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Exam Code: JN0-348 Practice test 2022 by Killexams.com team
JN0-348 Enterprise Routing and Switching, Specialist (JNCIS-ENT)

Exam Name : Enterprise Routing and Switching Specialist
Exam Number : JN0-348 JNCIS-ENT
Exam Duration : 90 minutes
Questions in test : 65
Passing Score : Variable (60-70% Approx.)
Recommended Training : Junos Intermediate Routing (JIR)
Junos Enterprise Switching (JEX)
Exam Registration : PEARSON VUE
Real Questions : Juniper JN0-348 Real Questions
VCE practice test : Juniper Networks Certified Specialist Enterprise Routing and Switching Practice Test

Identify the concepts, benefits or functionality of the core elements of the Junos OS

Software architecture
Control and forwarding planes
Routing Engine and Packet Forwarding Engine
Transit traffic processing
Exception traffic

Identify the concepts, operation or functionality of the Junos user interface

CLI functionality
CLI modes
CLI navigation
CLI Help
Filtering output
Active versus candidate configuration
Reverting to previous configurations
Modifying, managing, and saving configuration files
Viewing, comparing, and loading configuration files
J-Web (core/common functionality only)

Identify the main elements for configuring Junos devices

Factory-default state
Initial configuration
User accounts
Login classes
User authentication methods
Interface types and properties
Configuration groups
Additional initial configuration elements, such as NTP, SNMP, and syslog
Configuration archival
Logging and tracing
Rescue configuration

Identify methods of monitoring or maintaining Junos devices

Show commands
Monitor commands
Interface statistics and errors
Network tools, such as ping, traceroute, telnet, SSH, and so on
Junos OS installation and upgrades
Powering on and shutting down Junos devices
Root password recovery

Identify basic routing concepts or functionality for Junos devices

Traffic forwarding concepts
Routing tables
Routing versus forwarding tables
Route preference
Routing instances
Static routing
Advantages of and use cases for dynamic routing protocols

Identify the concepts or functionality of routing policy and firewall filters on Junos devices

Default routing policies
Import and export policies
Routing policy flow
Effect of policies on routes and routing tables
Policy structure and terms
Policy match criteria, match types, and actions
Firewall filter concepts
Filter structure and terms
Filter match criteria and actions
Effect of filters on packets
Unicast reverse-path-forwarding (RPF)

The Juniper Networks Certification Program (JNCP) Data Center certification track is a program that allows participants to demonstrate competence with advanced data center technologies and related configuration and troubleshooting skills. Successful candidates demonstrate advanced knowledge of the Junos OS used in a data center environment.

Enterprise Routing & Switching JNCIS-ENT Learning Path

The Juniper Networks Certified Internetworking Specialist (Enterprise) requires completion of the Junos Intermediate Routing (JIR) and Junos Enterprise Switching (JEX) courses to sit and successfully pass the JNCIS-ENT certification exam.

Juniper has two types of command-line structures across its Enterprise Switching Portfolio with ELS (Enhanced Layer Switching) being introduced later.

From a training perspective, Juniper historically addressed this with two courses code-named JEX and JEX-ELS. These courses were very similar, however with subtle command-line differences contrasting the traditional EX switches and the newer ELS-enabled switches. From October 2017 onwards the newer JEX-ELS course has been re-released as the JEX course and it now focuses on ELS commands and contains an appendix referencing the more traditional EX switching commands. Labs are performed on Juniper EX4300s which contain ELS commands for Junos.
Enterprise Routing and Switching, Specialist (JNCIS-ENT)
Juniper (JNCIS-ENT) learn
Killexams : Juniper (JNCIS-ENT) learn - BingNews https://killexams.com/pass4sure/exam-detail/JN0-348 Search results Killexams : Juniper (JNCIS-ENT) learn - BingNews https://killexams.com/pass4sure/exam-detail/JN0-348 https://killexams.com/exam_list/Juniper Killexams : Learn to Evaluate Juniper Networks (JNPR) using the Charts

The MarketWatch News Department was not involved in the creation of this content.

Oct 01, 2022 (Stock Traders Daily via COMTEX) -- Stock Traders Daily has produced this trading report using a proprietary method. This methodology seeks to optimize the entry and exit levels to maximize results and limit risk, and it is also applied to Index options, ETFs, and futures for our subscribers. This report optimizes trading in Juniper Networks (NASDAQ: JNPR) with integrated risk controls.

Warning:

The trading plans were valid at the time this was published, but the support and resistance levels for JNPR change as time passes, and this should be updated in real time. Access those real time updates for this and 1000 other stocks here. Unlimited Real Time Reports

Protection from Market Crashes: Subscribers also get our Tail Risk hedge, Evitar Corte

Instructions:

Use the basic rules of Technical Analysis. Here are some examples: if JNPR is testing support the signal is to buy and target resistance. On the other hand, if resistance is tested, that is a sign to short, and target support. No matter which side the trade is, long or short, the trigger point is both a place to enter and as a risk control.

Swing Trades, Day Trades, and Longer term Trading Plans:

This data can be used to define Day Trading, Swing Trading, and Long Term Investing plans for JNPR too. All of these are offered here: Access our Real Time Trading Plans

Longer Term Trading Plans for JNPR

  • NONE.
  • Short JNPR slightly under 26.44, target n/a, stop loss @ 26.52

Swing Trading Plans for JNPR

  • Buy JNPR slightly over 26.44, target 30.05, Stop Loss @ 26.36
  • Short JNPR slightly near 26.44, target 26.08, Stop Loss @ 26.52.

Day Trading Plans for JNPR

  • Buy JNPR slightly over 26.46, target 30.05, Stop Loss @ 26.4
  • Short JNPR slightly near 26.46, target 26.08, Stop Loss @ 26.52.

JNPR Technical Summary | Raw Data for the Trading Plans

Bias Weak Weak Neutral
P1 0 0 26.44
P2 25.80 25.21 30.05
P3 26.46 26.08 33.82

COMTEX_415689486/2570/2022-10-01T09:18:03

Is there a problem with this press release? Contact the source provider Comtex at editorial@comtex.com. You can also contact MarketWatch Customer Service via our Customer Center.

The MarketWatch News Department was not involved in the creation of this content.

Fri, 30 Sep 2022 21:18:00 -0500 en-US text/html https://www.marketwatch.com/press-release/learn-to-evaluate-juniper-networks-jnpr-using-the-charts-2022-10-01
Killexams : Otolaryngology Services

Severe hearing loss wasn’t a condition that Heather Simonsen expected as a side effect of pregnancy. Yet, after the birth of her third child, the gradual hearing loss she had been experiencing over several years suddenly became acute, resulting in deafness in her left ear. She couldn’t understand speech, distinguish sounds, or even hear her newborn cry.

Wed, 07 Sep 2022 16:36:00 -0500 en text/html https://healthcare.utah.edu/ent/
Killexams : What’s Behind Juniper Networks’ Stock’s Strong Underperformance Of The S&P Since 2017?

Juniper Networks Inc. (NYSE: JNPR) stock price lost around 3% from $28.50 in 2017 end to around $27 currently, primarily due to unfavorable changes in its P/S multiple. During this period, the company also witnessed a 2% drop in revenues, anda despite a drop in its outstanding share count, the company’s stock price has remained roughly at the same level it was five years ago. Additionally, over the same period, the S&P 500 returned around 45%, meaning that Juniper stock has strongly underperformed the index since 2017-end.

In our interactive dashboard, Why Juniper Networks Stock Moved: JNPR Stock Has Lost 3% Since 2017, we break down the factors behind this move.

JNPR’s Total Revenue has decreased 2% from $5.03 billion in FY 2017 to $4.93 billion on an LTM basis

  • JNPR’s total revenue initially dropped from $5.03 billion in FY 2017 to as low as $4.4 billion in FY 2019 and 2020.
  • Sales have since recovered to $4.7 billion in FY 2021, and currently stand even higher at $4.9 billion on an LTM basis.
  • The company develops and markets networking products, including routers, switches, network management software, network security products, and software-defined networking technology.
  • Product sales made up 65% of the company’s total sales in FY 2021, bringing in $3.08 billion, with services sales making up the remaining 35%.
  • For additional details about JNPR’s revenues and comparison to peers, see Juniper Networks Revenue Comparison

Revenue per share increased 14% from $13.30 in 2017 to $15.21 currently

  • JNPR’s revenue dropped from $5 billion in 2017 to $4.9 billion currently, while the outstanding share count dropped from 378 million in 2017 to around 324 million currently.
  • Due to this, RPS has risen from $13.30 in FY ’17 to $15.21 currently.

Price-To-Sales (P/S) multiple for JNPR rose strongly from 1.8x in 2017 to 2.4x by 2021 end, but has pulled back to 1.8x currently, around the same as its 2017 level

  • JNPR’s P/S multiple rose strongly to around 2.4x by late 2021, on the back of rising investor expectations surrounding increased demand for the company’s products and services.
  • However, due to the current geopolitical tensions and increased economic uncertainty weighing on the broader markets, the P/S multiple has pulled back, currently standing at around 1.8x.
  • For additional details about the company stock returns, and comparison to peers, see Juniper Networks Stock Return Comparison.

What if you’re looking for a more balanced portfolio instead? Our high-quality portfolio and multi-strategy portfolio have beaten the market consistently since the end of 2016.

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Mon, 19 Sep 2022 12:00:00 -0500 Trefis Team en text/html https://www.forbes.com/sites/greatspeculations/2022/09/20/whats-behind-juniper-networks-stocks-strong-underperformance-of-the-sp-since-2017/
Killexams : JEI Learning Center

JEI Learning Center knows that a quality education can be a life-changing experience. This is why their franchisees have a real passion for teaching children and improving education opportunities in their communities.

Founded in 1977, the JEI Learning Center was established in Seoul, South Korea. With immense success in Korea, the founder, Sung Hoon Park, brought JEI Learning Center to the U.S. in 1992. Company expansion continued in places like Canada, Australia, and New Zealand. JEI Learning Center operates under the admirable idea that it will teach education to any willing student. 

Why You May Want to Start a JEI Learning Center Franchise

When you open a JEI Learning Center franchise, you will receive ample guidance and support from company headquarters, which is located in Los Angeles, California. Franchise support staff wants franchisees to feel confident and fully trained when the doors to the existing JEI Learning Center open. Other JEI Learning Center locations cannot take customers away from your specific area with the additional benefit of a protected territory.

With multiple subjects offered for students, franchise locations can have a constant stream of customers to teach. Subjects include math, English, reading and writing, problem solving math, and Brain Safari. With a variety of subjects, students can always find something new to learn. 

What Might Make a JEI Learning Center Franchise a Good Choice?

To be part of the JEI Learning Center team, you should make sure you’re financially ready for an initial investment that will include a franchise fee and other startup costs. Ongoing fees will include royalty fees, advertising fees, and potential renewal fees. Franchisees will also need to meet the company's set net worth and liquid capital requirements. 

It may be wise for potential franchisees to consult with a financial planner and attorney as they begin the franchising process. It is best to make sure you are financially sound and prepared to make an investment in a franchise.

How to Open a JEI Learning Center Franchise

Starting a JEI Learning Center franchise is a six-step process to complete. You can start by requesting an information packet and a franchise inquiry form. The packet will include a copy of a franchise application and the Franchise Disclosure Document, while the inquiry form will provide the company with your relevant information.

If, after the initial inquiry, both parties are still interested, it is time for an interview. The JEI Learning Center franchise team may arrange an interview so you can ask all of the questions you have. A franchise representative may also ask you questions as they get to know you as a potential franchisee. 

Once ready, it’s time to get legal. You'll sign the franchise agreement and begin to make the initial investment. Then you can begin the process of selecting your location with the help of a JEI Learning Center franchise team member. Next, you'll attend the new franchisee training program. Here, JEI Learning Center will give you even more keys to franchise operations. After training is complete, franchisees can open their doors and enroll their first students.

Thu, 01 Sep 2022 12:00:00 -0500 en text/html https://www.entrepreneur.com/franchises/jeilearningcenter/326137
Killexams : Four of five pinyon-juniper tree species declining in their ranges in the West

Pinyon-juniper woodlands host unique wildlife and wildlife habitat, as well as areas for hiking and outdoor recreation. They are also part of a web of healthy ecosystems that, together, help to balance water availability, storage and runoff; and prevent erosion. A new study published in Global Ecology and Biogeography and led by University of Nevada, Reno researcher Robert Shriver sheds new light on what is happening in pinyon-juniper woodlands across the West. The research is unique, in that it looks at both tree mortality, as well as recruitment, or new seedlings and saplings, to calculate a “net effect.” And, the news isn’t necessarily good, particularly in warmer, drier locations.

“We found that four of the five species were declining,” said Shriver, an assistant professor in the University’s College of Agriculture, Biotechnology & Natural Resources. “And, in the driest, warmest locations, up to about 50% of populations are declining. It’s pretty severe in those locations, which are usually at lower elevations that tend to be hotter and get less water than woodlands at higher elevations.”

Shriver said that when looking at all locations studied, which included over 6,000 plots and more than 59,000 tagged trees, up to 10-20% of populations were declining. Of the five species, including two pinyon pines and three junipers, Pinus edulis, more commonly referred to as two-needle pinyon or simply pinyon, showed the greatest declines, with about 24% of its populations in decline. The other pinyon species and two of the juniper species showed more moderate declines overall, but still quite severe declines in the hotter, drier areas. These species include Pinus monophylla (single-leaf pinyon), Juniperus monosperma (one-seed juniper) and Juniperus scopulorum (Rocky Mountain juniper). Juniperus osteosperma (Utah juniper) was the only species that did not show a decline.

“Utah juniper was the exception to everything,” Shriver, who conducts research as part of the College’s Department of Natural Resources & Environmental Science and Experiment Station, said. “What we found pretty much matches up with what we know about that species’ resiliency. It’s the most abundant in the Great Basin, and is typically less vulnerable to hotter, drier climate conditions, so it could mean that there might be compositional shifts occurring in the future, where some areas that are mixed species might become more juniper-dominated.”

Gathering the data and building the models

In part, Shriver used data from the Forest Inventory and Analysis, a nationwide survey of forested lands in the U.S., conducted by the U.S. Forest Service.

“They tag the trees and return to the same plots for comparison at least every 10 years, but they have a systematic scheme to determine where,” he explained. “They are making sure they are getting a broad sample of both federal and private land. The result is a representative sample of what all forests look like across the U.S., even covering some very remote locations. It’s staggered, with 10% of plots surveyed in a given year.”

Pinyon woodland in Nevada.
A dead tree canopy can be seen in the top right of this pinyon pine stand in the Anchorite Hills in western Nevada. Research shows pinyon pine populations have been declining in western Nevada. Photo by Robert Shriver.

Shriver said the plots that were included in this pinyon-juniper research were first sampled between 2000 and 2007, and were surveyed the second time between 2010 and 2017. It is data obtained within those 10-year spans that he used for the research. He pointed out, however, that the Forest Service survey doesn’t capture as complete data on recruitment, or seedlings, since they don’t tag anything under 1 inch in diameter. Trees of this size are counted, but not tagged.

“Recruitment is the really hard part,” he said. “Tree mortality is easy to see, but recruitment is harder to observe, so it’s been harder to account for. Having a stable population is dependent on both mortality and recruitment. So, we developed a new statistical approach that allowed us to understand and factor in recruitment. Using these modeling approaches, we were able to quantify what the recruitment rate is in these different areas, and then combine that data with the mortality data to get a more clear, accurate picture of what is really going on in terms of change in species’ populations under different climate conditions and woodland densities in different regions.”

The research excluded plots where fire mortality or intentional tree harvesting occurred, allowing the researchers to more directly observe changes occurring due to climatic conditions across each species’ range.

Impacts of the findings

Shriver says the declines in populations they calculated could be significant for a number of reasons.

“In regard to wildlife, probably the most significant effect is on the pinyon jay, which has been in decline for the last couple of decades, and is really dependent on the seed that is produced by pinyon pine,” he said. “The areas where the pinyon jay tends to choose are on that border of the sagebrush and the pinyon. It likes those habitats that are probably the most vulnerable. But, beyond the pinyon jay, certainly a number of species could be affected – mule deer, and other birds and wildlife.”

In addition, Shriver said pinyons and pine nut harvesting are culturally important, to Native Americans and others, and pinyon-juniper woodlands provide recreational value for hikers and outdoor enthusiasts. Importantly, he adds, there’s the functions that pinyon-juniper woodlands play in our watersheds. Pinyon-juniper woodlands play an important role in water and soil retention in some locations.

What does the future hold?

“We are likely to see pretty big changes in where we find forests in the Great Basin and the Southwest over the next few decades,” Shriver said. “A lot of places where we saw forests, we may not see them, especially in lower elevations, because they tend to be the hottest and driest.”

Shriver said there has been a lot of expansion in these woodlands since the mid-1800s, and that some declines may not be a bad thing everywhere. For example, in some areas the pinyon-juniper woodlands have encroached on shrubland ecosystems that provide important ecosystem services and unique wildlife habitat. And, the trees, especially when packed in too densely and without enough moisture, also increase the intensity of wildfires.

“Our results also suggest that for some locations, management actions could slow down or reverse the woodland declines,” Shriver said. “As it gets warmer and drier, the density of trees a landscape is able to support lessens, so reductions in tree density might expand the envelope of where the trees can be, reducing the chance of large tree mortality events.”

While woodland decline could create an opportunity for expansion of native shrublands such as sagebrush, Shriver cautioned that other, less beneficial vegetation could also take hold.

“Just because the pinyon and juniper die off, doesn’t mean something desirable would establish in their place,” he said. “You might get cheatgrass or other undesirable vegetation.”

Shriver said the purpose of the research and models it created is to help anticipate the vulnerability of woodlands and forecast coming range shifts, so that we might be able to sway the outcomes to be more positive ones.

“If we know where this is likely to happen, we can do the best we can to influence what might happen next,” he said. “We might be able to direct these into ecosystems that might support native plants and animals in the Great Basin and the Southwest, and fit into our watersheds in a beneficial way.”

Funding for the study was provided by the United States Geological Survey North Central Climate Adaptation Science Center. Coauthors of the study include Charles B. Yackulic and John B. Bradford, with the USGS Southwest Biological Science Center; and David M. Bell, with the USDA Forest Service Pacific Northwest Research Station.

Wed, 05 Oct 2022 03:14:00 -0500 en-us text/html https://www.unr.edu/nevada-today/news/2022/pinyon-juniper-population
Killexams : An Intrinsic Calculation For Juniper Networks, Inc. (NYSE:JNPR) Suggests It's 50% Undervalued No result found, try new keyword!How far off is Juniper Networks, Inc. (NYSE ... Anyone interested in learning a bit more about intrinsic value should have a read of the Simply Wall St analysis model. We are going to use a ... Thu, 29 Sep 2022 04:01:00 -0500 text/html https://www.nasdaq.com/articles/an-intrinsic-calculation-for-juniper-networks-inc.-nyse%3Ajnpr-suggests-its-50-undervalued Killexams : UMass Amherst Switches to Juniper Networks AI-Driven Wi-Fi to Boost Student Engagement and Strengthen Digital Experiences on Campus

SUNNYVALE, Calif., September 21, 2022--(BUSINESS WIRE)--Juniper Networks, a leader in secure, AI-driven networks, today announced that the University of Massachusetts Amherst, the flagship and largest school of the UMass system and the largest public research university in New England, switched to Juniper’s AI-driven wireless network to optimize the digital experience for students, teachers, staff and guests while minimizing operational burdens placed on IT staff.

Reliable Wi-Fi became especially important at UMass Amherst as in-person learning resumed in 2021. The university chose to pilot Juniper’s AI-driven wireless platform in residence halls that previously experienced the most Wi-Fi complaints. After two months with no Wi-Fi support tickets, the university began rolling out Juniper wireless across the rest of campus.

The Juniper network leverages Mist AI to proactively identify and fix problems with self-driving actions, which streamlines the campus wireless experience, creates new initiatives, and will enable new strategic initiatives across campuses, like green smart buildings with automatic doors and environmental controls and smart buses with predictive maintenance capabilities.

Juniper’s cloud-based microservices architecture driven by Mist AI delivers a scalable, agile and reliable Wi-Fi environment that constantly optimizes the experience of the 32,000 students, 6,400 faculty/staff and over 120,000 devices connected to the UMass Amherst network. Benefits include faster connectivity, better student engagement inside and outside of the classroom, increased health and safety across campuses and better integration for IoT devices.

"With Juniper, we have better visibility into the student experience, while Mist AI and analytics make it easier to diagnose network problems," said Jim Mileski, chief technology officer at the University of Massachusetts Amherst. "Plus, a modern cloud simplifies the network and improves resiliency. We have less infrastructure to manage."

Zero-touch provisioning, through the Mist portal and mobile app, made it far simpler to set up thousands of access points than in the past. "With our previous Wi-Fi, outside consultants took two weeks to deploy a new building," Mileski said. "With Juniper, student workers can deploy a building in two to four hours."

About Juniper Networks

Juniper Networks is dedicated to dramatically simplifying network operations and driving superior experiences for end users. Our solutions deliver industry-leading insight, automation, security and AI to drive real business results. We believe that powering connections will bring us closer together while empowering us all to solve the world’s greatest challenges of well-being, sustainability and equality. Additional information can be found at Juniper Networks (www.juniper.net) or connect with Juniper on Twitter, LinkedIn and Facebook.

Juniper Networks, the Juniper Networks logo, Juniper, Junos, and other trademarks listed here are registered trademarks of Juniper Networks, Inc. and/or its affiliates in the United States and other countries. Other names may be trademarks of their respective owners.

category-enterprise

View source version on businesswire.com: https://www.businesswire.com/news/home/20220921005170/en/

Contacts

Leslie Ruble
Juniper Networks
408-936-2111
lruble@juniper.net

Wed, 21 Sep 2022 00:15:00 -0500 en-US text/html https://finance.yahoo.com/news/umass-amherst-switches-juniper-networks-114500129.html
Killexams : Juniper cultivars deserve more consideration | Tony Tomeo

Fads come and go. Many can be good, even if only briefly. A few might be bad enough to later stigmatize the object of the fad. For example, the formerly esteemed crape myrtle is now familiar as a mundanely common tree.

Flashy bloom and complaisance contributed to its excessive popularity. Most sorts of juniper are similarly victims of their previous fad.

A few cultivars of juniper suddenly became overly popular during suburbanization of the 1950s. They were remarkably reliable and resilient. Most were shrubbery or low hedges. A few were groundcover.

Hollywood juniper grew as a compact sculptural tree. However, most junipers grew too big. They became difficult to maintain, or impossible to renovate.

As many outgrew suburban gardens, few junipers outgrew their reputation. Even modern cultivars that were unavailable during the fad of the 1950s are perhaps less popular than they should be. Realistically, many old and new cultivars of juniper are quite practical for refined home gardens. They merely need to be appropriate to their particular application.

Many cultivars of several species of Juniperus are commonly available. Straight species are very rare from nurseries, although a few are native nearby.

All junipers are evergreen with tiny awl or scale leaves. Foliar color ranges from forest green to silvery gray. Bloom is unremarkable. Some junipers produce pretty and aromatic blue, gray or black berries.

Junipers generally do not respond favorably to pruning that damages their natural forms. Those that grow as groundcovers, with stems that sprawl over the surface of the soil, are not offended by pruning to contain their edges. However, most groundcover junipers are actually just low shrubbery. Pruning might leave holes within their dense foliar canopies.

Junipers that grow as small trees do not mind removal of lower limbs at their main trunks, but object to partial pruning or 'stubbing' of such limbs. Regardless of their natural forms, all junipers should be proportionate to their particular applications.

With sufficient space, they can mature and develop their naturally distinguished forms with minimal altercation. Maintenance could really be quite minimal.

Rocky Mountain juniper

Hollywood juniper had formerly been the only popular juniper of tree form. As it became less popular during the past few decades, cultivars of the once obscure Rocky Mountain juniper, Juniperus scopulorum, became more popular.

Also, a few more modern cultivars became available. Now, the once overly common Hollywood juniper is quite uncommon.

Rocky Mountain juniper is naturally rather grayish for protection from the harsh exposure of the high elevations which it inhabits. Cultivars are grayer, bluish or silvery, and mostly develop symmetrically conical form.

Old specimens that were initially conical eventually grow as small trees with rounded and relatively dense canopies, perhaps on bare trunks.

'Skyrocket' and 'Blue Arrow' are very narrow like Italian cypress that grow only 15 feet tall. 'Wichita Blue' and 'Moonglow' are stoutly conical. 'Blue Arrow' and 'Wichita Blue' are bluish green. 'Skyrocket' and 'Moonglow' are silvery gray.

Established specimens do not require much water, but develop better foliar color with warmth and occasional watering.

Sat, 08 Oct 2022 01:01:00 -0500 en text/html https://lompocrecord.com/lifestyles/juniper-cultivars-deserve-more-consideration-tony-tomeo/article_2de545b7-6bcf-52a5-9617-3af9196e2524.html
Killexams : Juniper review – Charlotte Rampling is absolutely furious and fabulous

“Give me my gin, you little shit!” It’s a role that only Charlotte Rampling could play: a veteran war photographer famous for her adventuring, bravery and hard drinking. Now almost elderly, ill and perhaps afraid of being alone, Ruth has flown from England to New Zealand to stay with her son. The little shit is her teenage grandson Sam (George Ferrier), recently expelled from school. He’s grieving the death of his mum and is not best pleased to be left alone in the house with Ruth. “I’m not looking after that old bitch.”

You can exactly see where this is going from the off. Ruth and Sam – each raging at the world – inching towards friendship and a sense of peace. Still, while first-time feature director Matthew J Saville won’t be winning any awards for originality, he has made an emotionally satisfying film. It’s beautifully acted with insightful things to say about how alcoholism and dysfunction echo unhappily down the generations.

The character of the hard-bitten been-there-seen-that war reporter is a bit of a movie cliche. But Rampling is wonderful, adding layers to rude, arrogant Ruth, showing her affinity with those who are suffering. Ferrier is very good, too, as Sam, all unprocessed grief and defiance.

Juniper, unfortunately, is let down by a couple of corny moments that belong in the made-for-TV version. It’s a shame because elsewhere the directness is refreshing. There’s a scene in which a doctor advises Ruth to have a catheter fitted. She replies archly: “What if I meet someone, we have a few drinks, and …?” She leaves the final bit hanging, enjoying watching the doctor squirm as he explains she must refrain from sex. In another she catches a glimpse of herself in a mirror. “I’ve still got it” – and boy does Ramping still have it, in spades.

Juniper is released on 23 September in cinemas.

Mon, 19 Sep 2022 22:01:00 -0500 Cath Clarke en text/html https://www.theguardian.com/film/2022/sep/20/juniper-review-charlotte-rampling-is-absolutely-furious-and-fabulous
Killexams : Four of five pinyon-juniper tree species declining in their ranges in the West

Pinyon-juniper woodlands host unique wildlife and wildlife habitat, as well as areas for hiking and outdoor recreation. They are also part of a web of healthy ecosystems that, together, help to balance water availability, storage and runoff; and prevent erosion. A new study published in Global Ecology and Biogeography and led by University of Nevada, Reno researcher Robert Shriver sheds new light on what is happening in pinyon-juniper woodlands across the West. The research is unique, in that it looks at both tree mortality, as well as recruitment, or new seedlings and saplings, to calculate a "net effect." And, the news isn't necessarily good, particularly in warmer, drier locations.

"We found that four of the five species were declining," said Shriver, an assistant professor in the University's College of Agriculture, Biotechnology & Natural Resources. "And, in the driest, warmest locations, up to about 50% of populations are declining. It's pretty severe in those locations, which are usually at that tend to be hotter and get less water than woodlands at higher elevations."

Shriver said that when looking at all locations studied, which included over 6,000 plots and more than 59,000 tagged trees, up to 10-20% of populations were declining. Of the five species, including two pinyon pines and three junipers, Pinus edulis, more commonly referred to as two-needle pinyon or simply pinyon, showed the greatest declines, with about 24% of its populations in decline. The other pinyon species and two of the juniper species showed more moderate declines overall, but still quite severe declines in the hotter, drier areas. These species include Pinus monophylla (single-leaf pinyon), Juniperus monosperma (one-seed juniper) and Juniperus scopulorum (Rocky Mountain juniper). Juniperus osteosperma (Utah juniper) was the only species that did not show a decline.

"Utah juniper was the exception to everything," Shriver, who conducts research as part of the College's Department of Natural Resources & Environmental Science and Experiment Station, said. "What we found pretty much matches up with what we know about that species' resiliency. It's the most abundant in the Great Basin, and is typically less vulnerable to hotter, drier climate conditions, so it could mean that there might be compositional shifts occurring in the future, where some areas that are mixed species might become more juniper-dominated."

Gathering the data and building the models

In part, Shriver used data from the Forest Inventory and Analysis, a nationwide survey of forested lands in the U.S., conducted by the U.S. Forest Service.

"They tag the trees and return to the same plots for comparison at least every 10 years, but they have a systematic scheme to determine where," he explained. "They are making sure they are getting a broad sample of both federal and private land. The result is a representative sample of what all forests look like across the U.S., even covering some very remote locations. It's staggered, with 10% of plots surveyed in a given year."

Shriver said the plots that were included in this pinyon-juniper research were first sampled between 2000 and 2007, and were surveyed the second time between 2010 and 2017. It is data obtained within those 10-year spans that he used for the research. He pointed out, however, that the Forest Service survey doesn't capture as complete data on recruitment, or seedlings, since they don't tag anything under 1 inch in diameter. Trees of this size are counted, but not tagged.

"Recruitment is the really hard part," he said. "Tree mortality is easy to see, but recruitment is harder to observe, so it's been harder to account for. Having a stable population is dependent on both mortality and recruitment. So, we developed a new statistical approach that allowed us to understand and factor in recruitment. Using these modeling approaches, we were able to quantify what the recruitment rate is in these different areas, and then combine that data with the mortality data to get a more clear, accurate picture of what is really going on in terms of change in species' populations under different climate conditions and woodland densities in different regions."

The research excluded plots where fire mortality or intentional tree harvesting occurred, allowing the researchers to more directly observe changes occurring due to climatic conditions across each species' range.

Impacts of the findings

Shriver says the declines in populations they calculated could be significant for a number of reasons.

"In regard to wildlife, probably the most significant effect is on the pinyon jay, which has been in decline for the last couple of decades, and is really dependent on the seed that is produced by pinyon pine," he said. "The areas where the pinyon jay tends to choose are on that border of the sagebrush and the pinyon. It likes those habitats that are probably the most vulnerable. But, beyond the pinyon jay, certainly a number of species could be affected—mule deer, and other birds and wildlife."

In addition, Shriver said pinyons and pine nut harvesting are culturally important, to Native Americans and others, and pinyon-juniper woodlands provide recreational value for hikers and outdoor enthusiasts. Importantly, he adds, there's the functions that pinyon-juniper woodlands play in our watersheds. Pinyon-juniper woodlands play an important role in water and soil retention in some locations.

What does the future hold?

"We are likely to see pretty big changes in where we find forests in the Great Basin and the Southwest over the next few decades," Shriver said. "A lot of places where we saw forests, we may not see them, especially in lower elevations, because they tend to be the hottest and driest."

Shriver said there has been a lot of expansion in these woodlands since the mid-1800s, and that some declines may not be a bad thing everywhere. For example, in some areas the pinyon-juniper woodlands have encroached on shrubland ecosystems that provide important ecosystem services and unique wildlife habitat. And, the trees, especially when packed in too densely and without enough moisture, also increase the intensity of wildfires.

"Our results also suggest that for some locations, management actions could slow down or reverse the woodland declines," Shriver said. "As it gets warmer and drier, the density of trees a landscape is able to support lessens, so reductions in tree density might expand the envelope of where the trees can be, reducing the chance of large events."

While woodland decline could create an opportunity for expansion of native shrublands such as sagebrush, Shriver cautioned that other, less beneficial vegetation could also take hold.

"Just because the pinyon and juniper die off, doesn't mean something desirable would establish in their place," he said. "You might get cheatgrass or other undesirable vegetation."

Shriver said the purpose of the research and models it created is to help anticipate the vulnerability of woodlands and forecast coming range shifts, so that we might be able to sway the outcomes to be more positive ones.

"If we know where this is likely to happen, we can do the best we can to influence what might happen next," he said. "We might be able to direct these into ecosystems that might support native plants and animals in the Great Basin and the Southwest, and fit into our watersheds in a beneficial way."



More information: Robert K. Shriver et al, Dry forest decline is driven by both declining recruitment and increasing mortality in response to warm, dry conditions, Global Ecology and Biogeography (2022). DOI: 10.1111/geb.13582

Citation: Four of five pinyon-juniper tree species declining in their ranges in the West (2022, October 6) retrieved 17 October 2022 from https://phys.org/news/2022-10-pinyon-juniper-tree-species-declining-ranges.html

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