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By Dinesh Nirmal, General Manager, Data, AI and Automation, IBM

The age of data-driven work is here. Virtually all employees today say they are expected to work with data on the job to some extent, from retail employees needing to keep tabs on sales and supply chains to professional athletes using data to fine tune their game.

Despite the expectation for employees, most people have a really hard time getting the data they need. Research shows that up to 82% of enterprises are inhibited by data silos, meaning data that's left in inaccessible repositories and databases. Simply put, the prevalence of these data silos can make working with data a real pain, a fact which perhaps helps explain why employees spend an average of one hour per week procrastinating on data-related tasks alone.

As more people need access to data – and the volume of data within an organization continues to dramatically grow – the task of governing that data, ensuring it is secure and compliant with privacy standards, is increasingly difficult.

Unlocking Innovation

It doesn't have to be this way. A clear data strategy defines how to make sense of vast amounts of data, align data initiatives to business strategy, and build solutions that span the entire organization. It helps organizations realize their data's potential and gather insights and identify efficiencies while complying with increasingly complex regulations.

But a critical part of implementing a data strategy vision is getting the right technology in place. That's exactly why companies around the world are investing heavily in a solution that can weave their disparate data sources together, also known as a data fabric. A data fabric is a type of data architecture that automates data discovery, governance, and consumption, allowing enterprises to elevate the value of their data by providing access to the right data, at the right time, regardless of where it resides. 

Research shows organizations that have adopted a data fabric architecture are significantly more innovative. Companies that have actively deployed and are seeing value from AI, for example, are 283% more likely to have a data fabric architecture in place than those that have not.

Making Work Easier

A data fabric unlocks innovation because it makes employees' jobs easier. With a data fabric, employees don't need to spend time hunting down, validating, and verifying the data they need to do their jobs. A data fabric architecture is also critical for feeding the models, AI, and automation needed to eliminate repetitive, low-value tasks and divert resources to more interesting, value-adding work.

A data fabric also enables a comprehensive approach to privacy and data access. Consumers need assurances that their data is being protected and companies are not running the risk of breaches, abuses, or other misuse that risks damage to their reputation.

The data-driven enterprise is more than just a buzzword – access to quality data can be transformative and differentiating. But ensuring access to quality data remains challenging for numerous reasons, and more employees need access to more data than ever before. A data strategy that takes advantage of data fabric architecture is the best way to democratize access to data so that data consumers —whether they are in human resources, customer service, manufacturing, or marketing — can get the data they need, while empowering IT teams to work smarter, not harder. 

Optimize your data strategy and democratize data access with a data fabric. Check out IBM's new guide for data leaders here.

This post was created by IBM with Insider Studios.

Tue, 09 Aug 2022 05:09:00 -0500 en-US text/html https://www.businessinsider.com/sc/why-your-data-strategy-probably-needs-an-overhaul
Killexams : From software developer to CEO: Red Hat's Matt Hicks on his journey to the top
Image: Red Hat

Matt Hicks, Red Hat's new CEO, doesn't have the background of your typical chief executive. 

He studied computer hardware engineering in college. 

He began his career as an IT consultant at IBM. 

And instead of jumping into management at Red Hat, Hicks started at the open-source software business in 2006 as a developer on the IT team. 

SEE: Red Hat names new CEO

His on-the-ground experience, however, is one of his core assets as the company's new leader, Hicks says. 

"The markets are changing really quickly," he tells ZDNet. "And just having that intuition -- of where hardware is going, having spent time in the field with what enterprise IT shops struggle with and what they do well, and then having a lot of years in Red Hat engineering -- I know that's intuition that I'll lean on... Around that, there's a really good team at Red Hat, and I get to lean on their expertise of how to best deliver, but that I love having that core intuition."

Hicks believes his core knowledge helps him to guide the company's strategic bets.

While his experience is an asset, Hicks says it's not a given that a good developer will make a good leader. You also need to know how to communicate your ideas persuasively. 

SEE: Hands on: Putting Ubuntu Linux on my Microsoft Surface Go

"You can't just be the best coder in the room," he says.

"Especially in STEM and engineering, the softer skills of learning how to present, learning how to influence a group and show up really well in a leadership presentation or at a conference -- they really start to define people's careers." 

Red Hat CEO Matt Hicks has big plans for the future of his company.

Image: Red Hat

Hicks says that focus on influence is an important part of his role now that he didn't relish earlier in his career. 

"I think a lot of people don't love that," he says.

"And yet, you can be the best engineer on the planet and work hard, but if you can't be heard, if you can't influence, it's harder to deliver on those opportunities."

Hicks embraced the art of persuasion to advance his career. And as an open-source developer, he learned to embrace enterprise products to advance Red Hat's mission.

He joined Red Hat just a few years after Paul Cormier -- then Red Hat's VP of engineering, and later Hicks' predecessor as CEO -- moved the company from its early distribution, Red Hat Linux, to Red Hat Enterprise Linux (RHEL). It was a move that not everyone liked. 

"There was a significant amount of angst," Hicks says, with developers questioning whether it was the right business model for open source. "People are passionate about creating sustaining models. So I think at the time [the question] was, is Red Hat departing from that, or will this continue to make open source better?" 

Hicks had an understanding of both sides of that debate.

"I really started my whole journey with technology with Linux itself," he says. "I was on the consumer side -- you know, I bought the boxes of Linux from Best Buy. But my first professional job was actually in consulting with IBM at the time. And as much as I knew about Linux, there's a difference when you're a consultant at an enterprise and you're deploying Linux next to [IBM's Unix-based operating system] AIX.

"I had my consumer view -- I loved this open source thing," he says. "But I also had that practitioner view of, I'm going into large enterprises, and I'm only going to be here on a consulting gig and this has to have credibility. And RHEL really delivered to that well."

Hicks says he was drawn to Red Hat because of the inherent tension between community and commerce.

"There's the pull to either side, of how do you enable a community where the software is accessible to anyone on the planet, your partners and your competitors on it?" he says, versus the question of, "How do you harness that innovation, to have a really successful commercial model that customers value?"

In all the years he's been at Red Hat, Hicks doesn't think much has changed around the challenge of balancing those two forces.

Of course, plenty of other stuff has changed, both in the profession of software development and at Red Hat. Hicks wants to ensure that the company is always ready to evolve -- that's why in a message to Red Hat's workforce, he wrote: "When we hire, look for culture add, not culture fit."

He believes the idea of searching for a culture fit among prospective employees has a very static feel to it. 

"It's not you're not adding anything, you're not looking at potential," he says. "If you're always staying with what you know, the culture you have today, fitting your current constraints, I think you're going to lose out on a lot of that potential, both the potential for today and then as that talent evolves and changes tomorrow."

Red Hat was acquired by IBM in 2019 for $34 billion, but the company continues to operate as a standalone division. Meanwhile, RHEL is still the industry's leading enterprise Linux platform. As Steven Vaughan-Nichols noted for ZDNet, it's used by more than 90% of Fortune 500 organizations and touches $13 trillion in global business revenues in 2022.

"Pretty much any industry you look at is starting to define their innovation with software at this point, and we're in the software business," Hick says, stressing the opportunity in front of Red Hat. 

SEE: Red Hat's next steps, according to its new CEO and chairman

The company is focused on supporting the "open hybrid cloud," enabling IT teams to work across public clouds, data centers and the edge. 

"We're at the intersection of the potential of open source, the potential of open hybrid cloud and software innovation, and that's what gets me excited every day," Hicks says. 

As he settles into his new role as CEO, the main challenge ahead of Hicks will be picking the right industries and partners to pursue at the edge. Red Hat is already working at the edge, in a range of different industries. It's working with General Motors on Ultifi, GM's end-to-end software platform, and it's partnering with ABB, one of the world's leading manufacturing automation companies. It's also working with Verizon on hybrid mobile edge computing. 

Even so, the opportunity is vast. Red Hat expects to see around $250 billion in spending at the edge by 2025. 

"There'll be a tremendous growth of applications that are written to be able to deliver to that," Hicks says. "And so our goals in the short term are to pick the industries and build impactful partnerships in those industries -- because it's newer, and it's evolving."

Thu, 04 Aug 2022 02:00:00 -0500 en text/html https://www.zdnet.com/article/from-software-developer-to-ceo-red-hats-matt-hicks-on-his-journey-to-the-top/
Killexams : The Value Of Mobile: Lessons Learned From The Pandemic

CEO and Founder of InterPro Solutions, offering a suite of award-winning mobile Ops & Maintenance apps designed exclusively for IBM Maximo.

Over the past two years, I—and others—in the mobile technology industry have written about how mobile solutions became invaluable tools in maintaining and managing physical assets in large facilities ranging from college campuses to power generation plants, hospitals and more during the pandemic.

The driving factor for mobile asset management solution adoption during the pandemic was that these solutions minimized person-to-person contact. Instead of dozens of technicians reporting to the dispatch office each morning to pick up paper maintenance and repair work orders, assignments were distributed via mobile apps. At the end of the day, that return trip to the dispatch office was also eliminated since all work details were captured at point of service via the technician’s mobile device. The value equation was very clear—eliminate the need for the technicians to gather and therefore minimize the chance of person-to-person transmission of the virus.

While mobile solutions were effective in minimizing person-to-person contact, there were additional lessons learned and business benefits captured beyond the initial safety imperatives.

Capturing accurate, detailed data is crucial.

By arming technicians with mobile devices, facilities had a real-time view into work activities. With the use of NFC (near field communication) tags, geo-fencing and built-in bar code readers, maintenance managers were instantly aware when a technician arrived on the job. As the technician input work details, along with start and stop times, crew managers had real-time updates on the progress of repairs. Using in-app messaging, crew members could consult with each other without face-to-face contact—with the added benefit of that conversation being saved to the work record.

Using other capabilities such as voice-to-text, technicians captured details on issues and provided important notes for the next technician. Needless to say, this was more efficient than returning a paper work order back to the dispatch office to be typed into the organization’s enterprise asset management system.

Use data to predict and prepare for future problems.

The big “ah-ha” with this switch to mobile was the improvement in data quality, which directly translated to increased uptime for the machinery and equipment. Now instead of asking the data entry team to decipher handwritten service notes, technicians are prompted to capture data in a structured way, including the ability to make the capture of certain data elements mandatory.

This structured data capture then opened the door for data analysis and modeling to predict, and therefore prevent, equipment failures. The use of voice-to-text, audio and pictures to document asset health translated to reduced repair hours and increased first-fix rates—armed with a full understanding of the repair history and prior diagnostics, problems can be diagnosed quicker, and technicians can arrive with the proper tools and parts in hand.

Focus on efficiencies.

Other device features, such as maps, provided massive efficiencies. Maps were able to guide technicians to the proper address or building, and with GIS, also to the correct floor and exact asset location—even when the asset was inside a wall or internal to a large piece of equipment. In addition, mapping capabilities allow schedulers to group jobs by proximity to minimize travel time or optimize routes for technicians who travel to perform inspections.

For more mature mobile installations, the list goes on. Using apps, organizations could directly capture labor hours for each job, and in many instances, integrate with HR and payroll systems. Other organizations extended their mobile functionality to enable parts requests from stock rooms and even generate requisitions and/or purchase orders for items not in stock. Many have also equipped their outside vendors, e.g., elevator technicians or licensed tradesman that they don’t have on staff, to generate the same efficiencies they’re enjoying with their in-house maintenance team.

Spend time researching in order to create meaningful solutions.

If your organization has yet to invest in a mobile asset management solution, or you’re just getting started, understand that it’s a journey, not a one-time fix. Don’t fall into the trap of replicating a paper form on a mobile device—spend the time to think through which data are critical to your operation. Are you asking for data you already have? Are you asking for data that you won’t use in any meaningful way? Sit down with your technicians to understand what they do in the field, and design your mobile app to support the way they actually work.

Where possible, create workflows that guide the technician through the repair/inspection and prompt the technician for the specific data you need—ideally with dropdowns, radio buttons or voice commands that minimize the need to type. I've found this approach not only improves data quality, but also improves user adoption. Technicians will embrace the use of a mobile app it makes their jobs easier—and will resist if it just adds more work to their already full plate.

Prepare for the potential challenges of mobile adoption.

The use of mobile devices is generally welcomed by technicians—85% of the U.S. population owns a smartphone. Since veteran workers typically have the greatest technical expertise, getting them onboard with mobile is critical. Teaming a younger, “born-digital” employee with a veteran employee is a good way for the younger employee to gain technical expertise while allowing the veteran gain comfort with the mobile device.

Another challenge sometimes encountered is a fear of being tracked by the mobile device. While some level of tracking is often desired by the organization, e.g., being able to map the location of technicians to minimize travel between jobs, it may be perceived as surveillance. In my experience, it’s best to have a written mobile device use policy that clarifies what is and isn’t being tracked and what’s expected of your workforce, including individual responsibilities and restrictions on use.

Covid-19 forced organizations to rethink how they do business. Managing a large facility with hundreds of technicians is a difficult job, even in the best of times. In response, many organizations scrambled to adopt mobile asset management tools that would allow them to implement safety measures. As restrictions have eased, organizations have come to realize that these mobile tools have also resulted in labor efficiencies and equipment up-time gains—and made their facilities teams more responsive to their organizations.


Forbes Business Council is the foremost growth and networking organization for business owners and leaders. Do I qualify?


Tue, 02 Aug 2022 01:45:00 -0500 Bill Fahey en text/html https://www.forbes.com/sites/forbesbusinesscouncil/2022/08/02/the-value-of-mobile-lessons-learned-from-the-pandemic/
Killexams : The Ultimate Guide to Data Security in the Manufacturing Industry

There has long been a belief in the manufacturing industry that companies in the sector were relatively safe from cyber threats, with a misconception that cyber attackers prefer to target businesses in the financial services and healthcare industry instead.

Yet, according to the latest IBM Security X-Force Threat Intelligence Index 2022 report, the manufacturing industry is now the most frequently hacked industry. The sector was targeted in 23.2 percent of the attacks that X-Force remediated.

Ransomware was the top attack type, accounting for 23 percent of attacks on manufacturing organizations and underscoring the heavy focus ransomware actors placed on manufacturing. Server access attacks came in second place at 12 percent, while BEC and data theft tied for third place at 10 percent each.

Vulnerability exploitation was the top infection vector at manufacturing organizations in 2021, at 47 percent, followed closely by phishing at 40 percent. The report claims that the volume of these attacks probably drove the overall initial infection vector trends X-Force observed in 2021.

Removable media (7 percent), stolen credentials (3 percent) and brute force (3 percent) also accounted for a small percentage of attacks.

With the above statistics in mind, there’s no doubt that it’s more important than ever before that organizations working in the manufacturing industry implement robust data protection strategies to better secure their data and meet regulatory compliance requirements.

To help get your business started, we’ve created this guide as an overview of everything you’ll need to know to Excellerate data security in the manufacturing industry. 

Ensure your business is compliant with relevant data privacy regulations relevant

With the emergence of data privacy laws that regulate how organizations use personal data and share it with third parties, businesses in the manufacturing sector must prioritize how they collect, store and use personally identifiable information (PII).

Manufacturing businesses must ensure that they comply with the regulations that are relevant to them within the region or countries that they offer goods and services or collect consumer data. 

The data privacy regulations that your business must comply with will depend on your region of operation, but some of the most common laws include:

  • California Consumer Privacy Act (CCPA)
  • Colorado Privacy Act (CPA)
  • Virginia Consumer Protection Act (VCDPA)
  • Utah Consumer Privacy Act (UCPA)
  • Europe’s General Data Protection Regulation (GDPR)
  • And the Brazilian Data protection Law (LGPD), also known as Lei Geral de Proteção de Dados

To learn more about any of these data privacy laws please visit our recent blog:

What are the Consequences of Non-compliance With Data Privacy Laws

Implement data security best practices into your business

Unlike other industries, the manufacturing sector hasn’t typically held vast amounts of consumer data. As a result, manufacturing executives often haven’t put data security and compliance top of mind. 

Yet, with the manufacturing industry now being named as the most frequently hacked sector, that is changing rapidly. Contrary to popular belief, original equipment manufacturers (OEMs) and product makers hold vast amounts of sensitive data, including intellectual property and financial information. Your business is also exposed to additional risk through your extended supply chain

To mitigate the risk of cyber attacks and ensure customer and company information is kept secure, manufacturing businesses should look at bolstering their data security strategy with a few key best practices:

  • Gain visibility into where your sensitive data lives

Understanding what sensitive data your organization has, where it lives and who has access to it gives your business visibility of its internal and external surface attack risk and to ensure that your business processes are complying with the relevant data privacy requirements. 

Data discovery software scans your organization’s entire environment, finding and identifying where both structured and unstructured data resided across your business. This gives you real-time insight into where your data lives, so you can better ensure that data is being protected and that it complies with data privacy laws. 

Download the Guide to Data Discovery for Compliance

  • Train your employees to recognize cybersecurity threats

When it comes to cybersecurity vulnerability, a company’s employees pose the biggest weakness. Cybercriminals know that it’s easier to target employees through attacks like phishing than to find a way through a company’s infrastructure. That’s why manufacturing businesses must train their employees to recognize the signs of cyber attacks so they can avoid falling for them. 

  • Use data classification to enhance your compliance efforts

Data classification is the process of identifying and tagging data into categories based on relevant information, such as file type, content or what data privacy laws the data must comply with. By implementing this process into your data security strategy, your business will Excellerate its visibility into where sensitive data lives across the network making it easier ensure that the data is both secure and compliant.

  • Treat data security like a business issue, not an “IT problem”

As we mentioned previously, in the past data security hasn’t been a priority for the large majority of manufacturing executives. These businesses typically brushed off data security as an IT issue, making it an afterthought to the genuine business. 

But data security is about more than updating your passwords every few weeks, it’s a highly-strategic and comprehensive process that should be an essential aspect of all facets of the business. Data security should be seen as a vital process that mitigates costly system outages and downtime in the event you do experience a breach or data leak. 

Get a head start on your data protection strategy with a free vulnerability assessment from Cavelo to uncover your organization’s sensitive data and vulnerabilities. See what you’re missing and sign up today

SIGN-UP FOR A FREE VULNERABILITY ASSESSMENT

*** This is a Security Bloggers Network syndicated blog from Cavelo Blog and Press Release authored by Mandy Bachus. Read the original post at: https://www.cavelo.com/blog/the-ultimate-guide-to-data-security-in-the-manufacturing-industry

Wed, 27 Jul 2022 06:32:00 -0500 by Mandy Bachus on July 27, 2022 en-US text/html https://securityboulevard.com/2022/07/the-ultimate-guide-to-data-security-in-the-manufacturing-industry/ Killexams : Telos Corporation's (TLS) CEO John Wood on Q2 2022 Results - Earnings Call Transcript

Telos Corporation (NASDAQ:TLS) Q2 2022 Earnings Conference Call August 9, 2022 8:30 AM ET

Company Participants

Christina Mouzavires - Investor Relations

John Wood - Chairman and Chief Executive Officer

Mark Bendza - Executive Vice President and CFO

Mark Griffin - Executive Vice President, Security Solutions

Conference Call Participants

Zach Cummins - B. Riley

Rudy Kessinger - D.A. Davidson

Alex Henderson - Needham & Company

Nehal Chokski - Northland Capital Markets

Brad Clark - BMO

Operator

Good day and thank you for standing by. Welcome to the Telos Corporation Second Quarter 2022 Earnings Conference Call. At this time, all participants are in a listen-only mode. After the speakers’ presentation, there will be a question-and-answer session. [Operator Instructions]

Please be advised, today’s conference is being recorded. I would now like to hand the conference over to your speaker today, Christina Mouzavires. Please go ahead.

Christina Mouzavires

Good morning. Thank you for joining us to discuss Telos Corporation’s second quarter 2022 financial results. With me today is John Wood, Chairman and CEO of Telos; and Mark Bendza, Executive Vice President and CFO of Telos.

Let me quickly review the format of today’s presentation. John will begin with brief remarks on our 2022 second quarter results and Telos’ strategic priority, and Mark will cover the financials and guidance for the third quarter and full year 2022. Then we will open the line for questions-and-answers where Mark Griffin, Executive Vice President of Security Solutions will also join us.

The earnings press release was issued earlier today and is posted on the Telos Investor Relations website where this call is being simultaneously webcast. Additionally, we have provided presentation slides on our Investor Relations website.

Before we begin, we want to emphasize that some of our statements on this call are forward-looking statements and are made under the safe harbor provisions of the federal securities laws. These statements are based on current expectations and assumptions that are subject to risks and uncertainties.

Actual results could materially differ for various reasons, including the factors described in today’s earnings press release and the comments made during this conference call and in our SEC filings. We do not undertake any duty to update any forward-looking statements.

In addition, during today’s call we will discuss non-GAAP financial measures, which we believe are useful as supplemental and clarifying measures that help investors understand Telos’ financial performance.

These non-GAAP financial measures should be considered in addition to and not as assessed to for or in isolation from GAAP results. You can find additional disclosures regarding these non-GAAP measures, including reconciliations with comparable GAAP results in our earnings press release and on the Investor Relations portion at our website. Please also note that financial comparisons are year-over-year unless otherwise specified.

The webcast replay of this call will be available for the next year on our company website under the Investor Relations page.

With that, I will turn the call over to John.

John Wood

Thank you, Christina, and good morning, everyone. Let’s begin today on slide three. I am pleased to report that Telos over delivered again on key financial metrics in the second quarter of 2022. Mark will discuss our financial performance later in this call, but at a high level, we delivered $55.8 million of revenue in the second quarter, above our guidance range of $50 million to $54 million, up 4% year-over-year and 11%, sequentially. Gross margin was 37.5%, above our guidance range of 33% to 35%. Finally, we delivered $4.5 million of adjusted EBITDA, above the high end of our guidance range of negative $2 million to positive $2 million and $0.04 of adjusted EPS.

Now, let’s turn to slide four to discuss our recent business highlights and updates. This quarter we announced a new strategic partnership with IBM. Telos is the launch partner for the new active governance service or AGS offering with IBM Security.

Telos and IBM are teaming to provide capabilities to address the significant challenges organizations are facing with cybersecurity and risk compliance. AGS is a unique and comprehensive offering, coupling the Xacta suite of tools with IBM’s services and security expertise to significantly Excellerate the efficiency of clients’ approach to cyber security risk management in today’s increasingly challenging cyber environment. Target customers include large enterprise organizations in global markets such as financial services, healthcare, telecommunications and energy.

We are very excited about this opportunity to partner with IBM, a leading global organization that brings recognized thought leadership and leading capability in the cybersecurity management space. This relationship also enables us to effectively broaden our reach in the global marketplace for sales of our Xacta suite of tools to drive future growth for Telos.

Beyond the IBM partnership, we have continued to maintain momentum in the current environment. Within the Security Solutions business, Telos received Xacta renewals with several key customers, including the Central Intelligence Agency, The U.S. Department of the Interior, The U.S. Environmental Protection Agency, our U.S. Federal Reserve Bank and The U.S. Department of Energy, as well as Salesforce.

The company was also awarded new contracts with a foreign government customer, The U.S. Army Space and Missile Command, The U.S. Department of Homeland Security, Palantir Technologies and OmniHealth.

We continue to focus on the government and commercial space, and in particular, prioritizing regulated industries. The company also received an important Ghost renewal with a classified customer to continue providing support. Additionally, we were awarded up to a 10-year contract to continue and expand our aviation security practice with the U.S. Transportation Security Administration.

Our ONYX technology won first place in the Mobile Fingerprint Information Challenge posted by the National Institute of Standards and Technology.

Finally, the Secure Networks business continued to add to its backlog with new wins, including a new contract to support The U.S. Air Force SIPRNet Enterprise Modernization.

Let me turn now to some comments on the industry landscape and a number of recent initiatives in Washington, D.C., that presents opportunities for Telos. There are indications that Congress plans to boost spending above the level called for by President Biden in his proposed FY 2023 budget.

The House and Senate versions of the Annual Defense Authorization Bill provides for increasing topline defense spending, respectively $37 billion to $45 billion above the level proposed by the President.

We still have to see how the appropriations process plays out this fall to know how much funding will actually be provided for our military customers, but signs are there that the FY 2023 defense budget will see a meaningful increase.

On the non-defense side, as with defense, we will have to wait for Congress to agree on appropriations legislation. But so far, the spending bills under consideration reflect a consensus that more funding is needed for cybersecurity throughout the various departments and agencies.

A great example of this is with CISA, The Department of Homeland Security’s cybersecurity agency. CISA works to detect and mitigate the effects of cyber attacks on federal, state and local governments, and the private sector, and then manage cyber risks to our critical infrastructure. We understand that recognizing the importance of this mission, the draft Senate Appropriations Bill for DHS seeks to provide CISA a 16% increase above last year’s funding.

Congress clearly recognizes that more resources are needed by federal departments and agencies to combat challenges they face in the cyberspace. A major factor in that thinking is the Ukraine situation, which has resulted in continued warnings of potential cyber attacks against U.S. interests, including against U.S. critical infrastructure.

So far, the United States has done an excellent job in preventing what had been expected to be widespread impacts from cyber attacks in retaliation for our support for Ukraine. The policy makers and companies like ours know that the public and private sectors can’t let up and they must continue to follow cybersecurity best practices, including deploying and updating effective cyber defenses.

I will now turn the call over to Mark who will discuss second quarter 2022 financial results and our guidance for the third quarter and full year 2022. Mark?

Mark Bendza

Thank you, John, and thank you everyone for joining us today. Let’s turn to slide five. As John mentioned, we delivered a strong second quarter, with results that exceeded our guidance on key financial metrics.

We reported revenue, gross margin and adjusted EBITDA above the high end of our guidance range. We also delivered $5.4 million of free cash flow, representing a nearly four-fold increase in free cash flow year-over-year.

Before I turn the year-over-year comparison, I just wanted to remind everyone again, as I did in our last earnings call, that we had a large delivery on a lower margin program in our Secure Networks business last year that’s pulled forward from the second quarter of 2021 to the first quarter of 2021 per the request of our customer.

The accelerated delivery caused with Secure Networks contribution to total revenue to shift from 60% in the first quarter of 2021 to 40% in the second quarter of 2021 and gross margin to shift from 25.9% in the first quarter of 2021 to 42% in the second quarter of 2021, thereby skewing some of the second quarter year-over-year comparisons this year.

So I will provide year-over-year comparisons for the second quarter as usual and also for the first half overall to normalize for the accelerated shipment from the second quarter to the first quarter of last year.

Okay, with that backdrop, I will go into details. For the second quarter, total sales were $55.8 million, up 11% sequentially and up 4% year-over-year. Performance about the high end of the guidance range of $50 million to $54 million was driven by favorable timing variances and pre-existing higher margin programs in Security Solutions and strong supply chain management in Secure Networks.

Security Solutions sales were $30.8 million, up 15% sequentially and down 4% year-over-year, due to lower revenues on a classified program and the completion of the U.S. Census program, partially offset by growth in other pre-existing programs.

Secure Network sales were $25 million, up 7% sequentially and up 17% year-over-year, due to continued strong supply chain management, higher revenues on major programs and favorable year-over-year comparison due to the previously mentioned large delivery that pulled forward from the second quarter of 2021 to the first quarter of 2021.

Turning to profitability and cash flow, second quarter gross margin was 37.5%, above our guidance range of 33% to 35%, primarily due to the margin outperformance in Security Solutions.

Gross margin contracted 449 basis points year-over-year and gross profit declined 7%. The gross margin contraction was driven by a less favorable sales mix between Security Solutions and Secure Networks compared to last year, as well as gross margin contraction within Secure Networks, both of which were the result of the previously mentioned early shipments in 2021.

Security Solutions revenues as a percentage of total company revenues declined from 60% in 2021 to 55% in 2022, as Secure Networks gross margin contracted nearly 700 basis points to 18%. Security Solution gross margins held constant at 53.3%.

Adjusted EBITDA declined by approximately $700,000 due to lower gross profit, partially offset by lower below the line expenses.

Free cash flow improved nearly four-fold to $5.4 million. The improvement in free cash flow continued the trends from the first quarter of more favorable working capital dynamics compared to last year and created an opportunity to begin returning capital to shareholders.

On May 24th, we announced that our Board of Directors authorized a share repurchase program for up to $50 million of the company’s stock. During the second quarter, we deployed $3 million to repurchase over 360,000 shares at a weighted average price of $8.33 and we have continued repurchasing stock daily during the third quarter. During the third quarter till last Friday, we deployed an additional $1.1 million to repurchase nearly 143,000 shares at a weighted average price of $7.86.

Now let’s recap on the first half overall to normalize for the accelerated shipments from the second quarter to the first quarter of 2021. First half revenues declined 3%. Secure Networks revenues declined 11%, as expected, due to the headwind associated with the ongoing wind down of two large programs in 2022. Security Solutions revenues grew 5%, primarily due to the ramp up of a confidential program.

First half gross margin expanded 374 basis points to 37.6% and gross profit increased 8%. The gross margin expansion was driven by a more favorable sales mix within Security Solutions and Secure Networks, as well as gross margin expansion within Security Solutions.

Security Solutions revenues as a percentage of total company revenues increased from 50% in 2021 to 54% in 2022 and Security Solutions, gross margin expanded 638 basis points to 54.5% due to the ramp of high margin progress. Secure Networks gross margin contracted 206 basis points to 17.2%.

Adjusted EBITDA declined $1.3 million due to higher SG&A, offsetting $2.8 million of higher gross profit.

Lastly, free cash flow was $10.3 million higher due to favorable working capital dynamics, driving significantly better cash flow from operations in the first and second quarters. Overall, our first half has performed ahead of forecast and guidance, primarily due to favorable timing differences -- variances between the second half and the first half in orders and deliveries on pre-existing programs and diligent supply chain management.

Now, let’s turn to slide six to discuss our outlook for the third quarter. For the third quarter, we forecast sales in a range of $58 million to $62 million, up 4% to 11% sequentially and down 10% to 15% year-over-year.

We forecast Security Solutions revenues to be down mid- to high-teens year-over-year, primarily due to the completion of the 2020 Census Program in 2021, lower orders expected on a single pre-existing program and lumpiness of perpetual licensing.

We continue to make good progress on the TSA PreCheck program, but revenues for this program in 3Q, if any, are expected to be de minimis. We expect Secure Networks revenues to be down mid-single digits to mid-teens year-over-year due to the ongoing wind down of two large programs coming to a successful completion.

We expect gross margins to be down approximately 350 basis points to 500 basis points year-over-year, primarily due to a slightly lower weighting of revenues to our high margin Security Solutions segment and revenue within both Security Solutions and Secure Networks mixing lower in the quarter.

Below the line expenses, excluding stock compensation expense, are expected to be approximately $1 million higher due to the ramp of R&D and G&A investments during 2021. Adjusted EBITDA is expected to be $3.5 million to $5 million, representing a 6% to 8% mark.

Now, let’s turn to slide seven to discuss our updated outlook for 2022. For the full year, we have narrowed our revenue range from our prior guidance of$226 million to $257 million to our updated range of $226 million to $242 million. There is no change to the low end of the revenue.

Reduction at the high end of the range reflects lower assumption on TSA PreCheck revenues and new business in the second half, partially offset by higher revenues on pre-existing programs within Security Solutions.

We have lowered and widely narrowed our adjusted EBITDA range from our prior guidance of $21 million to $28 million to our updated range of $18 million to $24 million. The reduction at the high end of the range reflects our -- reflects lower gross profit associated with the corresponding revenue reduction, partially offset by lower than previously forecasted below the line expenses. The reduction at the low end of the range primarily reflects the impact of lower than previously forecasted gross margins on Secure Networks in the second half, including on new business.

Overall, we have performed ahead of forecast in the first half, our core business is performing well and we expect that to continue, pre-existing programs are performing well, sequential sales growth is expected to continue into the third and fourth quarters as originally planned, and we are taking a slightly more cautious approach to new business in the second half in part as a result of the more complex macro environment, which could create some headwinds for our new business growth initiatives in the short-term.

With that, I will pass it back to John who will wrap up on slide eight.

John Wood

Thanks, Mark. In summary, we delivered a solid second quarter during which we formed a new strategic partnership with IBM and outpaced guidance on our key financial metrics. We also delivered gross margin expansion and strong free cash flow in the first half of the year and have begun to return free cash flow to shareholders through share repurchases.

Our core business and pre-existing programs are performing well and we expect that to continue for the balance of the year. We are taking a slightly more cautious approach to new business in the second half of the year and are managing our forecasting expenses accordingly.

With that, we are happy to take questions.

Question-and-Answer Session

Operator

Thank you. [Operator Instructions] Our first question comes from the line of that Zach Cummins with D.A. Davidson, oh, I am sorry with B. Riley. Your line is open. Please go ahead.

Zach Cummins

Yeah. Thanks. Good morning. Hi, John. Hi, Mark. Thanks for taking my questions. Mark, I -- my question is really geared towards the updated guidance for the year. I mean can you provide a little more granularity around the assumptions you are making for TSA PreCheck and maybe why you are taking a slightly more cautious approach to new business wins here in the second half of the year?

Mark Bendza

Yeah. Sure, Zach. Thanks for your question. So why don’t I dissect that a little bit for you? So, at the high end of the guidance range, we are taking sales down by $15 million, $11 million of the $15 million is PreCheck net revenue. So we previously assumed $12 million of net revenues for PreCheck at the high end of the guidance, now we are assuming $1 million.

The PreCheck process is progressing well. Obviously, we don’t have the ATO yet and so we felt it appropriate to take that guide down, but certainly, wanted to leave revenue in there as a recognition that we still expect the ATO this year.

The balance of the $4 million, the other $4 million, is really net reductions across the rest of the portfolio, primarily driven by lower assumptions on new business in the second half. The thought there is, even though we are not seeing impact from the more complicated macro environment right now in our core business, our core business is performing very well, it’s not being impacted by the macro environment and you are seeing that in the second quarter results.

But we wanted to acknowledge at least as we scrub the forecast for PreCheck, we wanted to take a broader look at some of the higher risk items in the forecast. For example, anywhere where we are selling new solutions for pre-existing solution to new customers in new end markets, we wanted to take a slightly more cautious approach there.

So that’s the $4 million of additional net reduction. To put that in perspective, at the midpoint of the range that would represent about 80 basis points of year-over-year growth, so a very modest reduction as a nod, in part to the macro environment, but very modest nonetheless.

On adjusted EBITDA at the high end of the guidance, we are taking by $4 million. That is the reduction in the gross profit corresponding to the revenue reduction, partially offset by reduction in below the line expense.

And then at the low end, no change to sales, but what you are seeing in the $3 million of lower adjusted EBITDA is lower gross margin on Secure Networks, primarily in new business in the second half.

Zach Cummins

Understood. That’s helpful. Much appreciated and best of luck in the coming quarter.

John Wood

Thanks a lot.

Mark Bendza

Thanks, Zach.

Operator

Our next question comes from the line of Rudy Kessinger with D.A. Davidson. Your line is open. Please go ahead.

Rudy Kessinger

Hey, guys. So just following up on that question there, I guess, the $4 million reduction at the top end, I am just more conservative ex-TSA and the rest of the portfolio. I guess, I would just ask, the channel and the direct sales reps, are they meeting your expectations from, say, the start this year on pipeline build in sales production as we get into the second half year? And then, secondly, on IBM, do you have anything incremental baked into the guide this year for IBM? And I guess just bigger picture, how big of a driver or growth -- how much can IBM be, say, in maybe 2023?

John Wood

Hey, Rudy. This is John. I will take first -- I will take the second question and I will ask Mark Griffin to answer the first one. As it relates to IBM, we have a couple of hundred thousand dollars in our model for purposes of this year.

As it relates to the -- how big it can be, we think it could be quite sizable and that’s not a good number -- that’s not me able to provide you -- I am not able to provide you a modeling perspective as yet. What I can say however is that the their pipeline is filling up quite rapidly with what I would consider to be Tier 1 names, large car manufacturers, large banks, large pharmaceutical companies, countries, et cetera, places that I think would be very difficult for us to get into on our own and really what’s happened is that they have embedded Xacta as their launch partner in their advanced -- its governance solutions. So I think it’s got a lot of potential in front of us.

As we put out our guide for 2023, I am sure we will provide you much greater detail. But I am quite happy with how the -- how that relationship is really coming out in a fully blossoming way, much like I had hoped it was going to be with the cloud service providers, but they have been quite, as you are well aware slower. So here IBM is completely embraced it. They are also looking at using it internally. So I think there is a great opportunity for us with IBM in over the next five years to 10 years. And Mark, if you have a mic, can you answer the first question on the sales force?

Mark Griffin

Sure. Hello, Rudy. Mark Griffin. Commercial adoption is happening, but obviously, we took a more cautious and slower approach than initially planned. We are ongoing and continuing to fine-tune the staff, not only in the sales area, but also increase the capture and business development areas to achieve operational efficiencies and maximize our potential.

So, yes, we are seeing progress. The pipeline is increasing. We are seeing some opportunities that will close in late Q3 and in Q4. But we continue to fine-tune that staff and look for additional opportunities and growth from additional -- look across operations in the sales and Capture BD areas.

John Wood

Go ahead.

Operator

Thank you. And our next question comes from the line of Alex Henderson with Needham & Company. Your line is open. Please go ahead.

Alex Henderson

Thanks. I am going to break little bit, just ask two questions, one just why you think there’s any improvement in TSA. The primary question is on the Xacta. It’s very difficult looking at the numbers to cut through the noise and understand exactly what’s going on with the product. Can you provide us some sense of what the growth rate, based on your current guidance for Xacta on a full year basis? Is it actually producing double-digit growth, is it flat, is it up 20%? What -- can you just provide us some parameters around what the true underlying growth rate is, because it’s kind of lost in the numbers?

Mark Bendza

Yeah. Hey, Alex. It’s Mark. So on our Information Assurance business for 2022, I mean, as you know, we don’t guide at that level. But I would say, we are probably going to end somewhere in the -- we are probably going to be somewhere in the, call it, low-to-mid single digits on the year, say, mid single-digit on year, higher at the high end of the range but, call it, midpoint -- kind of mid-single digits.

Alex Henderson

And the reason for the TSA optimism that it actually was going to close, I mean, you thought it was going to close in September, then you thought it was going to close at the end of the year, now we are still thinking it’s somehow going to close and that it’s improved. What makes you think that?

Mark Griffin

Sure, Alex. This is Mark Griffin. So ultimately we follow TSA guidelines and schedule for launch. We are engaged with them extensively on a daily basis going through their launch plan and their security approvals.

We are getting to the end of that schedule and we are in this process now deploying to our enrollment sites and gearing up training and operational enrollment capabilities for those site. So every indication is we are following TSA schedule. They are positive on our results at this point and we fully expect to launch this year.

Alex Henderson

So just so I understand, when you say gearing up training, they have been instructed you to train your employees and they are -- they understand that that’s an expense you are carrying and therefore they wouldn’t stretch that…

Mark Griffin

Look…

Alex Henderson

…ask you do that it would if it wasn’t imminent. Is that the right way we should be memorizing that?

John Wood

Yeah. Would you explain a little more about...

Mark Griffin

Sure.

John Wood

…if you could.

Mark Griffin

Alex, yeah, the entire program is under guidance and policy and procedures from TSA. So every aspect of the program is reviewed and approved by TSA. And so everything we do from approval of sites, to training of personnel, to our soft launch, to our security process and procedures are all controlled by TSA.

So, yes, TSA reviews every document. There are contractual delivery -- deliverables that we have to adhere to on every aspect of this launch. So, yes, TSA is the ultimate approval of when we launch, but we are meeting their schedules and we are doing everything that they are asking in the time frame they are asking for a launch this year.

Alex Henderson

Great. Thanks.

Operator

Thank you. And our next question comes from the line of Nehal Chokski with Northland Capital Markets. Your line is open. Please go ahead.

Nehal Chokski

Yeah. Thank you and congrats on the solid results and commend you, Mark, on especially a clear guidance deck. Thank you very much for that. Where are you guys in terms of percent of software billing sold on a term basis versus perpetual basis now and relative to the one, two and four quarters ago?

John Wood

That’s a good question. I would say, the majority of what we are selling now, Nehal, is subscription or term versus perpetual and that’s true in our pipeline as well that the vast majority of our pipeline are subscription oriented.

There are a couple of exceptions. There are a couple of government examples that are exceptions, but the vast majority of the remaining pipeline, whether you are talking about ACA or Ghost or you are talking about Xacta, there are going to be subscription based or term based licenses versus perpetual.

Nehal Chokski

Okay. Great. And how much of an impact does that transition have on the projection of low-to-mid single-digit growth for Xacta?

John Wood

It has a -- it definitely has an impact. I don’t know the number off the top my head. But in the past, when we would do, say, we did $6.5 million in revenue. That was all perpetual. My guess right now is we are at about 60% or 50% perpetual currently and I think going forward it’s going to be -- the vast majority is going to be term or subscription.

Nehal Chokski

And then to be clear, what is -- for every dollar of perpetual that’s capitalized into term, what the...

John Wood

Basically -- what that basically means is, if I am delivering on a $6 million number for the year and it’s all term, I have got to deliver $12 million of orders by no later than June 30th.

Nehal Chokski

Got it. Great. Thank you. And then my last question is that, Mark you alluded to in terms of a more cautious outlook on the macro being part out for the $15 million take down on the high end of the guidance, but that you are not seeing any impact yet. Why do you think you are not seeing any impact yet?

Mark Bendza

Correct. So what I am distinguishing between there is our core business. Our core business has been very strong through the first half of the year and including in the second quarter as the macro became choppier. So we are not seeing any impact there. I think it’s really just the nature of our portfolio and the customers and markets that we serve.

And then, for the second half, again, slightly outside of our core business where we are selling either new solutions or pre-existing to new end markets and customers, we just wanted to take a finer point on that forecast. And again, the net effect is only 80 basis points of year-over-year growth.

Nehal Chokski

Thank you.

Operator

Thank you. And our next question comes from the line of Brad Clark with BMO. Your line is open. Please go ahead.

Brad Clark

Hi. Thanks for taking my question. I want to ask a question about the sort of new business slowdown and how it’s in the guide and so much more of a clarification. And what I am trying to understand is, the deals out there that are sort of being pushed back either by the customers or from Telos’ perspective given the sort of proposed margin profile and it’s more not so good business at this or is it, yeah, it basically trying to understand between those two, more from the customer side or from Telos’ side to sort of push back and delay the new business? That’s it from me. Thank you.

John Wood

So, it depends on the customer’s side, Brad. The government’s side is always -- it takes longer than people think and that we have mainly built into our guide. On the commercial side, I think, we are actually having success. But what’s happening is they are starting small and building out over time.

So we landed another commercial customer in this quarter. It started out being a six-digit, if you will starting place for it, but we expect it to be more like a seven-digit plus opportunity for us per year as they rollout Xacta throughout their offerings.

So I would say that on the commercial side, there is more of a try it and buy it, they are going to buy it small and then build out over time whereas in the markets that were more well known as in the Federal Government, there is some level of doing a pilot, but it’s a much more controlled pilot and it typically has a very, very specific beginning, middle and an end. And there the customers will go to an enterprise-wide license more quickly just based on the reputation that we have.

Operator

Thank you. And we do have a follow-up question from the line of Alex Henderson with Needham & Company. Your line is open. Please go ahead.

Alex Henderson

Great. Thank you very much. So I was hoping you could talk a little bit about what’s going on with the voice-over-AWS and is your big chunk of the story when you guys came out was that those guys were going to be reselling it starting kind of in the beginning of this year and that they thought it was a big driver of acceleration of the -- their services business, yet that doesn’t seem to be materializing. Can you talk about what the environment is there and why it’s taking so long or not metastasizing?

John Wood

Metastasizing. That’s a good word. Thank you, Alex. I think it is taking longer. It is frustrating. They continue to use it internally. There are pockets of the organization that still want to build their own capabilities and it is moving but slowly, whereas on the other hand IBM made that -- made the decision not to build, but buy using Xacta as a -- as their launch partner.

And so, there we have a situation that a service provider is using us in the way that I was hoping the cloud providers are going to use us. It doesn’t mean the cloud providers aren’t going to get there. It’s just that they have not got there yet. They do continue to use us. They continue to use us more and more.

On the recent -- one of the recent awards we had that we haven’t announced the name on, it started out in the intelligence community. They see the value of the intelligence community. Now they are bringing us into their Department of Defense side of the business. And then, ultimately, we want to be in a commercial world. So each of the cloud providers has looked at it and gone about it in a little bit of a different way.

In the case of Azure, there has been quite a bit of turnover on the security and compliance side of their house. So we have had to sort of start-over in the case of Azure. And so, each cloud provider has a little bit of a story associated with it, but it is frustrating.

Alex Henderson

Similarly, can you talk a bit about the Ghost product and the progress or what’s going on there in terms of commercializing it into a product that’s used outside of the government security infrastructure play?

John Wood

Sure. And actually you made a comment that I’d like to extend a little bit. One of the things that we have learned about our Xacta is that, it’s in the language of the government. And one of the things that we have to do is we have had to really change verbiage, how we describe things that we do inside of Xacta and I will provide you an example.

There is something called a poem in the government world. Poem doesn’t mean anything to the commercial guys. Remediation is the commercial equivalent of a poem. So we had to make changes in the product itself that more reflected what it is that the commercial world want it, which was also something that we had to build in.

As it relates to the -- as it relates to Ghost, we have continued to -- we have got continued progress with JCI offering Ghost as an embedded option with their cameras. Those cameras will -- if you will be hidden on the internet and their security product sales continue to be a very healthy growing business.

We expect a small level of sales out of that to happen late this year with this offering. And again, you have had some -- not turnover but promotions over there. So getting it off the ground has just taken longer than we would have liked.

Having said that, there are other organizations that are looking to do very similar things with JCI and we are in the midst of negotiating those -- with those other players and our hope is that we will be able to roll out some other announcements about how we are building that capability inside of these other players.

Now just to remind you, what we do with advanced cyber analytics is, all of that activity is hidden behind Ghost as well. So there is a -- there are opportunities for us with Ghost, both within our existing customer set, as well as selling through other players.

Alex Henderson

Since we are going around into the second round of questions, I am going to ask one more, if it’s okay. If not then just let me know. But I was hoping you could talk a little bit about the security networking business. It sounds like some projects were pulled forward in that business into the first half and just the favorable timing comment. Does that mean that you are expecting little less in the back half of the year from Security Networks?

Mark Griffin

So not in Secure Networks, the dynamic within Secure Networks, the team there is doing a really terrific job of managing their supply chain risk. And so when we set guidance we account for their supply chain risk in guidance and they have been outperforming that risk. So the program management teams there are doing a terrific job and outperforming guidance.

The pull-forward I think that you are referencing is more or less Security Solutions side. We did have some higher margin order on one program in particular within that business that came into the second quarter that we were otherwise expecting to more so come in the second half. So that’s the favorable…

Alex Henderson

Mark, but….

Mark Griffin

…there.

Alex Henderson

But if you pulled forward the availability of supply then you deployed products sooner than expected. Doesn’t that come out of your pipeline?

Mark Griffin

I am not sure I understand the question.

Alex Henderson

You have got an order from a government agency to deploy a, I don’t know, choose a location…

Mark Griffin

Oh! I think that lapped….

Alex Henderson

… and you told you can’t deploy because you don’t have the product…

Mark Griffin

Alex I think you are ….

Alex Henderson

[Inaudible]

Mark Griffin

…referring to last year. You are talking about the pull-forward last year in 2021, the pull-forward on the Secure...

Alex Henderson

No. I am not. Mark, I am talking about the current environment. You used that as an example because they could not know specifically which projects we are involved. But you have a pipeline of business that you need to deploy gear for in order to get the revenue. If you get the parts sooner than expected…

Mark Griffin

Yeah.

Alex Henderson

… then that do reduces your pipeline into the forward period, correct?

John Wood

That assumes that the pipeline is static, Alex. So the pipeline is not static.

Alex Henderson

Okay. So there’s no erosion in the outlook for the back half of the year within that because of the pull-forward of parts?

John Wood

Not the revenue line.

Mark Griffin

Correct.

Alex Henderson

Thank you. That’s what I was looking for.

Mark Griffin

Yeah. Thanks, Alex.

Operator

Thank you. And I am showing no further questions and I would like to turn the conference back over to John Wood for any further remarks.

John Wood

Oh! Thank you very much, Operator. Well, first, I really well thank our shareholders for your ongoing support. And despite the current environment, I am pleased with our recent performance. And well, our year-to-date has progressed as we have expected. We are taking a balanced approach to the second half and we remain very focused on delivering for our customers and our shareholders. And again, I just want to say thank you to all of you for listening and to the analysts for asking questions and covering our stock. Thanks a lot everybody.

Operator

This concludes today’s conference call. Thank you for participating -- this concludes today’s conference call. Thank you for participating. You may now disconnect. Everyone, have a great day.

Tue, 09 Aug 2022 06:45:00 -0500 en text/html https://seekingalpha.com/article/4532115-telos-corporations-tls-ceo-john-wood-on-q2-2022-results-earnings-call-transcript
Killexams : Cloud-based Information Governance Market Located Worldwide Trends and Application – EMC, HP Autonomy, IBM, Symantec

The MarketWatch News Department was not involved in the creation of this content.

Aug 05, 2022 (Market Insight Reports) -- Overview of the Global Cloud-based Information Governance Market:

The Cloud-based Information Governance Market Report 2022 report provides the latest industry data and future industry trends. The report lists leading competitors and manufacturers in the Cloud-based Information Governance industry and provides strategic industry insights and analysis of factors influencing the competitiveness of the market. The geographical scope of the Cloud-based Information Governance market is studied. The forecast market information, SWOT analysis, market scenario, and feasibility study are the vital aspects analyzed in this report.

Looking forward, Market Intelligence Data Group expects the market to grow at a CAGR of 12.6% during 2022-2028.

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Leading Players in the Cloud-based Information Governance Market- EMC, HP Autonomy, IBM, Symantec, AccessData, Amazon, BIA, Catalyst, Cicayda, Daegis, Deloitte, Ernst & Young, FTI, Gimmal, Google, Guidance Software, Index Engines, Iron Mountain, Konica Minolta, Kroll Ontrak, Microsoft, Mimecast, Mitratech, Proofpoint, R and other.

The leading players of the Cloud-based Information Governance industry, their market share, product portfolio, company profiles are covered in this report. The leading market players are analyzed based on production volume, gross margin, market value, and price structure. The competitive market scenario among Cloud-based Information Governance players will help the industry aspirants in planning their strategies. The statistics offered in this report will be a precise and useful guide to shape business growth.

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Market Segmentation: By Application

BFSI

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– Cloud-based Information Governance Market Overview

– Global Cloud-based Information Governance Market Competition, Profiles/Analysis, Strategies

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– Global Cloud-based Information Governance Supply (Production), Consumption, Export, Import by Region (2016-2022)

– Global Cloud-based Information Governance Market Regional Highlights

– Industrial Chain, Sourcing Strategy, and Downstream Buyers

– Marketing Strategy Analysis, Distributors/Traders

– Market Effect Factors Analysis

– Market Decisions for the present scenario

– Global Cloud-based Information Governance Market Forecast (2022-2028)

– Case Studies

– Research Findings and Conclusion

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Fri, 05 Aug 2022 01:01:00 -0500 en-US text/html https://www.marketwatch.com/press-release/cloud-based-information-governance-market-located-worldwide-trends-and-application-emc-hp-autonomy-ibm-symantec-2022-08-05
Killexams : Cloud Security Solutions Market 2022-2028: Mergers and Acquisitions, Expansion Plans by top companies – Cisco, IBM, McAfee, Symantec

The MarketWatch News Department was not involved in the creation of this content.

Aug 05, 2022 (Market Insight Reports) -- Overview of the Global Cloud Security Solutions Market:

The Cloud Security Solutions Market Report 2022 report provides the latest industry data and future industry trends. The report lists leading competitors and manufacturers in the Cloud Security Solutions industry and provides strategic industry insights and analysis of factors influencing the competitiveness of the market. The geographical scope of the Cloud Security Solutions market is studied. The forecast market information, SWOT analysis, market scenario, and feasibility study are the vital aspects analyzed in this report.

Looking forward, Market Intelligence Data Group expects the market to grow at a CAGR of 13.8% during 2022-2028.

Request sample Copy of this Report:

https://www.marketintelligencedata.com/reports/4306251/global-cloud-security-solutions-market-insights-forecast-to-2028/inquiry?mode=DiVya

Leading Players in the Cloud Security Solutions Market- Cisco, IBM, McAfee, Symantec, Trend Micro, Akamai Technologies, Alert Logic, Broadcom, Check Point Software Technologies, Clearswift, Fortinet, Imperva, NTT Security, Panda Security, SafeNet, SecureWorks, SKYHIGH NETWORKS, Sophos, Zscaler and other.

The leading players of the Cloud Security Solutions industry, their market share, product portfolio, company profiles are covered in this report. The leading market players are analyzed based on production volume, gross margin, market value, and price structure. The competitive market scenario among Cloud Security Solutions players will help the industry aspirants in planning their strategies. The statistics offered in this report will be a precise and useful guide to shape business growth.

Global Cloud Security Solutions Market Segmentation:

Market Segmentation: By Application

Healthcare

Retail

Government

BFSI

IT & Telecom

Aerospace & Defense

Media & Entertainment

Manufacturing

Others

Market Segmentation: By Type

Cloud IAM

Cloud Email Security

Cloud IDS/IPS

Cloud DLP

Cloud SIEM

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Regional and Country-level Analysis:

The key regions covered in the Cloud Security Solutions market report are North America,

Europe, Asia Pacific, Latin America, Middle East and Africa. It also covers

key regions (countries), viz, U.S., Canada, Germany, France, U.K., Italy,

Russia, China, Japan, South Korea, India, Australia, Taiwan, Indonesia,

Thailand, Malaysia, Philippines, Vietnam, Mexico, Brazil, Turkey, Saudi Arabia,

U.A.E, etc.

Key questions answered in the report include:

  1. What will the market size and the growth rate be in 2028?
  2. What are the key factors driving the Global Cloud Security Solutions Market?
  3. What are the key market trends impacting the growth of the Global Cloud Security Solutions Market?
  4. What are the challenges to market growth?
  5. Who are the key vendors in the Global Cloud Security Solutions Market?
  6. What are the market opportunities and threats faced by the vendors in the Global Cloud Security Solutions Market?
  7. Trending factors influencing the market shares of the Americas, APAC, Europe, and MEA.

Explore Full Report With Detailed TOC Here:

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Crucial Elements from the Table of Contents of Global Cloud Security Solutions Market:

– Cloud Security Solutions Market Overview

– Global Cloud Security Solutions Market Competition, Profiles/Analysis, Strategies

– Global Cloud Security Solutions Capacity, Production, Revenue (Value) by Region (2016-2022)

– Global Cloud Security Solutions Supply (Production), Consumption, Export, Import by Region (2016-2022)

– Global Cloud Security Solutions Market Regional Highlights

– Industrial Chain, Sourcing Strategy, and Downstream Buyers

– Marketing Strategy Analysis, Distributors/Traders

– Market Effect Factors Analysis

– Market Decisions for the present scenario

– Global Cloud Security Solutions Market Forecast (2022-2028)

– Case Studies

– Research Findings and Conclusion

Finally, the Cloud Security Solutions Market report is the believable source for gaining the market research that will exponentially accelerate your business. The report gives the principle locale, economic situations with the item value, benefit, limit, generation, supply, request, and market development rate and figure, and so on. The Cloud Security Solutions industry report additionally presents a new task SWOT examination, speculation attainability investigation, and venture return investigation.

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Killexams : NASA and its IBM computers

The Real-Time Computer Complex (RTCC) is located at the NASA Mission Control Center in Houston, TX.

In 1962, the RTCC housed several IBM large-scale data processing mainframe digital computers.

Think of the RTCC as the computing brain that processes mountains of data to guide nearly every portion of a NASA spaceflight mission. Flight controllers and engineers in the Mission Control Center depended on the RTCC.

On April 11, 1970, a portion of the Apollo 13 command service module exploded while it was halfway to the moon. Numerous voices from flight controllers in the Mission Control room desperately attempted to ascertain how serious the situation was while communicating with the astronauts aboard the Apollo 13 command module.

NASA Flight Director Gene Kranz directs his Mission Control team by clearly and firmly saying, “OK, listen up … Quiet down, people. Procedures, I need another computer up in the RTCC.”

The quick thinking and resourcefulness of NASA flight controllers and engineers, along with the courage and professionalism of the Apollo 13 astronauts, resulted in their safe return to earth.

Credit for their safe return should also be acknowledged to the five high-performance IBM System/360 Model 75 computers in the RTCC.

About 16 years earlier, the 1954 IBM 704 digital mainframe computer operated using a low-level assembly language and a high-speed magnetic core storage memory, replacing the electrostatic tube storage used in previous IBM computers.

In 1957, Sputnik 1, Earth’s first artificial satellite, was tracked during its orbit around the planet by two IBM 704 computers.

In 1959, the IBM 1401 mainframe computer was built using a high-level programming language with FORTRAN (Formula Translation/Translator) computer language coding system created by IBM programmer John Backus in 1957 and tested on the IBM 704.

Backus said FORTRAN took what had previously required 1,000 machine statement instructions to be written in only 47 statements, significantly increasing computer programmer productivity.

In 1961, NASA launched two crewed Mercury suborbital flights. IBM 7090 computers installed in NASA Ames Research Center assisted engineers and mission flight controllers by quickly performing thousands of calculations per second.

The 1965 NASA Gemini spacecraft’s 59-pound onboard digital guidance computer was manufactured by IBM. It used a 7.143-hertz processor clock and could execute more than 7,000 calculations per second.

In 1969, IBM’s computer reliability was credited with keeping Apollo 12 on its proper trajectory after a potentially catastrophic event.

On Nov. 14, 1969. About 37 seconds after the Apollo 12 Saturn V rocket left the launchpad from Cape Canaveral, two lightning bolts struck it, knocking out all of the command module’s onboard instrumentation systems and telemetry with Mission Control in Houston.

“What the hell was that?” shouted Apollo 12 command module pilot Richard Gordon after lightning struck the Saturn V rocket traveling at 6,000 mph.

Fortunately, two-way radio communications were still functioning between Mission Control and the command module spacecraft.

“I just lost the whole platform,” Apollo 12 mission commander Charles Conrad Jr. radioed Mission Control. “We had everything in the world drop out,” he added.

The static discharge from the lightning caused a voltage outage, knocking out most of the Apollo 12 command module control systems, including the disconnection of its vital telemetry communications link with Mission Control.

Loud, overlapping voices could be heard in Mission Control as engineers and flight controllers worked on what course of action to take.

Fortunately, the Apollo 12 Saturn V rocket did not deviate from its planned trajectory. Instead, the IBM 60-pound Launch Vehicle Digital Computer (LVDC) housed inside the Instrument Unit section of the rocket’s third stage contained the required processing power to continue the Saturn V’s programmed course.

Meanwhile, Mission Control engineers saw strange data pattern readings on their control screens and desperately worked to find a solution.

NASA Mission flight controller and engineer John Aron recalled similar data patterns during simulation tests. He remembered it meant the Signal Conditioning Electronics were down.

“Flight, try SCE to AUX,” Aaron recommended to Mission Flight Director Gerry Griffin.

Griffin instructed the recommendation to be radioed to the astronauts in the command module.

One minute after the lightning strike, Mission Control radioed the astronauts in the Apollo 12 command module with the following:

“Apollo 12, Houston. Try SCE to Auxiliary. Over.”

There was a brief pause as the astronauts heard what they thought was the acronym “FCE” instead of “SCE.”

“Try FCE to Auxiliary. What the hell is that?” Conrad questioned Mission Control.

“SCE – SCE to Auxiliary,” Mission Control slowly repeated with emphasis.

Apollo 12 pilot astronaut Alan Bean was familiar with the SCE switch inside the command module. So, turning around in his seat, he flipped SCE to AUX, which restored and normalized the command module instrumentation data and telemetry transmissions.

Apollo 12 was able to complete its mission to the moon, thanks in significant part to the reliability of the IBM LVDC and, of course, Aaron’s “SCE to AUX.”

In 1962, science fiction writer Arthur C. Clarke witnessed a demonstration in Bell Labs where its scientists used the IBM 7094 computer to create a synthesized human voice singing the song “Daisy Bell (Bicycle Built for Two).”

This demonstration by the IBM computer inspired Clarke to write a much-remembered scene in the 1968 science fiction movie “2001: A Space Odyssey” featuring the somewhat sentient “Heuristically programmed ALgorithmic” computer known as the HAL 9000.

In the movie, the HAL 9000 computer is singing “Daisy Bell (Bicycle Built for Two)” while deactivating to inoperability as astronaut David Bowman removes its computing modules.

For the record, the HAL 9000 was not an IBM computer.

Thu, 04 Aug 2022 08:26:00 -0500 text/html http://www.herald-journal.com/archives/2022/columns/mo080522.html
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