Our L4M5 PDF Dumps are ultimately necessary to pass L4M5 exam

The vast majority of our clients survey our administration 5 stars. That is because of their accomplishment in L4M5 test with our mock exam that contains actual test questions and answers and practice test. We feel cheerful when our applicants get 100 percent marks on the test. It is our prosperity, not just competitor achievement.

Exam Code: L4M5 Practice exam 2022 by Killexams.com team
Commercial Negotiation
CIPS Negotiation candidate
Killexams : CIPS Negotiation candidate - BingNews https://killexams.com/pass4sure/exam-detail/L4M5 Search results Killexams : CIPS Negotiation candidate - BingNews https://killexams.com/pass4sure/exam-detail/L4M5 https://killexams.com/exam_list/CIPS Killexams : Live news updates from August 1: Pelosi to meet Taiwanese president on Wednesday, Aramco to buy Valvoline division for $2.65bn

This week, the Conservative leadership contest caravan moves from parliament to the membership in the country. Ballots are expected to land on the doormats of 150,000 Tory party members in the next few days, while the finalists Liz Truss and Rishi Sunak will go head to head in another televised debate on Sky News on Thursday at 8pm.

But have Tory members already made up their minds? Polls have shown Truss pulling ahead of the former chancellor among the rank and file. Stephen Bush, who helms the Inside Politics newsletter, warns that Sunak has limited time to close the gap with Truss, as “most Conservative members will vote right away when their ballot papers arrive”.

Whoever clinches victory in the leadership race will be inheriting a wave of industrial discontent. Thousands of BT employees will walk out on Monday for the second of two strikes, led by the Communication Workers Union, in a dispute over pay. In response to BT’s £1,500 pay deal offered to staff in April, the CWU said company bosses had “stuck two fingers up” to workers. Dockers at the UK’s biggest container port are also expected to strike in August.

Across the Atlantic, Hungary’s prime minister Viktor Orbán will speak at the Conservative Political Action Conference in Dallas despite an international backlash following a speech he gave about race that led to the resignation of one of his close aides, who called it “pure Nazi”.

Speaking of controversial international trips, Kathrin Hille reports that China is pulling out all the stops — including possibly the military — to dissuade US House of Representatives Speaker Nancy Pelosi from visiting Taiwan in the next few days.

Past the doom and gloom, we can look forward to a weekend of revelry. As well as International Beer Day on Friday, Brighton’s streets will be awash with glitter as one of the UK’s biggest Pride events kicks off. The annual LGBTQ parade will see thousands of people flocking to the south coast of England. And don’t miss the Fire of Love on the big screen, writes our film critic Danny Leigh.

Economic data

The Bank of England will be in a tight(ening) spot on Thursday as its Monetary Policy Committee weighs up how high to raise interest rates in a bid to bring inflation down to its 2 per cent target. It is currently running at a 40-year high of 9.4 per cent and is expected to climb higher. Governor Andrew Bailey said an increase of half a percentage point — which would be the biggest increase in 27 years — is on the table.

The BoE is under pressure to step up inflation-taming efforts after the US Federal Reserve raised its benchmark rate by 0.75 percentage points for the second month in a row on Wednesday. The White House will be trumpeting any good news from US employment figures this week to downplay fears of recession. The economy shrank for a second straight quarter and “core” personal consumption expenditures rose 0.6 per cent in June.

Companies

The August earnings lull is not quite upon us. After last week’s frenzy, things will chill out only a little in the days ahead, says FT corporate commentator Cat Rutter Pooley.

The narrative of consumer goods and drinks groups raising sales forecasts on the back of surging inflation has been firmly set ahead of Heineken’s results on Monday and Kellogg’s on Thursday.

The windfall profits earned by oil and gas groups have also been a major focus of the earnings season. After Shell racked up $11.5bn in profits in a record quarter, it’s BP’s turn to step into the political storm on Tuesday. The UK has imposed additional taxes on energy companies this year but another round of record profits could increase calls for additional levies.

And while the major US banks gave their updates what feels like aeons ago, reports from the European banking sector are still trickling through. HSBC will update on whether lockdowns in China have continued to weigh on its Asian profitability, while Bank of Ireland and Commerzbank both report on Wednesday.

Read the full week ahead calendar here.

Mon, 01 Aug 2022 09:42:00 -0500 en-GB text/html https://www.ft.com/content/708a7cdc-0b97-4fcf-ad02-7a929cd1abe5
Killexams : Wendy Cutler on China, Taiwan, and the CPTPP

On September 16, China officially submitted its application to join the Comprehensive and Progressive Agreement on Trans-Pacific Partnership (CPTPP), an 11-member trade pact known for high standards that go well beyond tariff reductions. On September 23, one week later, Taiwan announced that it had done the same.

The Diplomat’s Shannon Tiezzi interviewed Wendy Cutler, vice president at the Asia Society Policy Institute (ASPI), about the implications of China and Taiwan’s bids. Cutler previously served as acting deputy U.S. trade representative and worked on the original TPP negotiations, among other bilateral, regional, and multilateral trade initiatives.

First, a technical question: What does it actually mean for China to submit its application to join the CPTPP? What are the next steps from here?

By submitting its application to join CPTPP on September 16, China has formally indicated its interest in joining the eleven-member trade pact. Expression of interest does not result in automatic membership. It is up to the current CPTPP membership to determine whether they are satisfied that the applicant can live up to the high-standard rules of the agreement and make ambitious market access offers. A formal application by a prospective candidate triggers a series of procedural steps that were agreed upon by CPTPP members in January 2019. Upon receiving the application, each member will undertake internal discussions to determine its position, while consulting with other CPTPP members. Members may also reach out to Beijing for more information to help shape its position.

The first decision point for CPTPP members will be whether to establish a formal Working Group that would kickstart real accession negotiations. This decision needs to be taken by consensus of those CPTPP members that have brought the agreement into force, which currently totals eight. It is possible that the remaining three CPTPP members – Malaysia, Chile, and Brunei – will accelerate ratification of the agreement in order to have their vote count. If any of the eight members blocks the decision, the Working Group cannot be established. There is no time limit on deliberations by the Working Group, but it is incumbent upon the applicant economy to explain early on how it can currently or plans to comply with CPTPP rules, as well as to make market access offers. Upon completion of the negotiations with the candidate, the Working Group is to submit a report to the CPTPP Commission, consisting of all CPTPP members. A final decision on whether to welcome the country as an official member is to be made by consensus by those countries that have ratified and brought the agreement into force.

Enjoying this article? Click here to subscribe for full access. Just $5 a month.

It is also important to note that the Chinese application was only the second formal CPTPP accession application made to date – following the bid made by the United Kingdom in February. As such, there is little precedence to guide the process. The U.K. Working Group was established in June and its accession negotiations are ongoing.

The CPTPP was envisioned from the start – back when it was just the TPP – as a “high standard” trade agreement. Given that, what is the likelihood of China meeting those standards and actually being able to join the bloc? China’s CPTPP announcement came alongside a wave of new regulations, particularly aimed at the tech industry. How do you see China’s CPTPP application fitting into the broader economic policies on display under Xi Jinping?

This is the key question and one on which CPTPP members will deliberate. Over the years, China has moved closer to CPTPP obligations in certain areas, including liberalizing its services market, lifting investment restrictions, and strengthening its intellectual property protection and enforcement regime. But on many other matters, including state owned enterprises, labor rights, environmental protections, and e-commerce, large gaps remain between the high-standard CPTPP rules and Chinese trade practices.

Moreover, in many respects Beijing is moving further away from the letter and spirit of CPTPP, with increased state involvement in its economy, growing restrictions on the use, storage, and flow of data, arbitrary imposition of trade restrictions in response to political concerns, implementation of preferential government procurement policies, and a questionable track record in implementing its existing trade commitments.

Taiwan submitted its application to join CPTPP less than a week after China’s bid. What are the implications of this move? How will CPTPP countries respond?

Coming six days after China’s bid, Taiwan’s formal CPTPP accession application complicates the decisions facing CPTPP members. CPTPP rules clearly stipulate that separate customs territories, like Taiwan, can be members. In latest years, Taiwan has been consulting with CPTPP members and taking steps to bring its trade regime in compliance with CPTPP rules by passing laws and implementing regulations on intellectual property protection, agriculture, and other areas. Nevertheless, Beijing was quick to make its position clear in the strongest terms by urging other CPTPP members to reject Taiwan’s bid. On the day following Taiwan’s application, Zhao Lijian, China’s Foreign Ministry spokesperson, stated,”China firmly opposes all official interactions with Taiwan, firmly rejects Taiwan’s accession to any agreement or organization of official nature.” These developments put additional pressure on CPTPP members, now forced to navigate through these complex and politically sensitive matters.

Has the Biden administration expressed any interest in coming back into the CPTPP fold? Given the political climate in the U.S., would such a move be feasible?

While CPTPP countries would welcome the U.S. back to the agreement, the Biden administration has shown little interest in rejoining. President Biden has made it clear that he will not pursue trade agreements until domestic measures are implemented to build back the strength and resilience of the U.S. economy. With respect to CPTPP, he has not entirely closed the door. He has talked about the need for major revisions and giving labor and environmentalists a seat at the negotiating table. Following his lead, USTR [Katherine] Tai has distanced herself from the agreement, pointing to its outdated provisions that do not reflect latest developments in the international trade landscape. While there is some Congressional and stakeholder support for rejoining the pact, opponents remain vocal and the political climate for reviving the CPTPP debate in the United States remains toxic.

Aside from China, the U.K. has entered into talks to join CPTPP and a number of other countries have expressed interest. What should we expect from the expansion process over the coming years, and which countries in particular should we pay attention to?

The original TPP and its successor agreement, CPTPP are “open architecture” agreements, with provisions encouraging expanded membership over time. The rationale is that as the membership circle broadened so would the reach of the high-standard rules, promoting them as the norm for the region. While numerous economies expressed interest in joining the original TPP when concluded in 2015, this interest waned with the U.S. departure in 2017, and the growing focus on negotiations on the other mega-regional trade pact, the Regional Comprehensive Economic Partnership (RCEP).

Enjoying this article? Click here to subscribe for full access. Just $5 a month.

To date, CPTPP members have received three formal applications for accession – the United Kingdom, China, and Taiwan – but more are expected over time. Thailand and South Korea appear to be the most viable prospective candidates, but have yet to make the leap. The Philippines, Indonesia, and Colombia, among others, have expressed varying degrees of interest in the past, but their degree of seriousness is unclear. What is clear is that all prospective candidates will be closely watching developments in the U.K. accession to gain a better sense of the process, including the expectations and flexibilities of the current CPTPP membership.

Mon, 04 Oct 2021 12:52:00 -0500 en-US text/html https://thediplomat.com/2021/10/wendy-cutler-on-china-taiwan-and-the-cptpp/
Killexams : Live news update: Italian government bonds rally as debt worries fade

This week, the Conservative leadership contest caravan moves from parliament to the membership in the country. Ballots are expected to land on the doormats of 150,000 Tory party members in the next few days, while the finalists Liz Truss and Rishi Sunak will go head to head in another televised debate on Sky News on Thursday at 8pm.

But have Tory members already made up their minds? Polls have shown Truss pulling ahead of the former chancellor among the rank and file. Stephen Bush, who helms the Inside Politics newsletter, warns that Sunak has limited time to close the gap with Truss, as “most Conservative members will vote right away when their ballot papers arrive”.

Whoever clinches victory in the leadership race will be inheriting a wave of industrial discontent. Thousands of BT employees will walk out on Monday for the second of two strikes, led by the Communication Workers Union, in a dispute over pay. In response to BT’s £1,500 pay deal offered to staff in April, the CWU said company bosses had “stuck two fingers up” to workers. Dockers at the UK’s biggest container port are also expected to strike in August.

Across the Atlantic, Hungary’s prime minister Viktor Orbán will speak at the Conservative Political Action Conference in Dallas despite an international backlash following a speech he gave about race that led to the resignation of one of his close aides, who called it “pure Nazi”.

Speaking of controversial international trips, Kathrin Hille reports that China is pulling out all the stops — including possibly the military — to dissuade US House of Representatives Speaker Nancy Pelosi from visiting Taiwan in the next few days.

Past the doom and gloom, we can look forward to a weekend of revelry. As well as International Beer Day on Friday, Brighton’s streets will be awash with glitter as one of the UK’s biggest Pride events kicks off. The annual LGBTQ parade will see thousands of people flocking to the south coast of England. And don’t miss the Fire of Love on the big screen, writes our film critic Danny Leigh.

Economic data

The Bank of England will be in a tight(ening) spot on Thursday as its Monetary Policy Committee weighs up how high to raise interest rates in a bid to bring inflation down to its 2 per cent target. It is currently running at a 40-year high of 9.4 per cent and is expected to climb higher. Governor Andrew Bailey said an increase of half a percentage point — which would be the biggest increase in 27 years — is on the table.

The BoE is under pressure to step up inflation-taming efforts after the US Federal Reserve raised its benchmark rate by 0.75 percentage points for the second month in a row on Wednesday. The White House will be trumpeting any good news from US employment figures this week to downplay fears of recession. The economy shrank for a second straight quarter and “core” personal consumption expenditures rose 0.6 per cent in June.

Companies

The August earnings lull is not quite upon us. After last week’s frenzy, things will chill out only a little in the days ahead, says FT corporate commentator Cat Rutter Pooley.

The narrative of consumer goods and drinks groups raising sales forecasts on the back of surging inflation has been firmly set ahead of Heineken’s results on Monday and Kellogg’s on Thursday.

The windfall profits earned by oil and gas groups have also been a major focus of the earnings season. After Shell racked up $11.5bn in profits in a record quarter, it’s BP’s turn to step into the political storm on Tuesday. The UK has imposed additional taxes on energy companies this year but another round of record profits could increase calls for additional levies.

And while the major US banks gave their updates what feels like aeons ago, reports from the European banking sector are still trickling through. HSBC will update on whether lockdowns in China have continued to weigh on its Asian profitability, while Bank of Ireland and Commerzbank both report on Wednesday.

Read the full week ahead calendar here.

Mon, 01 Aug 2022 02:06:00 -0500 en-GB text/html https://www.ft.com/content/708a7cdc-0b97-4fcf-ad02-7a929cd1abe5
Killexams : Port Authority chairman accused by sister of keeping her from Cedar Grove police chief job

Eileen O'Toole — sister of Kevin O'Toole, the influential former lawmaker and current chairman of the board of the Port Authority of New York and New Jersey — has sued the township of Cedar Grove and its manager, council and police department, accusing them of denying her the police chief position because of her brother's intervention and gender discrimination.

Eileen O'Toole is a captain in the Cedar Grove Police Department, where she has worked for 18 years. She became officer in charge after the police chief retired last year, and has also served as acting township manager when the current manager, Thomas Tucci, was on vacation.

She alleged that Tucci "did not plan on interviewing her and she was going to be the next Chief of Police" and that two Township Council members also told her this, the lawsuit said. She was the first woman to be promoted to a supervisory position in the Cedar Grove Police Department, according to court documents.

The 18-page lawsuit, filed in state Superior Court in Essex County on Tuesday, and first reported by NBC News, details how she allegedly lost her promotion after a family dispute with her brother the night before her daughter's wedding in November 2021. Kevin O'Toole is not named as a defendant in the lawsuit.

How NJ lost $850M to NY:A look inside the negotiations to split federal transit funds

Text messages that followed between the family members allegedly included false suggestions from Kevin O'Toole that Eileen O'Toole has a drinking problem, that her companion, Michael Kraynanski, should quit his job that was "secured" for him and that he could face an internal investigation, according to the lawsuit.

In January, Eileen O'Toole had a meeting with Tucci, who allegedly said "this is not going to be a good meeting" and explained that she would not be getting the police chief position because the "town council is disgusted with you," the lawsuit said. She says there were no "written charges of insubordination" in her personnel file and she received "exceptional employment evaluations," including from Tucci, who negotiated her salary for her current position, the lawsuit said.

Matthew J. Giacobbe, the attorney representing the township and Tucci, wrote in an email that the "most qualified candidate" was selected to serve as police chief, a candidate with "the longest service and highest educational degree," who previously was offered the job in 2017 but declined it.

More:Lawsuits claim Cedar Grove senior living facility failed to protect residents from COVID

"The Township and Township Manager Tucci look forward to vigorously defending this frivolous lawsuit," Giacobbe wrote.

In addition to the allegedly false narrative about the reasons she was not promoted, including insubordination and misuse of the chief's vehicle, Eileen O'Toole was stripped of her captain duties and "ostracized," the lawsuit said. She claims Tucci "conferred" with her brother about the reasons she was not promoted, the lawsuit said.

More:$27 for a beer? Port Authority reins in 'totally indefensible' airport drink prices

The O'Tooles' father, Robert O'Toole, a former Cedar Grove mayor, allegedly confronted Kevin O'Toole about his sister's non-promotion, and he repeated the allegedly false reasons, including one she had not been told in the meeting with Tucci, according to court documents.

In an interview with NBC News, Robert O'Toole said his son is an "evil person."

Kevin O'Toole said in an emailed statement that he was "saddened" to read about the lawsuit and his family in the news. He indicated that arguments in the family have erupted over vaccination opinions.

"Whether it be on vaccination policy or politics, the family has had various disagreements. Without getting into details, some time ago, I sought out assistance from the Essex County Prosecutor‘s Office regarding my being a victim of harassment/stalking," O'Toole wrote. "Needless to say, the allegations against me are meritless. As this matter is now the subject of legal proceedings, this will be the last I will comment on this subject or my family."

The Essex County Prosecutor's Office did not immediately respond to requests for comment.

Kevin O'Toole served as a council member and mayor in Cedar Grove from 1989 to 1996, and in the New Jersey Legislature from 1996 to 2017, first as an assemblyman and then as a senator.

More:Murphy administration sends $58.3M to NJ Transit after missing months of payments

He was named by then-Gov. Chris Christie to the Port Authority board in 2017, three years after the political retribution scandal known as Bridgegate, in which a former agency executive, David Wildstein, admitted to realigning lanes at the George Washington Bridge entrance in Fort Lee to punish that town's mayor.

O'Toole, a Republican close to Christie, sat several years earlier on the legislative committee that investigated the realignments. He now writes political columns for Wildstein's news website, the New Jersey Globe.

In addition to his role leading the Port Authority board, O'Toole is a managing and founding partner of the law firm O'Toole Scrivo, LLC, based in Cedar Grove.

This article originally appeared on NorthJersey.com: Cedar Grove captain: Port Authority chairman brother blocked promotion

Mon, 25 Jul 2022 03:18:00 -0500 en-US text/html https://www.yahoo.com/now/port-authority-chairman-accused-sister-150234869.html
Killexams : Tory leadership candidates: Who’s in the race for No 10?

The race is on to find the new occupant of 10 Downing Street (PA) (PA Archive)

A crowded field of contenders is vying to replace Boris Johnson as the next Tory leader and Prime Minister.

Here are the MPs who have thrown their hat in the ring.

– Rishi Sunak

Age: 42.

Experience: was Chancellor of the Exchequer until July 5 when he quit in protest at the Prime Minister’s leadership.

Key message: The former chancellor has positioned himself as the candidate prepared to tell hard truths about the state of the public finances rather than “comforting fairy tales” – something that may not endear him to Tory MPs and activists eager for tax cuts.

Campaign name: Ready for Rishi.

– Penny Mordaunt

Age: 49.

Experience: Currently Trade Minister, has Cabinet experience in the defence and international development briefs.

Key message: Her campaign launch video highlighted the need for “solemnity and wisdom” in contrast to the Johnson era. Ms Mordaunt, a Royal Navy Reservist, said leadership “needs to become a little less about the leader and a lot more about the ship”. She has pledged a 50% cut in VAT on fuel.

Campaign name: PM 4 PM.

– Liz Truss

Age: 46.

Experience: Foreign Secretary.

Key message: She used a Daily Telegraph article to launch her bid, promising to “lead, deliver and make the tough decisions”. She has pledged to “start cutting taxes from day one”, reversing April’s rise in National Insurance and promising to keep “corporation tax competitive”.

Campaign name: Liz for Leader.

Sajid Javid has pledged to scrap the Government’s controversial national insurance hike (BBC/PA) (PA Wire)

– Sajid Javid

Age: 52.

Experience: Former chancellor. Was health secretary until he resigned on July 5.

Key message: He would scrap the National Insurance rise – despite campaigning for the extra funding it provides while health secretary – and has pledged to cut corporation tax to 15% from its current 19%, a full 10 percentage points lower than the planned rate of 25% from April 2023.

Campaign name: Team Saj.

Transport Secretary Grant Shapps said tackling the cost-of-living crisis and strengthening the economy are top of his agenda (PA) (PA Wire)

– Grant Shapps

Age: 53.

Experience: Currently in the Cabinet as Transport Secretary.

What’s his message: Another candidate promising tax cuts, he would take 1p off income tax and scrap the proposed increase in corporation tax. He has also highlighted his record as a campaigner and organiser to tell nervous Tory MPs “I can help you win your seat”.

Campaign name: Back Shapps.

Chancellor Nadhim Zahawi argued Britons must be trusted ‘to do what is best for themselves’ (PA) (PA Wire)

– Nadhim Zahawi

Age: 55.

Experience: Current Chancellor of the Exchequer.

Key message: Has promised that “nothing is off the table” when it comes to taxes, highlighting concerns about the planned increase to 25% and also hinting at bringing forward the cut 1p cut in income tax.

Campaign name: None.

Tom Tugendhat has been a trenchant critic of Mr Johnson (PA) (PA Wire)

– Tom Tugendhat

Age: 49.

Experience: Never held ministerial office but chairs the Commons Foreign Affairs Committee.

Key message: A former Army Intelligence Corps officer, he has made a virtue of his lack of ministerial experience to promise a “clean start”. Has vowed to reverse the National Insurance rise and cut fuel tax.

Campaign name: Tom – A Clean Start.

Boris Johnson resignation

Attorney General Suella Braverman was first elected as an MP in 2015 and is regarded as something of an outlier for the top job (PA) [/caption]

– Suella Braverman

Age: 42.

Experience: Current Attorney General.

Key message: She has promised “rapid and large tax cuts”. She would suspend net zero targets to deal with the energy crisis and pull the UK out of the European Convention on Human Rights.

Campaign name: Suella 4 Leader.

– Jeremy Hunt

Jeremy Hunt is having another run at the Tory leadership after losing to Boris Johnson in 2019 (Stefan Rousseau/PA) (PA Wire)

Age: 55.

Experience: Former foreign secretary, health secretary and culture secretary.

Key message: He has promised to slash corporation tax to 15% and remove business rates for five years in the poorest communities. But he would keep the National Insurance rise and any cut in income tax could only come if it was sustainable, with a growing economy.

Campaign name: Win Back Trust.

Kemi Badenoch has been endorsed by Michael Gove (PA) (PA Media)

– Kemi Badenoch

Age: 42.

Experience: Resigned as equalities minister and a minister in the Levelling Up department on July 6.

Key message: She wants lower taxes and “limited government” that focuses on the essentials. She appears to be targeting the anti-woke vote, complaining about “the shutting down of debate” and stressing the need to “reinvigorate the case for free speech”.

Campaign name: None.

Rehman Chishti previously stood as a Labour candidate in the 2005 general election before defecting to the Conservatives in 2007 (PA) (PA Media)

– Rehman Chishti

Age: 43.

Experience: Appointed as a junior foreign minister on July 8 and was Tory vice-chair in 2018.

Key message: He promised a Government of “lower taxes, small state, big society”. Mr Chishti said his vision was “about aspirational conservatism, it’s about fresh ideas and then it comes down to having a fresh team”.

Campaign name: None.

Sun, 10 Jul 2022 23:55:00 -0500 en-GB text/html https://uk.news.yahoo.com/tory-leadership-candidates-race-no-110121746.html
Killexams : Kemi Badenoch knocked out of Tory leadership race as field narrows to three

Kemi Badenoch has become the latest candidate to be knocked out of the Conservative leadership race.

In the fourth round of voting by Tory MPs, the contenders received the following support:

  • Kemi Badenoch - 59

  • Penny Mordaunt - 92

  • Rishi Sunak - 118

  • Liz Truss - 86

There was one spoiled ballot paper and one eligible MP did not cast a vote.

Former equalities minister Ms Badenoch took to Twitter to thank her supporters, saying what her campaign had achieved in two weeks "demonstrates the level of support for our vision of change for our country and for the Conservative Party".

Politics Hub: Rishi Sunak unlikely to win against remaining candidates, poll shows

Another vote will take place on Wednesday, which will leave just two candidates remaining - and all eyes will be on where Ms Badenoch's 59 votes go.

Defence minister Leo Docherty became the first of her supporters to announce he would now be backing Foreign Secretary Ms Truss to become the next prime minister.

Trade Secretary Anne Marie-Trevelyan - a former supporter of Tom Tugendhat, who was eliminated in the previous round of voting - also declared her support for Ms Truss.

She saw a surge in her votes, up by 15 since yesterday, and a spokesperson for Ms Truss again urged the party "to unite behind a candidate who will govern in a Conservative way and who has shown she can deliver time and again".

But Ms Mordaunt remains in second place, with her support rising by 10 votes.

The trade minister said she is now "so nearly across the finish line" and "raring to go", adding she was "excited to put my case to members across the country and win".

Both Ms Mordaunt and the foreign secretary's spokesperson also praised the latest fallen candidate, with Ms Truss' team saying Ms Badenoch she ran a "a fantastic campaign" and "contributed enormously to the battle of ideas throughout this contest".

Ms Mordaunt said her "friend" had "electrified the leadership contest with her fresh thinking and bold policies", adding: "She and I both know that the old way of government isn't working as it should. Voters want change and we owe it to them to offer a bold new vision for this country."

Former Chancellor Mr Sunak remained at the top of the pack, but with 118 votes, he was just shy of the 120 needed to ensure him a place in the final two.

However, he has already received the support of at least one more MP, Sir Desmond Swayne, who has moved from supporting former candidate Suella Braverman and then Ms Badenoch, to backing Mr Sunak.

A source close to his campaign reiterated their belief that "only Rishi can beat [Labour leader Sir Keir] Starmer", and that Mr Sunak "is the candidate the public think would make the best PM".

They added: "Rishi has continued to progress today because he is the candidate with the clearest plan to restore trust, rebuild the economy, reunite the country and because he is best placed to beat Labour at the next election.

"MPs are also recognising that Rishi has the best experience and plans to deal with the current economic situation.

"Rishi will rebuild our economy by gripping inflation, so we can get our economy growing and unleash the full opportunities of post-Brexit Britain."

After tomorrow's vote, the remaining candidates will face a summer of campaigning and hustings before a vote by the wider party membership, with the winner expected to be announced on 5 September.

But while Ms Badenoch had been stuck in fourth place throughout the rounds of voting, a YouGov poll of Conservative members ahead of today's results showed she would beat any of her three rivals in a final head-to-head.

The survey suggested she would beat Mr Sunak by 56 votes to 34, Ms Mordaunt by 48 votes to 43 and Ms Truss by 46 votes to 43.

The same poll also suggested that Mr Sunak will struggle to win over the Tory membership irrespective of which of the remaining candidates he may face in the final two.

Following the result, former candidate Mr Tugendhat said he was "sorry" to see Ms Badenoch leaving the contest.

"She has brought courage and substance to the argument and will add to the future government of the UK," he posted on social media.

Earlier today, senior Conservative MP Tobias Ellwood had his whip removed - meaning he was not able to vote in the party's fourth leadership ballot.

The move was a punishment after Mr Ellwood failed to take part in yesterday's confidence vote in the government.

Mr Ellwood, chairman of the influential defence select committee, said he was "very sorry" to lose the Tory whip, but argued he was unable to return from a meeting with the president of Moldova due to "unprecedented disruption".

The remaining runners will not face each other in a debate that had been planned by Sky News for tonight after Mr Sunak and Ms Truss refused to take part.

Conservative MPs are said to be concerned about the damage the previous debates have done to the image of the party after exposing disagreements and splits between the leading candidates.

The leadership contest was triggered after Boris Johnson announced he would be leaving Downing Street after an avalanche of ministerial resignations over his handling of the Chris Pincher scandal.

He will remain as prime minister until his successor has been named.

Tue, 19 Jul 2022 03:46:00 -0500 en-GB text/html https://uk.news.yahoo.com/kemi-badenoch-knocked-tory-leadership-073600413.html
Killexams : Opec+ agrees small oil output rise in rebuff to Biden; UK inflation ‘could hit 15%’ – as it happened No result found, try new keyword!Oil producers will lift oil production by 100,000 barrels per day in September, a much smaller rise than in latest months. 16:34 A late PS - the oil price has now dropped back, with Brent crude ... Wed, 03 Aug 2022 04:55:00 -0500 en-gb text/html https://www.msn.com/en-gb/money/other/opecplus-agrees-small-oil-output-rise-in-rebuff-to-biden-uk-inflation-could-hit-15percent-%e2%80%93-as-it-happened/ar-AA10fLpv Killexams : Norway calls off gas strikes that threatened UK supply No result found, try new keyword!Energy giant Equinor today said it had shut down production at three oil and gas fields after oil workers walked out following failed wage negotiations, and warned that more closures were expected. Tue, 05 Jul 2022 02:41:00 -0500 en-gb text/html https://www.msn.com/en-gb/money/other/norway-strikes-threaten-total-cut-off-of-uk-gas-supplies-live-updates/ar-AAZcRBT Killexams : Bank of England probes the persistence of UK's inflation surge

LONDON (Reuters) - The Bank of England says it will act forcefully if needed to stop the surge in inflation from turning into a long-term problem, meaning it could deliver a rare half-percentage point interest rate rise as soon as this week.

Here are some of the things that Governor Andrew Bailey and his colleagues will be looking as they assess the persistence of inflation pressures ahead of their next scheduled monetary policy announcement at 1100 GMT on Thursday.

Measures of inflation expectations and prices charged by companies have slowed recently but core pay has risen.

BoE's rate-setters might feel that they should raise rates by 50 basis points after other central banks pushed up borrowing costs sharply in latest weeks, despite the risk of an economic slowdown or a recession.

INFLATION EXPECTATIONS

Britain's main inflation measure hit a 40-year high of 9.4% in June, prompting some economists to push up their forecast for inflation's peak to 12%. But central banks typically worry just as much about expectations for future inflation.

The BoE might take some comfort from a latest drop in how much consumers think prices will rise in the years ahead.

A survey by U.S. bank Citi and pollsters YouGov published on Monday showed expectations among the public for inflation in five to 10 years - the measure the BoE looks at most - fell in July for the third time in four months, although at 3.8% it remained high by historical standards.

Another survey by Bank of America published on July 12 showed five-year inflation expectations falling to their lowest in almost a year.

A measure of expectations in financial markets for inflation in five to 10 years' time hit its lowest since April 2020 last week but has risen since then.

GRAPHIC - Inflation expectations edge down

https://graphics.reuters.com/BRITAIN-BOE/zgvomxozxvd/chart.png

PAY INCREASES

If high inflation expectations become entrenched, they could lead to higher pay demands that may in turn fuel more inflation in future.

Growth in salaries has accelerated but much of the increase is due to one-off bonuses to attract or retain staff as employers struggle to find candidates to fill their jobs.

Pay including bonuses grew by 6.2% in the three months to May, up from about 3% just before the COVID-19 pandemic but down from the two previous monthly readings and lagging inflation.

Regular pay growth edged up to 4.3%, above its immediate pre-pandemic levels of around 3-4%.

The BoE's own survey of employers showed expectations for pay growth in the 12 months ahead rose to 5.1% in June from 4.8% in May. But the survey also showed expectations for employment over the next 12 months fell to their lowest in over a year.

GRAPHIC - Regular wage growth edges up

https://graphics.reuters.com/BRITAIN-BOE/dwpkrbxqavm/chart.png

PRICING PLANS

As well as via pay, high inflation could also become embedded in the economy if companies keep on pushing up their prices in response to rising costs.

Increases in prices charged by firms, as measured by the S&P Global/CIPS Purchasing Managers Index, rose by the most since records began in 1999 in April. But that pace, while still high by historical standards, slowed a bit in May and June and cooled more significantly in July.

Separate data from the Office for National Statistics has shown a fall in early July in the proportion of businesses expecting to increase their prices.

GRAPHIC - Companies scale back their price hikes

https://graphics.reuters.com/BRITAIN-BOE/mopanaeowva/chart.png

(Writing by William Schomberg; graphics by Vincent Flasseur; Editing by Toby Chopra)

Mon, 01 Aug 2022 04:49:00 -0500 en-CA text/html https://ca.finance.yahoo.com/news/bank-england-probes-persistence-uks-093909825.html
Killexams : Germany's Uniper gets 15 billion euro state bailout to avert collapse

By Christoph Steitz, Essi Lehto and Holger Hansen

FRANKFURT/HELSINKI/BERLIN (Reuters) - The German government stepped in to rescue Uniper with a 15 billion euro ($15.28 billion) bailout on Friday after the gas importer became the biggest casualty of Europe's energy standoff with Russia so far.

Under a bailout that is among the biggest in German corporate history, the government will take a 30% stake in Uniper, reducing the ownership of its Finnish parent Fortum to 56% from nearly 80% after weeks of tough negotiations.

It will also allow Uniper to start passing on some of the costs of soaring gas prices to consumers in the coming months, which German Chancellor Olaf Scholz said would be offset by more welfare support to shield poorer households.

The bailout underscored how Russia's invasion of Ukraine in February has major implications for governments across Europe as they grapple with soaring energy costs and fears of acute gas shortages over the peak demand winter months.

Uniper shares plunged more than 30% to record lows following the announcement. Fortum shares were 3% lower.

Graphic: Uniper plunge- https://graphics.reuters.com/UKRAINE-CRISIS/gkvlgykkgpb/chart.png

"We are living through an unprecedented energy crisis that requires robust measures," Fortum CEO Markus Rauramo said, adding the deal reflected the interests of all parties. "We were driven by urgency and the need to protect Europe's security of supply in a time of war."

At a news conference, Scholz asked the country to pull together, invoking the popular song lyric "you'll never walk alone" in English, while announcing the Uniper bailout.

Under the agreement, Germany will buy 157 million new ordinary Uniper shares for 267 million euros and make available capital of up to 7.7 billion against issuance of mandatory convertible instruments.

In addition, state-lender KfW will raise an existing credit line by 7 billion euros to 9 billion in total.

Scholz, who broke off his holiday in southern Germany to finalise the bailout, said the government would eventually relinquish its stake.

CONDITIONS AND APPROVALS

The package needs approval from the European Commission, and requires confirmation of Uniper's investment grade rating by agency S&P. The deal also needs the backing of Uniper shareholders.

It carries certain conditions, including that Uniper withdraws a lawsuit against the Netherlands over its coal phase-out as well as a commitment by the Duesseldorf-based group to suspend dividend payments for the duration of its stabilisation period.

Following the rescue, Uniper, Fortum and the German government will work on a long-term solution to reform the company's wholesale gas contract architecture, which has exposed the group to billions in losses.

The parties intend to agree on the longer-term solution by the end of 2023, they said.

Germany has accused Russia of deliberately strangling gas flows to Europe on spurious pretexts in retaliation for Western sanctions after the invasion of Ukraine. Moscow denies doing so and said it is ready to fulfil all its commercial obligations.

Germany's largest importer of Russian gas, Uniper on Friday signalled it would take legal action against Gazprom after the Russian company retroactively claimed force majeure for past and current shortfalls in deliveries.

"To date, we have already suffered billions in damages and there is no end in sight. Gazprom itself has not shown any willingness to pay for even part of the damage," Uniper Chief Executive Klaus-Dieter Maubach told journalists.

A drop in Russian supplies meant that, rather than being able to rely on long-term price agreements, Uniper had to buy expensive gas on the spot market to make up for the shortfall.

Fortum's Rauramo said it was too early to estimate what the total losses for Uniper and Fortum would be as these depended on the price and quantity of Russian gas to Europe.

Fortum and the German government have agreed that Germany will cover 90% of price increases which means Fortum would need to cover the rest.

Germany has said that utilities risk a similar collapse to that of Lehman Brothers, whose demise helped trigger the 2008 financial crisis. Scholz compared Friday's rescue to former European Central Bank (ECB) chief Mario Draghi's famous promise to do "whatever it takes" to save the euro.

"We will do everything necessary that we can together as a country, as companies, as citizens, to get through this situation so that nobody is put in an impossible situation," he said.

($1 = 0.9847 euros)

(Reporting by Christoph Steitz, Essi Lehto, Matthias Inverardi, Holger Hansen, Andreas Rinke, Markus Wacket Miranda Murray, Matthias Williams and Tom Sims; Writing by Christoph Steitz and Matthias Williams; Editing by Maria Sheahan, Kirsti Knolle, Barbara Lewis, Jane Merriman and Louise Heavens)

Fri, 22 Jul 2022 01:34:00 -0500 en-GB text/html https://uk.style.yahoo.com/germanys-uniper-gets-15-billion-095922301.html
L4M5 exam dump and training guide direct download
Training Exams List