its perspective, re-envision its approach in attracting and enabling success of these populations, and even reimagine its role looking forward and building opportunities. Universities that create a welcoming and supportive environment will not only attract this demographic but will ensure their success. These potential students are self-motivated and driven to succeed. We just need to create the systems that deliver them a good experience, acknowledging that their presence on our campuses and in our classes adds a huge positive dimension to the educational experience of our “traditional” students due to the tremendous diversity of life and career experiences they bring. Although universities may well view these potential students as an attractive demographic to pursue, especially as they struggle with decreases in the “traditional” student population, there are specific aspects of difference that must be kept in mind if the needs of returning adult learners are to be met adequately, absent which these students are unlikely to attend public universities.

1. Recognizing that they are different from “traditional” students

Adult learners, and especially those returning to gain a degree after years of experience in the workforce, have different needs and expectations than an 18-year-old. Their time is valuable; they come with tremendous real-world experience that is equivalent to, and often exceeds, a lot of coursework. Their expectations regarding the value proposition of time spent in gaining knowledge are justifiably high. Unlike the 18-year-old in awe of an older instructor, these students are not overcome by titles and qualifications but come expecting the development of skills and talent, and the acquisition of knowledge, that will help them break through the glass barrier created by their lack of degree or accelerate their professional advancement by use of new knowledge. These differences need to be recognized and addressed right from the point of recruitment/application, through orientation (acknowledging that for these students the orientation is not a “feel-good” activity but one of purpose and intent, focused on identifying resources, understanding policies, and developing the procedures and contacts to optimize their academic endeavors and learning) to their overall engagement, the experience needs to focus on their goals and optimize the use of their time.

2. Decreasing “red tape” and unnecessary barriers

Individuals who have substantial work experience expect efficiency, customer service and convenience—all aspects that are perhaps not at the uppermost of the general academic lexicon. Ensuring that response times in areas ranging from admissions and financial aid to registration, prior course assessment, and transcript evaluation are short and that students do not have to run from pillar to post to get questions answered are essential if we are to meet the justifiable expectations of adult returning students. Asking them to find all old transcripts when the most accurate one, or a certification that required it, was readily available is just putting up a needless barrier as is requiring them to repeat a non-essential course just because it was taken 5 or more years ago. Similarly, taking months to complete an audit of courses to assess transferability is just not acceptable.

3. Providing credit for prior learning and experience

Many returning students have completed some level of coursework in years gone by, and we need to acknowledge that for most of them, the grades earned five or more years ago do not adequately reflect their current levels of intellectual skill, understanding, and motivation. A “C” earned five or seven (or in many cases more) years ago should not automatically result in rejection for a subsequent course. Rather, previous work experience and performance need to be assessed and accounted for, including through mechanisms of competency-based learning. Similarly, asking a student to repeat a course, despite their having taken a similar one in the past because it did not match exactly, makes little sense. The use of supplementary online modules, or assessment of knowledge based on experience to bridge the gap, would be sufficient and in fact if the courses are close this should not even be an issue. Yet, it is surprising how many times students are asked to repeat courses because of differences in title and minor differences in scope. In addition, just as faculty and administrators justifiably feel that they have the knowledge, motivation, and ability to learn new material by themselves rather than going “back to school” to prove competence, we should expect that most returning adult learners are able to bridge gaps in knowledge by themselves with minimal hand holding if appropriate guidance and resources are provided. We need to acknowledge that these are highly motived, extremely hardworking adults who come back with clarity of purpose, and we need to treat them at that level, clearing barriers so that they can progress as fast as they can rather than being bound by what many feel is a meandering walk.

4. Ensuring flexible learning structures including accelerated programs

It is important that we provide flexibility in timing, shorter-term lengths, and multiple starts to match the schedules and responsibilities of returning adults. Our current semesters were based on the agrarian calendar and the concept of a credit hour was originally based on the need to devise a mechanism for pension for faculty. Advances in technology have made it possible for us to augment traditional forms of interaction and access through online/digital means and it is critical that we use these, adopting best practices already largely implemented by the for-profit and nonprofit online institutions to afford opportunities that are not constrained by time, space, or location. Highly motivated and driven students with years of work experience could well complete tasks faster than their “traditional” counterparts. We should not use “time in seat” as a metric of advancement, or rather as an inadvertent means of slowing their progress to degree or completion of a credential.

5. Enhancing modularity of offerings

Just as faculty and administrators would be insulted if asked to spend months practicing background material that was considered to be duplicative of existing knowledge before they were allowed to gain new information, we need to recognize that these students have often gained significant knowledge that is relevant to our courses through their work experience, and we should provide mechanisms to assess and deliver credit for this.  The unbundling of degrees through modularization of courses along with mechanisms for assessment of prior knowledge is an aspect that needs to be implemented across the board so that students can rapidly move up to the requisite level rather than waste time repeating preliminary and introductory material.  While crucial for returning adults, such mechanisms would also assist in personalizing the educational experience for all students. We further need to recognize and acknowledge that these returning students are highly motivated and can attain significant goals by themselves if appropriate guidance, direction, and resources are provided and that they can address gaps in knowledge without having to always go through highly structured and time-intensive courses.

6. Enabling financial aid

Adult students often have as great a need for financial aid as those entering directly from high school–and often even more, because of family responsibilities. Just because they have jobs does not mean that financial aid is not necessary. Many have family responsibilities, including children and aging parents. Returning to gain a degree may require cutting down on work hours or a second job, and universities need to be aware and cognizant of their needs, as well as of the nuances and intricacies of financial aid for those drawing a salary elsewhere. Rapid recognition of the difference and working to assist them rather than trying to use the same guidelines as those for more “traditional” students is essential. This is an area of significant need as related to relevant policies at both the institutional and government levels.

7. Providing clarity in pathways to jobs

College is not a right-of-passage for these students. Rather it is a means to a better future, a higher-paying job, and/or a more desirable career. Universities need to ensure that the curriculum and courses offer clear pathways to these goals and that academic knowledge is augmented by helpful career development centers and partnerships with the corporate/nonprofit sector to enable rapid progression. Universities need to enable this from day 1, assisting in placement and career advising, and ensuring integration of industry-desired certifications and stapling/stacking of credentials that will help both in their ongoing work responsibilities and in climbing their career ladders.

8. Enhancing opportunities for network building

Returning adult students often are shy and need assistance in building networks and support systems for themselves within academic settings. Special efforts need to be made to do this as well as to expand their horizons and opportunities through networking with alumni and corporate partners. Academia needs to recognize that these students are not interested in, and probably do not have time for, partying and socializing and that every minute they spend at the institution or online is time away from their families and other ongoing responsibilities–and hence, activities need to be intentional and purposeful.

While there is need to significantly change the way we operate to meet the needs and ensure the success of the growing adult returning population, it should also be clear that these additions and changes will positively impact all students, irrespective of age or background.  In fact, one could argue that attention to these aspects has been long overdue and that public institutions of higher education need to accelerate change if they are to remain relevant in the 21st century. Oddly, this simple idea—that higher education should primarily serve as a means for helping individuals access opportunities that will lead to a better life for themselves and for their families—is regularly dismissed by those within academia as ignorant of the “higher” virtues of education, such as the creation of good citizenry. We need to realign around the true purpose of higher education. With renewed clarity of purpose and greater collaboration between academia and industry, we’ll be one step closer to designing a more effective and inclusive system that makes opportunity work for everyone.

Related
5 strategies to help community colleges re-enroll adult learners
Higher ed continues to see changing enrollment, low confidence
For more news on the enrollment cliff, visit eCN’s Campus Leadership page

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Sun, 24 Dec 2023 20:00:00 -0600 Vistasp M. Karbhari, Professor in the Departments of Civil Engineering & Mechanical and Aerospace Engineering, University of Texas at Arlington en-US text/html https://www.ecampusnews.com/campus-leadership/2023/12/25/8-tips-adult-learners-enrollment-cliff/
Octorara Area school board re-elects president and vice president

When: Octorara Area school board reorganization and regular meeting, Dec. 7. The meeting was delayed from its original date of Dec. 5 due to delays in Chester County certification of election results.

Reorganization: New board members Jacob Lusby, Joelyn Metzler, Karen Williamson and reelected members Anthony Falgiatore and Brian Norris joined the board. Sam Ganow will continue as board president with Matt Hurley as vice president.

Calendar: The board will continue to hold meetings on the second and third Mondays of each month. However, those meetings will now shift to the next day, Tuesday, when there is a Monday school holiday. Superintendent Steven Leever asked for that change in consideration of employees, who must come in on a holiday for a board meeting.

Community engagement: During the regular board meeting, Leever presented the revised vision and mission statements developed by a committee of over 20 people that included community members.

New mission statement: “The mission of the Octorara Area School District in partnership with community and family, is to foster a culture of high expectations where students are empowered to become lifelong learners who positively contribute to their communities.”

Vision: "Empowering students to build successful futures.”

Quotable: “I want to point out the word empowering. That was something that was missing,” Leever said.

Tax cap: The board passed an opt-out resolution, committing to limit any real estate tax increase in the 2024-25 budget to no more than the Act 1 index of 6.4% set by the state.

Cybersecurity: The board also voted to purchase security hardware and software from Turn-Key Technologies to protect against cyber attacks at a cost of $72,589.

Tech ed director: The board named assistant principal Mark Pericca as the new career and technical education director effective February at a prorated salary of $130,000. He will replace Lisa McNamara who is retiring.

What’s next: The mission and vision statements will be up for approval at the next board meeting on Jan. 8.

Sat, 30 Dec 2023 18:00:00 -0600 en text/html https://lancasteronline.com/news/regional/octorara-area-school-board-re-elects-president-and-vice-president/article_7e7f1adc-986e-11ee-b01d-8368a655b051.html
These laws are going into effect in North Carolina on Jan. 1 No result found, try new keyword!From changes to wastewater rules implementation to election law changes, there's a lot going into effect in North Carolina on the first of the year. Thu, 07 Dec 2023 03:16:59 -0600 en-us text/html https://www.msn.com/ New police board revokes certification for six officers in first meeting

Dec. 13—During their first time meeting as a group Wednesday, members of a newly formed state police board revoked the certification of six officers — and one law enforcement communication worker — from around the state.

The board also issued certification suspensions — from 30 hours to 180 days — to eight officers or dispatchers and dismissed four disciplinary cases.

They were the first steps in a process that could shape law enforcement statewide for years to come — changes that could include the overhaul of rules that govern law enforcement policies, discipline and training.

In the short term, Wednesday's moves cut down some of the backlog in disciplinary cases for the Law Enforcement Certification Board, a product of state legislation earlier this year that split the former Law Enforcement Academy Board into two different groups that each oversee different functions of the state's police academy program.

The other newly formed body — the Standards and Training Council — met in accurate weeks to begin its review of police training around the state.

One of the actions the board took Wednesday was a temporary suspension of certification for Brad Lunsford, a Las Cruces police officer who recently was indicted on a voluntary manslaughter charge after he was accused of shooting and killing a man.

The board requested the academy's staff to expedite an investigation into Lunsford's disciplinary case.

Board members voted on the disciplinary cases after spending more than three hours in private discussions. The closed session also included discussion of four pending court appeals challenging suspensions or revocations by the former board, as well as one pending lawsuit from an Albuquerque Police Department officer whose certification-by-waiver was rejected by the former board in accurate years.

The new certification board is made up of sheriffs and police chiefs from around the state as well as civil rights attorneys and academics.

Board member and attorney Joseph Walsh called the new board structure "effectively a new paradigm that's trying to be implemented to hopefully be a model for law enforcement."

He added the new board structure can bring "true accountability."

The board began a process to hire a CEO for the academy Wednesday with the approval of a job description to be posted for recruiting. Members expressed hope the position would be filled in six months to a year.

A CEO will act as the "enforcement mechanism" of the board's directives at the academy, Walsh said, and make business decisions such as hiring and firing.

Until the position is filled, the board authorized academy director Sonya Chavez to make decisions.

Chavez, who began in the position Oct. 30, previously served as the U.S. Marshal of New Mexico. Before that, she worked as a special agent in the FBI.

"What we're involved in I think is going to be monumental for law enforcement in New Mexico," Chavez told the board Wednesday.

The board's misconduct investigations and hearings are still conducted according to administrative rules set decades ago for the former board, which was for years led by the state Attorney General.

On Wednesday, board members voted to form a four-member working group to draft changes to the rules.

The two members tasked with drafting changes to the rules for the board's disciplinary actions are public defender Julie Ball and Cody Rogers, a Las Cruces-based attorney. Rule changes pertaining to certification qualifications were assigned to be reviewed and redrafted by John Soloman, a criminal justice program director at Central New Mexico Community College, and Carly Lea Huffman, a training coordinator at the Bernalillo County Emergency Communications Center.

The rulemaking process is expected to generate new administrative rules for the board to be in place by the end of 2024.

Wed, 13 Dec 2023 10:01:00 -0600 en-US text/html https://www.aol.com/police-board-revokes-certification-six-043300039.html




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