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Exam Code: HP0-M50 Practice exam 2022 by Killexams.com team
HP BSM Operations Manager i. 9.x Software
HP Operations teaching
Killexams : HP Operations teaching - BingNews https://killexams.com/pass4sure/exam-detail/HP0-M50 Search results Killexams : HP Operations teaching - BingNews https://killexams.com/pass4sure/exam-detail/HP0-M50 https://killexams.com/exam_list/HP Killexams : The Last Scientific Calculator?

There was a time when being an engineering student meant you had a sword. Well, really it was a slide rule hanging from your belt, but it sounds cooler to call it a sword. The slide rule sword gave way to calculators hanging from your belt loop, and for many engineers that calculator was from HP. Today’s students are more likely to have a TI or Casio calculator, but HP is still in there with the HP Prime. It is hard to call it a calculator since the latest variant has a 528 MHz ARM Cortex A7, 256 MB of RAM, and 512 MB of ROM. But if you can’t justify a $150 calculator, there are some cheap and even free options out there to get the experience. To start with, HP has a free app that runs on Windows or Mac that works just like the calculator. Of course, that’s free as in no charge, not free as in open source. But still, it will run under Wine with no more than the usual amount of coaxing.

You might wonder why you need a calculator on your computer, and perhaps you don’t. However, the HP Prime isn’t just your 1980s vintage calculator. It also has an amazing number of applications including a complete symbolic math system based on xCAS/Giac. It is also programmable using a special HP language that is sort of like Basic or Pascal. Other applications include plotting, statistics, solvers, and even a spreadsheet that can hold up to 10,000 rows and 676 columns.

Portability

It is easy to think that HP provides the free PC software so you’ll go out and buy the real calculator, and that may be part of it. However, you can also get official apps for Android and iOS. They aren’t free, but they are relatively inexpensive. On iOS the cost right now is $25 and on Android it is $20. There are also “lite” versions that are free.

It appears that these apps are not emulating the genuine calculator hardware, but are ports of the calculator code. So this isn’t a case of someone just writing a pretend calculator, these apps act like the real calculator because it is running the same source code. For example, there is an application, HP Connectivity Kit, that lets you talk to a real calculator over the network. The PC and phone versions will also connect just like a real device.

Programming

You can write programs on the device or if you have the HP Connectivity software (also free) you can write programs on your PC. You can even find some from the Internet. If you miss your old calculator, there is a define feature that lets you program like a key macro recording.

The programming language isn’t hard to pick up. Here’s a short snippet:


EXPORT AREAVOL()
BEGIN
LOCAL N1, N2, L1;
CHOOSE(N1, "Area or Volume?", "Area", "Volume");
IF N1 == 1 THEN
CHOOSE(N2, "Choose shape", "Rectangle", "Triangle", "Disk");
ELSE
CHOOSE(N2, "Choose solid", "Prism", "Cylinder", "Cone", "Pyramid", "Sphere");
. . .

Hacking and What’s Next?

You’d think that the real hardware would be a prime platform for hacking, but so far that’s still on the to-do list. The only really good hardware hack for the real calculator adds a Samsung battery with a higher capacity to the machine. There are also some enticing pads on the PCB that appear to support a buzzer and I2C communications, but there’s no firmware for it. There have been a few attempts to load alien firmware into the device, but there’s no full-blown development system. Getting to the JTAG port looks pretty intense. There’s also been the inevitable hacking of the communication protocol.

History is replete with products that seemed amazing for their day but turned out to be just a stopgap for something better. Cassettes gave way to CDs and then CDs gave way to digital music. Telephone answering machines gave way to voicemail. Calculators have that feel to them. How much longer will we need them? Are the virtual HP Prime applications going to overshadow the physical device?

Regardless, the Prime is state of the art and would shame a personal computer from a few years ago. You can only wonder if it will be the last great calculator, or if there are more yet to come. And a calculator still makes a nice project. Not all homemade calculators are simple.

Wed, 03 Aug 2022 11:59:00 -0500 Al Williams en-US text/html https://hackaday.com/2020/03/02/the-last-scientific-calculator/
Killexams : The Flight That Made The Calculator And Changed The World

It was the fall of 1965 and Jack Kilby and Patrick Haggerty of Texas Instruments sat on a flight as Haggerty explained his idea for a calculator that could fit in the palm of a hand. This was a huge challenge since at that time calculators were the size of typewriters and plugged into wall sockets for their power. Kilby, who’d co-invented the integrated circuit just seven years earlier while at TI, lived to solve problems.

Fig. 2 from US 3,819,921 Miniature electronic calculator
Fig. 2 from US 3,819,921 Miniature electronic calculator

By the time they landed, Kilby had decided they should come up with a calculator that could fit in your pocket, cost less than $100, and could add, subtract, multiply, divide and maybe do square roots. He chose the code name, Project Cal Tech, for this endeavor, which seemed logical as TI had previously had a Project MIT.

Rather than study how existing calculators worked, they decided to start from scratch. The task was broken into five parts: the keyboard, the memory, the processor, the power supply, and some form of output. The processing portion came down to a four-chip design, one more than was initially hoped for. The output was also tricky for the time. CRTs were out of the question, neon lights required too high a voltage and LEDs were still not bright enough. In the end, they developed a thermal printer that burned images into heat-sensitive paper.

Just over twelve months later, with the parts all spread out on a table, it quietly spat out correct answers. A patent application was filed resulting in US patent 3,819,921, Miniature electronic calculator, which outlined the basic design for all the calculators to follow. This, idea borne of a discussion on an airplane, was a pivotal moment that changed the way we teach every student, and brought the power of solid-state computing technology into everyday life.

TI showed the Cal Tech prototype to a number of companies and Canon took an interest. Canon brought it to market as the Pocketronic, releasing it in Japan in October 1970 and the US in April 1971, selling for around $150 ($910 in 2017 dollars). It had three chips and a heat-sensitive paper tape readout. It was still just handheld though, not really pocket-sized, but sold very well.

By then a number of other handheld calculators were also hitting the market. In November 1970, the first calculator-on-a-chip, the Mostek MK6010, was announced, followed in February 1971 by the first truly pocket-sized calculator, the Busicom LE-120A “Handy” that used the chip. That same year, TI followed with their own calculator-on-a-chip and in 1972 TI started releasing its own calculators.

HP-35, the first scientific calculator
HP-35, the first scientific calculator, by Seth Morabito CC BY 2.0

In 1972 Hewlett-Packard released the HP-35, the first scientific calculator, one that could replace a slide rule. It used reverse Polish notation (which our own [Jenny List] recently wrote about), included scientific notation and had 35 buttons, hence its name. Despite a $395 price tag ($2,320 in 2017), 100,000 were sold in its first year. The HP-35, along with the release of TI’s equivalent SR-50 in 1974 for $150, spelled the end of the genuine slide rule. (The SR stood for Slide Rule.)

Display technology also advanced through vacuum fluorescent displays, LEDs and LCDs. In the mid-1970s, twisted nematic (TN) LCDs gave calculators the now omnipresent dark numerals on a light background while decreasing the power requirements to the point where they could run on button cells.

Prices dropped as new features were added and sales doubled each year. By 1976, a four-function calculator cost only a few dollars. In 1972, 5 million calculators were sold in the US and within ten years there were more calculators in the US than people.

Why had the calculator become so popular? This was a clear case of a consumer product that was conceived for a market that wasn’t known to exist. When Haggerty conceived of the idea in 1965, calculators were heavy and took up significant space on a desktop, so perhaps the convenience of one which you could carry around played a part. They also needed no setup, no programming — simply flip the on/off switch and do some calculations. For the average person, they replaced the need to learn multiplication tables, necessary for working out how much a dozen apples would cost at $0.05 an apple. They also made it easier for the high school student to do the trigonometry in their physics homework. Though, in the early 1970s, given the initial high price, perhaps it was engineers and companies that bought them first.

TI-30
TI-30, by D. Meyer CC BY-SA 3.0

I can attest to the latter. I was just becoming a teenager back around 1976 when my father bought a TI-30 calculator for $25, or around $107 in 2017 dollars. The mining company at which he worked as an electrician had made them available. Before that, I recall using long division to divide up a long sheet of paper for a mural that was to be a backdrop for a school play. I would likely have gone on to learn to use a slide rule, but never did. After the calculator arrived, I’ve done long division on paper only once when no calculator was available, though I have done it for fun and to see if I remember how.

TI-81 graphing calculator
TI-81 graphing calculator, by Calcvids CC BY-SA 3.0

Through the decades that followed, calculators continued to gain functionality. In 1974, HP came out with their first programmable calculator, the HP-65. It had 100 functions and stored programs with a magnetic card reader. Starting in 1978, a company called Calculated Industries released very niche calculators such as the Loan Arranger for the Real Estate industry with functions for calculating payments and future values. Then later came the Construction Master with programmed functions for pitch, rise, run, feet-inch conversions and more. In the 1990s TI came out with the TI-81, a popular graphing calculator for algebra and precalculus courses and power by a Zilog Z80.

If memory serves, it was a programmable Sharp El-5040 with a single line formula display that I’d left behind in a University auditorium, hopefully having found a good home on an engineer’s desk. Now, my Sharp EL-531W, also with a single line formula that can be retrieved and edited, sits ever-present beside my computer monitor, getting daily use while a Casio fx-3600P that I’d thought I’d lost but later found, sits waiting for its turn in my desk drawer.

This being Hackaday, you no doubt have a calculator that gets frequent use. Or perhaps you have your own fond memories of one that got away or a family one that you grew up with. Or perhaps there’s one you’ve hacked, like this ESP8266-connected scientific calculator? Share your stories with us, we’d love to hear how the calculator has played a part in your life. We also wonder how much longer the calculator as a distinct piece of electronics will survive now that the infinite adaptability of smartphones has made calculator apps the go-to for today’s upcoming engineering candidates?

[Pocketronic photo used in main image via Dentaku-Museum]

Tue, 26 Jul 2022 12:00:00 -0500 Steven Dufresne en-US text/html https://hackaday.com/2017/11/27/the-flight-that-made-the-calculator-and-changed-the-world/
Killexams : Product Focus: Classroom Collaboration Tools

Product Focus: Classroom Collaboration Tools

Sponsored by

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Interactive WhiteBoard (IWB) as Collaboration Tools

IWBs or "a smartboard" (SmartBoard™ is actually just a trademarked brand name of IWBs, there are many manufacturers such as 3M, DYMO (Mimio), Hitachi, HP, Lenovo, Panasonic, eInstruction, and more) is a white or marker board that has been designed and manufactured to be projected on by a projector and used as an input device. IWBs typically build in one or more of the following technologies:

  • Resitive touch
  • Infrared (IR) touch (also called IR scan)
  • Electomaganetic pens
  • Touch-free camera-based

IWBs, when used with a projector and computer, allow users to interact with a presentation right on the whiteboard as well as control their computer from the whiteboard (which is typically mounted on the wall or on a rolling floor stand). IWBs are sort of like a giant graphics tablet. IWBs are great for teaching and collaboration as they allow instructors to annotate and capture notes during a presentation or even videoconferencing. If used with an audience response system (also known as "clicker") presenters can directly get feedback by polling their audience or giving quizzes during their presentation.

Alternatives to IWBs:

1) Interactive Projection

There are some projectors with built-in Interactive whiteboard technology, which turns the projector screen surface or wall (whatever they are projecting on) into an interactive surface. Both Epson and InFocus were the first to bring this technology to market (InFocus was this first to bring it to market in late 2009 but Epson was not far behind with their solution in spring 2010) but now there are units from Optoma, ViewSonic, Hitachi, BenQ, Dell, and, Luidia, Boxlight as well. Some of the solutions, like Epson’s, are pen-based which means you need to be at the board or screen, while others are wand-based, which means you can interact from almost anywhere in the room within 30 to 40 feet. Like interactive whiteboards, these solutions work similarly to graphics tablets or optical mice in that they work off a digital grid. Once the projector and pen or wand are calibrated, the user can interact with, annotate, create, and more with the presentation content.

2) Touch displays

Touch capable LCD or plasmas are offered by most of the display manufacturers like Samsung, NEC, Sony, HP, Planar, ViewSonic and ELO. This displays work like any other large format display (30" or larger) but they have the added feature of touch screen just like an iPhone or Droid. The largest single display is 82" offered by Samsung but users can also utilize multiple smaller screens to make an interactive video wall. For instance four 55-inch touch screens in a 2 high x 2 wide tile would yield a 110-inch diagonal touch screen. The combinations are endless.

Some of the manufacturers, like Samsung and Infocus, even offer units specifically for education as alternatives to IWBs, but in theory any touch monitor can deliver you the same capabilities as a traditional IWB.

Collaborative devices/solutions for IWBs

There are numerous add-on collaborative products that are both pen-based and tablet-based that can be used with existing projectors to allow you to interact with your presentations. Some of these require you to be at the whiteboard and some work from anywhere. Ebeam from Luidia has a device you mount to a traditional whiteboard and using a Ebeam pen interactive on the whiteboard. The Q300 Mirrorboard is a 10-inch wireless screen or slate that allows users to see what is being projected on a large format display and interact with it from up to 30-feet away from the receiver (which is hooked to the computer). This allows teachers to walk around the room and not even have to face the board to see what they are doing. There are many different types of interactive whiteboard devices available from manufacturers like Avermedia, Luida, Optoma, Hitachi, eInstruction and more.

The database presented here offers products that GovConnection sells specifically for the education market.


Virtual Ink Mimio Interactive

Virtual Ink Mimio Interactive

mimio Interactive is a portable and low cost device that attaches to any whiteboard (up to 4'x8' in size), connects to your PC and when used with a projector, allows you control your desktop applications and documents directly from the board.

With the included ergonomic mimio Mouse stylus, controlling your interactive whiteboard has never been easier. The mimio Mouse stylus has a teflon tip to glide across any surface and two integrated buttons with user selectable functions, such as hover and right-click.

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Panasonic Panaboard 83", Interactive Multi-Touch

Panasonic Panaboard 83", Interactive Multi-Touch

The elite Panaboard is an advanced educational tool that helps you grab students' attention. It makes it easy to create effective, eye-catching teaching materials and it promotes active, visual-based teaching and learning that make the classroom fun for both teacher and students. By connecting a PC with Internet access and a projector, you can bring the huge amount of information available on the Web or any information on your PC right into your classroom. Panasonic's Elite Panaboard opens the door to a kind of active, visual-based education.

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Panasonic UB-8325 Interactive Whiteboard with USB Interface

Panasonic UB-8325 Interactive Whiteboard with USB Interface

White-"bored"? We've got just the solution. Panasonic's UB-8325 Interactive Panaboard will energize your meetings, keeping your audience focused and your ideas flowing. Complete with an abundance of interactive technological advancements, the benefits of the UB-8325 are without bounds.

Save written and projected notes from the board directly into your PC. Remote PC operations lets you control your Windows applications from your host PC. Easy-to-install utility software includes an electronic pen used in the same way as a computer mouse. Pen strokes can be recorded, captured, saved and replayed on top of PC applications. Experience a real time global teleconference solution using the Microsoft NetMeeting software platform. Draw ideas from all of your resources around the world simultaneously.

Panaboard Mode lets you increase efficiency and reduce meeting time by simply writing on the board and printing out the information for easy distribution. Whiteboard Mode helps you distribute consistent information by using the power of your PC to save meeting notes and then send the information electronically via email or to a printer. Projector Mode allows you to interact with projected images while controlling Windows applications directly from the board for convenient and practical analysis.

Included colorful electronic pens track meeting notes and important words to emphasize critical issues in color. The screen displays crisp data and video images with minimal light reflection. A built-in printer allows for materials to be distributed to the audience in seconds.

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ViewSonic Ebeam Edge eBeam Edge Interactive Projector/Whiteboard Solution by Luidia

ViewSonic Ebeam Edge eBeam Edge Interactive Projector/Whiteboard Solution by Luidia

If you walked into a classroom where ViewSonic's PJ-PEN-002 eBeam Edge For Education was being used you're realize almost instantly what was going on. What you might not realize is how it was going on.

You know what a whiteboard is. There must be one in just about every classroom in America. Although they're far less common than ordinary whiteboards, you might know what an interactive whiteboard is too.

With an interactive whiteboard, a computer and a projector you can display PowerPoint slide shows, computer-based lessons and other programs on the board and navigate through them, manipulate them and annotate them. With many you can save your work along with your notes in a variety of file formats.

eBeam for Education turns any ordinary whiteboard into an interactive whiteboard. Here's how it works:

After you've installed the software into your Mac or PC you connect your computer to your USB-equipped projector. (Cable available separately) Then you place the eBeam receiver on the edge of your whiteboard. It's less than eight inches long (200 mm) 1.6 inches (41 mm) wide and less than a half inch thick (10.5 mm). If you have a metal-edged board you can attach it magnetically. Otherwise you can use the included mounting brackets. Run the included 16 foot (4.87 meters) long USB cable from the receiver to your computer and you're ready to go.

Once you're set up you can project PowerPoint and Keynote slideshows, lesson plans, and other computer-based learning materials. Pick up the stylus and navigate, annotate and manipulate what's on the board just as you would with an genuine interactive whiteboard.

The eBeam system includes a complete package of software that makes your eBeam even more valuable. Included in the software is eBeam Scrapbook, a multi-media organizer for gathering, preparing, presenting, and sharing your content.

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Hitachi StarBoard FX-TRIO-77 Whiteboard

Hitachi StarBoard FX-TRIO-77 - Whiteboard - infrared - wired - USB

The key to the FX-TRIO interactive whiteboard is a multi-touch surface. Use your finger, stylus or electronic pen to annotate on the whiteboard and easily navigate through computer applications, websites and multi-media content. Up to three users can operate the board and perform the same task simultaneously. Moreover the hard electronic-free surface of the FX-TRIO makes it almost unbreakable and usable as a dry-wipe whiteboard.

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Panasonic 55 in x 65 in Panaboard - Plain Paper Model with USB Interface Port

Panasonic 55 in x 65 in Panaboard - Plain Paper Model with USB Interface Port

Connect your meetings, brain storming sessions, scheduling and training with this 55" by 65" plain paper Panaboard. It features a 35.4" by 55.1" panel size with four endless type panel surfaces and includes one non-glare screen for projectors. File Document Management System software easily archives, retrieves and disseminates your meeting notes. For your convenience, this Panaboard can be wall-mounted or used with the mobile floor stand (sold separately).

This model comes standard with Document Manager and Document Viewer utility software. Meeting content that appears on the Panaboard screen can become your meeting minutes with notes through the Document Viewer feature. Using Document Manager, you can quickly and easily file and distribute the meeting minutes by converting the file into common electronic file formats, including BMP, TIFF, JPG, PNG and PDF.

With the included Printer Driver, this Panaboard can also work as a PC printer. If you need to print documents during a meeting, the built-in Plug and Play USB port makes it easy to print out your documents right from the Panaboard. In addition, with the included TWAIN driver, you can scan the image on the Panaboard screen as image data to your computer with just one click. You can also control the Panaboard operation right from your computer.

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Virtual Ink MimoTeach Interactive System

Virtual Ink MimioTeach Interactive System

The MimioTeach interactive system transforms any dry erase board into a fully interactive whiteboard. The patented infrared and ultrasound sensor technology fits neatly into a small, unobtrusive bar that attaches easily to a board. Combine it with a projector and computer, and it becomes a fully interactive system. Lightweight yet durable, the MimioTeach system is easy to handle and transport.

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Hitachi StarBoard WT-1 Interactive Wireless Tablet

Hitachi StarBoard WT-1 Interactive Wireless Tablet

The WT-1 Interactive Wireless Tablet's compact and portable design allows you to comfortably control your computer and present up to 30 feet away – even while standing up. Whether you're in the boardroom or in a meeting, you can quickly jot down notes – from mathematical formulas to flow charts. Easily mark up Word documents, PowerPoint presentations, and highlight information with digital inks. Then, reorganize your notes and recall them later to share with colleagues. Skip the frustration of trying to set-up a wireless connection. The WT-1's Radio Frequency technology takes the guess work out of pairing devices and easily connects to your computer. The integrated rechargeable battery provides up to 16 hours of wireless operation and can be charged via USB.

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Mitsubishi Bundle XD250U-ST Portable DLP Projector with Ebeam Edge

Mitsubishi Bundle XD250U-ST Portable DLP Projector with Ebeam Edge

  • 2700 ANSI lumens / 2000:1 Contrast Ratio / 1024 x 768 Max Resolution
  • 4:3, 16:9 Image Aspect Ratio / Digital Light Processing (DLP) Display
  • Remote control, Single speaker, Speaker Included, Blackboard mode, Whiteboard mode / 3 Years Warranty

This bundle includes (1) XD250U-ST DLP projector and (1) eBeam Edge.

In the past, attempting to show large projected presentations in small rooms could prove quite difficult, as a projector would need to take up a lot of desk space in order to show a sufficiently large image. Thanks to the short throw projector from Mitsubishi Electric however, this problem is a thing of the past. Requiring only an 83cm distance to deliver a 1.5m projection image, the XD250U-ST can be placed right at the edge of a table top, eliminating the loss of workspace commonly associated with conventional projectors. The XD250U-ST's lightweight and compact design also makes it ideal for sales presentations on the move or easy transfer between classrooms.

Great images in limited area aren't the only thing going for the XD250U-ST, as it also features an outstanding range of value-added functions. The built-in 10W speaker effectively eliminates the need for an external audio system in small rooms, while the "Audio Mix" feature allows the user to connect two audio inputs to the projector (e.g. a microphone and DVD player) and control each of the input volumes separately. The projector can be connected to a local area network for remote monitoring and control, and the visual PA feature allows messages to be simultaneously broadcast to multiple Mitsubishi projectors on the network. Low operating costs are also a standout feature of the XD250U-ST, with a staggering lamp life of up to 6000 hours ensuring far fewer lamp changes, and a filter free design meaning less downtime for maintenance.

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Optoma TW675UTi-3D Ultra Short Throw Interactive Multimedia Projector

Optoma TW675UTi-3D Ultra Short Throw Interactive Multimedia Projector, 3200 Lumens

  • 3200 ANSI lumens / 3000:1 Contrast Ratio / 1600 x 1200 Max Resolution
  • 16:9, 4:3, 16:10 Image Aspect Ratio / Digital Light Processing (DLP) Display / P-VIP Lamp
  • Remote control, 3D, Speakers Included, Dual speakers / 3 Years Warranty

Now you can make your conference room or classroom an interactive learning environment without the cost or complication of installing an electronic whiteboard. The Optoma TX675UTi-3D, an XGA ultra short-throw multimedia projector with interactive 3D function, upgrades plain whiteboards and screens (or even a bare wall) into an immersive learning experience. The high-performance projector and pen combination integrates the features that educators and business presenters need to meet today's day-to-day demands and tomorrow's emerging technologies.

With high brightness, contrast and sharpness, the TX675UTi-3D engages the audience by producing crystal clear images that keep audiences connected. The ultra short-throw design minimizes shadows, while the sleek styling hides cables from view. This fully-loaded projector delivers an all-in-one solution that meets your needs.

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Mitsubishi Bundle XD221U-ST(D) 3D-Ready DLP Projector with Ebeam Edge

Mitsubishi Bundle XD221U-ST(D) 3D-Ready DLP Projector with Ebeam Edge

  • 2000 ANSI lumens / 2000:1 Contrast Ratio / 1024 x 768 Max Resolution
  • 4:3, 16:9 Image Aspect Ratio / Digital Light Processing (DLP) Display
  • Remote control, Single speaker, Speaker Included, Blackboard mode, Whiteboard mode / 3 Years Warranty

This bundle includes (1) XD221U-ST(D) 3D-Ready DLP Projector and (1) eBeam Edge.

At last, a multimedia projector that goes right to the front of the class. The XD221U-ST DLP 3D-ready projector takes classroom presentations to a new level, with ultra short-throw capabilities, sharp image reproduction, incredibly quiet operation, low cost of operation and more.

With the XD221U-ST multimedia projector instructors no longer worry about casting a shadow on the whiteboard or face the bright glare of the projector. An ultra-powerful short-throw lens can project an amazing 60-inch diagonal image from a distance of just 33-inch, an asset whether the room is large or small.

Near-silent 26 decibel operation in low mode ensures that the XD221 doesn't compete with the presenter. A high-volume, 10 watt built-in speaker eliminates the need for an external speaker. The optional microphone reproduces the presenter's voice loud and clear in real-time while the audio mix feature enables the microphone's audio to lay over the sound from another input source.

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Panasonic 77" Diagonal Interactive Board with MultiTouch

Panasonic 77" Diagonal Interactive Board with MultiTouch

The elite Panaboard is an advanced educational tool that helps you grab students' attention. It makes it easy to create effective, eye-catching teaching materials and it promotes active, visual-based teaching and learning that make the classroom fun for both teacher and students. By connecting a PC with Internet access and a projector, you can bring the huge amount of information available on the Web or any information on your PC right into your classroom. Panasonic's Elite Panaboard opens the door to a kind of active, visual-based education.

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HP TeamBoard Resistive Touch 4:3 62" x 50" Interactive Whiteboard

HP TeamBoard Resistive Touch 4:3 62" x 50" Interactive Whiteboard

TeamBoard RT (4:3) Interactive Whiteboard for Business with Finger Touch Interactivity. Combining state of the art resistive touch (RT) technology with award wining EVS projection and dry-erase surface, TeamBoard RT is an industry-leading learning solution. TeamBoard RT comes with a detachable controller that easily slides on and off for simple upgrading or replacement.

The interactive whiteboard is easy does it with TeamBoard RT 4:3 – robust construction, reliable finger-touch interactivity, a guaranteed-to-clean surface, and an integrated Action Bar that needs no special pens or parts. TeamBoard is a global leader in the interactive whiteboard market. TeamBoard's award-winning interactive whiteboards are designed to accelerate learning by increasing engagement, improving retention and fostering an enthusiasm for learning. TeamBoard RT has been designed with today's classroom in mind.

TeamBoard RT (4:3 aspect ratio) models are user-friendly interactive whiteboards. You do not have to worry about losing any proprietary gadgets, pens or tools. All features are controlled with the touch of a finger. The standard 4:3 aspect ratio is familiar and compatible with most existing projectors and computer set ups.

The low-glare VersaSurface is perfectly suited for projection. The image can be viewed from any angle and seat in the room. The matte-white surface ensures that there will be no visible hot spots or glare–even without dimming the lights. TeamBoard's award wining Versa presentation surface is a unique dry-erase writing and projection surface. The VersaSurface is guaranteed-to-clean; even permanent marker, if used by mistake, is easy to erase.

TeamBoard RT's removable controller allows for quick upgrades and replacements. There is no need to wait for a technician to visit nor will you be burdened with the responsibility of having to send back your interactive whiteboard should you experience technical difficulties.

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Optoma TX665UTi-3D Ultra Short Throw Interactive Multimedia Projector

Optoma TX665UTi-3D Ultra Short Throw Interactive Multimedia Projector, 3000 Lumens

  • 3000 ANSI lumens / 3000:1 Contrast Ratio / 1600 x 1200 Max Resolution
  • 16:9, 4:3 Image Aspect Ratio / Digital Light Processing (DLP) Display / P-VIP Lamp
  • Remote control, 3D, Speakers Included, Dual speakers / 3 Years Warranty

Now you can make your conference room or classroom an interactive learning environment without the cost or complication of installing an electronic whiteboard. The Optoma TX665UTi-3D, an XGA ultra short-throw multimedia projector with interactive 3D function, upgrades plain whiteboards and screens (or even a bare wall) into an immersive learning experience. The high-performance projector and pen combination integrates the features that educators and business presenters need to meet today's day-to-day demands and tomorrow's emerging technologies.

With high brightness, contrast and sharpness, the TX665UTi-3D engages the audience by producing crystal clear images that keep audiences connected. The ultra short-throw design minimizes shadows, while the sleek styling hides cables from view. This fully-loaded projector delivers an all-in-one solution that meets your needs.

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Hitachi iPJ-AW250N Interactive Ultra Short-Throw WXGA Projector

Hitachi iPJ-AW250N Interactive Ultra Short-Throw WXGA Projector, 2500 Lumens

  • 2500 ANSI lumens / 1600 x 1200 Max Resolution
  • UHP Lamp
  • 3 Years Warranty

Project a clear image in any classroom or conference room with Hitachi iPJ-AW250N. It features an Ultra Short Throw lens which will project an 80" image at 10" from the edge of the projector. This not only prevents shadows caused by obstructions but also means no shadows and no light shining in the presenter's eyes.

For better performance, both an IR sensor and Ultra Sonic technology are used. This increases reliability as well as eliminating lag time from pen to projection for a more natural writing experience.

Digital connectivity allows for highest image quality from your HD device.

Perfect Fit 2 allows the user to adjust the four corners and four sides of the image one by one. This feature helps correct geometrical and complicated distortions. Some geometric limitations apply.

Template function projects lines onto the screen, making it easier to write on a whiteboard or blackboard.

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InFocus IN3916 Interactive Projector

InFocus IN3916 Interactive Projector, 2700 Lumens

  • 2700 ANSI lumens / 3200:1 Contrast Ratio / 1920 x 1200 Max Resolution
  • 16:10, 16:9, 4:3, 5:4 Image Aspect Ratio
  • Remote control, Keystone correction, Dual speakers, Speakers Included / 5 Years Warranty

Engage your audience with an IN3916 interactive projector instead of a cumbersome and expensive interactive whiteboard or smartboard. Turn any surface into an engaging, collaborative interactive workspace. It's like an interactive whiteboard without the board.

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3M 65" Digital Board

3M 65" Digital Board

This innovative digital whiteboard allow you to electronically capture notes to save and distribute instantly. The board electronically captures notes in color which you can then save, print, or e-mail in various file formats instantly, including: ESB, JPEG, TIFF, HTML, PDF, vector PDF, BMP 256 color, WBD, PowerPoint (ppt and pps), and metafile (emf). You can import files from most business programs (including Excel and Word), annotate and save changes. A Playback feature allows you to review all drawings on the board, including erased items. Designed for long-term durability with a porcelain enamel surface over steel design, the board will be your preferred note-taking tool for years to come.

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HP TeamBoard RT 85" 16:10 WhiteBoard

HP TeamBoard RT 85" 16:10 WhiteBoard

The TeamBoard RT 16:10 TMWM7450EM offers a robust construction, reliable finger-touch interactivity, a guaranteed-to-clean surface, and an integrated Action Bar that needs no special pens or parts! It also brings you compatibility with the latest projectors, with full widescreen functionality that offers 20% more interactive workspace than a standard interactive whiteboard. TeamBoard is a global leader in the interactive whiteboard market. Inspired by teachers, students, professionals and facility experts, TeamBoard's interactive whiteboards are designed to accelerate learning by increasing engagement, improving retention and fostering an enthusiasm for learning. TeamBoard has been designed with today's classroom in mind. It provides the power of interactivity to learning–made easy.

TeamBoard RT models are the most user-friendly interactive whiteboards. You do not have to worry about losing any proprietary gadgets, pens or tools. All features are controlled with the touch of a finger. The low-glare VersaSurfacetm is perfectly suited for projection. The image can be viewed from any angle and seat in the room. The matte-white surface ensures that there will be no visible hot spots or glare–even without dimming the lights. TeamBoard's award wining Versa presentation surface is a unique dry-erase writing and projection surface. The VersaSurface is guaranteed-to-clean; even permanent marker, if used by mistake, is easy to erase. TeamBoard RT's removable controller allows for quick upgrades and replacements (usually within 24 hours). There is no need to wait for a technician to visit nor will you be burdened with the responsibility of having to send back your interactive whiteboard should you experience technical difficulties.

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Sony Bundle SW125 Short-Throw 3D LCD Projector with Ebeam Edge portable Interactive solution

Sony Bundle SW125 Short-Throw 3D LCD Projector with Ebeam Edge portable Interactive solution

  • 2600 ANSI lumens / 3800:1 Contrast Ratio / 1400 x 1050 Max Resolution
  • 16:10 Image Aspect Ratio / LCD Display / UHP Lamp
  • Single speaker, Speaker Included, Remote control, Keystone correction / 3 Years Warranty

This bundle includes the VPL-SW125 WXGA projector and the Ebeam Edge interactive projector/whiteboard solution.

The VPL-SW125 WXGA projector is an ideal choice for close projection applications in the corporate and educational markets. The model has a low brightness mode which reduces power consumption and extends the lamp lifetime to approximately 6000 hours, which means lower operating costs across the board.

Excellent contrast, consistent colour stability, high picture quality and longer durability will Improve visibility and enhance teaching quality. This projector is easy to install in small or difficult spaces, and has easy to operate controls.

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Panasonic Panaboard 83" Interactive Whiteboard

Panasonic Panaboard 83" Interactive Whiteboard

The elite Panaboard is an advanced educational tool that helps you grab students' attention. It makes it easy to create effective, eye-catching teaching materials and it promotes active, visual-based teaching and learning that makes the classroom fun for both teacher and student! Panasonic and the elite Panaboard open the door to a kind of active, visual-based education.

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Panasonic Panaboard 63" Whiteboard, USB

Panasonic Panaboard 63" Whiteboard, USB

This advanced color Panaboard supports a variety of business situations with a wide range of functions. You can save the information written on the board onto a PC, an SD memory card, or USB flash memory, and distribute it as electronic data to your colleagues from a PC, all in color. Operation is done using easy-to-understand icons. Panaboard gives you maximum power in presentations and conferences.

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ViewSonic PJD7383i Short-Throw XGA DLP Interactive Projector with Speaker

ViewSonic PJD7383i Short-Throw XGA DLP Interactive Projector with Speaker, 3000 Lumens

  • 3000 ANSI lumens / 2000:1, 3000:1 Contrast Ratio / 1024 x 768 Max Resolution
  • 4:3, 16:9 Image Aspect Ratio / Digital Light Processing (DLP) Display
  • Keystone correction, Remote control, Single speaker, Speaker Included / 3 Years Warranty

The PJD7383i is an advanced short throw DLP projector which includes BrilliantColor technology to produce more vibrant colors, while the high brightness and contrast ratios make this projector shine in virtually any lighting situation.

The PJD7383i delivers 3000 lumens with a 1024 x 768 XGA native resolution. Priced at just a fraction of the cost of a traditional 77” interactive white board, the ViewSonic iProjector provides ultimate flexibility for interactive learning.

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Hitachi StarBoard Link EZ Interactive Whiteboard System

Hitachi StarBoard Link EZ Interactive Whiteboard System

StarBoard Link EZ turns any dry erase board or surface into a fully functioning Interactive Whiteboard. Easy to set up. Easy to use. Attach your StarBoard Link EZ system to any flat surface, connect it to a computer, connect the computer to a projector, a quick set-up routine and you are ready to start teaching with a fully functioning IWB.

StarBoard Link EZ secures to any flat surface in minutes to transform a static wall into an interactive environment. The size of active area is adjustable, from 45'' if the surface is limited, to 90'' for the rooms where a bigger size of projection and work space is required. Use your finger, stylus or any object to easily navigate through activities, websites, and multi-media content. Use your finger to annotate, fist to scroll and two fingers to erase or zoom in and out.

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Mitsubishi Bundle EW230U-ST DLP Projector with Ebeam Edge portable Interactive solution

Mitsubishi Bundle EW230U-ST DLP Projector with Ebeam Edge portable Interactive solution

  • 2500 ANSI lumens / 1600 x 1200 Max Resolution

The issue of presenting in environments with limited projection space can now be eliminated with the EW230U-ST. This native WXGA projector is equipped with an ultra-powerful short-throw lens that can project an amazing 60-inch diagonal image from a distance of just 63cm from the screen. With such an amazingly short projection distance, previous concerns about presenters casting their shadow on the screen are now eliminated.

The EW230U-ST is a WXGA projector with 1280 x 800 pixel resolution specially tuned to screen aspect ratios that support the shift towards wide-screen computer monitors. It reproduces a display area 1.3 times that of conventional XGA projectors, ensuring full compatibility with wider screens and eliminating the need for left-right screen adjustment. Depending on the software installed, dual-screen projection, such as simultaneously viewing the menu and previews, is possible. DVD images can also be reproduced directly without requiring signal compression, thus providing sharper, clearer images.

The EW230U-ST is equipped with a built-in LAN (RJ-45) terminal for remote operation when connected to a network. Additionally, when used with Crestron software, integrated control of up to 250 projectors including power on/off control, message display on multiple projectors and confirmation of lamp service hours is possible using RoomViewTM/e-Control applications.

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Hitachi 17" StarBoard T-17SXL Interactive Pen Display

Hitachi 17" StarBoard T-17SXL Interactive Pen Display

The T-17SXL is a compact, ergonomic, pen-driven, SXGA resolution 17-inch LCD display provided with the StarBoard Software suite of presentation and collaboration tools. The T-17SXL raises the bar in tablet presentation technology with a 17-inch LCD display screen that boasts SXGA resolution, excellent color and contrast, and a thin screen that assures natural, accurate operation. Other technological innovations include built-in video pass-through permitting the connection of projectors and computers with the StarBoard system without requiring an external video splitting amplifier.

Eight hardware function buttons permit full screen operation without requiring constant use of on-screen menus. The T-17SXL is connected to a standard PC via USB link and comes with a smoothly adjustable tilt stand.

Perhaps the most powerful innovation is the inclusion of the latest in the StarBoard suite of professional presentation and collaboration software. StarBoard Software's intuitive, icon-driven interface enables presenters to easily operate in a whiteboard mode or to annotate right over Windows applications or digital video on the display. Collaboration software lets the T-17SXL easily communicate with other StarBoard systems and allows for simultaneous viewing and annotation by multiple systems connected either locally or across the Internet.

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Optoma TW675UTiM-3D Ultra Short Throw Interactive Multimedia Projector with ST Mount

Optoma TW675UTiM-3D Ultra Short Throw Interactive Multimedia Projector with ST Mount, 3200 Lumens

  • 3200 ANSI lumens / 3000:1 Contrast Ratio / 1600 x 1200 Max Resolution
  • 16:9, 4:3, 16:10 Image Aspect Ratio / Digital Light Processing (DLP) Display / P-VIP Lamp
  • Remote control, 3D, Speakers Included, Dual speakers / 3 Years Warranty

Now you can make your conference room or classroom an interactive learning environment without the cost or complication of installing an electronic whiteboard. The Optoma TX675UTi-3D, an XGA ultra short-throw multimedia projector with interactive 3D function, upgrades plain whiteboards and screens (or even a bare wall) into an immersive learning experience. The high-performance projector and pen combination integrates the features that educators and business presenters need to meet today's day-to-day demands and tomorrow's emerging technologies.

With high brightness, contrast and sharpness, the TX675UTi-3D engages the audience by producing crystal clear images that keep audiences connected. The ultra short-throw design minimizes shadows, while the sleek styling hides cables from view. This fully-loaded projector delivers an all-in-one solution that meets your needs.

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Samsung 65" 650TS-2 E-Board Touch Solution, Full HD LCD Touch Display with Speakers

Samsung 65" 650TS-2 E-Board Touch Solution, Full HD LCD Touch Display with Speakers, Black

The Samsung 650TS-2 LCD Touch Screen display features fast and accurate touch sensitive infrared (IR) technology. With a fast screen response time, you can get the information you need with just the touch of a finger.

The touch-sensitive display is protected by a sheet of protective glass, so your touchscreen display will deliver information for years to come. Full HD 1920 x 1080 resolution allows you to display the highest resolution content.

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Panasonic UB-T780BP 77" 4:3 Interactive Electonic Whiteboard

Panasonic UB-T780BP 77" 4:3 Interactive Electonic Whiteboard

The elite Panaboard is an advanced educational tool that lets you grab students' attention. It makes it easy to create effective, eye-catching teaching materials and it promotes a style of active, visual-based teaching and learning that makes the classroom fun for both teacher and students. By connecting a PC with Internet access and a projector, you can bring the huge amount of information available on the web or any information on your PC right into your classroom.

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Panasonic Panaboard 76" Whiteboard, USB, Color

Panasonic Panaboard 76" Whiteboard, USB, Color

This advanced color Panaboard supports a variety of business situations with a wide range of functions. You can save the information written on the board onto a PC, an SD memory card, or USB flash memory, and distribute it as electronic data to your colleagues from a PC, all in color. Operation is done using easy-to-understand icons. Panaboard gives you maximum power in presentations and conferences.

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ViewSonic PJD7583wi WXGA Short-Throw DLP Interactive ProjecProjector

ViewSonic PJD7583wi WXGA Short-Throw DLP Interactive Projector, 2500 Lumens

  • 2500 ANSI lumens / 2000:1, 3000:1 Contrast Ratio
  • 16:10, 4:3 Image Aspect Ratio / Digital Light Processing (DLP) Display
  • Remote control, Single speaker, Speaker Included, Keystone correction / 3 Years Warranty

The PJD7583wi is an advanced short throw DLP widescreen projector which includes BrilliantColor technology to produce more vibrant colors, while the high brightness and contrast ratios make this projector shine in virtually any lighting situation. The PJD7583wi delivers 2500 lumens with a 1280 x 800 WXGA native resolution. The short throw lens allows it to project a 95" image, from a distance of just 1 meter, and built-in interactivity lets you turn any surface into an interactive white board.

Priced at just a fraction of the cost of a traditional 77" interactive board, the ViewSonic iProjector provides ultimate flexibility for interactive learning. With 120Hz/3D ready support, a host of display options such as display over RJ-45, USB Plug ‘n Play, and PC-less thumb drive, your content comes alive and encourages the entire class to be more engaged in the learning process.

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Sony Bundle SX125 Short-Throw 3D LCD Projector with Ebeam Edge portable Interactive solution

Sony Bundle SX125 Short-Throw 3D LCD Projector with Ebeam Edge portable Interactive solution

  • 2500 ANSI lumens / 3800:1 Contrast Ratio
  • LCD Display / UHP Lamp
  • Remote control, Single speaker, Speaker Included / 3 Years Warranty

This bundle includes the VPL-SX125 XGA projector and the Ebeam Edge interactive projector/whiteboard solution.

The VPL-SX125 XGA projector is an ideal choice for close projection applications in the corporate and educational markets.

This model has a low-brightness mode which reduces power consumption and extends the lamp lifetime to approximately 6000 hours, which means lower operating costs across the board.

This projector is easy to install in small or difficult spaces, and has easy to operate controls.

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InFocus IN3914 Interactive Projector with Speakers

InFocus IN3914 Interactive Projector with Speakers, 2700 Lumens, Black

  • 2700 ANSI lumens / 3200:1 Contrast Ratio / 1920 x 1200 Max Resolution
  • 16:10, 16:9, 4:3, 5:4 Image Aspect Ratio
  • Remote control, Keystone correction, Dual speakers, Speakers Included / 5 Years Warranty

Engage your audience with an IN3914 interactive projector instead of a cumbersome and expensive interactive whiteboard or smartboard. Turn any surface into an engaging, collaborative interactive workspace. It's like an interactive whiteboard without the board.

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Optoma TX665UTiM-3D Ultra Short Throw Interactive Multimedia Projector with Mount

Optoma TX665UTiM-3D Ultra Short Throw Interactive Multimedia Projector with Mount, 3000 Lumens

  • 3000 ANSI lumens / 3000:1 Contrast Ratio / 1600 x 1200 Max Resolution
  • 16:9, 4:3 Image Aspect Ratio / Digital Light Processing (DLP) Display / P-VIP Lamp
  • Remote control, 3D, Speakers Included, Dual speakers / 3 Years Warranty

Now you can make your conference room or classroom an interactive learning environment without the cost or complication of installing an electronic whiteboard. The Optoma TX665UTi-3D, an XGA ultra short-throw multimedia projector with interactive 3D function, upgrades plain whiteboards and screens (or even a bare wall) into an immersive learning experience. The high-performance projector and pen combination integrates the features that educators and business presenters need to meet today's day-to-day demands and tomorrow's emerging technologies.

With high brightness, contrast and sharpness, the TX665UTi-3D engages the audience by producing crystal clear images that keep audiences connected. The ultra short-throw design minimizes shadows, while the sleek styling hides cables from view. This fully-loaded projector delivers an all-in-one solution that meets your needs.

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Virtual Ink PAD WIRELESS INTERACTIVE TABLETWRLS

Virtual Ink PAD WIRELESS INTERACTIVE TABLETWRLS

mimio pad interactive stylus pen

USB mini-B cable

USB RF wireless receiver

Pen tip extractor tool with 2 replaceable pen tips

Rechargeable Nokia type battery

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Hitachi FXTRIO-88W Whiteboard

Hitachi FXTRIO-88W Whiteboard

Students absorb concepts better when they can hear, see and touch them. Eliminate distractions and dive right into your lessons with the FXTRIO interactive whiteboard. Use your finger or a stylus to easily navigate through activities, websites, and multi-media content that connects with today's digital learners.

Transform lessons into creative opportunities to inspire imaginations with a library of interactive tools that allow you to make notes, draw diagrams, and illustrate your point with digital ink. Have students collaborate on the board simultaneously with the FXTRIO's multi-touch technology.

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3M 78" Digital Board

3M 78" Digital Board

This innovative digital whiteboard allows you to electronically capture notes to save and distribute instantly. The board electronically captures notes in color which you can then save, print, or email in various file formats instantly, including: ESB, JPEG, TIFF, HTML, PDF, vector PDF, BMP 256 color, WBD, PowerPoint (ppt & pps), and metafile (emf). You can import files from most business programs (including Excel and Word), annotate and save changes. A Playback feature allows you to review all drawings on the board, including erased items. Designed for long-term durability with a porcelain enamel surface over steel design, the board will be your preferred note-taking tool for years to come.

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Thu, 03 Mar 2022 15:43:00 -0600 en text/html https://campustechnology.com/directory/list/classroom-collaboration-tools/classroom-collaboration-tools-home.aspx
Killexams : USING E-BOOKS IN SCHOOL:

21st Century Classroom: Transforming the Textbook

In 21st century classrooms, blackboard chalk is on the endangered list, the pop quiz has been replaced with clicker questions, and bowling alley technology (overhead projector transparencies) has disappeared, thanks to digital projectors and document cameras.

But if you’re going to point to any aspect of the classroom that still hasn’t covered much ground on its trip into the 21st century, it has to be the textbook. This ubiquitous accessory has been beset by editorial controversy as we have seen recently in Texas; has seen consistently high price increases of an average of six percent per year; and still inspires parental derision for the outdated information often portrayed.

And then there’s the matter of weight. The heft of textbooks was the subject of a 21-page report written in 2004 in California for the state’s board of education. According to researchers, the combined weight of textbooks in the four “core” subjects (social studies, math, reading/ language arts, and science) ran, on average, from eight pounds at the first grade level to 20 pounds at the 11th grade level. Legislation to mandate weight limitations quickly followed in that state.

As this comparison of two school districts on opposite sides of the country and economic spectrum illustrates, in a world rich with alternative methods of delivery of content exemplified by digitized conversation, Google books, the Kindle and iPad, the textbook is the next classroom object worthy of transformation.

Realigning the Budget with Netbooks

“Everyone has a different 1:1 approach,” says Gary Brantley, chief information systems officer for the Lorain City School District. “Ours was to eliminate the books.”

Lorain City Schools is located in a city 35 miles from Cleveland. The district has 18 schools and 8,400 students. By moving to digital delivery of textbooks Superintendent Cheryl Atkinson saw an opportunity to address several larger district challenges than simply replacing outdated texts. A majority of families are low-income; its schools were struggling to meet yearly academic progress measures; and the district had just come out from under a state-mandated “fiscal watch.”

And, recalls Brantley, Atkinson was sincerely concerned about the weight of the textbooks being hauled around by the kids in her schools.

That was the atmosphere under which initial discussions began, he says. The district quickly realized that adopting a 1:1 program with digital textooks at the heart of the initiative could reduce textbook expenses and help bring students into the 21st century. “We’re an inner city school district,” says Brantley. “We saw this as a way to level the playing field for our kids and deliver them equal access and opportunities with technology.”

After a pilot program in 2007 and 2008, the district went after a federal grant to partially fund a full rollout to 9th and 10th graders for the following year. In January 2009, the district used federal Title 1 and Ohio state educational technology grant funds to lease Dell Inspiron 910 netbooks. The following year that program was expanded to 6th, 7th, 8th, and 11th grades, and the district switched to Acer Aspire One AOD150-1577 netbooks. This fall the district hopes to add 12th graders to the program.

The publishers the district is working with on the program are the traditional ones: Pearson Prentice Hall; Holt McDougal; and McGraw-Hill/Glencoe. They have provided versions of the texts, Brantley says, that go beyond simply being a PDF of the book. “It’s interactive. For example, if you have someone like Martin Luther King or John F. Kennedy in a history book, you can click on a picture, and it will tell you information about [that person] or [you can] do a search from the book to get more information about that particular person.”

Brantley is quick with numbers. He says that for 2,600 math books—the number of texts needed for grades nine through 12—the cost was going to be about $182,000. That’s $70 per book. The e-book edition for that same math book was about $15,000. The savings on that one text alone covered a large part of the expense of that first rollout of digital textbooks. The savings don’t stop there. An English textbook was priced at $163,673.05 for 2,475 books—about $66 per book. The digital version of the same volume was a fourth of the cost—$36,554.45.

Explains Brantley, Superintendent Atkinson “was very persistent” that the district find a content supplier for the program, even if it wasn’t one of the three or four big textbook publishers. The publishers were willing to try the program in pilot mode. “A lot of trust was built on both sides to make this happen,” he says.

Now, says Brantley, students don’t have to travel to labs to gain access to computers. “Basically, there’s a lab in every classroom. Every kid is using that netbook as a textbook and as a computer.”

Brantley knows the technology is making an impact. “I think it’s pushed us a long way. It’s allowing the students to become a lot more creative in what they do and how they do it. It’s also leveled the playing field. A lot of these kids don’t have computers or internet access at home. Because the books are loaded on the hard drive, [Superintendent Atkinson] has given kids the ability to work on things they’d only have access to in a limited time within the classroom or in the lab.”

Although Brantley says student testing scores have gone up, he can’t confidently point to quantifiable results tied directly to the digital textbooks. “We brought different pieces of technology into the district in the same period, so we have to let the program run for a little while,” he explains.

“But Why Do We Care?”

The Campbell Union High School District, next door to San Jose in California’s Silicon Valley consists of six sites, five of which have been designated by the state as excellent. During the 2009-2010 school year, they performed a pilot program to experiment with the replacement of textbooks with e-readers. Director of Technology Charles Kanavel and his IT team of five distributed 270 Sony Reader Touch model PRS-600s into English classes across the district’s sites.

“These kids get technology. They go home and look at YouTube all day. An e-reader isn’t that hard for them,” Kanavel explains. The goal of the pilot was to get a “true sense of what’s it like for the everyday student to use one of these things in terms of wear and tear and what they wanted to see on the device.”

The effort was spurred by the Williams Settlement, Kanavel says. That California statute calls for California schools to have sufficient educational materials and conditions to meet curriculum standards. In order to meet standards of currency, textbooks need to be replaced every seven years—an expensive proposition in a district with 8,000 students. “It’s $180 for a biology textbook. That’s just one. With e-readers and how ubiquitous they’ve become,” Kanavel recalls asking, “Why do they need to carry 80 pounds worth of books around, when we have the technology to do this differently?”

But that initial test might never have come about if Kanavel hadn’t persisted in trying to woo Sony to participate in the proof of concept, a process that took seven months. The Campbell director focused on Sony because of its durability, price, and open platform. “Kindle, if you drop it, it’s game over,” he says. “With the Nook you have to buy everything from Barnes & Noble. The [Apple] iPad with 32 or 64 Gb, that’s $600 to $800. With one iPad, I can get four e-readers from Sony at around $200 each.”

But persuading the manufacturer to pay attention to education’s needs wasn’t an easy sell. Kanavel, who has a background in investment banking, studied the company’s financial reports and figured out how many e-readers had probably been sold through its nearby Silicon Valley area store, the largest Sony store in the United States.

When he approached the company about doing a test, it replied, “Yeah, yeah, yeah, interesting. But why do we care?” In response, he used this argument: “You sold 14,000 at the Valley Fair store in a three month period. Those are respectable numbers. But realistically, our district is 8,000 kids. You’d sell me 8,000 units. Then I’d have to buy a quarter of that every year forever. Once I start on it, I can’t get off.” He also pointed out that Campbell was only a medium-sized district. “Take San Jose Unified —55,000 students right next door. That would make your store numbers look like nothing. And there are 32 districts in Santa Clara County alone. Think of the entire country. Then they started caring.”

Once Sony was on board, the next hurdle was the textbook publishers trying to safeguard the pricing model, according to Kanavel. He estimates that a single school might have 300 copies of a particular book. On average the textbook will cost $120 on the low side and $180 on the high side. That’s a total outlay of $36,000 to $54,000 for a single textbook in a single school in the Campbell district.

For English classes, however, many of the books contained classic works of literature that are now in the public domain and available on various digital book websites. “Shakespeare is Shakespeare. The guy’s not writing a new version,” Kanavel says. He has been able to make a deal with Houghton Mifflin Harcourt for some digital textbooks in PDF format; but others—particularly novels —came from the Sony Reader Store; on Project Gutenberg (a good source for Shakespeare, he says); and via the OverDrive School download Library.

The challenge faced by textbook publishers, he points out, is that they have to change their business model. Kanavel wants to set up a site license with the publishers, but so far those negotiations are still on-going, and, besides, many still have to convert their textbooks into the epub format.

But the financials, as this former numbers guy points out, still work out nicely for the district. “For example, historically we have paid $9 a book for paperback copies of Macbeth and 70 to 80 percent of them come back unusable at the end of the year. Now with the e-reader, that replacement cost goes to zero.”

On average 15 out of every 100 books in the district need to be replaced because they’re damaged, lost, or stolen. Often, the same student loses multiple books when he or she loses a backpack. “If you’re a parent, you have to pay to replace all of those books. If your student loses a history book, biology book, math book, and English book, that’s about $600,” Kanavel says. “If they lose an e-reader or it breaks, you pay for the replacement cost of the e-reader —$200 -- then we just download the content.” This, he adds, “has long-term implications for budgeting and funding.”

So far, Kanavel says, the pilot has been successful with students. “They’ve taken good care of them. I’ve only had three break out of 270, which is pretty good.” He plans to add an additional 200 e-readers to the district for the next school year. “One thing I’ve been very focused on with this pilot is offsetting the cost of textbook replacement with this device and making it easier on the kids.” He believes the district is on the right track.

Teachers and students are discovering other advantages. The e-readers have built-in dictionaries. If a reader has a visual impairment, text can be upsized quickly. Users can annotate, draw, and take notes—something that’s forbidden with traditional textbooks. When the year is over, the kids will return the devices, and that added material can be wiped from the hard disk.

But e-readers still aren’t perfect, he adds. First, not every book is available in a digital format. He cites a high school classic, Chinua Achebe’s Things Fall Apart, as an example. Many textbooks have already been put on CD, but those are designed to be used in a PC. Publishers haven’t made huge inroads into converting their materials into the standard epub format that works with the major e-readers. But Kanaval is hopeful those gaps will diminish with time.

With the expected expansion of the pilot, negotiations with Sony continue. “We’ve proven that the kids can take care of them. The technology does work,” Kanavel says. “The next thing is to get Sony to build something bigger—an eight and a half by 11 inch format. And there are a lot of features that we don’t use. We’ve given them feedback on those things. There may be ways to cut cost by eliminating feature sets that can help them balance the cost of manufacturing.”

Textbook Smackdown

So given the experiences of these two districts—and others—how does a standard textbook stack up against an e-book? If a publisher needs to repair the mistakes introduced in the text, as happened with math books issued in Sacramento County in spring 2010, it won’t have to arrange to destroy the outdated books and incur shipping costs for the new ones; it can correct the errors and electronically distribute new versions of the content. In the face of a quickly evolving business model, publishers will be forced to adjust their pricing schemes—no doubt, to the advantage of the districts. In the matter of weight— well, the Acer netbook comes in under three pounds, and the Sony device is a little over 10 ounces. Those are metrics anyone can use no matter how much digital content sits on the devices.


Building the E-Book Structure

Although every e-book initiative shares common aspects—hardware, bandwidth, content, and professional development—how the program unfolds in your district will be unique. For example, should you connect e-readers to the internet?

In order to have a successful 1:1 implementation, you need hardware, bandwidth, content, and teacher professional development and buy in. But each district will be unique in its approach to implementing each aspect and the entire program. The question of when in implementation a district allows connection to the internet is a case in point. Campbell Union High School District in Silicon Valley wants students to stay on task as it implements e-books. Therefore, the Sony Reader Touch devices being used there don’t include web access. Although Sony does make a model of its e-reader that includes WiFi, according to Director of Technology Charles Kanavel, the decision to leave that feature out helps simplify the transition teachers have to make in integrating the device in the classroom.

“If I’m a teacher and I have these new devices in class, it affects my lesson planning,” he explains. “Without administrative control of access to the internet, some smart kid will make the thing text another e-reader. Then once that kid knows, all the kids will know. In class, instead of reading, they’re texting each other, surfing MySpace, and doing everything else. Have I just disrupted an entire class with this device? So let’s get the adoption in first. Let’s get the hurdles out of the way surrounding usage of content, usage of technology, and how it integrates into your standards in the classroom. Once that’s outlined, then we’ll figure out how to do WiFi.”

That absence of web access has also streamlined professional development. The district had 270 devices, which it handed out in English classes spread fairly evenly across its six sites. To ensure that the pilot wouldn’t get put on the back-burner by teachers uninterested in using the ereader, Kanavel had the principals at those sites nominate teachers to participate who were a “little bit tech savvy.”

From there, his IT team called teachers in for a demonstration of the Sony product they’d be using with their students. “That was it,” he says. “Maybe 30 minutes of Q&A with teachers, and off we went. The devices aren’t that complicated. You turn it on, pick your book, turn to the page, and that’s it.”

To make sure the program is on track, Kanavel has been doing evaluation of it in “real time.” “It’s not something we threw out there and said we’ll come back to you in six months. Every couple of weeks I’m pinging these teachers. They have direct lines back to me. As they’ve noticed things, they’ve emailed me.” Along with that, device maker Sony has put out surveys for the users too.

It’s Complicated

What complicates implementation of digital content in a 1:1 program is when the device being deployed is used for other purposes too. That’s the case at Lorain City School District in Ohio, which has distributed Acer netbooks to 9th, 10th, and 11th grade students. The goal there is to deliver its students access to technology and the wider world it can deliver. Many don’t have computers or an internet connection at home. Therefore, Chief Information Systems Officer Gary Brantley has chosen to implement WiFi on the devices.

The devices, which cost about $300 with software and maintenance, are loaded with a gigabyte of RAM, a 150 Gb or 160 Gb hard drive, an Intel Atom processor, a webcam, Windows XP Professional, Microsoft Office, a couple of calculators, 802.11 b/g WiFi, and, of course, digital textbooks.

Teachers have an interest in educating students about social networking, so, although access to the internet is filtered, the devices do allow access to sites such as Twitter, and Facebook. But that, says Brantley, “is being carefully monitored.”

Also, connectivity is necessary for implementation of CompuTrace, a program from Absolute Software that provides a service for tracking down lost, stolen, or missing devices. “We were finding that we were spending a lot of money replacing textbooks,” Brantley explains. “Now, we actually are spending less. If CompuTrace doesn’t find the netbook within 60 or 90 days, they pay for it. I can tell you they have found every single one.”

To simplify operations, the district uses only two images for the netbooks. Every middle school book in use is on every middle school netbook; and the same with all high school books. That approach, says Brantley, makes IT’s work easier since they don’t have to worry about granular inventory or “fool around” with what books any given student should be able to access.

The district has tackled the challenge of teacher acceptance from multiple sides. First, there was a teachers’ union aspect. Would it promote the change in teaching approaches necessary for success? To gain support, Brantley took the head of the union to a 1:1 conference to show her what could be done. After that, he says, “She came on board for the professional development piece.”

The next aspect was putting together programs and teams for professional development. Since the district has an “early release” day once a week, “that’s the block of time that increasingly is being dedicated to helping teachers learn how to integrate the technology into their classes. Gaining traction in that area is a longer haul,” Brantley admits. “It takes a while to get teachers on board with this.”

Next up for the Lorain district: implementation of a teacher recognition program and some type of graduate credit to motivate the teachers to try out new methods of instruction.

An area where Brantley has seen success is having the kids teaching the teachers. “That’s one thing that we’ve been trying to push,” he says. “Don’t be afraid to let the kids show you something as well. It becomes a collaborative effort.”

Challenges have surfaced in two IT areas. First, the sheer number of new devices has put a strain on Brantley’s department, which has 10 employees. “We’ve doubled the number of computers in the district but didn’t add one staff member,” he says. Second, IT has to be able to supply technical support to students in a timely manner. “Turnaround can’t be longer than a day. Even though we have spares, we still have to turn around these machines really quickly, so kids aren’t left without their books.”

But these burdens aren’t slowing down the district’s dreams. Brantley says eventually the netbook and digital textbook program could be expanded to every student in the district, from the fourth grade up.

Sat, 09 Jul 2022 04:48:00 -0500 en text/html https://thejournal.com/pages/cdwg/21st-century-classroom_e-books.aspx
Killexams : New CEO named for Saratoga Hospital

SARATOGA SPRINGS — A Maryland health care executive has been named the new president and CEO of Saratoga Hospital and will start Sept. 19.

The appointment of Jill Johnson VanKuren of MedStar Health System was announced Tuesday by Saratoga Hospital board of trustees Chairperson Michael J. Toohey, who cited her 17 years of experience with the largest integrated health care system in the Baltimore-Washington metropolitan area.

Most recently, VanKuren served as senior vice president of operations and chief operating officer at MedStar Franklin Square Medical Center, one of 10 MedStar hospitals, according to Tuesday's announcement. VanKuren succeeds Angelo Calbone, who will retire in August after 16 years "of significant investment in programs, facilities and talent."
 
“From her first interview, Jill impressed us with her understanding of the vital role of a community hospital in a larger health system,” Toohey said. “She shares our commitment to maintaining Saratoga Hospital’s reputation for exceptional quality and personal attention while bringing the benefits of the Albany Med Health System to our patients and community.”

Saratoga Hospital is a member of the Albany Med Health System.
 
At MedStar, VanKuren held leadership positions at the corporate and hospital levels for a system with more than 300 care locations and 31,000 employees. As an assistant vice president with MedStar corporate strategic planning, she developed system service lines and business models. As senior vice president and chief operating officer at MedStar Franklin Square Medical Center, she oversaw and aligned operations at one of the largest teaching hospitals in the Baltimore area.

Tue, 19 Jul 2022 07:44:00 -0500 en-US text/html https://www.timesunion.com/news/article/New-CEO-named-for-Saratoga-Hospital-17315307.php?IPID=Times-Union-HP-latest-news
Killexams : Summer Principals Academy NYC

Lorea Martinez- Perez

Pro Seminar in Education Leadership: SAT and Social Emotional Leadership

Lorea is a researcher and consultant, supporting schools to implement Social Emotional Learning (SEL) programs and practices, by teaching educators and administrators the principles of emotional intelligence. She is a faculty member of the Principals Academy at
Teachers College, Columbia University. Past and current clients include Aspire Public Schools, New Schools Venture Fund, Learning Policy Institute, Hispanic Information Telecommunications Network
(HITN), Facebook, Nearpod, LEEP Dual Language Academies, as well as a number of public, private and charter schools. Her favorite emotions are curiosity, courage and serenity.

Lorea approaches the implementation of SEL programs with the expertise of a practitioner and the rigor of a researcher. Her most recent case study, conducted with the Learning Policy Institute (LPI), investigates how pre-service and in-service teacher training can support good teaching practices and SEL integration into the school day. Using Six Seconds assessment tools, Lorea has studied how principals’ emotional intelligence support their leadership effectiveness, and has partnered with school districts to develop the capacity of their leadership teams. Her doctoral dissertation received
highest honors from the Universitat Autònoma de Barcelona, and won the 2014 Graduate Student Award for Excellence in SEL Research from the American Association of Educational Research (AERA). A testimony of the impact SEL can have on students and teachers, her research identifies the conditions that make SEL implementation successful in schools. She is part of the leadership committee at AERA’s SEL Special Interest Group, currently serving as the Program Chair.

Lorea published her first book for teachers, the EQ Educator, in 2018, and she is currently working on a second book, Teaching with the HEART in Mind. She has published several peer-reviewed articles in the Journal of Character Education, the Journal of Advanced Developmental Psychology, the International Journal of Emotional Education, the Advances in SEL Research, the Manual de Orientación y Tutoría, and the well-known educational website Edutopia. She frequently blogs about how to incorporate SEL in teaching practices. Prior to her research and consulting work, Lorea was a special education teacher and administrator, serving students and adults in Spain, Nicaragua, Peru and California where she led several successful innovative initiatives. She developed the first Special Education Program for 8 charter schools in the San Francisco-Bay Area and created a training-of-trainers program to enable 500+ school data leaders to interpret student achievement results
to make instructional decisions.

Sun, 22 May 2022 23:18:00 -0500 en text/html https://www.tc.columbia.edu/organization-and-leadership/spa-nyc/faculty/
Killexams : Ukraine’s Additive Manufacturing Industry Needs Your Help
An additive manufacturing center in Ukraine? [Source: 3D Print Ukraine]

There are moves underway to develop additive manufacturing operations in Ukraine, and we believe everyone should pitch in to help.

I spoke at length with Alexander Mertens and Sergei Naleskin, who are coordinating efforts in that country. I connected to them through Eugene Giller of RIZE fame, and who now operates Palitra, a company that produces full color 3D printing equipment.

As everyone knows, Ukraine is currently enduring an aggressive invasion in the east from neighboring Russia. This ongoing event has caused turmoil in much of the country, yet even so there are plenty of areas in the western regions still operating more or less normally.

Nevertheless, sections of Ukraine’s industrial east have been devastated by Russia, causing workers to lose their homes and jobs, and fleeing to the safer western parts of the country. There, they seek new jobs.

It’s important to note that Ukraine is quite an advanced country in many respects. They are well-known for their software expertise, for example. I personally know of several highly successful software operations in Ukraine that have long offered highly skilled programmers at very low cost to western countries in a kind of overseas offering model.

The manufacturing team above looks to be attempting to organize something similar, but for advanced manufacturing instead of software. It may indeed work, as they seem to have many of the pieces already at their disposal.

One of the spaces available for development in Ukraine [Source: Eugene Giller]

They have a large space available for development in the far western part of the country, quite near the border, and about as far away from the war as you can get and still be in Ukraine. The country also has inexpensive electricity, which will also be useful in setting up new additive operations.

The key, of course, is people. With the eastern areas vacated of businesses, there are large numbers of highly experienced engineers and designers available. They’re also not going anywhere, as Ukraine currently does not allow military-aged males to leave the country. That said, there are some previously outside the country, but Naleskin believes many would return to Ukraine to work using their speciality training in companies if spots were available.

Teaching engineers in Ukraine [Source: Eugene Giller]

They also have significant training capability. Mertens has long been a business school professor at the leading business school in Ukraine, and has a considerable educational network.

Naleskin said their original idea was to create an advanced manufacturing center near Kyiv, but eventually realized the engineers needed some training upgrades as their skills relate to older equipment. Naleskin explained:

”We tried to understand what is necessary to link interactions with industrial processes, both during and after the war, using new technology instead of old processes in manufacturing.
We know many people are involved in this, but their technology is not up to date. There is 3D manufacturing equipment, but it’s not very new. It’s necessary to get absolutely new everything!
Computer programs, 3D printers, scanners, everything is necessary to teach people.”

Giller explained:

“We are looking for partners to help educate from design to manufacturing. We are connected to several young companies in Ukraine, but they have a rudimentary understanding of advanced techniques and equipment. They do understand subtractive manufacturing, but have limited additive and mass production experience.”

They want to make a new, institute of modern technology, including additive manufacturing.

The group does have quite a bit of experience operating joint educational programs with UK, Canada and the USA, with connections to universities and developers. This will be of great use when additive partnerships evolve.

3D scanning a part in Ukraine [Source: Eugene Giller]

One of the pieces they don’t have is equipment. According to Mertens, there are very few advanced 3D printers in Ukraine:

“We surveyed for 3D printers, and found only one HP device in Odessa, with intentions of buying one more; there are 2 Formlabs Fuse 1 machines, and one Formlabs SLA device. For SLS, there is one Sinterit device. Mostly there are inexpensive Asian devices, but they are not that useful for manufacturing. Our SLA profile is very basic, and we need CAD licenses.”

The country apparently has no metal 3D printing capacity whatsoever at this time, and that’s almost a requirement for today’s advanced manufacturing practices.

Mertens added:

“The demand side deeply needs development of modern technology for production. Ukraine lost a large part of production potential in the east, as well as disrupted logistic chains.

On the supply side there are lots of qualified engineers. Sievierodonetsk [a major city in the industrial east of Ukraine] was recently flattened by Russia. The people are now spread out and need jobs.”

For now the group has set up a new website, 3D Print Ukraine, while they develop plans for the additive manufacturing center. Meanwhile, the site offers the ability to 3D print a variety of interesting items, such as the “3D Printed Sunken Russian Warship” or the “3D Printed Ukrainian Salute To Invaders – Middle Finger”.

While these prints may seem fun, both Mertens and Naleskin say the funds raised by sale of these items is extraordinarily valuable to those in Ukraine, and I encourage readers to check out their offers.

Hearing all this, it seems clear to me that this group needs assistance and partnership from western 3D printer companies to help develop their additive manufacturing center.

If there are any readers from companies like EOS, 3D Systems, Stratasys, Formlabs, Desktop Metal, Autodesk, Dassault, Autodesk, Markforged, SLM Solutions, GE Additive, Siemens, HP and others, please consider contacting the group through their website to discuss opportunities to partner on equipment and software licenses. Smaller companies can also consider participating. For example, companies like Xact Metal, Minifactory, and Massivit all offer advanced manufacturing capabilities that would certainly be more than welcome in Ukraine.

One concept that might fly in my mind is a hybrid operation where there is an additive production center combined with an educational program. The program could produce workers for the additive operation, which could then make inexpensive parts for the west.

Of course, there are many other possibilities, and that’s up to discussions between the Ukraine group and western providers.

The war that’s currently underway won’t last forever, and when it ends Ukraine will resume its path towards advanced technology, as its engineering history demonstrates. It might be a very strategic move to start the establishment of facilities now in preparation for major growth later.

This could be a significant long-term opportunity.

If you’ve gotten this far into this piece, please consider contacting Ukraine to see how you and your company can help.

Via 3D Print Ukraine

Fri, 29 Jul 2022 09:40:00 -0500 en-US text/html https://www.fabbaloo.com/news/ukraines-additive-manufacturing-industry-needs-your-help
Killexams : Historic B&B's Are A Dream Come True For A Working Retirement No result found, try new keyword!For some people, the thought of retirement conjures images of lazy days spent lounging around the house with nothing to do. But for others, the ... Read More ... Mon, 08 Aug 2022 04:38:10 -0500 en-us text/html https://www.msn.com/en-us/travel/tripideas/historic-b-bs-are-a-dream-come-true-for-a-working-retirement/ar-AA10rvLg Killexams : Graduate Program

The Department of Computer Science at William & Mary offers a stimulating, collegial environment in which to pursue M.S. or Ph.D. degrees in Computer Science. These degrees may be specialized in Computational Science. In cooperation with the Department of Mathematics, the Department also offers graduate degrees in Computational Operations Research. Defining qualities of the graduate program include the opportunity for easy interaction with faculty, and excellence in research and teaching. Degrees offered:

  • M.S. Computer Science
  • M.S. Computer Science, Computational Operations Research Specialization
  • M.S. Computer Science, Computational Science Specialization
  • Ph.D. Computer Science
  • Ph.D Computer Science, Computational Science Specialization

Established in 1986, the graduate program features an outstanding placement record for its graduates. Students earning an M.S. have found employment with computer system manufacturers, with software development companies, with technical consulting firms, and within the aerospace and defense industries; several have founded or joined start-up companies. Students earning a Ph.D. have gone on either to tenure-track academic positions (eight of them have received prestigious Faculty Early Career Development (CAREER) Awards from the National Science Foundation, and one has received a Young Investigator Award from the Air Force Office of Scientific Research) or to industrial research and development positions.

The Computer Science Department provides a strong research program with faculty actively engaged in research in the following areas: algorithms, computer systems and networking, high performance computing, modeling and simulation, programming languages and compilers, security, software verification, software engineering, graphics, and scientific computing.

Graduate students benefit from the strong research funding received by the department's faculty, which allows faculty members to offer competitive Research Assistantship positions. Federal agencies that support research within the department include the National Science Foundation, the Department of Energy, the Defense Advanced Research Projects Agency, the Office of Naval Research, and NASA. Faculty and graduate students also collaborate with, and receive support from, major IT firms, including IBM, HP Labs, and Google, to name a few. In addition, the proximity of NASA Langley Research Center, the Thomas Jefferson National Accelerator Facility (TJNAF), and the Virginia Institute of Marine Science (VIMS) offer further opportunities for collaborative research.

For questions about the graduate program, please send email to [[cs|gradinfo]].

Wed, 18 Apr 2018 18:21:00 -0500 en text/html https://www.wm.edu/as/computerscience/graduate/index.php
Killexams : What happens when there is an infectious disease outbreak in the UK?

The dark web has made cyber crime accessible even to those with only “rudimentary” IT skills, with malware available to buy for less than $10, around £8.50, a new report by forensic experts Forensic Pathways and security platform HP Wolf Security has found.

The dark web – a group of websites only accessible via special routing software, usually Tor – gives cyber criminals “an anonymous online environment” where they “can collaborate, organise, hone their skills and establish illicit shops”, the report says.

The early hacking subcultures of the 1990s, in which participants would often compete purely for the prestige of demonstrating their technical prowess, have receded and given way to a for-profit free-for-all of “DIY cyber crime” kits and for-sale malware, the report’s authors claim, dramatically lowering the skills level needed to engage in cyber crime.

“Back in the day you had to figure stuff out yourself and show off what you could do technically to be noticed,” said Michael Calce, HP Security Advisory Board chairman and former hacker. “Today, only a small minority of cyber criminals really code – most are just in it for the money, and the barrier to entry is so low that almost anyone can be a threat actor.”

In 2000, Calce, then a young teenager using the pseudonym “MafiaBoy”, launched a series of high-profile denial-of-service attacks against large online companies such as Yahoo, Amazon, Dell and Ebay. Yahoo, then the world’s most popular search engine, was sent offline for an hour. Now working as a security expert, Calce says the monetisation and spread of ransomware is “bad news for business”.

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[ See also: How ransomware shut own an English council ]

Many criminals have now shifted from online fraud to data denial and destructive attacks, supercharged by the dark web and aided by the emergence of cryptocurrencies like Bitcoin. These have given hackers new, difficult-to-trace ways of monetising and laundering money from ransomware scams. Cyber crime has followed a trajectory towards “service and platform business models”, the report says, becoming much more efficient and targeted. “The cyber crime economy,” says Mike McGuire, senior lecturer in criminology at the University of Surrey, “has shifted from sole traders to mass production in less than 25 years.”

Content from our partners

The cyber crime world has grown very sophisticated, according to the research, with 77 per cent of online marketplaces requiring a vendor bond, or license, to sell, and 92 per cent offering a third-party dispute resolution service. All marketplaces provide Amazon-like review and rating services. More than three-quarters of malware adverts listed cost under $10, the report says.

“Unfortunately, it’s never been easier to be a cyber criminal. Complex attacks previously required serious skills, knowledge and resource. Now the technology and training is available for the price of a gallon of gas. And whether it’s having your company and customer data exposed, deliveries delayed or even a hospital appointment cancelled, the explosion in cyber crime affects us all,” says Alex Holland, senior malware analyst at HP and author of the report.

The National Cyber Security Centre’s 2021 annual report noted that 39 per cent of all UK businesses reported a cyber attack in 2020-21. And private companies aren’t the only victims – in 2020, Hackney council estimated it would cost £10m to recover from a serious breach that affected local service delivery.

[ See also: In the cyber war between Russia and Ukraine, media companies are under threat ]

Thu, 04 Aug 2022 03:33:00 -0500 en-US text/html https://www.newstatesman.com/spotlight/2022/07/malware-on-sale-price-pint-dark-web
HP0-M50 exam dump and training guide direct download
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