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Killexams : IBM Intelligence test Questions - BingNews https://killexams.com/pass4sure/exam-detail/M2020-626 Search results Killexams : IBM Intelligence test Questions - BingNews https://killexams.com/pass4sure/exam-detail/M2020-626 https://killexams.com/exam_list/IBM Killexams : IBM, MIT AI tool generates questions to help clinicians using EHRs

IBM and Massachusetts Institute of Technology data scientists teamed up to create an artificial intelligence tool that generates questions to help healthcare professionals use EHRs more effectively and efficiently, according to their paper published June 6.

Working with 10 medical experts and using more than 100 patient discharge summaries, researchers at IBM and MIT compiled more than 2,000 questions and 1,000 triggers of questions that physicians may ask when looking at a patient's EHR. They categorized each question or trigger written by the medical experts into groups such as symptom/sign, demographics and test results, making it easier for physicians to navigate through the questions. 

The team then trained a data model to do this organically. For instance, if an EHR notes that a patient had a mass in their neck, one question generated may be about its size or color, in the category of symptoms. 

They found that their model produced a high-quality question 62.5 percent of the time in response to a prompt, but only if given more context. Without the context, the question generation quality declined. 

"Our results demonstrate that existing machine learning systems, including large-scale neural networks, struggle with the tasks we propose. We encourage the community to Excellerate on our baseline models," the researchers wrote. They also opened their machine learning tool to the public for continued work.

Wed, 20 Jul 2022 09:48:00 -0500 en-gb text/html https://www.beckershospitalreview.com/ehrs/ibm-mit-ai-tool-generates-questions-to-help-clinicians-using-ehrs.html
Killexams : Search IBM Courses No result found, try new keyword!chances are you've studied artifical intelligence, built chatbots and have perhaps even used Watson Assistant along the way. But did you know that you can turbocharge your chatbot's IQ with IBM ... Thu, 22 Apr 2021 07:23:00 -0500 text/html https://www.usnews.com/education/skillbuilder/provider-search/ibm Killexams : How to Invest in Artificial Intelligence -- 3 Companies to Watch No result found, try new keyword!Artificial Intelligence has long been a staple of science ... the pioneering computer expert Alan Turing proposed the notion of a test that could be used to determine if an AI is indistinguishable ... Sat, 23 Jul 2022 12:00:00 -0500 en-us text/html https://www.thestreet.com/opinion/how-to-invest-in-artificial-intelligence-3-companies-to-watch-13359989 Killexams : The autism advantage - why businesses are hiring autistic people

Autism is known as a spectrum disorder because every autistic person is different, with unique strengths and challenges.

Varney says many autistic people experienced education as a system that focused on these challenges, which can include social difficulties and anxiety.

Many autistic children found education focused on their deficits rather than their strengths.Credit:Rodger Cummins

He is pleased this is changing, with recent reforms embracing autistic students’ strengths.

But the unemployment rate of autistic people remains disturbingly high. ABS data from 2018 shows 34.1 per cent of autistic people are unemployed – three times higher than that of people with any type of disability and almost eight times that of those without a disability.

“A lot of the time people hear that someone’s autistic and they assume incompetence,” says Varney, who was this week appointed the chair of the Victorian Disability Advisory Council.

“But we have unique strengths, specifically hyper focus, great creativity, and we can think outside the box, which is a great asset in workplaces.”

In Israel, the defence force has a specialist intelligence unit made up exclusively of autistic soldiers, whose skills are deployed in analysing, interpreting and understanding satellite images and maps.

Locally, organisations that actively recruit autistic talent include software giant SAP, Westpac, IBM, ANZ, the Australian Tax Office, Telstra, NAB and PricewaterhouseCoopers.

Chris Pedron is a junior data analyst at Australian Spatial Analytics, a social enterprise that says on its website “neurodiversity is our advantage – our team is simply faster and more precise at data processing”.

He was hired after an informal chat. (Australian Spatial Analytics also often provides interview questions 48 hours in advance.)

Pedron says the traditional recruitment process can work against autistic people because there are a lot of unwritten social cues, such as body language, which he doesn’t always pick up on.

Australian Spatial Analytics founder Geoff Smith (right) with data analyst Chris Pedron.Credit:Glenn Hunt

“If I’m going in and I’m acting a bit physically standoffish, I’ve got my arms crossed or something, it’s not that I’m not wanting to be there, it’s just that new social interaction is something that causes anxiety.”

Pedron also finds eye contact uncomfortable and has had to train himself over the years to concentrate on a point on someone’s face.

Australian Spatial Analytics addresses a skills shortage by delivering a range of data services that were traditionally outsourced offshore.

Projects include digital farm maps for the grazing industry, technical documentation for large infrastructure and map creation for land administration.

Pedron has always found it easy to map things out in his head. “A lot of the work done here at ASA is geospatial so having autistic people with a very visual mindset is very much an advantage for this particular job.”

Pedron listens to music on headphones in the office, which helps him concentrate, and stops him from being distracted. He says the simpler and clearer the instructions, the easier it is for him to understand. “The less I have to read between the lines to understand what is required of me the better.”

Australian Spatial Analytics is one of three jobs-focused social enterprises launched by Queensland charity White Box Enterprises.

It has grown from three to 80 employees in 18 months and – thanks to philanthropist Naomi Milgrom, who has provided office space in Cremorne – has this year expanded to Melbourne, enabling Australian Spatial Analytics to create 50 roles for Victorians by the end of the year.

Chief executive Geoff Smith hopes they are at the front of a wave of employers recognising that hiring autistic people can make good business sense.

In 2017, IBM launched a campaign to hire more neurodiverse people.Credit:AP

“Rather than focus on the deficits of the person, focus on the strengths. A quarter of National Disability Insurance Scheme plans name autism as the primary disability, so society has no choice – there’s going to be such a huge number of people who are young and looking for jobs who are autistic. There is a skills shortage as it is, so you need to look at neurodiverse talent.”

In 2017, IBM launched a campaign to hire more neurodiverse (a term that covers a range of conditions including autism, Attention Deficit Hyperactivity Disorder, or ADHD, and dyslexia) candidates.

The initiative was in part inspired by software and data quality engineering services firm Ultranauts, who boasted at an event “they ate IBM’s lunch at testing by using an all-autistic staff”.

The following year Belinda Sheehan, a senior managing consultant at IBM, was tasked with rolling out a pilot at its client innovation centre in Ballarat.

“IBM is very big on inclusivity,” says Sheehan. “And if we don’t have diversity of thought, we won’t have innovation. So those two things go hand in hand.”

Eight things workplaces can do for autistic employees

  • Recruit differently. Send applicants interview questions in advance or use work trials and practical assessments
  • Offer flexible hours
  • Provide noise cancelling headphones and quiet spaces
  • Give clear and direct instructions and feedback 
  • Have mentors or a buddy system
  • Don’t make assumptions about autistic people
  • Provide managers with autism training
  • Partner with autism employment experts

Sheehan worked with Specialisterne Australia, a social enterprise that assists businesses in recruiting and supporting autistic people, to find talent using a non-traditional recruitment process that included a week-long task.

Candidates were asked to work together to find a way for a record shop to connect with customers when the bricks and mortar store was closed due to COVID.

Ten employees were eventually selected. They started in July 2019 and work in roles across IBM, including data analysis, testing, user experience design, data engineering, automation, blockchain and software development. Another eight employees were hired in July 2021.

Sheehan says clients have been delighted with their ideas. “The UX [user experience] designer, for example, comes in with such a different lens. Particularly as we go to artificial intelligence, you need those different thinkers.”

One client said if they had to describe the most valuable contribution to the project in two words it would be “ludicrous speed”. Another said: “automation genius.”

IBM has sought to make the office more inclusive by creating calming, low sensory spaces.

It has formed a business resource group for neurodiverse employees and their allies, with four squads focusing on recruitment, awareness, career advancement and policies and procedures.

And it has hired a neurodiversity coach to work with individuals and managers.

Sheehan says that challenges have included some employees getting frustrated because they did not have enough work.

“These individuals want to come to work and get the work done – they are not going off for a coffee and chatting.”

Increased productivity is a good problem to have, Sheehan says, but as a manager, she needs to come up with ways they can enhance their skills in their downtime.

There have also been difficulties around different communication styles, with staff finding some autistic employees a bit blunt.

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Sheehan encourages all staff to do a neurodiversity 101 training course run by IBM.

“Something may be perceived as rude, but we have to turn that into a positive. It’s good to have someone who is direct, at least we all know what that person is thinking.”

Chris Varney is delighted to see neurodiversity programs in some industries but points out that every autistic person has different interests and abilities.

Some are non-verbal, for example, and not all have the stereotypical autism skills that make them excel at data analysis.

“We’ve seen a big recognition that autistic people are an asset to banks and IT firms, but there’s a lot more work to be done,” Varney says.

“We need to see jobs for a diverse range of autistic people.”

The Morning Edition newsletter is our guide to the day’s most important and interesting stories, analysis and insights. Sign up here.

Fri, 05 Aug 2022 07:00:00 -0500 en text/html https://www.smh.com.au/business/workplace/the-autism-advantage-why-businesses-are-hiring-autistic-people-20220804-p5b767.html
Killexams : Artificial Intelligence is getting ‘scary good’ – four things AI programs can beat humans at

ARTIFICIAL intelligence systems have mastered some of mankind's best creations and natural intuitions.

These AI systems notched some of the first wins for the machines.

Major tech companies are investing billions in AI development

5

Major tech companies are investing billions in AI development

Down goes the chessmaster

Chess champion Garry Kasparov and the machine he faced played by regulation match rules

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Chess champion Garry Kasparov and the machine he faced played by regulation match rulesCredit: AFP - Getty

Artificial intelligence and table games make a good pair because humans have been trying to develop perfect tactics for strategy games for decades or even centuries.

Chess is "known as a game that requires strategy, foresight, logic—all sorts of qualities that make up human intelligence," IBM researcher Murray Campbell told Scientific American.

Campbell and a team developed Deep Blue, a six-foot supercomputer that defeated chess grandmaster Garry Kasparov in a six-game series in 1997.

During the pivotal final game, Deep Blue made a move that Kasparov thought only a human could rationalize - Kasparov insisted the IBM team cheated, which they denied.

Deep Blue would make 100million calculations a second to select its attacks but an early move that splintered Kasparov's confidence was actually the result of a bug that caused the computer to choose a move at random.

Data journalist Nate Silver's book on analytical forecasting says that Kasparov's over-analysis of a "last-resort fail-safe" move may have cost him the tournament.

PokerBot

Poker's top players faced off against a poker-playing AI in head-to-head and later multiplayer games

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Poker's top players faced off against a poker-playing AI in head-to-head and later multiplayer gamesCredit: Carnegie Mellon University

In chess, both players have access to all of the activity unfolding in the game - a player could mislead another into making a mistake, but both players can see and assess the whole of the board.

Texas Hold 'em is a card game with random draws, hidden information, and deception, making it an ideal playground for sophisticated artificial intelligence modeling.

The New York Times reported that even a simplified, two-player version of Texas Hold 'em with fixed bet amounts has 316,000,000,000,0000,0000 different potential outcomes.

Researchers at Carnegie Mellon University built Libratus, which defeated four of poker's best in head-to-head matchups over the course of 120,000 hands.

In 2019, engineers leveled up with Pluribus, their next iteration of self-improving poker-playing AI - Forbes reported that Pluribus can reflect on previous moves and act on the data.

Pluribus cleaned up five other human players at one table, marking the first time an AI program had beaten multiple players at the game.

Human professionals will try to replicate the AI-powered strategy by studying a model's calculations and the poker-playing community has to keep up with banning players using AI in games hosted online.

The robot that taught itself to walk

Researchers have built a robotic dog named Morti that taught itself to walk just an hour after coming online

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Researchers have built a robotic dog named Morti that taught itself to walk just an hour after coming onlineCredit: Felix Ruppert /Dynamic Locomotion Group

Morti is a AI robot dog that learned to walk quicker than a human.

“Our robot is practically ‘born’ knowing nothing about its leg anatomy or how they work," Felix Ruppert study co-author, told The Independent.

As people and animals learn to become independent, the Central Pattern Generator (CPG) in the spinal cord communicates with the limbs and muscles to move.

Ruppert and study co-author Alexander Badri-Sprowitz built their "walking intelligence" system in a computer to model a naturally occurring CPG.

To learn how to walk, Morti's "virtual spinal cord" would check the pressure of a step against the CPG's predictions.

If Morti fell, the computer's algorithm would adjust the pendulum swing of its legs or the speed or time spent contacting the ground.

Human babies take about a year to learn how to walk because humans are less far along in developing their intellect at birth.

Morti differs from game-playing bots because the robotic dog is a demonstration of an artificial intelligence program powering movement, potentially resolving robots' history of clumsiness.

Reading comprehension

Microsoft Research Asia HQ is in Beijing

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Microsoft Research Asia HQ is in BeijingCredit: AP:Associated Press

Evaluating studying comprehension is a staple in the American education system.

Reading is nearly twice as efficient as listening and it could be argued there is no single more important trait in learning than understanding what we read and being able to recall it.

In 2018, engineers at Microsoft Research Asia in Beijing built an AI bot that could read and understand just as well as a human.

The Microsoft model was tested against the Stanford Question Answering Dataset, a studying comprehension test made of questions based on Wikipedia articles.

Machine studying can be unsettling because while not everyone plays chess or poker, humans are biologically programmed to try to interpret letters and numbers, according to a study published in ScienceDaily.

Microsoft's machine studying model is available for public use on their site - plug in your own text and ask it questions to test the model's understanding.

Each of these systems represents a type of Artificial Narrow Intelligence - an AI system that's programmed to do one thing exceptionally well.

The next stage, artificial general intelligence, would be a computer that can do anything as well as a person, including reason, deception, and other more abstract human abilities that are not purely computational.

Sun, 24 Jul 2022 16:22:00 -0500 Tyler Baum en-gb text/html https://www.thesun.co.uk/tech/19304649/artificial-intelligence-robots-beat-humans/
Killexams : IBM Research Open-Sources Deep Search Tools

(Laborant/Shutterstock)

IBM Research’s Deep Search product uses natural language processing (NLP) to “ingest and analyze massive amounts of data—structured and unstructured.” Over the years, Deep Search has seen a wide range of scientific uses, from Covid-19 research to molecular synthesis. Now, IBM Research is streamlining the scientific applications of Deep Search by open-sourcing part of the product through the release of Deep Search for Scientific Discovery (DS4SD).

DS4SD includes specific segments of Deep Search aimed at document conversion and processing. First is the Deep Search Experience, a document conversion service that includes a drag-and-drop interface and interactive conversion to allow for quality checks. The second element of DS4SD is the Deep Search Toolkit, a Python package that allows users to “programmatically upload and convert documents in bulk” by pointing the toolkit to a folder whose contents will then be uploaded and converted from PDFs into “easily decipherable” JSON files. The toolkit integrates with existing services, and IBM Research is welcoming contributions to the open-source toolkit from the developer community.

IBM Research paints DS4SD as a boon for handling unstructured data (data not contained in a structured database). This data, IBM Research said, holds a “lot of value” for scientific research; by way of example, they cited IBM’s own Project Photoresist, which in 2020 used Deep Search to comb through more than 6,000 patents, documents, and material data sheets in the hunt for a new molecule. IBM Research says that Deep Search offers up to a 1,000× data ingestion speedup and up to a 100× data screening speedup compared to manual alternatives.

The launch of DS4SD follows the launch of GT4SD—IBM Research’s Generative Toolkit for Scientific Discovery—in March of this year. GT4SD is an open-source library to accelerate hypothesis generation for scientific discovery. Together, DS4SD and GT4SD constitute the first steps in what IBM Research is calling its Open Science Hub for Accelerated Discovery. IBM Research says more is yet to come, with “new capabilities, such as AI models and high quality data sources” to be made available through DS4SD in the future. Deep Search has also added “over 364 million” public documents (like patents and research papers) for users to leverage in their research—a big change from the previous “bring your own data” nature of the tool.

The Deep Search Toolkit is accessible here.

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Mon, 18 Jul 2022 02:37:00 -0500 text/html https://www.datanami.com/2022/07/18/ibm-research-open-sources-deep-search-tools/
Killexams : IBM acquires Israeli startup Databand to boost data capabilities

US tech giant IBM said Wednesday that it acquired Israeli startup Databand.ai, the developer of a data observability software platform for data scientists and engineers, to strengthen the multinational’s data, artificial intelligence, and automation offerings.

The terms of the acquisition were not disclosed. According to the agreement, Databand employees will join the IBM Data and AI division to further enhance IBM’s portfolio of data and AI products including its IBM Watson, a question-answering computer system, and IBM Cloud Pak for Data, a data analytics platform.

IBM said the acquisition was finalized in late June and that the purchase will build on IBM’s research and development investments, as well as strategic acquisitions in AI and automation. Databand is IBM’s fifth acquisition this year, the company noted.

Databand was founded in 2018 by Josh Benamram, Victor Shafran, and Evgeny Shulman, and rolled out a software platform that the company says helps enterprises and organizations get on top of their data to ensure “data health” and fix issues like errors and anomalies, pipeline failures, and general quality.

The data observability and data quality market is likely to see further growth, as more organizations look to closely track and protect their data. A Statista report estimated that the sector will grow from about $13 billion in worth in 2020 to almost $20 billion in 2024.

Based in Tel Aviv, Databand has raised about $20 million, according to the Start-Up Nation Finder database, with investors such as VCs Accel, Blumberg Capital, Ubiquity Ventures, Bessemer Venture Partners, Hyperwise, and F2 Ventures.

“By using Databand.ai with IBM Observability by Instana APM [an application performance monitoring solution] and IBM Watson Studio, IBM is well-positioned to address the full spectrum of observability across IT operations,” IBM said in the announcement Wednesday.

“Our clients are data-driven enterprises who rely on high-quality, trustworthy data to power their mission-critical processes. When they don’t have access to the data they need in any given moment, their business can grind to a halt,” said Daniel Hernandez, general manager for IBM Data and AI, in a statement.

“With the addition of Databand.ai, IBM offers the most comprehensive set of observability capabilities for IT across applications, data and machine learning, and is continuing to provide our clients and partners with the technology they need to deliver trustworthy data and AI at scale,” he explained.

Benamram, who serves as Databand CEO, said: “You can’t protect what you can’t see, and when the data platform is ineffective, everyone is impacted –including customers. That’s why global brands such as FanDuel, Agoda and Trax Retail already rely on Databand.ai to remove bad data surprises by detecting and resolving them before they create costly business impacts.

Joining IBM will help Databand “scale our software and significantly accelerate our ability to meet the evolving needs of enterprise clients,” he added.

Databand is one of a number of leading Israeli data observability companies including Coralogix, which raised a $142 million Series D funding round announced in May, and Monte Carlo, which secured a $135 million Series D round at a valuation of $1.6 billion, also in May.

Separately, IBM has been active in Israel for decades and runs an R&D center in Tel Aviv and a research lab in Haifa.

The Haifa team is the largest lab of IBM Research Division outside of the United States. Founded as a small scientific center in 1972, it grew into a lab that leads the development of innovative technological products and cognitive solutions for the IBM corporation. Its various projects utilize AI, cloud data services, blockchain, healthcare informatics, image and video analytics, and wearable solutions.

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Wed, 06 Jul 2022 06:54:00 -0500 en-US text/html https://www.timesofisrael.com/ibm-acquires-israeli-startup-databand-to-boost-data-capabilities/
Killexams : IBM Report: Consumers Pay the Price as Data Breach Costs Reach All-Time High

60% of breached businesses raised product prices post-breach; vast majority of critical infrastructure lagging in zero trust adoption; $550,000 in extra costs for insufficiently staffed businesses

CAMBRIDGE, Mass., July 27, 2022 /PRNewswire/ -- IBM (NYSE: IBM) Security today released the annual Cost of a Data Breach Report,1 revealing costlier and higher-impact data breaches than ever before, with the global average cost of a data breach reaching an all-time high of $4.35 million for studied organizations. With breach costs increasing nearly 13% over the last two years of the report, the findings suggest these incidents may also be contributing to rising costs of goods and services. In fact, 60% of studied organizations raised their product or services prices due to the breach, when the cost of goods is already soaring worldwide amid inflation and supply chain issues.

60% of breached businesses studied stated they increased the price of their products or services due to the data breach

The perpetuality of cyberattacks is also shedding light on the "haunting effect" data breaches are having on businesses, with the IBM report finding 83% of studied organizations have experienced more than one data breach in their lifetime. Another factor rising over time is the after-effects of breaches on these organizations, which linger long after they occur, as nearly 50% of breach costs are incurred more than a year after the breach.

The 2022 Cost of a Data Breach Report is based on in-depth analysis of real-world data breaches experienced by 550 organizations globally between March 2021 and March 2022. The research, which was sponsored and analyzed by IBM Security, was conducted by the Ponemon Institute.

Some of the key findings in the 2022 IBM report include:

  • Critical Infrastructure Lags in Zero Trust – Almost 80% of critical infrastructure organizations studied don't adopt zero trust strategies, seeing average breach costs rise to $5.4 million – a $1.17 million increase compared to those that do. All while 28% of breaches amongst these organizations were ransomware or destructive attacks.
  • It Doesn't Pay to Pay – Ransomware victims in the study that opted to pay threat actors' ransom demands saw only $610,000 less in average breach costs compared to those that chose not to pay – not including the cost of the ransom. Factoring in the high cost of ransom payments, the financial toll may rise even higher, suggesting that simply paying the ransom may not be an effective strategy.
  • Security Immaturity in Clouds – Forty-three percent of studied organizations are in the early stages or have not started applying security practices across their cloud environments, observing over $660,000 on average in higher breach costs than studied organizations with mature security across their cloud environments.
  • Security AI and Automation Leads as Multi-Million Dollar Cost Saver – Participating organizations fully deploying security AI and automation incurred $3.05 million less on average in breach costs compared to studied organizations that have not deployed the technology – the biggest cost saver observed in the study.

"Businesses need to put their security defenses on the offense and beat attackers to the punch. It's time to stop the adversary from achieving their objectives and start to minimize the impact of attacks. The more businesses try to perfect their perimeter instead of investing in detection and response, the more breaches can fuel cost of living increases." said Charles Henderson, Global Head of IBM Security X-Force. "This report shows that the right strategies coupled with the right technologies can help make all the difference when businesses are attacked."

Over-trusting Critical Infrastructure Organizations
Concerns over critical infrastructure targeting appear to be increasing globally over the past year, with many governments' cybersecurity agencies urging vigilance against disruptive attacks. In fact, IBM's report reveals that ransomware and destructive attacks represented 28% of breaches amongst critical infrastructure organizations studied, highlighting how threat actors are seeking to fracture the global supply chains that rely on these organizations. This includes financial services, industrial, transportation and healthcare companies amongst others.

Despite the call for caution, and a year after the Biden Administration issued a cybersecurity executive order that centers around the importance of adopting a zero trust approach to strengthen the nation's cybersecurity, only 21% of critical infrastructure organizations studied adopt a zero trust security model, according to the report. Add to that, 17% of breaches at critical infrastructure organizations were caused due to a business partner being initially compromised, highlighting the security risks that over-trusting environments pose.

Businesses that Pay the Ransom Aren't Getting a "Bargain"
According to the 2022 IBM report, businesses that paid threat actors' ransom demands saw $610,000 less in average breach costs compared to those that chose not to pay – not including the ransom amount paid. However, when accounting for the average ransom payment, which according to Sophos reached $812,000 in 2021, businesses that opt to pay the ransom could net higher total costs - all while inadvertently funding future ransomware attacks with capital that could be allocated to remediation and recovery efforts and looking at potential federal offenses.

The persistence of ransomware, despite significant global efforts to impede it, is fueled by the industrialization of cybercrime. IBM Security X-Force discovered the duration of studied enterprise ransomware attacks shows a drop of 94% over the past three years – from over two months to just under four days. These exponentially shorter attack lifecycles can prompt higher impact attacks, as cybersecurity incident responders are left with very short windows of opportunity to detect and contain attacks. With "time to ransom" dropping to a matter of hours, it's essential that businesses prioritize rigorous testing of incident response (IR) playbooks ahead of time. But the report states that as many as 37% of organizations studied that have incident response plans don't test them regularly.

Hybrid Cloud Advantage
The report also showcased hybrid cloud environments as the most prevalent (45%) infrastructure amongst organizations studied. Averaging $3.8 million in breach costs, businesses that adopted a hybrid cloud model observed lower breach costs compared to businesses with a solely public or private cloud model, which experienced $5.02 million and $4.24 million on average respectively. In fact, hybrid cloud adopters studied were able to identify and contain data breaches 15 days faster on average than the global average of 277 days for participants.

The report highlights that 45% of studied breaches occurred in the cloud, emphasizing the importance of cloud security. However, a significant 43% of reporting organizations stated they are just in the early stages or have not started implementing security practices to protect their cloud environments, observing higher breach costs2. Businesses studied that did not implement security practices across their cloud environments required an average 108 more days to identify and contain a data breach than those consistently applying security practices across all their domains.

Additional findings in the 2022 IBM report include:

  • Phishing Becomes Costliest Breach Cause – While compromised credentials continued to reign as the most common cause of a breach (19%), phishing was the second (16%) and the costliest cause, leading to $4.91 million in average breach costs for responding organizations.
  • Healthcare Breach Costs Hit Double Digits for First Time Ever– For the 12th year in a row, healthcare participants saw the costliest breaches amongst industries with average breach costs in healthcare increasing by nearly $1 million to reach a record high of $10.1 million.
  • Insufficient Security Staffing – Sixty-two percent of studied organizations stated they are not sufficiently staffed to meet their security needs, averaging $550,000 more in breach costs than those that state they are sufficiently staffed.

Additional Sources

  • To obtain a copy of the 2022 Cost of a Data Breach Report, please visit: https://www.ibm.com/security/data-breach.
  • Read more about the report's top findings in this IBM Security Intelligence blog.
  • Sign up for the 2022 IBM Security Cost of a Data Breach webinar on Wednesday, August 3, 2022, at 11:00 a.m. ET here.
  • Connect with the IBM Security X-Force team for a personalized review of the findings: https://ibm.biz/book-a-consult.

About IBM Security
IBM Security offers one of the most advanced and integrated portfolios of enterprise security products and services. The portfolio, supported by world-renowned IBM Security X-Force® research, enables organizations to effectively manage risk and defend against emerging threats. IBM operates one of the world's broadest security research, development, and delivery organizations, monitors 150 billion+ security events per day in more than 130 countries, and has been granted more than 10,000 security patents worldwide. For more information, please check www.ibm.com/security, follow @IBMSecurity on Twitter or visit the IBM Security Intelligence blog.

Press Contact:

IBM Security Communications
Georgia Prassinos
gprassinos@ibm.com

1 Cost of a Data Breach Report 2022, conducted by Ponemon Institute, sponsored, and analyzed by IBM
2 Average cost of $4.53M, compared to average cost $3.87 million at participating organizations with mature-stage cloud security practices

IBM Corporation logo. (PRNewsfoto/IBM)

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SOURCE IBM

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Killexams : IBM Acquires Observability Platform Databand.ai

IBM has announced the acquisition of data observability software vendor Databand.ai. Today’s announcement marks IBM’s fifth acquisition of 2022. The company says the acquisition “further strengthens IBM’s software portfolio across data, AI, and automation to address the full spectrum of observability and helps businesses ensure that trustworthy data is being put into the right hands of the right users at the right time.”

Data observability is an expanding sector in the big data market, spurred by explosive growth in the amount of data organizations are producing and managing. Data quality issues can arise with large volumes, and Gartner shows that poor data quality costs businesses $12.9 million a year on average.

“Data observability takes traditional data operations to the next level by using historical trends to compute statistics about data workloads and data pipelines directly at the source, determining if they are working, and pinpointing where any problems may exist,” said IBM in a press release. “When combined with a full stack observability strategy, it can help IT teams quickly surface and resolve issues from infrastructure and applications to data and machine learning systems.”

IBM says this acquisition will extend Databand.ai’s resources for expanding its observability capabilities for broader integration across more open source and commercial solutions, and enterprises will have flexibility in how they run Databand.ai, either with a subscription or as-a-Service.

IBM has made over 25 strategic acquisitions since Arvind Krishna took the helm as CEO in April 2020. The company mentions that Databand.ai will be used with IBM Observability by Instana APM, another observability acquisition, and IBM Watson Studio, its data science platform, to address the full spectrum of observability across IT operations. To provide a more complete view of a data platform, Databand.ai can alert data teams and engineers when data they are working with is incomplete or missing, while Instana can explain which application the missing data originates from and why the application service is failing.

A dashboard view of Databand.ai’s observability platform. Source: Databand.ai

“Our clients are data-driven enterprises who rely on high-quality, trustworthy data to power their mission-critical processes. When they don’t have access to the data they need in any given moment, their business can grind to a halt,” said Daniel Hernandez, General Manager for Data and AI, IBM. “With the addition of Databand.ai, IBM offers the most comprehensive set of observability capabilities for IT across applications, data and machine learning, and is continuing to provide our clients and partners with the technology they need to deliver trustworthy data and AI at scale.”

Databand.ai is headquartered in Tel Aviv, and its employees will join IBM’s Data and AI division to grow its portfolio of data and AI products, including Watson and IBM Cloud Pak for Data.

“You can’t protect what you can’t see, and when the data platform is ineffective, everyone is impacted –including customers,” said Josh Benamram, co-founder and CEO of Databand.ai. “That’s why global brands such as FanDuel, Agoda and Trax Retail already rely on Databand.ai to remove bad data surprises by detecting and resolving them before they create costly business impacts. Joining IBM will help us scale our software and significantly accelerate our ability to meet the evolving needs of enterprise clients.”

Related Items:

VCs Open Up the Checkbook for Observability Startups

Building Continuous Data Observability at the Infrastructure Layer

Data Quality Study Reveals Business Impacts of Bad Data

Wed, 06 Jul 2022 00:02:00 -0500 text/html https://www.datanami.com/2022/07/06/ibm-acquires-observability-platform-databand-ai/
Killexams : IBM Report: Consumers Pay the Price as Data Breach Costs Reach All-Time High

60% of breached businesses raised product prices post-breach; vast majority of critical infrastructure lagging in zero trust adoption; $550,000 in extra costs for insufficiently staffed businesses

CAMBRIDGE, Mass., July 27, 2022 /PRNewswire/ -- IBM (NYSE: IBM) Security today released the annual Cost of a Data Breach Report,1 revealing costlier and higher-impact data breaches than ever before, with the global average cost of a data breach reaching an all-time high of $4.35 million for studied organizations. With breach costs increasing nearly 13% over the last two years of the report, the findings suggest these incidents may also be contributing to rising costs of goods and services. In fact, 60% of studied organizations raised their product or services prices due to the breach, when the cost of goods is already soaring worldwide amid inflation and supply chain issues.

60% of breached businesses studied stated they increased the price of their products or services due to the data breach

The perpetuality of cyberattacks is also shedding light on the "haunting effect" data breaches are having on businesses, with the IBM report finding 83% of studied organizations have experienced more than one data breach in their lifetime. Another factor rising over time is the after-effects of breaches on these organizations, which linger long after they occur, as nearly 50% of breach costs are incurred more than a year after the breach.

The 2022 Cost of a Data Breach Report is based on in-depth analysis of real-world data breaches experienced by 550 organizations globally between March 2021 and March 2022. The research, which was sponsored and analyzed by IBM Security, was conducted by the Ponemon Institute.

Some of the key findings in the 2022 IBM report include:

  • Critical Infrastructure Lags in Zero Trust – Almost 80% of critical infrastructure organizations studied don't adopt zero trust strategies, seeing average breach costs rise to $5.4 million – a $1.17 million increase compared to those that do. All while 28% of breaches amongst these organizations were ransomware or destructive attacks.

  • It Doesn't Pay to Pay – Ransomware victims in the study that opted to pay threat actors' ransom demands saw only $610,000 less in average breach costs compared to those that chose not to pay – not including the cost of the ransom. Factoring in the high cost of ransom payments, the financial toll may rise even higher, suggesting that simply paying the ransom may not be an effective strategy.

  • Security Immaturity in Clouds – Forty-three percent of studied organizations are in the early stages or have not started applying security practices across their cloud environments, observing over $660,000 on average in higher breach costs than studied organizations with mature security across their cloud environments.

  • Security AI and Automation Leads as Multi-Million Dollar Cost Saver – Participating organizations fully deploying security AI and automation incurred $3.05 million less on average in breach costs compared to studied organizations that have not deployed the technology – the biggest cost saver observed in the study.

"Businesses need to put their security defenses on the offense and beat attackers to the punch. It's time to stop the adversary from achieving their objectives and start to minimize the impact of attacks. The more businesses try to perfect their perimeter instead of investing in detection and response, the more breaches can fuel cost of living increases." said Charles Henderson, Global Head of IBM Security X-Force. "This report shows that the right strategies coupled with the right technologies can help make all the difference when businesses are attacked."

Over-trusting Critical Infrastructure Organizations
Concerns over critical infrastructure targeting appear to be increasing globally over the past year, with many governments' cybersecurity agencies urging vigilance against disruptive attacks. In fact, IBM's report reveals that ransomware and destructive attacks represented 28% of breaches amongst critical infrastructure organizations studied, highlighting how threat actors are seeking to fracture the global supply chains that rely on these organizations. This includes financial services, industrial, transportation and healthcare companies amongst others.

Despite the call for caution, and a year after the Biden Administration issued a cybersecurity executive order that centers around the importance of adopting a zero trust approach to strengthen the nation's cybersecurity, only 21% of critical infrastructure organizations studied adopt a zero trust security model, according to the report. Add to that, 17% of breaches at critical infrastructure organizations were caused due to a business partner being initially compromised, highlighting the security risks that over-trusting environments pose.

Businesses that Pay the Ransom Aren't Getting a "Bargain"
According to the 2022 IBM report, businesses that paid threat actors' ransom demands saw $610,000 less in average breach costs compared to those that chose not to pay – not including the ransom amount paid. However, when accounting for the average ransom payment, which according to Sophos reached $812,000 in 2021, businesses that opt to pay the ransom could net higher total costs - all while inadvertently funding future ransomware attacks with capital that could be allocated to remediation and recovery efforts and looking at potential federal offenses.

The persistence of ransomware, despite significant global efforts to impede it, is fueled by the industrialization of cybercrime. IBM Security X-Force discovered the duration of studied enterprise ransomware attacks shows a drop of 94% over the past three years – from over two months to just under four days. These exponentially shorter attack lifecycles can prompt higher impact attacks, as cybersecurity incident responders are left with very short windows of opportunity to detect and contain attacks. With "time to ransom" dropping to a matter of hours, it's essential that businesses prioritize rigorous testing of incident response (IR) playbooks ahead of time. But the report states that as many as 37% of organizations studied that have incident response plans don't test them regularly.

Hybrid Cloud Advantage
The report also showcased hybrid cloud environments as the most prevalent (45%) infrastructure amongst organizations studied. Averaging $3.8 million in breach costs, businesses that adopted a hybrid cloud model observed lower breach costs compared to businesses with a solely public or private cloud model, which experienced $5.02 million and $4.24 million on average respectively. In fact, hybrid cloud adopters studied were able to identify and contain data breaches 15 days faster on average than the global average of 277 days for participants.

The report highlights that 45% of studied breaches occurred in the cloud, emphasizing the importance of cloud security. However, a significant 43% of reporting organizations stated they are just in the early stages or have not started implementing security practices to protect their cloud environments, observing higher breach costs2. Businesses studied that did not implement security practices across their cloud environments required an average 108 more days to identify and contain a data breach than those consistently applying security practices across all their domains.

Additional findings in the 2022 IBM report include:

  • Phishing Becomes Costliest Breach Cause – While compromised credentials continued to reign as the most common cause of a breach (19%), phishing was the second (16%) and the costliest cause, leading to $4.91 million in average breach costs for responding organizations.

  • Healthcare Breach Costs Hit Double Digits for First Time Ever– For the 12th year in a row, healthcare participants saw the costliest breaches amongst industries with average breach costs in healthcare increasing by nearly $1 million to reach a record high of $10.1 million.

  • Insufficient Security Staffing – Sixty-two percent of studied organizations stated they are not sufficiently staffed to meet their security needs, averaging $550,000 more in breach costs than those that state they are sufficiently staffed.

Additional Sources

  • To obtain a copy of the 2022 Cost of a Data Breach Report, please visit: https://www.ibm.com/security/data-breach.

  • Read more about the report's top findings in this IBM Security Intelligence blog.

  • Sign up for the 2022 IBM Security Cost of a Data Breach webinar on Wednesday, August 3, 2022, at 11:00 a.m. ET here.

  • Connect with the IBM Security X-Force team for a personalized review of the findings: https://ibm.biz/book-a-consult.

About IBM Security
IBM Security offers one of the most advanced and integrated portfolios of enterprise security products and services. The portfolio, supported by world-renowned IBM Security X-Force® research, enables organizations to effectively manage risk and defend against emerging threats. IBM operates one of the world's broadest security research, development, and delivery organizations, monitors 150 billion+ security events per day in more than 130 countries, and has been granted more than 10,000 security patents worldwide. For more information, please check www.ibm.com/security, follow @IBMSecurity on Twitter or visit the IBM Security Intelligence blog.

Press Contact:

IBM Security Communications
Georgia Prassinos
gprassinos@ibm.com

1 Cost of a Data Breach Report 2022, conducted by Ponemon Institute, sponsored, and analyzed by IBM
2 Average cost of $4.53M, compared to average cost $3.87 million at participating organizations with mature-stage cloud security practices

IBM Corporation logo. (PRNewsfoto/IBM)

Cision

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SOURCE IBM

Tue, 26 Jul 2022 21:33:00 -0500 en-AU text/html https://au.news.yahoo.com/ibm-report-consumers-pay-price-040100294.html
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