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We are doing an extraordinary battle to offer you genuine Foundations of HPE Storage Solutions test questions and responses, alongside clarifications. Each HPE0-J74 questions and answers on killexams.com has been checked and approved by our HPE0-J74 specialists. They are qualified and confirmed individuals, who have a seriously long encounter seen with the HP certificates. They really look at the HPE0-J74 exam dumps according to Practice test.

Exam Code: HPE0-J74 Practice exam 2022 by Killexams.com team
Foundations of HPE Storage Solutions
HP Foundations exam syllabus
Killexams : HP Foundations exam syllabus - BingNews https://killexams.com/pass4sure/exam-detail/HPE0-J74 Search results Killexams : HP Foundations exam syllabus - BingNews https://killexams.com/pass4sure/exam-detail/HPE0-J74 https://killexams.com/exam_list/HP Killexams : CMA Foundation 2022 June Results Declared at icmai.in, Check List of Pass Candidates Here

CMA June Result 2022: ICAI has declared the CMA Foundation result 2022 in online mode. Candidates will be able to check their ICAI CMA foundation result at icmai.in. Check details here 

CMA Foundation 2022 June Results
CMA Foundation 2022 June Results

CMA June Result 2022: Institute of Cost Accountants of India (ICAI) has declared the CMA Foundation result for June 2022 session. The authorities have announced the result in online mode. Candidates can check their ICAI CMA result for foundation on the official website - icmai.in. They can check their results for CMA June by using - the identification number in the login window. 

Along with the CMA login Foundation results, ICAI has also released a press release with the list of complete pass candidates. Those who secure an aggregate of 50% in all subjects are considered to pass the exam.

How To Check ICAI CMA Foundation Result 2022? 

To check the CMA foundation result for June 2022 session, candidates will have to visit the official website. The result has been announced in online mode. They can go through the steps to know complete details - 

  • Step 1 - Go to the official CMA exam website - icmai.in.
  • Step 2 - Click on the link stating - Result from the tab.
  • Step 3 - On the new page click on the link for CMA June 2022 Foundation results.
  • Step 4 - Click on the - press release option to check the list of complete pass candidates.
  • Step 5 - Further, login and check the result - Online Result and enter the CMA Foundation identification number.
  • Step 6 - Click on the link - View Result. 

What Details Will Be Mentioned on the ICAI CMA Foundation Result 2022? 

After downloading the result of CMA 2022, candidates must go through their scorecard. As per updates, the ICAI CMA Foundation result will include the following details - the name of the candidate, identification number, roll number, CMA foundation syllabus (2016 or 2022), paper -wise, marks for each exam group, qualifying status and overall marks. 

Also Read: MHT CET PCM exam 2022 Begins Today, Check Exam-Day Guidelines and Admit Card Details Here 

Thu, 04 Aug 2022 16:17:00 -0500 text/html https://www.jagranjosh.com/news/cma-foundation-2022-june-results-declared-at-icmai-in-check-list-of-pass-candidates-here-164389
Killexams : Education News 2022

Education News: Read the Latest Education News updates on results, entrance exams, colleges, admissions, admit cards, board exams, scholarships, career, events to new regulations and rules and New Education Policy – NEP 2022 Here. For students and young professionals, being aware of Education News Today is very important to get the latest information regarding their academic future and career life. To help them do so, we provide Education News India about school closures, School and College Reopening News, Board exam Date Sheets and Time Tables and SC hearing on important Exams including NEET and JEE Main Tests. Jagranjosh.com brings Education News Today which will provide students with all the important updates about the latest happenings in the education space. Be it Education News related to school, Colleges, B schools, registration, scholarships, exam result and Industry Updates, you can count on us to provide you with the Latest Education News Updates to help you stay aware of the developments.

  • AILET 2021 exam Rescheduled: As per the latest update, the National Law University, Delhi has decided to reschedule AILET 2021 Law Entrance Exam. As per the earlier notification, AILET 2021 exam was scheduled to be held on 2nd May, which has now been postponed and the revised date for Law Entrance exam stands as 20th June 2020. Candidates can read the detailed notification confirming the rescheduling of AILET 2020 exam via official website nludelhi.ac.in. Get Direct Link Here.

  • GATE 2021 Admit Card Released: Finally, the GATE 2021 exam Admit Card has been officially released by the exam organizing institute IIT Bombay today evening. Candidates who are registered   to appear for the PG Engineering Entrance Exam, can now get their individual hall tickets by logging onto the exam portal i.e. gate.iitb.ac.in. Get Direct Link Here.

  • The Andhra Pradesh State Council of Higher Education has released the AP EAMCET Counselling 2020 Round 2 schedule on the official website. Candidates eligible for the counsellings can visit the official website to check the complete schedule. 

  • Register for Result Updates
  • Bihar School Reopening News: Amid rising concerns about safety of the students after reopening of schools in Bihar, the state government is planning to carry out random testing in schools across the test to closely monitor the situation. The decision comes close on the heels after 22 students from Munger tested positive for COVID in rapid antigen testing drive, but were found to be negative in the 2nd Round of Testing. Get Complete Details Here.

  • OJEE Counselling 2020: As per the latest update, the Odisha Joint Entrance Examination (OJEE) Committee has released the details about OJEE 2020 Institute Level counselling for various courses. OJEE 2020 Counselling at institute level would be carried out from 12th January onwards in offline mode for various undergraduate and postgraduate level programmes. Get Complete Details Here.

  • Patna University is expected to complete the admissions to the 2020-21 academic session.  Patna University which commenced the online application process on April 30, 2020 and have reopened the admissions for the postgraduate programmes.

  • Register for Result Updates
  •  Anna University has released the TANCET 2021 entrance examination schedule on the official website. The students interested to apply and appear for the TANCET 2021 exams can visit the official website to check the complete schedule. 

  • GMAC has announced NMAT by GMAC™ 2021 dates for the aspirants who wish to appear in the extended exam window. Find out registration dates, exam dates and other important details here.

  • The list of eligible candidates for the NEET 2020 stray vacancy round have been released on the official website of the Medical Counselling Committee. Candidates who have registered for the NEET UG 2020 counselling caan visit the official website to check the eligibility list through the direct link here.

  • Register for Result Updates
  • A Committee has been formed by the Odisha state government for reserving the seats for the students from government schools in the medical and engineering colleges. Check complete details here. 

  • MHT CET 2021 MBA Merit List Today: As per the latest update, the Maharashtra State CET Cell is all set to release the final merit list for MBA aspirants today i.e. on 7th January 2021. Candidates who have participated in the MHT CET 2021 Counselling Process can check their MBA allotment results online by logging onto the exam portal mahacet.org. Get Direct Link Here.

  • BCECEB Medical / Pharmacy Counselling 2020 Registration Begins: As per the latest update, the Bihar Combined Entrance Competitive Examination (BCECE) will officially begin accepting the applications of candidates willing to participate in counselling process for medical and pharmacy courses. Such aspirants can complete their registration for Bihar BCECE Counselling 2020 online by logging onto the exam portal bceceboard.bihar.gov.in. Get Direct Link Here.

  • Register for Result Updates
  • The Indian Institute of Technology Bombay has released the UCEED and CEED 2021 mock test online. Candidates who have applied for the entrance examinations can visit the official website to appear for the mock test. 

  • ICAI has released the ICAI CA 2021 Admit Card  on the official website. Candidates can get the ICAI CA 2021 Admit Card through the direct link provided here. 

  • Odisha School Reopening Update: Finally, after a gap of nearly 9 months, Schools in Odisha state are all set to welcome students back onto their campuses from today. As announced earlier by the state government, Schools for Class 10 and 12 Students will reopen from today in Odisha. Check important COVID-19 precautionary guidelines and SOPs to be followed by students here.

  • Register for Result Updates
    Mon, 13 Dec 2021 13:42:00 -0600 text/html https://www.jagranjosh.com/news-p476
    Killexams : Orientation programme held for Delhi govt school heads

    New Delhi: The State Council of Educational Research and Training (SCERT) Delhi on Tuesday conducted a joint-orientation program for heads of schools from Delhi government schools and MCD schools to review the learnings from the implementation of Mission Buniyaad

    Read this news in brief form

    New Delhi: The State Council of Educational Research and Training (SCERT) Delhi on Tuesday conducted a joint-orientation program for heads of schools from Delhi government schools and MCD schools to review the learnings from the implementation of Mission Buniyaad.

    During the orientation session that saw over 2700 heads of schools from government schools of Delhi under the Directorate of Education (DoE) and Municipal Corporation of Delhi (MCD), stakeholders discussed the gains made during the April-June implementation of the program and deliberated on a roadmap to further strengthen the foundational learning skills of students studying in DoE and MCD schools through the program.

    Mission Buniyaad is a learning competency program that seeks to plug learning gaps and Excellerate the reading, writing and basic mathematical abilities of children in classes 3 to 9. In a written statement on Tuesday, the government shared that 88% of children in classes 3 to 5 in DoE schools and 78% of children in MCD schools are able to read at least words. In classes 6-9, 90% of students are able to read small paragraphs, as per government data.

    The orientation was led by MCD Commissioner Gyanesh Bharti and Secretary (Education) Shri Ashok Kumar. “26 lakh children studying in DoE and MCD schools are the future of Delhi. With the introduction of Mission Buniyaad in all government schools we have seen 20-30% improvement in the learning level of children, which is just the first milestone,” said Bharti.

    He added that school heads should strive to ensure that all children in schools are able to read before October. “We will run Mission Buniyaad till we achieve 100% results. The learning gap has widened beyond limits during COVID and Mission Buniyaad can help us fill that significantly,” said Bharti.

    Ashok Kumar, secretary education, said that schools needed to focus on building a strong foundation over syllabus completion. “Mission Buniyaad was a success in its current phase due to collective efforts of teachers and HoS from both DoE and MCD schools. We should not rest till we bring every child back to the mainstream. Our focus should be to build the foundation rather than completing the syllabus,” said Kumar.

    Close Story
    • Inmates of a prison in India. (HT File Photo)

      ‘Azadi Ka Amrit Mahotsav’: Bihar govt plans special remissions for prisoners

      The Bihar government has planned to release a section of prisoners who have served half their jail terms to commemorate the 75th anniversary of the country's independence. The decision was taken during a cabinet meeting chaired by chief minister Nitish Kumar on Friday. The state has nearly 59 prisons, which include central, district and open jails, where more than 68,580 people, including 3,051 female inmates, are lodged.

    • ‘Azadi Ka Amrit Mahotsav’ campaign by HSR Layout citizens in Bengaluru

      Bengaluru citizens walk with 75m Indian flag to celebrate 75th Independence Day.

      As part of the 'Azadi Ka Amrit Mahotsav' campaign to mark the country's 75th Independence, the citizens of HSR layout in Bengaluru walked with a 75-meter-long Indian flag on Sunday morning. The residents walked from Somasundarapalya lake to Haralur Lake, covering a distance of three kilometers. Over 100 citizens participated in the walkathon on Sunday morning and carried the tricolor flag with slogans like 'Jai Hind' and 'Bharat Mata ki Jai'.

    • The IndiGo flight was grounded at Nagpur airport and could not proceed to its next destination.

      Two IndiGo engineers struck by lightning at Nagpur airport, hospitalised

      Two engineers of IndiGo airlines were injured after being struck by lightning at Nagpur's Dr Babasaheb Ambedkar International Airport on Saturday. One of the engineers fell unconscious on impact of the lightning, while the second continues to have weakness in his right hand as a result of the accident, duty doctor of Kingsway Hospital at the airport, Mohammad Etesham, told PTI.

    • Rajasthan chief minister Ashok Gehlot  (File/PTI)

      Gehlot says law on hanging rapists ‘caused dangerous trend’, sparks controversy

      Rajasthan Chief Minister Ashok Gehlot said that after the law to hang the rape accused came into force, the incidents of murder after rape have increased across the country. The Chief Minister made this statement on Friday in Delhi during the demonstration by Congress against the Central government over price rise and unemployment.

    • BMRCL requested metro commuters to make use out of increased train frequency.

      Bengaluru metro to increase frequency in non-peak hours. Details here

      The BMRCL(Bangalore Metro Rail Corporation Limited) announced on Saturday that the frequency of metro trains will be increased during non-peak hours from Monday. Currently, the metro trains run at a frequency of 20 minutes' interval between 5am to 6am and 10pm to 11pm every day. As per the latest announcement of the BMRCL, the trains will run at a frequency of 15 minutes' interval between the same timings from August 8.

    Tue, 19 Jul 2022 12:19:00 -0500 en text/html https://www.hindustantimes.com/cities/delhi-news/orientation-programme-held-for-delhi-govt-school-heads-101658256556255.html
    Killexams : EXPERT SPEAK

    The Times of India Expert Speak section is all about the opinion and advice provided by the best teachers and subject experts. It will help you to get the desired result in the various exams like CAT or how to Excellerate your score in SAT examination. Preparation for the SAT can be a stressful but under the TOI's Expert Speak section you will get to read the articles authored by experts of their fields. Through the advice of experts you will be able to qualify the CAT examination even without coaching. You can get help on understanding subject, which books you should read and how to attempt question paper....More

    Thu, 28 Apr 2022 22:58:00 -0500 text/html https://timesofindia.indiatimes.com/home/education/expert-speak
    Killexams : Ace NEET With Flying Colours: NEET 2021 Preparation Tips
    Ace NEET With Flying Colours: NEET 2021 Preparation Tips

    NEET 2021 Preparation Tips

    New Delhi:

    National Eligibility cum Entrance Test (NEET) is a national medical entrance exam conducted every year for the admission to MBBS, BDS, AYUSH, BVSc, and AH degree programmes. NEET is an exam with not only a difficult academic curriculum but also involves rigorous verification of students’ diligence, hard work and passion towards medicine. Candidates who wish to pursue a medical career in the country are required to sit for the National Eligibility cum Entrance Test conducted by National Testing Agency (NTA). With a limited number of seats and fierce competition, it becomes essential for candidates to come up with the best preparation strategy for NEET 2021. To help students prepare for NEET 2021, here is a short guide that tells you how to prepare for NEET 2021. This article will help students to understand the exam and have a crisp strategy to ace NEET 2021. The preparation tips for NEET 2021 discussed here are clear, concise, tried, and tested.

    Latest: Use NEET College Predictor to check  your expected NEET rank & admission chances in Govt/Private MBBS/BDS Colleges Check Now!

    Don't Miss: Check your admission chances in BHMS/BAMS/other AYUSH Colleges at All India Level, Check Now!

    To begin your preparation of NEET 2021, divide your NEET 2021 preparation strategy as per the below given four mantras:

    • Understand
    • Study
    • Practise
    • Revise

    NEET 2021 preparation tip 1: Understanding the syllabus, and exam pattern

    Before beginning the NEET 2021 preparation, it is important to have a comprehensive knowledge of the syllabus, exam pattern, and weightage. Some pointers here are:

    • Syllabus of NEET includes 180 questions in total which are segregated into three parts as Biology, Chemistry, and Physics
    • Biology section consists of 90 questions in total, whereas Chemistry and Physics consist of 45 questions each respectively. The maximum marks awarded are 720 which are further divided into three parts as 360 in Biology, 180 in Chemistry, and 180 in Physics.
    • 4 marks are awarded for every correct answer and 1 mark is deducted for wrong answers.
    • Set a target score of at least 650. After getting through with the exam pattern, start understanding the syllabus.
    • Check the courses in all three subjects and mark your strongest area with a green pencil and weak area with a red pencil. This will help you segregate the syllabus into two parts and you will be able to know how far you are from your target score.
    • Also, make a list of courses proceeding from highest weightage to the lowest weightage followed by biology, then chemistry and physics. By this, you will be able to cover more syllabus in less time.
    • You are done with the first level. Knowledge of the syllabus, exam pattern and weightage will help you formulate a strategy for NEET 2021 preparation tips.

    NEET 2021 preparation tip 2: Start studying

    Making a plan is easy but its execution is what requires strength. Know your most effective hours and start your NEET 2021 preparation in those hours. In order to prepare for NEET 2021, it is important to study for at least 12 hours per day. Having a 650+ in your NEET 2021 requires you to devote 50 per cent of your time in a day to study.

    • Begin with Biology and one other subject simultaneously. Start studying your strongest courses with the most weightage. This way you will cover more courses in less time.
    • Read NCERT line by line. Mark important facts with a highlighter and make notes simultaneously. After completing NCERT, start reading extra study material available in the form of books, and preparation websites. Also, make notes from these references.
    • For Biology, learn diagrams by heart to understand a topic. Pictures help you retain the information more effectively. Diagrams are an important factor for NEET 2021 preparation.
    • For physics, solve as many questions as you can. Additionally, create a chapter-wise formula sheet that comprises all formulas and laws discussed in the chapter.
    • For chemistry, learn diagrams and chemical equations by heart. After completing every chapter, create a sheet for chemical equations and formulas to be used in solving the questions.

    NEET 2021 preparation tip 3: Practise questions

    No emphasis is enough to showcase how important practising questions is for your NEET 2021 preparation. Some guidelines for this are

    • Practise as many questions as possible for all three subjects. This will help you understand the type of questions asked from each Topic and you will know how far you stand from your target score.
    • Practising vaguely won’t be much effective. Make timed sessions and try to solve a certain amount of questions in a fixed time. This will help you overcome the time constraint.
    • Also, make a test log and note down all the questions that were attempted wrong. This way, you will know your weak points and working on them will be easy.
    • Take as many tests as possible. It is not necessary for the test to be full-length. You can take chapter-wise tests within a limited amount of time.
    • Try to solve previous years question papers within a certain period of time. Solving previous years papers is a good way of practising chapters/topics.

    NEET 2021 preparation tip 4: Revision is important

    All the study and hard work would be of no use if there is no revision. Revising chapters you have already covered will not only help you retain the information but also find new points that remained unnoticed previously.

    Also, during a few days before the exam, it would not be possible for you to study all the chapters from scratch. Hence, the practise of revision will help you cover all the courses in time. Start revising way before NEET 2021. Include revision slots in your time table beforehand. Make revision your habit from the beginning of the NEET 2021 preparation.

    Important books for the preparation of NEET 2021

    Physics

    Chemistry

    Biology

    1. Concepts of Physics by H. C. Verma
    2. Objective Physics by DC Pandey
    3. Fundamentals of Physics by Halliday, Resnick, and Walker
    4. Fundamental Physics by Pradeep
    5. Problems in General Physics by IE Irodov
    6. Physical Chemistry by OP Tandon
    1. ABC of Chemistry for Classes 11 and 12 by Modern
    2. Concise Inorganic Chemistry by JD Lee
    3. Dinesh Chemistry Guide
    4. Practise books by VK Jaiswal (Inorganic), MS Chauhan (Organic) and N Awasthi (Physical)
    1. Biology Vol 1 and Vol 2 by Trueman
    2. Objective Biology by Dinesh
    3. Objective Botany by Ansari
    4. Pradeep Guide on Biology
    5. GRB Bathla publications for Biology


    Some important preparation tips for NEET 2021

    1. Divide you study time into small portions of 1 to 2 hours each. Take small breaks. This will help you in concentrating effectively.
    2. While making notes, don’t make long sentences. Keep them short. This way, you would be able to memorise them fast. Use abbreviations while making notes.
    3. NEET examines your basics. Keep your basics strong. Solving complex problems requires you to have strong fundamentals. Do not skip a Topic because it seems hard. Read it as many times as required.
    4. Cover every part of NCERT thoroughly. Most of the questions asked in the exam can be found in NCERT.
    5. Don’t neglect eleventh class topics. Keep revising them with the same intensity as twelfth class topics.
    6. Coaching classes and school classes will help in studying the topics. But self-study holds the ultimate power. Always remember, nothing can replace self-study. Having a complete grasp of courses is only possible through self-study.
    7. Invest your break time into something productive such as music, art, or any sports activities. This will increase your productivity and concentration.
    8. Take tests regularly. Your test scores will work as a constant reminder for your target score.
    9. Maintain test logs. These logs not only help you supervise your scores but also point out the areas you need to work on.
    10. Revise the questions from your test logs every time before appearing for the next practice test.
    11. Take proper sleep of 7-8 hours. Compromising with sleep will result in lack of concentration and will affect your retaining power.
    12. Stay healthy. Health is important in times of preparation. Stay hydrated and take nutritious food. Don’t take the stress.


    Topics according to weightage for NEET 2021 preparation

    Physics

    Class 11

    Class 12

    Topics/ Units

    Weight-age in percentage

    Topics/ Units/ Concepts

    Weight-age in percentage

    Physical world and measurement

    2%

    Electrostatics

    9%

    Kinematics

    3%

    Current Electricity

    8%

    Laws of Motion

    3%

    Magnetic Effect of Current & Magnetism

    5%

    Work, Energy and Power

    4%

    Electromagnetic Induction & Alternating Current

    8%

    Motion of System of Particles and Rigid Body

    5%

    Electromagnetic Waves

    5%

    Gravitation

    2%

    Optics

    10%

    Properties of Bulk Matter

    3%

    Dual Nature of Matter and Radiation

    6%

    Thermodynamics

    9%

    Atoms & Nuclei

    3%

    Behaviour of Perfect Gas and Kinetic Theory

    3%

    Electronic Devices

    9%

    Oscillation & Waves

    3%


    Chemistry

    Class 11

    Class 12

    Unit

    Topic/ Chapters

    Weightage in Percentage

    Unit

    Topic / Chapters

    Weightage*

    I

    Basic Concepts of Chemistry

    1%

    I

    Solid State

    2%

    II

    Structure of Atom

    2%

    II

    Solutions

    5%

    III

    Classification of Elements & Periodicity in Properties

    2%

    III

    Electrochemistry

    2%

    IV

    Chemical Bonding and Molecular Structure

    5%

    IV

    Chemical Kinetics

    3%

    V

    States of Matter: Gases and Liquids

    2%

    V

    Surface Chemistry

    2%

    VI

    Thermodynamics

    8%

    VI

    Isolation of Elements

    2%

    VII

    Equilibrium

    6%

    VII

    p-Block Elements

    5%

    VIII

    Redox Reactions

    3%

    VIII

    d- and f-Block Elements

    4%

    IX

    Hydrogen

    3%

    IX

    Coordination Compounds

    9%

    X

    s-Block Elements

    2%

    X

    Haloalkanes and Haloarenes

    3%

    XI

    Some p-Block Elements

    2%

    XI

    Alcohols, Phenols and Ethers

    4%

    XII

    Organic Chemistry: Basic Principles & Techniques

    4%

    XII

    Aldehydes, Ketones and Carboxylic Acids

    4%

    XIII

    Hydrocarbons

    3%

    XIII

    Organic Compounds containing Nitrogen

    2%

    XIV

    Environmental Chemistry

    2%

    XIV

    Biomolecules

    3%


    XV

    Polymers

    3%


    XVI

    Chemistry in Everyday Life

    2%

    Biology

    Class 11

    Class 12

    Unit

    Topic / Chapters

    Weightage*

    Unit

    Topic / Chapters

    Weightage*


    Diversity of Living Organisms

    14%


    Diversity of Living Organisms

    14%

    Chapter-1: The Living World

    Chapter-1: The Living World

    Chapter-2: Biological Classification

    Chapter-2: Biological Classification

    Chapter-3: Plant Kingdom

    Chapter-3: Plant Kingdom

    Chapter-4: Animal Kingdom

    Chapter-4: Animal Kingdom

    II

    Structural Organisation in Plants & Animals

    5%

    II

    Structural Organisation in Plants & Animals

    5%

    Chapter-5: Morphology of Flowering Plants

    Chapter-5: Morphology of Flowering Plants

    Chapter-6: Anatomy of Flowering Plants

    Chapter-6: Anatomy of Flowering Plants

    Chapter-7: Structural Organisation in Animals

    Chapter-7: Structural Organisation in Animals

    III

    Cell: Structure and Function

    9%

    III

    Cell: Structure and Function

    9%

    Chapter-8: Cell-The Unit of Life

    Chapter-8: Cell-The Unit of Life

    Chapter-9: Biomolecules

    Chapter-9: Biomolecules

    Chapter-10: Cell Cycle and Cell Division

    Chapter-10: Cell Cycle and Cell Division

    IV

    Plant Physiology

    6%

    IV

    Plant Physiology

    6%

    Chapter-11: Transport in Plants

    Chapter-11: Transport in Plants

    Chapter-12: Mineral Nutrition

    Chapter-12: Mineral Nutrition

    Chapter-13: Photosynthesis in Higher Plants

    Chapter-13: Photosynthesis in Higher Plants

    Chapter-14: Respiration in Plants

    Chapter-14: Respiration in Plants

    Chapter-15: Plant - Growth and Development

    Chapter-15: Plant - Growth and Development

    V

    Human Physiology

    20%

    V

    Human Physiology

    20%

    Chapter-16: Digestion and Absorption

    Chapter-16: Digestion and Absorption

    Chapter-17: Breathing and Exchange of Gases

    Chapter-17: Breathing and Exchange of Gases

    Chapter-18: Body Fluids and Circulation

    Chapter-18: Body Fluids and Circulation

    Chapter-19: Excretory Products and Their Elimination

    Chapter-19: Excretory Products and Their Elimination

    Chapter-20: Locomotion and Movement

    Chapter-20: Locomotion and Movement

    Chapter-21: Neural Control and Coordination

    Chapter-21: Neural Control and Coordination

    Chapter-22: Chemical Coordination and Integration

    Chapter-22: Chemical Coordination and Integration

    Tue, 11 Aug 2020 20:48:00 -0500 en text/html https://www.ndtv.com/education/ace-neet-flying-colours-neet-2021-preparation-tips
    Killexams : DU's Academic Council to discuss FYUP syllabus on August 3 No result found, try new keyword!Provided by Free Press Journal DU's Academic Council to discuss FYUP syllabus on August 3 . The Academic Council of Delhi University will discuss on August 3 the syllabi of the ... Thu, 28 Jul 2022 16:36:29 -0500 en-in text/html https://www.msn.com/en-in/health/wellness/dus-academic-council-to-discuss-fyup-syllabus-on-august-3/ar-AA105snJ Killexams : Zarine Manchanda: The Quintessential Young Woman of Substance

    The past few decades have seen extraordinary leaps by women in India making their mark in different sectors as empowered women of substance. The spectrum is seen on one side in politics, journalism, media, medicine, law, engineering and other respected professions where women are praised for their brain power, and in the glamour industry’s actresses, models and brand ambassadors on the other, where women are praised for their beauty.

    While all such women are to be commended for their contributions to Indian life and society. It is rare when one woman is seen as possessing both brain power and beauty, when she is in the media spotlight both for success in business and as a model or showstopper, or when she can grace the covers or be featured in respected business magazines as CEO and philanthropist and the covers of beauty / glamour magazines.

    Meet Zarine Manchanda, the rare gem of a woman who effortlessly excels as a Beauty with Brains. With movie star good looks and strong business DNA, Zarine has catapulted onto the national and global stage as a respected philanthropist, and award-winning entrepreneur engaged in multiple business expansion (even during COVID restrictions and lockdowns). But she has also managed to be a showstopper at a prominent fashion week event in Mumbai as well as a glamorous brand ambassador.

    The more one knows about Zarine’s life, her value system and perspectives the easier it is to see how and why she has enjoyed a remarkable ascent in the past year as a national - and now international - media darling.

    How did all this come about? It starts with Zarine’s background and pedigree. She was born into a life of privilege and luxury by virtue of being the daughter of a prominent politician and businessman in Himachal Pradesh., near Dharamsala. Says Zarine: “I owe everything to my parents. My father is one of the most respected people in all of HP and he provided our family luxurious lifestyle. My other raised me with strong principles and ethical values.”

    Zarine enjoyed this “Princess Life” through her university days and a few years thereafter, but then wanted to move to Mumbai to pursue her dream of becoming an actress. She gave up those luxuries for which she was accustomed and was firmly set on making or breaking it on her own in Mumbai. Yet, for two years, she struggled to make her mark in Bollywood.

    As the disappointments piled up, Zarine made a life-changing decision. Zarine explains: “Due to my background, I always saw politics as a career option. To enter into this world, I was advised to be a social worker, to start a Foundation, which I did.” Now, two years later, the Zarine Manchanda Foundation has administered almost 200 charity donation programs, providing food, clothing and other essentials to Mumbai’s poorest and neediest citizens.

    The programs begin in the slum cells of Aarey Colony, where Zarine’s foundation is based. She and her team ventured into the slums and even in Aarey’s most remote tribal areas to help the poor. There, hundreds of residents clamored for Zarine each program, giving her “rock star status”. The programs have continued regularly even during COVID (although on a smaller scale due to BMC restrictions).

    As the word spread about a gorgeous young woman helping the poor in the most remote and dire slums of Mumbai, the media caught on. Zarine has now been profiled over 20 times in India’s most prestigious magazines and newspapers. She’s even been labeled as a “Princess of the Poor”, poised to be the Mother of Millions for this charity work. Says Zarine, “Of course I’m honoured that respected media outlets supply me such flattering titles. My two role models all my life were Princess Diana and Mother Teresa, who became friends in India and whose very different lives were aligned as Champions of the Poorest.” Zarine goes on to say: “I am also grateful to my amazing clients who donate food and other essentials regularly and with such strong commitment to help the poor in these toughest of times.”

    With success in her Foundation, Zarine then opened a café bearing her name in Mumbai. The Zarine Manchanda Café is a genuine 7-star experience. The Café brands itself as having “luxurious spiritual charm.” It is easy to see how these elements come together at ZMC. From flooring to ceiling, the posh and elegant décor is complemented by the most exclusive crockery and cutlery. Moreover, the café staff rings showpiece Tibetan Bells from Dharamsala – the home of the Dalai Lama – each time they bring food or beverages to café patrons. This “blessing” is a highlight for the café guests as part of ZMC’s most unique USP.

    Now that her café is a new Mumbai hotspot – filed with B-town celebrities and TikTok stars, she is actively looking to expand her brand to other upscale locations in Mumbai, then to expand to other cities in India and then globally. Says Zarine: “I’m pleased to already be recognized as the founder of the 7-star café experience in India. I’m getting requests on LinkedIn and other social media every day, begging me to open new branches of my café everywhere in India and also in many countries. This is all part of my targeted growth vision.”
    Zarine also opened an interior design house – Zarine Manchanda Interiors – which designed the 7-star café as well as providing design services to other elegant homes in Mumbai. And in exact weeks, she opened a security company (Zarine Manchanda Security) that provides guards and bouncers to its celebrity or well-heeled clientele.

    Explains Zarine: for all my current and future businesses, I try to make ‘luxury’ and ‘spiritual charm’ my primary USP. Both these elements go to the core of who I am as a young woman. I grew up with luxury, and there is an insatiable demand for luxury goods and services in India that I am focusing on.” But she further explains: “the spiritual charm” is also important as I want all my businesses to operate ethically and in a manner that inspires good karmas and benevolent intentions.”

    Straddling brains and beauty, Zarine is perfectly at home blazing her trail in politics, philanthropy entrepreneurship – and also in the glamour world of showstopping and being a brand ambassador. She even opened her own production shingle (Zarine Manchanda Productions) - in order to fulfill her dream of being an actress. Zarine laughs when she looks back at the years struggling to “make it” in Bollywood, running from audition to audition. “Now I’ll launch myself though my own production house at a time when my other business successes provided me celebrity status.”

    Indeed, Zarine shows again and again she is a rare and uniquely empowered woman of substance, as she rockets to fame, fueled by an irresistible combination of beauty, glamour, luxury and spiritual charm.

    Fri, 13 Aug 2021 20:32:00 -0500 en text/html https://www.outlookindia.com/website/story/outlook-spotlight-zarine-manchanda-the-quintessential-young-woman-of-substance/391399
    Killexams : FUTURE SHOCK: 25 Education trends post COVID-19
     Future Shock: 25 trends in education post COVID-19.
    Future Shock: 25 trends in education post COVID-19.
    By Sandeep Goyal

    This Future Shock series is inspired by the Alvin Toffler book with the same name, first published in the 1970s. The book future gazed a rapidly changing world, propelled into newer and newer orbits by not just science and technology, but by newer political realities, sociological change and the emergence of newer opportunities, newer aspirations and newer lifestyles. But even Toffler had not visualized a world faced with cataclysmic change because of a pandemic, a metamorphosis triggered by a virus.

    Most governments around the world have temporarily closed educational institutions in an attempt to contain the spread of the COVID-19 pandemic. Some 1.3-1.5 billion students and youth across the planet are affected by school and university closures. These nationwide closures are impacting over 72% of the world’s student population. Several other countries have implemented localized closures impacting millions of additional learners. Governments around the world are making efforts to mitigate the immediate impact of school closures, particularly for more vulnerable and disadvantaged communities, and to facilitate the continuity of education for all through remote learning.

    School closures carry high social and economic costs for people across communities. Their impact however is particularly severe for the most vulnerable and marginalized boys and girls, and their families. The resulting disruptions exacerbate already existing disparities within the education system but also in other aspects of their lives. UNESCO has put out many detailed, and learned, papers on the unprecedented current situation in the world of academics – one that has not occurred since the Second World War, though the scale and human impact of the current pandemic is far far larger than any war in human history. Closure of schools has a catastrophic impact on society, and the UNESCO studies summarize some of it as follows:

    • Interrupted learning: Schooling provides essential learning and when schools close, children and youth are deprived of opportunities for growth and development. The disadvantages are disproportionate for under-privileged learners who tend to have fewer educational opportunities beyond school.

    • Poor nutrition: Many children and youth rely on free or discounted meals provided at schools for food and healthy nutrition. When schools close, nutrition is compromised.

    • Confusion and stress for teachers: When schools close, especially unexpectedly and for unknown durations, teachers are often unsure of their obligations and how to maintain connections with students to support learning. Transitions to distance learning platforms tend to be messy and frustrating, even in the best circumstances. In many contexts, school closures lead to furloughs or absenteeism by teachers.

    • Parents unprepared for distance and home schooling: When schools close, parents are often asked to facilitate the learning of children at home and can struggle to perform this task. This is especially true for parents with limited education and resources.

    • Challenges creating, maintaining, and improving distance learning: Demand for distance learning skyrockets when schools close and often overwhelms existing portals to remote education. Moving learning from classrooms to homes at scale and in a hurry presents enormous challenges, both human and technical.

    • Gaps in childcare: In the absence of alternative options, working parents often leave children alone when schools close and this can lead to risky behaviors, including increased influence of peer pressure and substance abuse.

    • High economic costs: Working parents are more likely to miss work when schools close in order to take care of their children. This results in wage loss and tend to negatively impact productivity.

    • Unintended strain on health-care systems: Health-care workers with children cannot easily attend work because of childcare obligations that result from school closures. This means that many medical professionals are not at the facilities where they are most needed during a health crisis.

    • Increased pressure on schools and school systems that remain open: Localized school closures place burdens on schools as governments and parents alike redirect children to schools that remain open.

    • Rise in dropout rates: It is a challenge to ensure children and youth return and stay in school when schools reopen after closures. This is especially true of protracted closures and when economic shocks place pressure on children to work and generate income for financially distressed families.

    • Increased exposure to violence and exploitation: When schools shut down, early marriages increase, more children are recruited into militias, sexual exploitation of girls and young women rises, teenage pregnancies become more common, and child labour grows.

    • Social isolation: Schools are hubs of social activity and human interaction. When schools close, many children and youth miss out on social contact that is essential to learning and development.

    • Challenges measuring and validating learning: Calendared assessments, notably high-stakes examinations that determine admission or advancement to new education levels and institutions, are thrown into disarray when schools close. Strategies to postpone, skip or administer examinations at a distance raise serious concerns about fairness, especially when access to learning becomes variable. Disruptions to assessments results in stress for students and their families and can trigger disengagement.

    Read Also: FUTURE SHOCK: 25 food trends post COVID-19

    I read somewhere long back that, “A school is not paradise. But school is a place where paradise can be created”. It continued in the same vein with the thought, “The classroom with all its limitations, remains a location of great possibility”. In the past few weeks, we have gone from Classroom to Zoom. From pedagogy to ‘panicgogy’. Much has been written about the hastily made transition. In the process, however, much has also changed. Perhaps never to return to whatever we knew of teaching and learning for generations.

    As we track future trends, we will address both myths, and realities, in the new emerging scenario. Suffice it to say that academic schedules have been radically disrupted, most students outside the metro-based middle class have limited computer access, Wi-Fi is kind of spotty and erratic, there is a lot of electricity outage and synchronous virtual classes are very stressful for teachers not used to working with technology. However, since there are not many options for the time being, the education bulwark so used to brick-and-mortar face-to-face interactions, is trying its best to adjust and adapt to the new normal. Many new learnings, new perspectives, new trends will emerge as we head into The Great Unknown:

    1. Fewer kids will go back to school when schools re-open. Denmark eased its coronavirus lockdown on 14th April, by reopening schools and day care centres, but concerns they might become breeding grounds for a second wave of cases convinced thousands of parents to keep their children at home. There is actually a Facebook group called ‘My kid is not going to be a Guinea Pig’ with 40,000 members in a country as small as Denmark. An overwhelming number of parents are asking the inevitable question, ‘Why should my little child go outside first’ especially since the virus is still to be brought under leash. India is going to be no different. A lot of well-heeled middle class folks may prefer to delay the return of their kids to school or college. And of course, with so many livelihoods lost, many poor parents may not be able to in any case afford sending their offsprings back to school for a long long time.
    Linked question? Will this lead to home schooling? One, too early to say. Two, if the lockdowns re-occur soon, and frequently, home-schooling will become a distinct possibility with middle and upper middle families.

    2. Fewer kids will go out of town, far from home, to study. The nightmare of kids stuck in Kota, Rajasthan, having to be rescued and brought back home is still fresh in the minds of most parents. Till the situation settles down somewhat, most parents will prefer to find workable alternatives closer home. Competitive exams are surely important, but safety of the young ones will take higher priority till the virus shows at least a visible downward trajectory.

    3. Fewer kids will go overseas to study. Every form of international education is currently affected by the crisis and will be for some time, from study abroad schemes to staff exchanges and internships to transnational collaborative programmes. Universities have been closed and/or are delivering all education online. Every international conference in higher education has been cancelled or turned into a series of webinars. As governments are starting to reopen society and restart business, universities will also gradually reopen their campuses. Nevertheless, new modes of social distancing will continue to apply for quite some time, affecting on-campus learning in physical spaces, from the (international) classroom to libraries and on-campus student networking places. In the short term, international student mobility will decrease, including possible problems with student visas. International visiting professors could teach their courses online, continuing to provide some ‘internationalisation at home’. Once travel bans are lifted, in the medium term, student mobility will resume as it has so much become the DNA of contemporary higher education.

    4. Social distancing, little or no sports. The fist-bump, the high-five, the warm handshake, the hug will be gone for a long time. The personal greeting, the smile, the intimacy, the bonhomie have all been subtracted from the class of tomorrow. The class will go from social to asocial. Friendships, social networking, campus bonding and huddles will be on hold for a while. Invisible walls will come up, diluting in many ways the fun & euphoria of campus life.
    Sports too will be in low gear for a while. Gyms, swimming pools, maybe even tracks & fields will remain shut for sometime more. And when they do open, competitive sports and tournaments will take even longer to be reinstated.

    5. Two shift or three shift schools. The need for social distancing will mean lesser students in each class. So the need for most educational institutions to perhaps work two shifts, maybe even three, everyday. While this will put infinite more pressure on the teaching and administrative staff, it may actually be a boon in disguise for the taught. Lots of schools and colleges in India have far too many students packed into small classrooms. A sparser class may actually make for better teaching and class interaction.

    6. Social distance may lead to some getting ‘socially distant’. As it is, equality in the classroom has always been a fiction. The inequality, sadly, will only widen in the days to come. Caste/family background, social status, economic well-being, the kind of school you attended has invariably shaped the student’s confidence to speak-up in class. The underprivileged would most likely always be the meek attendees who would feel afraid to say something wrong in class, hence would prefer silence over participation. Such inequities do exist. The classroom, with equal seating, with uniform chairs, kind of brought an unsaid democracy to teaching. Technology which allows one student to access class from an air-conditioned, hi-speed wi-fi home, while another may be trying to find a quiet corner in an overcrowded tenement with jumpy internet will further ‘socially distance’ the class. Now, that is surely not what was intended from social distancing!

    7. Teaching versus learning, will need figuring. Oscar Wilde once said, “Education is an admirable thing, but it is well to remember from time to time that nothing that is worth learning can be taught”. Going forward, the role of the teacher will get redefined. The notion of a teacher or an educator as the knowledge-holder who imparts wisdom to pupils is no longer fit for the purpose of the future. With students being able to gain access to knowledge, and even learn many a technical skill, through a few clicks on their phones, tablets and computers, we will need to redefine the role of the teacher in the classroom of tomorrow. This may mean that the role of teachers will need to move towards facilitating young people’s development as contributing (and employable) members of society, rather than just lecturing.

    8. Teaching will go tech. But just Zoom isn’t e-learning. To enable remote learning, technology will kick in big time. The mechanics of remote instruction, however, are not necessarily inclusive or equitable. Remote instruction requires that students have access to both capable computing technology and reliable internet service (and in our country perennial electricity too). Which is not always unfortunately guaranteed in India. Also, Zoom deployment in itself isn’t going to equal learning. There will be need to do more. There are already educationists working on taking a lot of science lessons, even geography, to 3-D. A detailed world map in 3-D, for example, for a Class 6 student would surely be so much more fun. Also, a 3-D view of the heart. Technology will enrich teaching, but for that teachers and technologists both will have to persevere and innovate.

    Read Also: FUTURE SHOCK: 25 travel & tourism trends post COVID 19

    9. Technology in education alone will not be the enabler. If you want to see a true crisis in education, one has to look at our government-run schools, or at least the remote ones where a young teacher in an isolated village who has only received perhaps a basic college degree tries to teach 60+ children in a dilapidated, multi-grade classroom where books are scarce and many of the students (and even more of their parents) are often functionally illiterate. While talk in some elevated places of learning, at Harvard or even our own IIT/IIMs, may be about how new technologies can help transform education, in India it will first have to be about how such tools can help education systems function at a basic level. Change is on the way but those in pivotal positions will have to ensure that its benefits percolate to the benefit of all.

    10. Technology will be about the content, not the container. It is possible to become so enamoured with the technology (and so distracted by device-related and delivery related questions) that insufficient attention is then given to how to use whatever devices are eventually deployed to their full effect. As we move to a greater proliferation of devices, combined with the fact that we will be accessing more content from multiple places, a greater value will be placed on the content, and how that content is used, rather than on any one particular device. Viewed from this perspective, the future of education is in the ‘content’, not the 'container'. It's about more than just content, of course -- it's also about the connections and the communities (students collaborating with each other, teachers supporting other teachers) that technologies can help enable, catalyze and support as well in the future.

    11. Matthew Effect will have to be anticipated and mitigated. A Matthew Effect in educational technology is frequently observed: those who are most able to benefit from the introduction of technology (e.g. children with educated parents and good teachers, who live in prosperous communities, etc.) are indeed the ones who actually benefit the most. Just because investments in educational technology use are justified by rhetoric claiming that such use will benefit ‘the poor’ doesn't mean that this will actually happen. In fact, the opposite many well occur.

    12. The US $100 laptop and One Mouse Per Child. Now that technology is finally entering the classroom, a US$100 laptop, one for every child, may actually no longer be Utopian. Perhaps more do-able in the ‘connected’ basic classroom of tomorrow, is 'One Mouse Per Child', an initiative born from an ongoing relationship between Microsoft Research Connections and Miguel Nussbaum at the Pontificia Universidad Católica de Chile. The ‘One Mouse Per Child’ project is a broad spectrum of experiments in the education space around games for learning using Single Display Groupware and multiple mice, a collaborative learning of activities which Excellerate the way resources can be used in under-resourced schools and foster personalized learning with individual feedback.

    13. A lighter school bag may become a reality. On an average, an Indian school kid carries somewhere between 3-8 kilograms of weight every day to school, depending on the age and the class he/she is studying in. In addition to the books and notebooks, they carry a lunchbox and a water bottle. Digitisation and technology may help in shedding some of this weight.
    Homework too may move increasingly onto the net. It was already beginning to happen at the better quality schools. Expect it to become more ubiquitous. It may take time. But it will happen for sure.

    14. FOBA and Bulldozer Parents will intensify. Generation Z in our colleges and Universities today, is a generation that has grown up in a truly globalized and connected world. These Gen Z, 25 years old or less, faced with cancelled exams, shortened school terms, postponed sporting events and even delayed graduations will be troubled by both FOBA (Fear of Being Alone) and FOMO (Fear of Missing Out). Education in the days ahead will have to address the loneliness of remote learning as well as the distress of lost opportunities.
    We will also see emergence of more protective, more pushy ‘Bulldozer Parents’ who will try to propel Generation Alpha (Gen A) -- the children of current millennial parents – moving all obstacles out of their way to create a clear path for their ‘entitled’ kids, making out as if nothing really has happened in the world around us.

    15. Distance learning courses may not be considered inferior. The Organization for Economic Cooperation and Development (OECD) compared educational systems of developed countries and administered the international PISA, a test that involves 15-year-olds across 31 nations, some years ago. OECD found that students who used computers had both lower reading and math scores. The Reboot Foundation released a similar study in June 2019. They too found a negative connection between each nation’s performance on the PISA and their students’ use of technology in school. The more they used computer screens in schools, the lower the nation’s rank in educational achievement.
    Well, with most learning headed to go digital, shedding of some of these biases may actually define the new normal. My father could rattle off maths tables upto 50. My generation barely managed upto 20. My daughter’s classmates are happy to know their tables till 10. Their calculators are ever-handy for more. Going forward, some old skills will be shed, and newer learnings will take their place.

    16. Blended learning & personalized education. There will be, going forward, a great opportunity to develop new forms of blended education (that will be in much demand). ‘Pre crisis’ there was already a growing demand for more flexible and blended forms of lifelong learning beyond initial education in order to address the need to upskill and reskill for the digital economy. Mature adult learners in the future will be more and more interested in micro-credentials which allow them to acquire specific knowledge and skills. The demand will be for more work relevant courses or learning paths and learning experiences that prepare students for AI, AR, VR, ML, Blockchain, Big Data, Cloud, data analytics, voice deployment and more. We will see a significant thrust towards experiential learning too.
    We will see the emergence of top-of-the-line MasterClass formats taught by best-in-domain in every field, digitally delivered. A lot of this will be self-learning, that too self-motivated and self-funded. Adult learners will also spend more on ‘passion’ learning – hobbies or skills they always wanted to acquire but had no time for. With lesser travel, lesser likely socializing, and greater work-from-home, there will be more time for such learning indulgences.

    17. Learning Outcomes versus Informed Citizenry. A vigorous debate has already been ignited on what online instruction means for learning outcomes, student satisfaction, instructor convenience, the cost of course delivery, and more. This debate, however, has been narrow and has unfortunately sidestepped discussion of the equally important implications for in-class pedagogical improvisation, student capacity to organise and express dissent and how to build courage amongst students. With the shift to online and blended education likely to continue beyond Covid-19 and become permanent, it will fundamentally transform the structure of the education system. At stake will be the monumentally important issue of the very purpose of an education system in society. Should its role be restricted to solely enhancing ‘learning outcomes’ and creating a cadre of skilled professionals? Or should it have a more expansive obligation to deepen democracy by producing an informed citizenry that is aware of its rights and possesses the capability to exercise the tools of democracy for societal progress? Time will tell.

    18. Student debt crisis. This is more pronounced in the West. In India too lots of students (more their parents) are taking education loans. If the employment market does not pick up, student debt could become a serious issue.

    19. Reskilling & Upskilling will gain momentum. Often during recessions, enrollment in higher education surges as more people lose their jobs and/or face a lack of job prospects. Even those employed often see economy downsides as an opportunity to enroll back in school if they were already in lower-paying jobs. Those graduating might also want to stay back in school to get a post graduate degree like was seen in the Great Recession. Courses to be pursued will surely be in technology; but vocational courses may also see a significant uptick. Except that colleges and Universities are not geared to cater to these domains, and the private sector is mostly opportunistic, shallow and expensive.

    20. AI will personalise learning. The opportunities — and challenges — that the introduction of artificial intelligence (AI) could bring to higher education are significant. Today’s colleges and universities face a wide range of challenges, including disengaged students, high dropout rates, and the ineffectiveness of a traditional “one-size-fits-all” approach to education. But when big data analytics and artificial intelligence are used correctly, personalized learning experiences can be created, which may in turn help to resolve some of these challenges. With a personalized learning experience, every student would enjoy a completely unique educational approach that’s fully tailored to his or her individual abilities and needs. This could directly increase students’ motivation and reduce their likelihood of dropping out. It could also offer professors a better understanding of each student’s learning process, which could enable them to teach more effectively.

    21. Artificial Intelligence (AI) & Cloud Computing will enable MOOC. MOOC – massive open online courses – empower teachers and students in remote areas to learn and furnish themselves with the latest knowledge. While a definitive objective is mass customization, different applications and projects will help this grow in reach and impact. Tutoring applications will be modified, with their lesson structures relying upon the execution of a one of a kind user profile. Increased data crunching will make testing an increasingly interactive marvel. AI and machine learning will be used to outline a student’s qualities and shortcomings. Individual learning rates and records will be contemplated and computed. These tests, intended to support students’ confidence in zones they exceed expectations in and challenge them in regions they don’t will become holistic methodologies to enables students to stay encouraged and motivated.

    22. Examination & grading will undergo a change. AI will help teachers deal with assessment, evaluating, paper setting, making mark-sheets and tracking the performance of each student with less tedium. With these tasks made simple they will be able to concentrate more on course improvement, teaching quality and aptitude development. Artificial intelligence frameworks will also move examinations, and scoring sytems, to go increasingly digital with the role, and discretion, of the examiner reducing.

    23. Chatbots will provide personalized help and guidance. Recently, The University of Murcia in Spain began testing an AI-enabled chatbot to answer students’ questions about the campus and areas of study. As this chatbot was rolled out, the school’s administrators were surprised to discover that it was able to answer more than 38,708 questions, answering correctly more than 91% of the time. Not only was this chatbot able to provide immediate answers to students outside of regular office hours, but university officials also found that the chatbot increased student motivation. All of these benefits were achieved without the need to change the structure of the staff. One additional benefit of having chatbots at universities to answer students’ questions is the large volume of big data that would be obtained regarding students’ concerns and areas of interest. This data could be analyzed to help enable universities to create innovative new services and programs to further Excellerate students’ educational experiences.

    24. Executive education will witness a sea-change. The global university-based executive education market was worth close to $2bn in 2019. But this has come to a juddering halt in 2020. Wharton Executive Education is one of the largest providers of in-person and online executive education in the world. More executives choose to learn with Wharton than any other elite business school in the world, with upwards of 12,000 attending programmes in person and over 50,000 completing online certificate courses in 2019. The decline in business caused by coronavirus at Wharton has been significant but has been partially offset by an uptick in online enrolments and by converting some in-person programmes into online courses. Be it Wharton or B-schools in India, competition is emerging from elsewhere: Israeli tech venture Jolt, for example, which runs short skills classes and specialises in live video classes led by expert tutors is seeing massive traction. Universities will need to reconfigure their approach significantly to stay relevant.

    25. AR will make visualization, annotation and storytelling better. Augmented Reality (AR) is a powerful visualization tool. It allows one to bring an object or concept into a reality that is otherwise imagined, inaccessible or difficult to grasp, and can even help to make the invisible visible. All 185 first-year medical students at Case Western Reserve University (CWRU) are using HoloLens and HoloAnatomy, an award-winning AR app by CWRU and Cleveland Clinic, to learn from their own homes in the lockdown. HoloAnatomy helps students learn about the human body in ways not otherwise possible. With access to the minutest details of the human anatomy in 3D, students’ learning is not limited by the availability of cadavers for dissection or 2D medical textbook illustrations. Annotation with AR helps guide through with the completion of a task, helps navigate a new environment or even provide real-time descriptions of what’s happening around. London’s National Theatre is using AR to help make its performances more accessible for people who are deaf and hard of hearing. When wearing a pair of smart caption glasses, users see a transcript of the dialogue and descriptions of the sound from a performance displayed on the lenses. AR makes new modes of storytelling and creative expression possible with experiences unfolding in real time. Introducing new and alternate perspectives, it changes the way we tell, share and even remember stories. The National Gallery of Prague is using haptics (virtual touch feedback) to help people who are blind and visually impaired experience artwork with Touching Masterpieces by Neurodigital. Wearing a pair of haptic gloves, users are able to “see” 3D virtual sculptures like Michelangelo’s David through a series of touch vibrations to the fingertips, palms and hands.

    Will all this happen in education? Happen soon? My guess is perhaps not all of it. Not perhaps in India. Not for now atleast. But the more affluent West will surely see a lot of AR happening in teaching.

    One can continue to discuss trends. Seemingly unimportant ones like the shift to more and more digital will kill the skill of handwriting. Even drawing by hand. Digital teaching may kill books. And that howsoever we may use technology and AI, students of science will still need labs to do experiments, medical students will still need cadavers…

    Lots has to, and will, change in the field of education, and learning, in the weeks, months and years to come. One thing is for sure. We are never going to go back to the ‘pre-crisis’ era. That is now behind us. We will have to let go of the syllabus as it existed before; we will have to somewhat re-learn the ‘normal/expected’ order of classroom teaching; we will have to re-think contact hours; we will have to re-visit the notion of everyone having to do the same thing; we will have to re-examine assignments that invite cheating; we will have to recalibrate control and authority; we will have to question assumptions about what students want; we will have to tone down suspicions about student integrity; we will have to huddle together to discuss “covering the content” and “content delivery”; and of course we will have to correct perceptions about students’ access to technology and teachers’ relationship with the same.

    Concurrently, educationists will have to latch on to caring for students as whole people; fostering community and connections that facilitate learning; working to understand each student’s context; collaborating with students on their learning; learning from students; responding with flexibility; engaging in conversations about the ‘difficulty of now’; challenging students to learn, not just ride out the semester; avoiding isolation and collaboration within faculties; and using students and teaching colleagues as resources and sounding boards.

    Tomorrow will be a new dawn. What we make of it is entirely in our own hands. Change is desirable; change is inevitable. Change in fact has been forced upon us. Whether we use the opportunity to advantage or let it pass us by will decide whether the future will shock us or we will create shock-absorbers that will in fact use the impact to cushion us in our journey to a better tomorrow.

    The author has been in marketing and communication for 36 years. He has during his advertising innings handled over 500 brands across different domains, including education and technology.

    Wed, 20 Jul 2022 07:59:00 -0500 en text/html https://brandequity.economictimes.indiatimes.com/news/business-of-brands/future-shock-25-education-trends-post-covid-19/75729537
    Killexams : AAP MLA Atishi visits Delhi govt schools, assesses various education initiatives

    Aam Aadmi Party (AAP) MLA Atishi visited four Delhi government schools on Monday to assess the progress of various education initiatives and curricula--such as Mission Buniyaad and the happiness curriculum -- currently being implemented there

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    Aam Aadmi Party (AAP) MLA Atishi visited four Delhi government schools on Monday to assess the progress of various education initiatives and curricula--such as Mission Buniyaad and the happiness curriculum -- currently being implemented there.

    Atishi, who is also the chairperson of the Delhi legislative assembly’s standing committee on education, visited KV Government Senior Secondary School, Bulbuli Khana, Chandni Chowk, SKV No-1, Government Girls Senior Secondary School, Zeenat Mahal, Kamla Market, SBV Government Boys Senior Secondary School, Zeenat Mahal, Kamla Market and Government Girls Senior Secondary School, Lambi Gali where she also inspected the quality of infrastructure.

    During the visit, Atishi interacted with both students and teachers to seek feedback. “Teachers should prioritise improving the foundational skills of our students. If their foundation is strong, the quality of our education will automatically improve. This will lay down a strong foundation for their future,” Atishi said.

    She advised students to not just be job seekers but also try to create new employment opportunities for others. She also encouraged students to participate in governance and play an important role in nation-building.

    Atishi also appreciated teachers for their efforts toward shaping well-informed students. “It is heartening to see that instead of just finishing the syllabus the teachers are focusing on improving the foundational skills of the children,” she said, discussing the importance of co-curricular activities in a student’s overall development.

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    • Picture fore representation. (HT PHOTO)

      Bengaluru to Chennai in 2 hours: 10 things to know about this expressway

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      As part of the 'Azadi Ka Amrit Mahotsav' campaign to mark the country's 75th Independence, the citizens of HSR layout in Bengaluru walked with a 75-meter-long Indian flag on Sunday morning. The residents walked from Somasundarapalya lake to Haralur Lake, covering a distance of three kilometers. Over 100 citizens participated in the walkathon on Sunday morning and carried the tricolor flag with slogans like 'Jai Hind' and 'Bharat Mata ki Jai'.

    Mon, 25 Jul 2022 11:42:00 -0500 en text/html https://www.hindustantimes.com/cities/delhi-news/aap-mla-atishi-visits-delhi-govt-schools-assesses-various-education-initiatives-101658772735041.html
    Killexams : PM Modi To Visit Varanasi On July 7; To Inaugurate, Lay Foundation Stone Of Rs 1,800-Crore Projects
    PM Modi To Visit Varanasi On July 7; To Inaugurate, Lay Foundation Stone Of Rs 1,800-Crore Projects

    Prime Minister Narendra Modi

    New Delhi:

    Prime Minister Narendra Modi will visit his Lok Sabha constituency of Varanasi on Thursday during which he will inaugurate and lay foundation stone of multiple development initiatives worth over Rs 1,800 crore focussed on improving infrastructure and enhancing ease of living. At around 2 pm, the prime minister will inaugurate the 'Akshay Patra Mid Day Meal Kitchen' at LT College, Varanasi, which has a capacity of cooking mid-day meals for around one lakh students.

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    At around 2:45 pm, Prime Minister Modi will visit the International Cooperation and Convention Centre -- Rudraksh -- where he will inaugurate 'Akhil Bharatiya Shiksha Samagam' on the implementation of the National Education Policy, the Prime Minister's Office (PMO) said in a statement. Thereafter, at around 4 pm, the prime minister will reach Dr Sampurnanand Sports Stadium, Sigra where he will inaugurate and lay the foundation stone of multiple projects worth over Rs 1,800 crore, it said.

    Various social and education sector related projects to be inaugurated include ITI at Village Mahgaon, Phase-II of 'Vedic Vigyan Kendra' in Banaras Hindu University (BHU), Government Girls Home at Ramnagar, Theme Park in Government Old Age Women Home at Durgakund, the statement said. The prime minister will inaugurate synthetic athletic track and synthetic basketball court in Dr Bhim Rao Ambedkar Sports Complex, Bada Lalpur and various police and safety fire projects including non-residential police station building at Sindhaura, construction of hostel rooms, barracks in Mirzamurad, Cholapur, Jansa and Kapsethi police stations and building of Fire Extinguisher Centre in Pindra, it said.

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    The prime minister will also lay the foundation of Phase-1 of redevelopment works of sports stadium at Sigra, the statement said. Besides, he will inaugurate 'Akhil Bharatiya Shiksha Samagam' at International Cooperation and Convention Centre -- Rudraksh. Shiksha Samagam is being organised by the Ministry of Education from July 7-9.

    It will provide a platform to eminent academicians, policy makers and academic leaders to deliberate and share their experiences and to discuss the roadmap for effective implementation of National Education Policy (NEP) 2020. The event is being organised as part of capacity building of more than 300 academic, administrative and institutional leaders from universities, institutes of national importance (IIT, IIM, NIT, IISER) from all over the country.

    (Except for the headline, this story has not been edited by Careers360 staff and is published from a syndicated feed.)

    Wed, 06 Jul 2022 12:00:00 -0500 en text/html https://www.ndtv.com/education/pm-modi-to-visit-varanasi-on-july-7-to-inaugurate-lay-foundation-stone-of-rs-1800-crore-projects
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