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Killexams : HP Enterprise download - BingNews https://killexams.com/pass4sure/exam-detail/HP3-C29 Search results Killexams : HP Enterprise download - BingNews https://killexams.com/pass4sure/exam-detail/HP3-C29 https://killexams.com/exam_list/HP Killexams : This unusual ransomware attack targets home PCs, so beware
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A ransomware attack delivered by fake Windows 10 and antivirus software updates is targeting home users, using sneaky techniques to stay undetected before encrypting files and demanding a ransom payment of thousands of dollars. 

The Magniber campaign, detailed by HP Wolf Security, is unusual for 2022 in the way it focuses on generating relatively small ransom payments from individual users, compared to what could be extorted by going after businesses and demanding large ransoms

In many ways, it's a throwback to early ransomware campaigns that encrypted files on individual computers. However, Magniber is using innovative techniques that make it much more difficult to detect – especially for home users. 

Also: The scary future of the internet: How the tech of tomorrow will pose even bigger cybersecurity threats

The attack chain begins when the user visits a website controlled by the attackers, designed to look like legitimate websites and services that victims are tricked into visiting in one of a number of ways. 

"There are multiple ways the user can be directed to such a site. Either they register typo-squatted domains for common websites or infect websites with a malware that redirects the user to the final download site," Patrick Schläpfer, malware analyst at HP Wolf Security, told ZDNET. 

"I also have a suspicion that the reason for the redirection could be a malicious browser extension, which is installed on the victim's device," he added. 

The website suggests that the user needs to update their computer with an important software update – claiming that they're antivirus or Windows system needs it – and tricks users into downloading a JavaScript file that contains the ransomware payload. 

Magniber being distributed via JavaScript files appears to be a new technique that has only emerged recently – previously it has been hidden inside MSI and EXE files. 

By using a JavaScript file, the attack can use a technique called DotNetToJscript, allowing it to load a .NET executable in memory, meaning the ransomware does not need to be saved to disk. By doing this in memory, the attack bypasses detection and prevention tools – like antivirus software – that monitors files written to disk rather than memory. 

Also: Ransomware: Why it's still a big threat, and where the gangs are going next

It's this executable that runs the ransomware's code, which deletes shadow copies of files and disables Windows backup and recovery features before encrypting the victim's files. The ransomware also gains administrator privileges using an Account Control (UAC) bypass to run commands without alerting the user.  

By the time the user knows something is wrong, it's too late because their files have been encrypted and they've been presented with a ransom note telling them what's happened and providing them with a link to follow to negotiate a deal for a decryption key – and victims are told that if they attempt to restore their computer without paying a ransom, their files will be permanently wiped. 

Researchers say the ransom demand can be up to $2,500. While that might not sound like a lot compared with the hundreds of thousands – or more – cyber criminals can make from infecting a large enterprise with ransomware, targeting home users via drive-by downloads is much less effort than spending weeks or months infecting a corporate network. 

However, there are steps that individual users can take to help avoid falling victim to ransomware attacks.  

"Users can also reduce risk by making sure updates are only installed from trusted sources, checking URLs to ensure official vendor websites are used, and backing up data regularly to minimize the impact of a potential data breach," said Schläpfer. 

The most useful way to back up data would be to store it offline, so if a cyber criminal does encrypt your device, they can't reach the back ups too – allowing you to restore the device without paying a criminal. 

MORE ON CYBERSECURITY

Thu, 13 Oct 2022 23:53:00 -0500 en text/html https://www.zdnet.com/article/this-unusual-ransomware-attack-targets-home-pcs-so-beware/
Killexams : HP Enterprise (HPE) Down 9.7% Since Last Earnings Report: Can It Rebound?

A month has gone by since the last earnings report for Hewlett Packard Enterprise (HPE). Shares have lost about 9.7% in that time frame, underperforming the S&P 500.

Will the recent negative trend continue leading up to its next earnings release, or is HP Enterprise due for a breakout? Before we dive into how investors and analysts have reacted as of late, let's take a quick look at the most recent earnings report in order to get a better handle on the important drivers.

Hewlett Packard Q3 Earnings Match, Revenues Top Estimates

Hewlett Packard Enterprise reported third-quarter fiscal 2022 non-GAAP earnings of 48 cents per share, which matched the Zacks Consensus Estimate and was a penny higher than the year-ago quarter’s earnings of 47 cents per share.

Revenues of $7 billion increased 1% from the prior-year quarter and surpassed the consensus mark of $6.97 billion. Annualized revenue run-rate (“ARR”) was up 22% year over year to $858 million.

Hewlett Packard continued to witness increased demand for its products and services during the quarter, primarily driven by the accelerated digital transformation amid the remote working trend. Despite supply-chain constraints and high inflationary pressure, the company witnessed an increase in both earnings and sales growth.

Quarterly Details

Segment-wise, High-Performance Compute & Artificial Intelligence (“HPC & AI”) revenues increased 12% year over year to $830 million. The company stated that this segment’s market share has expanded 39% at the end of the quarter.

The Compute division’s sales decreased 3% year over year to $3 billion. The division witnessed 210 basis points (bps) operating profit margin expansion to 13.3%, driven by strategic pricing actions that offset inflated input costs.

Revenues in the Intelligent Edge division rose 8% year over year to $941 million during the quarter, primarily driven by strong customer demand. Revenues from both Aruba Services witnessed double-digit growth while Intelligent Edge as-a-Service saw an improvement of over 60%.

Financial Service revenues were down 3% year over year to $817 million. Net portfolio assets dipped 4% to roughly $12.6 billion.

Revenues from the Storage business were down 2% year over year to $1.2 billion, primarily on account of supply chain disruptions in HPE IP solutions.

Corporate Investments & Other revenues stood at $300 million, down 9.6% year over year.

Operating Results

Non-GAAP gross margin of 34.7% remained flat on a year-over-year basis while expanding 50 bps sequentially. The year-over-year increase in gross margin was mainly driven by a strong pricing discipline and a continued mix shift toward higher-margin software-rich offerings.

Hewlett Packard’s non-GAAP operating profit margin increased 70 bps year over year to 10.5% and 120 bps sequentially. The company continued to save from the cost optimization plan and invest in high-growth, margin-rich portfolios in the third quarter of fiscal 2022.

Balance Sheet and Cash Flow

Hewlett Packard ended the fiscal third quarter with $3.76 billion in cash and cash equivalents compared with $3.03 billion at the end of the previous quarter.

During the fiscal third quarter, Hewlett Packard generated $1.3 billion of cash for operational activities and a free cash flow of $587 million. Free cash flow reflected normal seasonality and certain inventory actions undertaken to keep pace with the growing demand of customers.

During the first nine months of fiscal 2022, the company generated $1.56 billion of cash for operational activities and a negative free cash flow of $201 million.

Hewlett Packard returned $353 million to shareholders through share repurchases and dividends in the reported quarter. The company declared a regular cash dividend of 12 cents per share, payable on Oct 7, 2022.

Guidance

Hewlett Packard revised guidance for fiscal 2022 non-GAAP earnings. The company now predicts the figure in the range of $1.96-$2.04 per share compared with the previously guided range of $1.96-$2.10 per share.

Further, HPE currently anticipates free cash flow in the band of $1.7-$1.9 billion, down from the prior estimated band of $1.8-$2 billion.

For the fourth quarter of fiscal 2022, Hewlett Packard expects non-GAAP earnings between 52 cents and 60 cents per share.

How Have Estimates Been Moving Since Then?

In the past month, investors have witnessed a downward trend in estimates revision.

VGM Scores

At this time, HP Enterprise has a poor Growth Score of F, however its Momentum Score is doing a lot better with a B. Charting a somewhat similar path, the stock was allocated a grade of A on the value side, putting it in the top 20% for this investment strategy.

Overall, the stock has an aggregate VGM Score of B. If you aren't focused on one strategy, this score is the one you should be interested in.

Outlook

Estimates have been broadly trending downward for the stock, and the magnitude of these revisions indicates a downward shift. Notably, HP Enterprise has a Zacks Rank #3 (Hold). We expect an in-line return from the stock in the next few months.


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Wed, 28 Sep 2022 20:31:00 -0500 en-US text/html https://www.aol.com/news/hp-enterprise-hpe-down-9-153003808.html
Killexams : Inside the HP Reverb: How HP Went All-In on Enterprise VR

HP wants you to know its all-in on enterprise virtual reality.

Among the various names vying for a place in the enterprise VR market, HP has arguably been one of the most surprising. The company, traditionally known for its printer and PC products, has become a pillar in the VR hardware landscape in only a few years. In 2017 the company unveiled the HP Z VR Backpack, essentially a VR-ready PC in a backpack form factor targeted at enabling powerful VR experiences with greater freedom of movement. HP followed that up with its first VR headset as part of the Windows Mixed Reality ecosystem.

Now, HP has debuted the HP Reverb, a Windows Mixed Reality headset focused on the enterprise market. The headset offers significant upgrades from the previous model and doubles down on the company's commitment to the commercial VR market.

According to John Ludwig, Global Lead of VR Headsets at HP, “Back in 2017 what was a surprise to us at the time, but in retrospect quite obvious, is that HP has a large commercial enterprise business and those sales people start ringing our phones asking, 'How do we get our hands on that VR backpack and VR headset?' ”

That initial flood of interest led HP to create a division dedicated fully to VR for commercial and enterprise use cases. Where other companies were going strongly after the video game and entertainment markets – largely viewed as the greatest area of opportunity for VR, HP decided it was going to create products aimed at engineers and designers.

Those verticals have ranged from product design and architecture to training and healthcare applications. “Training has been huge for two reasons,” Ludwig told Design News. “One, it saves a lot of cost. You don't have to fly a person in to train by actually working a the physical engine, for example. You can do in VR for the first 30-40 hours and then do the finishing touches in the real world. The other thing is actually the retention rate has been quite impressive for VR-based training. Retention is about five to 10 percent for lectures or memorizing quiz afterwards. VR is about 80 percent.”

They Want Resolution and Comfort

HP's first generation of VR products garnered feedback from customers and communities that the company has used in creating its latest products, including the Reverb. “The simple feedback from the architecture, healthcare, and product design sectors was that they needed more resolution,” Ludwig said. “They need to be able see the details so they can make VR a tool they use more often.

“In training a big issue is actually text illegibility. A lot of training is still on documents, using multiple choice questions and things like that. And so the ability to read text very well or comfortably in current generation VR hurts their ability go from documentation to VR training.”

The other big piece of feedback HP got was in relation to comfort. Even casual VR users are familiar with issues of headset weight and overall comfort, particularly in applications like product design and training that can involve a lot of head movement. The equation is pretty simple, if you make a headset more comfortable, you provide users the ability (and desire) to wear them for longer.

HP's first VR headset wasn't designed solely by the company. The base unit work was provided by Microsoft as part of its larger strategy to maintain a certain standard among the first Windows Mixed Reality headsets to roll out.

But Ludwig said HP knew if it was going to implement the feedback it had been receiving and meet expectations, the Reverb would have to be designed from the ground up.

Indeed the most notable specs for the Reverb come in the way of resolution and comfort. The headset boasts a 114-degree field-of-view with a 2160 x 2160-pixel resolution and a 90Hz refresh rate. Mathematically, that's nearly double the resolution of leading headsets such as the HTC Vive Pro, Oculus Rift, and Samsung Odyssey.

The headset itself weighs about 1.1 pounds. And while it is not a wireless headset (it uses DisplayPort 1.3 and USB 3.0), it does offer inside-out tracking, meaning it doesn't need external sensors (or “lighthouses”) to track the wearer's movement in space.

“We're utilizing the fact that you have two eyes to increase field of view and also boost clarity."

The Reverb comes packaged with wireless controllers (the standard Windows Mixed Reality controllers). However, because Bluetooth connectivity can sometimes be unreliable, HP's engineers have opted to implement a Bluetooth radio directly into the headset to avoid having to rely on the PC's Bluetooth and avoiding possible interference from other Bluetooth devices.

In our hands-on tests with the Reverb this Bluetooth implementation did cause some initial confusion with the Windows 10 setup, but after pairing the controllers directly through the OS rather than through the provided app, we found the controllers response to be very accurate and very low latency – even in gaming applications.

The high resolution is also immediately noticeable, provided you have a PC with the horsepower to handle the Reverb (HP recommends a setup with an Intel Core i7, Nvidia GTX 1080 graphics card, and 16GB of RAM at minimum). Even the Windows Mixed Reality Portal – essentially a virtual house that you can walk through to launch apps – takes on a whole new level of detail and clarity in the Reverb.

The comfort level will also be immediately noticeable to anyone who has tried other Mixed Reality headsets on the market. Thanks to some improved weight balancing and some other design decisions related to the optics, the Reverb offers a level of comfort rivaled only by the HTC Vive Pro, but at roughly half the weight.

In our own tests we logged a record amount of time using the Reverb both in enterprise demos and playing games (we ran the headset through its paces with enterprise demos provided by HP as well as by playing Robo Recall). It's a nice feeling to have to remove a VR headset simply because you're done with a task or actually want to take a break, as opposed to having neck strain or needing to stave off a headache.

The HP Reverb comes in two flavors: a consumer and professional edition. “We're commercially focused, but we also notice when the Venn diagram of consumer wants and commercial wants overlap enough,” Ludwig said. The base specs between the two versions are the same, but with slight differences. For example, the consumer variant comes with a machine washable cloth face mask, whereas the Pro version has a wipeable leather face mask for easier sanitation and use in multiuser environments. The Pro version also has a cord so that it can be connected to the HP Backpack, the latest version of which – the HP VR Backpack G2 – HP released to closely coincide with the release of the Reverb.

Coming to an Optical Conclusion

Ludwig said for HP's team of engineers the key to really delivering the resolution and visual quality that enterprise users demand is in the optics. “[With the Reverb] we're using LCD panels instead of OLED. HTC, Oculus, and Samsung, for example, all use OLED,” Ludwig explained. “The advantage there is we actually have an RGB subpixel stripe, so for each pixel we have a red, green, and blue subpixel – meaning each pixel can make any color. The result is we have two times the resolution, but we are actually more than twice as sharp.”

The other advantage the Reverb's LCDs offer is greater pixel density. “You can't really have a good panel with bad lenses, otherwise you get a bad experience,” Ludwig said. “Quite frankly the lenses aren't the best in the first generation mixed reality devices. The sweet spot is pretty small, which leads to a lot of moving your face around until the image looks clear. And it gets a little blurry near the edges, which isn't great.”

“The other advantage of our LCD panels is they are are much more pixel dense,” Ludwig added. “We use 2.89-inch panels versus the three-and-a-half-inch panels we find for OLED in the Vive, Samsung, and Oculus. So as we basically the headset ends up being a lot smaller and a lot lighter, which also leads directly to comfort.”

Adding only four degrees to the field of view over competing headsets (114-degrees versus 110) may not seem significant, but the difference is very noticeable in use. Aside from the larger view meaning less neck movement (another plus for comfort) it also lends to an overall improvement in clarity in virtual environments.

Ludwig said HP accomplished this by actually taking advantage of a bit of opticl trickery. “We found something interesting, which is that there tends to be an inverse relationship between your field of view and the clarity of the lens in a lot of cases with this kind of technology. So as you increase field of view the lens gets a little murky.

“So what we did is we moved from a symmetrical lens – where these are just circles with your eye in the very middle – to an asymmetrical lens, where your eyes are actually more inboard on the lenses,” Ludwig said. “They're not the same shape. What this lets us do is we've actually lowered the per eye field of view – so your monocular field of view has been lowered, which boosts the clarity of the lens up a bunch and increases the sweet spot of the optics by about 33 percent.”

The magic here is that the Reverb's lenses take advantage of the fact that humans have two eyes. Having a lower than average field of view in each eye results in a larger field of view with both eyes open. “We're utilizing the fact that you have two eyes to increase field of view and also boost clarity,” Ludwig said.

“We don't want to just throw hardware at companies and tell them to figure it. That would be a classic mistake.” 

Not Just Throwing Hardware

Moving forward, Ludwig said HP wants to maintain a relationship with its customers and not just become a high-end VR hardware vendor. “What we find in the enterprise space is a lot companies are saying, 'Okay let's have our technologist make something [with VR] and see if it's actually reasonable.'In general they all find yes it is. But they're having difficulty going from that to implementing it company wide because that's a much different problem.”

To address this HP is making a support system available to its customers to help bridge the gap from making VR a nice-to-have into a regular, crucial part of workflows. “We've ramped up this support system alongside our products so that say a company comes to us in future and says, 'We have CAD or architecture files, but we don't know how to make the solution to take those into VR we can work with them to find a solution...We don't want to just throw hardware at companies and tell them to figure it. That would be a classic mistake.”

Chris Wiltz is a Senior Editor at  Design News covering emerging technologies including AI, VR/AR, blockchain, and robotics.

Drive World with ESC Launches in Silicon Valley

This summer (August 27-29), Drive World Conference & Expo launches in Silicon Valley with North America's largest embedded systems event, Embedded Systems Conference (ESC). The inaugural three-day showcase brings together the brightest minds across the automotive electronics and embedded systems industries who are looking to shape the technology of tomorrow.
Will you be there to help engineer this shift? Register today!

Thu, 22 Sep 2022 12:00:00 -0500 en text/html https://www.designnews.com/design-hardware-software/inside-hp-reverb-how-hp-went-all-enterprise-vr
Killexams : This HP Workstation laptop is over $2,300 off (seriously!) The 15.6-inch HP ZBook Fury G8 Mobile Workstation with a design app on the display. © Provided by Digital Trends The 15.6-inch HP ZBook Fury G8 Mobile Workstation with a design app on the display.

The HP ZBook Fury G8 Mobile Workstation, a laptop that’s powerful enough for professional purposes, is currently on sale from HP with a $2,370 discount. You’ll only have to pay $1,939 for the machine, which is less than half its original price of $4,309. HP’s laptop deals always draw a lot of attention, so we’re not sure how long this offer will last — click that Buy Now button as fast as you can if you don’t want to miss out.

Buy Now

Whether you’re working from home or you need a machine that you can take with you while you move around for your job, the HP ZBook Fury G8 Mobile Workstation is the laptop for you. Following the footsteps of its successor as one of the best mobile workstations, it provides desktop-level performance with its 11th-generation Intel Core i7 processor and Nvidia RTX A2000 graphics card, plus 16GB of RAM that’s recommended by our guide on how much RAM do you need if you’ll be doing graphic design work.

The HP ZBook Fury G8 Mobile Workstation is equipped with a 15.6-inch Full HD screen so you can see all the details of the projects that you’re working on, and it has a 1TB SSD for ample storage for your software and files. Windows 10 Pro is pre-installed on the laptop, and it comes with a license for Windows 11 Pro. Business laptops should emphasize security and privacy, according to our laptop buying guide, and that’s the case with this device as HP is selling the Wolf Pro Security Edition. You’re protected by features such as HP Sure Start, a self-healing BIOS that safeguards your data, and the HP Privacy Camera, which comes with a physical shutter.

If you need a laptop that will provide the necessary performance to accomplish even the most demanding tasks, there’s no need to look any further than HP’s offer for the HP ZBook Fury G8 Mobile Workstation. It’s available under the ongoing HP laptop deals at $2,370 off, which slashes its price to $1,939 from $4,309 originally. There’s no indication when the discount will end though, so if you want to buy the HP ZBook Fury G8 Mobile Workstation for less than half its original price, you should finalize your purchase immediately.

Buy Now

Tue, 04 Oct 2022 05:51:17 -0500 en-US text/html https://www.msn.com/en-us/lifestyle/shopping/this-hp-workstation-laptop-is-over-242300-off-seriously/ar-AA12xYOL
Killexams : HP 14 Laptop Review

This low-priced PC is a solid choice for when you just need a no-frills laptop

By Nicholas De Leon

Walk into your local retailer and there’s a very good chance you’ll see several HP laptops on display in the computer section. The company makes all sorts of laptops, from high-end models aimed at digital creatives or budding content creators to more modest, workmanlike devices like the HP 14. It’s aimed at folks who just sorta need a laptop in the same way you just sorta need a toaster or teakettle: As long as it gets the job done without too much fluff, eh, that’s good enough.

That’s why Consumer Reports recently purchased an HP 14 (model DQ2053CL) for a budget-friendly price of $380, lived with it for a few weeks, then collected our thoughts for an overview.

In a world where laptops can easily go for more than $1,000, you might assume that a notebook that costs less than half of that would harbor some sort of hidden gotcha that justifies the lower price. Well, in our experience, this HP 14 is totally adequate for everyday stuff, like browsing the web to pay your bills or catch up on the news, or to print out your boarding pass for a trip to Grandma’s house.

The specs don’t scream “buy me!” but we think the HP 14 will work just fine for most people. And the price is hard to beat.

HP 14-DQ2053CL

Notable Features

  • Roomy 14-inch display. That’s right in the Goldilocks zone of “not too big, not too small,” so it should easily fit on a desk or in a bag for when you want to get up and go. Will the colors rival your big-screen TV’s? No, but for document-based work (using a web browser, working inside a spreadsheet, etc.), we’re not sure you’d notice the difference.

  • Spacious keyboard. The spacing of the keys feels good and not at all cramped, while the keyboard itself is backlit with what appears to be a white or very light blue backlight, making it easy to see what you’re typing in a dimly lit room. This is especially handy if you don’t have the layout entirely memorized and tend to glance every now and then to make sure you’re hitting the correct key. All good: Not everyone types for a living!

  • Built-in fingerprint reader. Hate having to type your passwords all the time? Then you’ll appreciate being able to simply let your fingerprint do the work.

  • Windows 11 in S Mode: This is a simplified version of Windows 11 that tries to strip away a lot of the cruft that can make using Windows slightly confusing if you’re not someone who sits in front of a computer all day. You’re limited to apps downloaded from the Microsoft App Store, but our guess is that if you mostly use mainstream apps like a web browser and productivity suite, it’s not that big of an issue. One omission you might find surprising is Google Chrome, which cannot be downloaded from this App Store. But in our experience, the Microsoft Edge browser (which uses the same underlying technology as Chrome, including the same extensions like password managers and ad blockers) is a perfectly capable stand-in. You can upgrade for free to the “full fat” version of Windows 11 via the Settings app, but we’re not sure that’s really necessary.

How Well Does the HP 14 Work?

Here’s a two-word summary: pretty well!

Upon opening the box you definitely get the feeling that this is more Timex than Rolex: It’s a mass-market device aimed at everyday consumers who don’t necessarily need (or even want) a premium laptop. It’s quite plasticy with a bit of flex to it. It sounds hollow when you tap it. The bezel (the border that frames the display itself) is pretty big compared with higher-end laptops. It’s covered in stickers.

All of the above are signs of a laptop that was designed to hit a low price. But you know what? When you’re actually using the laptop, it isn’t half bad.

In terms of specs, it has an Intel Core i3 processor, 8GB of memory, and 256GB of solid-state storage. On paper, you’d be forgiven for thinking the laptop would be somewhat underwhelming.

Guess again. Browsing around the web, even on today’s ad-laden websites, proceeds smoothly. Watching HD video on YouTube is more or less identical to the experience you’d get on a much more powerful PC (such as the gaming PC this review is being written on), although you can really hear the laptop’s fans whirring while doing so.

Switching between different apps like Edge, Adobe Photoshop Elements, and Word either using the keyboard shortcut alt-tab or by clicking the Windows Task Bar? No problems there, showing that despite being a lower-priced laptop, its everyday performance is more than adequate.

If you’re the type of person who immediately downloads a tool like GeekBench or Prime95 to see how fast your computer actually is, well, none of this may be too impressive. But if you’re not that person (and most of us aren’t), then it’s hard to find much fault here.

Who Is the HP 14 For?

This feels like an ideal laptop for someone who doesn’t want to spend a lot of money on a laptop and isn’t too bothered by things like build quality or construction or having “only” an Intel Core i3 processor. It’s a laptop that will be used to pay bills, keep track of expenses, do some online shopping, and plan the occasional getaway, and will be tucked away in a spare bedroom/home office. It’s an appliance designed to do a job without fuss.

It’s not a premium experience—the materials do feel a little cheap, the display won’t exactly wow you, and the battery life is nothing to write home about, especially if you’ve used laptops like the LG Gram or Apple MacBook Air. But overall it’s not too shabby, especially for the price.

How Consumer Reports Tests Laptops

There are almost 200 laptops and Chromebooks in our ratings, with dozens of models added every year. These models are refreshed constantly, ensuring that only currently available laptops are presented to CR members.

Our experts run a series of tests to check things like how fast the laptop is able to carry out tasks like opening apps, bouncing between web pages, and processing spreadsheets. We have two separate battery tests to get a better understanding of what you can expect under different loads: One test plays back a 4K video until the battery is fully depleted, and the other tests cycles through several websites until the battery is fully depleted. Having both numbers should provide you a more comprehensive idea of what real-world battery life looks like.

More from Consumer Reports:
Top pick tires for 2016
Best used cars for $25,000 and less
7 best mattresses for couples

Consumer Reports is an independent, nonprofit organization that works side by side with consumers to create a fairer, safer, and healthier world. CR does not endorse products or services, and does not accept advertising. Copyright © 2022, Consumer Reports, Inc.

Fri, 07 Oct 2022 00:48:00 -0500 en-US text/html https://news.yahoo.com/hp-14-laptop-review-124828861.html Killexams : HP Enterprise to Pay $8.5 Million to Settle Gender Pay Gap Suit No result found, try new keyword!Hewlett Packard Enterprise Co. agreed to pay $8.5 million to resolve a lawsuit that alleged it pays female employees less than their male counterparts. The settlement funds, minus attorney fees ... Wed, 28 Sep 2022 02:39:00 -0500 text/html https://www.bloomberg.com/tosv2.html?vid=&uuid=0c7d59b7-4dfe-11ed-97a2-77584357676f&url=L25ld3MvYXJ0aWNsZXMvMjAyMi0wOS0yOC9ocC1lbnRlcnByaXNlLXRvLXBheS04LTUtbWlsbGlvbi10by1zZXR0bGUtZ2VuZGVyLXBheS1nYXAtc3VpdA== Killexams : HP Envy 16 Review Mon, 10 Oct 2022 02:32:00 -0500 en text/html https://www.pcmag.com/reviews/hp-envy-16 Killexams : HP Enterprise (HPE) Down 9.7% Since Last Earnings Report: Can It Rebound?

A month has gone by since the last earnings report for Hewlett Packard Enterprise (HPE). Shares have lost about 9.7% in that time frame, underperforming the S&P 500.

Will the recent negative trend continue leading up to its next earnings release, or is HP Enterprise due for a breakout? Before we dive into how investors and analysts have reacted as of late, let's take a quick look at the most recent earnings report in order to get a better handle on the important drivers.

Hewlett Packard Q3 Earnings Match, Revenues Top Estimates

Hewlett Packard Enterprise reported third-quarter fiscal 2022 non-GAAP earnings of 48 cents per share, which matched the Zacks Consensus Estimate and was a penny higher than the year-ago quarter’s earnings of 47 cents per share.

Revenues of $7 billion increased 1% from the prior-year quarter and surpassed the consensus mark of $6.97 billion. Annualized revenue run-rate (“ARR”) was up 22% year over year to $858 million.

Hewlett Packard continued to witness increased demand for its products and services during the quarter, primarily driven by the accelerated digital transformation amid the remote working trend. Despite supply-chain constraints and high inflationary pressure, the company witnessed an increase in both earnings and sales growth.

Quarterly Details

Segment-wise, High-Performance Compute & Artificial Intelligence (“HPC & AI”) revenues increased 12% year over year to $830 million. The company stated that this segment’s market share has expanded 39% at the end of the quarter.

The Compute division’s sales decreased 3% year over year to $3 billion. The division witnessed 210 basis points (bps) operating profit margin expansion to 13.3%, driven by strategic pricing actions that offset inflated input costs.

Revenues in the Intelligent Edge division rose 8% year over year to $941 million during the quarter, primarily driven by strong customer demand. Revenues from both Aruba Services witnessed double-digit growth while Intelligent Edge as-a-Service saw an improvement of over 60%.

Financial Service revenues were down 3% year over year to $817 million. Net portfolio assets dipped 4% to roughly $12.6 billion.

Revenues from the Storage business were down 2% year over year to $1.2 billion, primarily on account of supply chain disruptions in HPE IP solutions.

Corporate Investments & Other revenues stood at $300 million, down 9.6% year over year.

Operating Results

Non-GAAP gross margin of 34.7% remained flat on a year-over-year basis while expanding 50 bps sequentially. The year-over-year increase in gross margin was mainly driven by a strong pricing discipline and a continued mix shift toward higher-margin software-rich offerings.

Hewlett Packard’s non-GAAP operating profit margin increased 70 bps year over year to 10.5% and 120 bps sequentially. The company continued to save from the cost optimization plan and invest in high-growth, margin-rich portfolios in the third quarter of fiscal 2022.

Balance Sheet and Cash Flow

Hewlett Packard ended the fiscal third quarter with $3.76 billion in cash and cash equivalents compared with $3.03 billion at the end of the previous quarter.

During the fiscal third quarter, Hewlett Packard generated $1.3 billion of cash for operational activities and a free cash flow of $587 million. Free cash flow reflected normal seasonality and certain inventory actions undertaken to keep pace with the growing demand of customers.

During the first nine months of fiscal 2022, the company generated $1.56 billion of cash for operational activities and a negative free cash flow of $201 million.

Hewlett Packard returned $353 million to shareholders through share repurchases and dividends in the reported quarter. The company declared a regular cash dividend of 12 cents per share, payable on Oct 7, 2022.

Guidance

Hewlett Packard revised guidance for fiscal 2022 non-GAAP earnings. The company now predicts the figure in the range of $1.96-$2.04 per share compared with the previously guided range of $1.96-$2.10 per share.

Further, HPE currently anticipates free cash flow in the band of $1.7-$1.9 billion, down from the prior estimated band of $1.8-$2 billion.

For the fourth quarter of fiscal 2022, Hewlett Packard expects non-GAAP earnings between 52 cents and 60 cents per share.

How Have Estimates Been Moving Since Then?

In the past month, investors have witnessed a downward trend in estimates revision.

VGM Scores

At this time, HP Enterprise has a poor Growth Score of F, however its Momentum Score is doing a lot better with a B. Charting a somewhat similar path, the stock was allocated a grade of A on the value side, putting it in the top 20% for this investment strategy.

Overall, the stock has an aggregate VGM Score of B. If you aren't focused on one strategy, this score is the one you should be interested in.

Outlook

Estimates have been broadly trending downward for the stock, and the magnitude of these revisions indicates a downward shift. Notably, HP Enterprise has a Zacks Rank #3 (Hold). We expect an in-line return from the stock in the next few months.

 

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Thu, 29 Sep 2022 03:30:09 -0500 en-US text/html https://www.msn.com/en-us/money/topstocks/hp-enterprise-hpe-down-9-7-since-last-earnings-report-can-it-rebound/ar-AA12oXQp
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