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Exam Code: HP0-D31 Practice exam 2022 by Killexams.com team
Designing HP Data Center and Cloud Solutions
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Headquartered near Chicago, CompTIA is a nonprofit trade association made up of more than 2,000 member organizations and 3,000 business partners. Although the organization focuses on educating and certifying IT professionals, CompTIA also figures prominently in philanthropy and public policy advocacy.

CompTIA certification program overview

CompTIA’s vendor-neutral certification program is one of the best recognized in the IT industry. Since CompTIA developed its A+ credential in 1993, it has issued more than two million certifications.

In early 2018, CompTIA introduced its CompTIA Infrastructure Career Pathway. While you’ll still see the same familiar certifications that form the bedrock of the CompTIA certification portfolio, this new career pathway program more closely aligns CompTIA certifications to the real-world skills that IT professionals need to ensure success when managing and supporting IT infrastructures.

CompTIA certifications are grouped by skill set. Currently, CompTIA certs fall info four areas: Core, Infrastructure, Cybersecurity and Additional Professional certifications.

  • Core Certifications: Designed to build core foundational skills, CompTIA offers four Core certifications: IT Fundamentals+ (a pre-career certification focused on IT foundation framework), CompTIA A+ (focused on user support and device connectivity), CompTIA Network+ (targeting core system connections with endpoint devices), and CompTIA Security+ (focused on entry level cybersecurity skills).
     
  • Infrastructure Certifications: Designed to complement the Network+ credential, you’ll find three Infrastructure certifications: CompTIA Server+ (focused on issues related to server support and administration), CompTIA Cloud+ (covering hybrid cloud, virtual system administration and deploying network storage resources), and CompTIA Linux+ (focused on Linux operating system administration and management).
     
  • Cybersecurity Certifications: CompTIA offers three cybersecurity credentials: CompTIA CySA+ (CySA stands for Cyber Security Analyst, and targets IT security behavioral analysts), CASP+ (CompTIA Advanced Security Practitioner; focuses on professionals who design and implement security solutions), and the CompTIA PenTest+ (Penetration testing, targets professionals who conduct penetration and vulnerability testing).
     
  • Additional Professional Certifications: This category includes several credentials which don’t readily fit into any of the foregoing CompTIA career paths, including: CompTIA Project+, CompTIA CTT+ and CompTIA Cloud Essentials.

CompTIA Core Certifications

CompTIA IT Fundamentals+

CompTIA IT Fundamentals+ is ideal for beginners with a basic understanding of PC functionality and compatibility as well as familiarity with technology topics, such as hardware basics, software installation, security risks and prevention, and basic networking. It’s also ideal as a career planning or development tool for individuals beginning their IT careers or those seeking to make a career change. A single exam is required to earn the credential. CompTIA launched a new IT Fundamentals+ exam (Exam FC0-U61) in September 2018. This new exam focuses on computing basics, database use, software development and IT infrastructure. The English version of the prior exam (Exam FC0-U510) retires on July 15, 2019. Exams in other languages retire on December 1, 2019.

CompTIA A+

The CompTIA A+ certification has been described as an “entry-level rite of passage for IT technicians,” and for a good reason. This certification is designed for folks seeking a career as a help desk, support, service center or networking technician. It covers PC and laptop hardware, software installation, and configuration of computer and mobile operating systems. A+ also tests a candidate’s understanding of basic networking, troubleshooting and security skills, which serve as a springboard for CompTIA networking or security certifications or those offered by other organizations.

According to CompTIA, more than one million IT professionals hold the A+ certification. The A+ is required for Dell, Intel and HP service technicians and is recognized by the U.S. Department of Defense. CompTIA released new “Core” exams for the CompTIA A+ credential on January 15, 2019. These new exams provide additional focus on operational procedure competency and baseline security topics. Candidates must pass the Core 1 (exam 220-1001) and Core 2 (Exam 220-1002) exams. The Core 1 exam targets virtualization, cloud computing, mobile devices, hardware, networking technology and troubleshooting. The Core 2 exams focuses on installation and configuring operating systems, troubleshooting software, operational procedures and security.

CompTIA Network+

Many IT professionals start with the A+ certification. While the A+ credential is recommended, if you have the experience and don’t feel a need for the A+, you can move directly to the CompTIA Network+ certification. It’s geared toward professionals who have at least nine months of networking experience. A candidate must be familiar with networking technologies, media, topologies, security, installation and configuration, and troubleshooting of common wired and wireless network devices. The Network+ certification is recommended or required by Dell, HP and Intel, and is also an accepted entry-point certification for the Apple Consultants Network. The Network+ credential meets the ISO 17024 standard and just like the A+, it is recognized by the U.S. DoD. A single exam is required to earn the certification.

CompTIA Security+

CompTIA Security+ covers network security concepts, threats and vulnerabilities, access control, identity management, cryptography, and much more. Although CompTIA does not impose any prerequisites, the organization recommends that cert candidates obtain the Network+ credential and have at least two years of IT administration experience with a security focus. To obtain the Security+ certification candidates must pass on exam, SY0-501.

Infrastructure Certifications

CompTIA Linux+

The CompTIA Linux+ Powered by LPI certification is aimed at Linux network administrators with at least 12 months of Linux administration experience. Such experience should include installation, package management, GNU and Unix commands, shells, scripting, security and more. The A+ and Network+ certifications are recommended as a preamble to this certification but are not mandatory. Candidates must pass two exams (LX0-103 and LX0-104) to earn this credential. The exams must be taken in order, and candidates must pass exam LX0-103 before attempting LX0-104. In 2018, CompTIA began testing a new beta exam (XK1-004). The beta exam offering ended October 22, 2018. New exams generally follow beta exam tests so interested candidates should check the Linux+ web page for updates.

CompTIA Cloud+

As the cloud computing market continues to grow by leaps and bounds, the CompTIA Cloud+ certification has been keeping pace. This certification targets IT professionals with two to three years of experience in storage, networking or data center administration. A single exam, CV0-002, is required. It tests candidates’ knowledge of cloud technologies, hybrid and multicloud solutions, cloud markets, and incorporating cloud-based technology solutions into system operations.

CompTIA Server+

CompTIA Server+ aims at server administrators with 18 to 24 months of experience with server hardware and software technologies, and the A+ certification is recommended. The Server+ credential is recommended or required by HP, Intel and Lenovo for their server technicians. It is also recognized by Microsoft and the U.S. Department of Defense (DoD). A single exam, SK0-004, is required to achieve this credential.

CompTIA Cybersecurity Certifications

CompTIA Cybersecurity Analyst (CySA+)

As cybercrime increases, the requirement for highly skilled information security analysts will continue to increase as well. The Bureau of Labor Statistics (BLS) reports anticipated growth of 28 percent for information security analysts between 2016 and 2026, the fastest rate of growth for all occupations. One of the newer additions to the CompTIA certification portfolio is the Cybersecurity Analyst (CySA+) certification. The CySA+ credential is specifically designed to meet the ever-growing need for experienced, qualified information security analysts.

CySA+ credential holders are well versed in the use of system threat-detection tools, as well as the use of data and behavioral analytics to secure applications and systems from risks, threats and other vulnerabilities. CySA+ certification holders are not only able to monitor network behavior, but analyze results and create solutions to better protect against advanced persistent threats (APTs), intrusions, malware and the like.

CompTIA describes CySA+ as a bridge cert between the Security+ credential (requiring two years’ experience) and the master-level Advanced Security Practitioner Certification (CASP), which requires 10 years of experience. To earn a CySA+, candidates must pass a performance-based exam.

CompTIA Advanced Security Practitioner+ (CASP+)

While CompTIA no longer uses the “master” designation, the highly sought-after CASP+ certification is most certainly a master-level credential. Targeting practitioners, CASP is the only performance-based, hands-on certification currently available from CompTIA. This certification is designed for seasoned IT security professionals who plan, design and implement security solutions in an enterprise environment.

Although this certification doesn’t impose any explicit prerequisites, it’s not a bad idea to earn the Network+ and Security+ certifications before tackling the CASP exam. You should also have 10 years of IT administration experience plus a minimum of five years of technical security experience (thus securing this certification’s place as a “master” credential).

Booz Allen Hamilton, Network Solutions and Verizon Connect, among other companies, require CASP+ certification for certain positions. The U.S. Army and U.S. Navy also accept CASP+ as an industry-based certification required by employees and contractors who perform IT work in DoD data centers. The CASP+ certification requires that candidates pass the CAS-003 exam, which consists of 90 multiple-choice and performance-based questions.

CompTIA PenTest+

The newest additional to the CompTIA certification family is the CompTIA PenTest+. An intermediate-level credential, PenTest+ is designed to complement the CySA+. While CySA+ is defensive in nature (focusing on threat detection and response), the PenTest+ credential is offensive, focusing on using penetration testing to identify and manage network vulnerabilities across multiple spectra.

There are no mandatory prerequisites, but the Network+ and Security+ (or equivalent skills) are highly recommended, along with a minimum of two years of information security experience. Candidates pursuing the cybersecurity career path may take the PenTest+ or CySA+ credential in any order.

The exam was released in July 2018, and is focused on communicating and reporting results, analyzing data, conducting penetration testing and scanning, and planning assessments. The exam also tests a candidate’s knowledge of legal and compliance requirements.

Additional Professional Certifications

CompTIA Project+

The CompTIA Project+ certification focuses exclusively on project management and is ideal for project managers who are familiar with project lifecycles from planning to completion, who can finish a project on time and under budget. Project managers interested in this certification should have at least one year of project management experience overseeing small- to medium-sized projects. The Project+ credential requires that candidates pass a multiple-choice exam, PK0-004.

CompTIA Cloud Essentials

The CompTIA Cloud Essentials certification is geared toward individuals who understand the business aspects of cloud computing and how to move from in-house to cloud storage. In addition, they should be familiar with the impacts, risks and consequences of implementing a cloud-based solution. A single exam is required to earn the credential.

CompTIA CTT+

The CompTIA Certified Technical Trainer (CTT+) certification is perfect for anyone interested in technical training. It covers instructor skills, such as preparation, presentation, communication, facilitation and evaluation, in vendor-neutral fashion. Adobe, Cisco, Dell, IBM, Microsoft and Ricoh all recommend CTT+ to their trainers and accept it in lieu of their own in-house trainer certifications.

Two exams are required for the CTT+ credential: CompTIA CTT+ Essentials (TK0-201) and either CTT+ Classroom Performance Trainer (TK0-202) or CTT+ Virtual Classroom Trainer (TK0-203).

The CTT+ Classroom Performance Trainer and CTT+ Virtual Classroom Trainer are performance-based exams. In this case, you must submit a video or recording of your classroom (or virtual classroom sessions), and complete a form that documents your training preparation, delivery and student evaluations.

In addition to certification levels, CompTIA groups its certifications into several career paths:

  • Information security
  • Network and cloud technologies
  • Hardware, services and infrastructure
  • IT management and strategy
  • Web and mobile
  • Software development
  • Training
  • Office productivity

The CompTIA Certifications page lets you pick a certification level and/or a career path and then returns a list of certifications to focus on. For example, one of the most popular career paths in IT is network administration. CompTIA’s Network and Cloud Technologies career path offers numerous certifications that can help you advance your network administration career, such as IT Fundamentals+, A+ and Network+ (Core certs), along with Cloud+ and Linux+ (Infrastructure certifications) and Cloud Essentials.

Those interested in network security (one of the fastest growing fields in IT) should consider the certifications in CompTIA’s Information Security career path. This includes all four of the Core credentials (IT Fundamentals, A+, Network+ and Security+) along with all cybersecurity certifications (CySA+, PenTest+ and CASP+).

CompTIA provides a comprehensive IT certification roadmap that encompasses certifications from CompTIA as well as a variety of other organizations, including Cisco, EC-Council, Microsoft, (ISC)2, ISACA, Mile2 and more.

Because CompTIA credentials do not focus on a single skill (such as networking or virtualization), CompTIA credential holders may find themselves in a variety of job roles depending on their experience, skill levels and areas of interest. Here are just a few of the possible careers that CompTIA credential holders may find themselves engaged in:

  • A+: Typically, A+ credential holders find work in support roles, such as support administrators, support technicians or support specialists.
     
  • Network+: Network+ professionals primarily work in network-related roles, such as network analysts, administrators or support specialists. Credential holders may also work as network engineers, field technicians or network help desk technicians.
     
  • CySA+ Security Analyst: Common roles for professionals interested in cybersecurity, information security and risk analysis may engage in roles that include security engineers, cybersecurity analysts or specialists, threat or vulnerability analysts, or analysts for security operations centers (SOCs).
     
  • Security+: Security spans a variety of jobs, such as network, system or security administrators, security managers, specialists or administrators, and security consultants.
     
  • Server+: Roles for server professionals include storage and server administrators, as well as server support or IT/server technicians.
     
  • Linux+: Linux professionals often work in roles such as Linux database administrators, network administrators or web administrators.
     
  • Cloud+/Cloud Essentials: Cloud+ credential holders typically work as cloud specialists, developers or system and network administrators. Cloud Essentials professionals tend to work in areas related to cloud technical sales or business development.
     
  • CASP+: Common roles for CASP+ credential holders include cybersecurity specialists, InfoSec specialists, information security professionals and security architects.
     
  • Project+: Project+ credential holders typically engage in project leadership roles, such as project managers, coordinators and directors, or team leads.

While the examples above are by no means exhaustive, they provide an overview of some available careers. Your career choices are limited only by your interests, imagination and determination to achieve your personal goals.

CompTIA training and resources

CompTIA provides various and extensive training options, including classroom training, study materials and e-learning. A wide range of CompTIA Authorized Training Provider Partners (CAPPs), such as Global Knowledge, Learning Tree International and more, operate all over the world. Classroom and online/e-learning offerings range in cost from $2,000 to $4,000, depending on the particulars. Visit the CompTIA Training page for more details.

CompTIA works with third parties to offer self-study materials (the search tool is available here). Content that has been through a vetting process is branded with the CompTIA Approved Quality Content (CAQC) logo. Other materials that allow you to study at your own pace, such as audio segments, lesson activities and additional resources, are available through the CompTIA Marketplace.

Finally, every CompTIA A+, Linux+, Network+, Server+, Security+ and IT Fundamentals+ certification candidates must check out CertMaster, CompTIA’s online test prep tool. CertMaster helps you determine which subjects you know well and those you need to brush up on, and suggests training to help you fill in the gaps.

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Table saws top the wish lists of both DIYers and seasoned woodworkers. These powerful saws cut with more accuracy than circular saws, and they can cut larger pieces of material, including wood, plastic, and aluminum sheeting, better than miter saws. Some cut certain types of material better than others, so we put some of the best table saws through side-by-side, hands-on testing.

Essentially, a table saw’s main function is to perform rips, or cuts along the length of a board. While you can make rip cuts (lengthwise cuts), crosscuts, and angled cuts, and can even create a bevel cut along with dadoes, ripping remains this power tool’s primary purpose.

Whether you’re building bookcases, framing a garage, or even making your own trim for a feature wall, having a table saw in your workshop can speed the project along. Read on to learn more about this useful saw and to find out the results of our hands-on tests. One of the following models may be just right for your workshop, whether you’re a pro or a hobbyist.

  1. BEST OVERALL: Skil 15 Amp 10 In. Jobsite Table Saw
  2. BEST BANG FOR THE BUCK: Ryobi 18V One+ HP Cordless Table Saw
  3. UPGRADE PICK: Bosch 10 In. Worksite Table Saw
  4. BEST WOODWORKING: SawStop Jobsite Saw Pro
  5. BEST JOBSITE: DeWalt 10 In. Jobsite Table Saw
  6. BEST HOME WORKSHOP: Ridgid 10 In. Pro Jobsite Table Saw with Stand
  7. BEST COMPACT: Skilsaw 8¼ In. Portable Worm Drive Table Saw

Types of Table Saws

While all table saws function in a similar manner—a flat tabletop surface supports the material being cut as you manually feed it into the saw blade—they differ in design, power, best use, mobility, and storage.

Bench Saws

Designed to be bolted to a workbench or attached to a stand, a benchtop table saw is compact and relatively lightweight, averaging 45 to 60 pounds (not including some stands). While some benchtop table saws have the cut capacity for cutting sheet goods, they are not really designed for this without modifications like infeed/outfeed support tables, usually shop built.

It’s possible to cut sheet material from time to time alone (better if there is a helper), but these saws are generally considered too compact and not quite stable enough for ripping something like ¾-inch medium-density fiberboard (MDF); sheet materials, such as plywood and oriented strand board (OSB); or plastic and aluminum paneling. For planks, deck boards, 2-by material, and the like, these tools are often indispensable.

Benchtop saws, which can cost $600 or more, are more affordable than larger contractor or cabinet table saws. But since they’re the smallest type of table saw, these tools are limited by the width of the material they can cut—usually about 18 to 20 inches (see “Rip Capacity” below).

Contractor Saws

A contractor table saw is designed to be somewhat mobile in a shop setting by utilizing a wheel kit. While some contractors use these types of saws on jobsites, the tools are often set up in a workshop for months on end. These jobsite table saws are also good for serious DIYers who have a semipermanent place for them and are doing a variety of tasks that require cast-iron stability and more horsepower than a benchtop saw.

They’re heavier than bench saws (90 to 150 pounds) and are generally capable of cutting sheet material up to 24 inches wide or wider. These tools can run as much as $1,500 or more, depending on quality and power.

Cabinet Saws

Packing more power than other table saws and sometimes requiring a 220-volt (V) circuit, cabinet saws are large stationary table saws. These are the priciest option, ranging from $1,200 to $5,000 or more, depending on power and quality. The motor is fully enclosed in a cabinet below the table.

Cabinet saw users also often build support tables for these tools—called infeed and outfeed support—to make it easier to manage sheet goods like MDF, plywood, and heavier material. Often found in professional or industrial workshops and in trade schools, these heavy saws can weigh more than 600 pounds.

Hybrid Saws

The hybrid table saw is a combination of the cabinet and contractor types. It offers at least as much power as a contractor saw, but without requiring a dedicated 220V circuit. Expect to pay from $750 to $1,500 for hybrid table saws, which are sometimes described as souped-up contractor saws.

Hybrid saws come with enclosed cabinets, mimicking the look of cabinet saws, but they weigh less, averaging 275 to 325 pounds. They’re usually moved with a hand truck, but wheel kits are often available for them as well.

What to Consider When Choosing the Best Table Saw

Table saws run the gamut in quality and price, so consider the guidance below when shopping for the best table saws.

Power

In short, the more horsepower (hp) in a table saw motor, the more cutting power the saw has. Smaller benchtop saws that typically feature horsepower in the range of ¾ hp to 1½ hp are sufficient for most things a larger table saw can cut; however, they may not leave quite as smooth a cut as a contractor or cabinet saw. Be aware that these ratings are typically shown in “amps” (e.g., 15 amps) and refer to how many amperes the tool draws. Benchtop tools are regular jobsite and workshop occupants, sizing everything from shelving to hardwoods for a woodworking project and to pressure-treated lumber for backyard projects.

Larger bench saws and contractor saws come with 2-hp to 4-hp motors, and cabinet table saws often feature 5-hp or larger motors. The more powerful motors run longer under heavy use without overheating (think cabinet shop where they’re used every day, all day, for years on end) and easily cut through denser materials, such as ironwood or Brazilian walnut.

Cutting Depth and Blade Size

Table saws are labeled by the size of the circular blade they accommodate; the vast majority take 10-inch blades, while a handful take 12-inch blades. The blade height and angles are adjustable, so it can make a shallow cut just a fraction of an inch deep as well as deeper cuts. The newest generation of table saws—many cordless or corded/cordless—spin a 7½-inch blade, similar to that on a circular saw.

The most common blade sizes for these saws are 10 inches and 12 inches. With a 10-inch table saw, users can often make a maximum cut up to 3½ inches deep (that enables the user to rip a 4×4 in half).

Fence

The fence on a table saw is the adjustable guide that holds the material in place while cutting. There are two fence styles that come with most table saws: one is a T-square fence, which is in all categories of table saw and built with varying degrees of quality based on the saw’s intended use. The other type of fence is a rack-and-pinion-style fence, which is found primarily in the benchtop category.

Some saws also come with extendable fences that either fold or slide out to accommodate larger sections of wood. Other table saws feature fences with embedded magnifiers that allow the user to better see the measurements on the saw when adjusting the fence. However, many users simply rely on a tape measure. By measuring from the fence to the tip of a blade tooth, the accuracy (or not) of the fence’s pointer doesn’t need to be depended upon or interpreted.

Rip Capacity

Table saws are key to ripping wide sheets of material, but the maximum width of material that will fit between the saw blade and the fence—the rip capacity—varies. Rip capacity starts at around 18 inches for entry-level benchtop saws and runs up to 60 inches or more for professional cabinet saws.

Depending on the planned projects, choose a table saw with a rip capacity large enough to accommodate the dimension of material. For example, if the goal is to build 2-foot-high toy boxes, a saw with a rip capacity of at least 24 inches can cut sections of plywood wide enough for the sides and back.

On the other hand, many pros use track saws for this purpose. Whether it’s cutting down a door to accommodate new flooring or sizing sheet stock for building a bench, track saws are light and accurate.

Dust Collection

If you’re working in a closed workshop, dust collection ports will help keep the air dust-free and collect sawdust chips that would otherwise have to be swept up later. Table saws have dust collection ports designed to connect to a standard shop vacuum. Users need to run the workshop vacuum while operating the saw to catch dust and sawdust.

For cutting synthetic material outdoors, such as composite decking or PVC trim, it’s a good idea to put a box or bucket under the saw to catch the shavings if the saw is set up on the grass. Standing on a large sheet of cardboard or a drop cloth also helps. Once those shavings get in the grass, they’re nearly impossible to get out.

Our Top Picks

There is an enormous breadth of table-saw users, needs, and requirements. Taking as much into account across this spectrum was not easy while evaluating the field of table saws during our hands-on testing. However, we have to land somewhere. It should be noted up front that each tool in this review delivered on its design promise.

Photo: amazon.com

The built-in foldout legs of the stand are light, stable, and easy to deploy. The saw is light yet powerful enough to blow through framing lumber like a boss. Its included blade leaves a lot to be desired, but that’s an easy swap. The fence was parallel to the blade out of the box, and carrying it to jobsites or moving it around the shop is a cinch. We loved that it stores in a cube when not in use.

The push-button switch takes some getting used to, and we wish the throat plate was steel, not plastic, but for making a few rips at home to plowing through treated lumber building a deck, the saw is on point with everything from power to mobility to accuracy.

This model’s dust port elbow should be on every table saw: With a 22.5-degree bend, it enables the user to chute dust into a box or bucket. It’s a simple, smart, and an eminently useful feature.

Product Specs

  • Type: Benchtop
  • Blade size: 10 inches
  • Cutting depth: 3½ inches
  • Rip capacity: 25½ inches
  • Weight: 51.2 pounds

Pros

Cons

  • Plastic throat plate
  • Included blade is rough

Get the Skil table saw on Amazon.

Photo: homedepot.com

The battery on this affordable table saw is fine for light work. The fence was square and parallel out of the box. It’s hardly plush, but it works. The saw is light and portable and has a decent amount of power. It’s not a beast, and that’s an attribute.

Some pros might even find its bare-bones setup and low cost just what they need. It handled 1x8s and composite decking just fine in terms of power. But it did have trouble ejecting the shavings. Having a blower on hand would be an added help. There’s no huge stand, but it does need to be set up at table height for best and safest use.

Product Specs

  • Type: Benchtop
  • Blade size: 8¼ inches
  • Cutting depth: 2¼ inches
  • Rip capacity: 12 inches
  • Weight: 45 pounds

Pros

  • Light
  • Small
  • Powerful enough
  • Cordless

Cons

  • Light-duty saw, primarily DIY
  • Stand not included

Get the Ryobi table saw at The Home Depot.

Photo: homedepot.com

A little-known fact is that the Bosch 10-inch worksite table saw is a pioneering table saw. Bosch has been making a version of this saw with very few visible changes (it’s that good) for 20 years. It was this saw that took table saws from being small, mainly featureless tools to being a solid, stable, on-site tool with wheels.

The fence is outstanding with the smoothest glide along the rails, which we found to be a real pleasure to use. The paddle switch is excellent and the included blade is nice. It has a soft—but not too soft—start that makes the saw comfortable for close-quarters use in a garage or jobsite shop where a million cuts per day need to be made.

The stand is solid, and the crank cadence to lower and raise the blade is nice. It rampages through 2-by treated lumber with a dust ejection that’s awesome. It has the best miter gauge in the bunch, the best push-stick storage ever, and an excellent thin stock auxiliary fence.

Like all of the tools in the category, this saw is heavy. Yes, it has a wheel kit, but it’s a two-person job to lift it into a truck.

Product Specs

  • Type: Benchtop
  • Blade size: 10 inches
  • Cutting depth: 3⅛ inches
  • Rip capacity: 30 inches
  • Weight: 94 pounds

Pros

  • High-quality construction
  • Best-in-class stand
  • Competitive capacities

Cons

  • Premium price
  • Stand requires initial assembly

Get the Bosch table saw on Amazon or at The Home Depot.

Photo: grizzly.com

Designed by woodworkers and based on the cabinet saw that brought flesh-sensing technology to the market, this tool is for dedicated users who want premium finishes and work primarily with dry lumber. The fence is best in class. Its deployable “thin material” fence is a genius feature that serious woodworkers will love.

Its folding cart works nicely, and the in-table storage is terrific. The blade depth adjustment moves the blade from zero to full height in one turn, which is another best-in-class feature. And the flesh-sensing tech is both comforting and causes one to be rife with anxiety; it picks up on electrical impulses and will save your finger if it’s ever near enough to the blade to be cut.

While there is a bypass mode to check if the sensors will react to wet lumber, it’s tricky to press the right series of buttons. Still, it’s a great saw to have on a trim site or for a garage woodworker. It does what stationary table saws do, but it is mobile-ish and safe.

Product Specs

  • Type: Benchtop
  • Blade size: 10 inches
  • Cutting depth: 3⅛ inches
  • Rip capacity: 25½ inches
  • Weight: 113 pounds

Pros

  • High-quality construction
  • Flesh-sensing technology
  • Astounding build quality

Cons

Get the SawStop table saw on Grizzly Industrial.

Photo: amazon.com

With front legs splayed when open toward the front of the saw, this tool is ideal for making long rips in heavy material. It is by far the most stable tool in the bunch.

The legs lock and unlock smoothly, though they are not identical to each other, which takes some getting used to. The table was flat out of the box and the blade was parallel to the fence from the start. The DeWalt-pioneered rack-and-pinion fence works really well.

It has an excellent included “rough carpentry” 24-tooth saw blade. The unit has a nice switch and a little bit of a slower blade height crank than other tools, and it was tight to the bevel release. Overall, it’s a high-quality saw at a very good price.

Product Specs

  • Type: Benchtop
  • Blade size: 10 inches
  • Cutting depth: 3⅛ inches
  • Rip capacity: 32½ inches
  • Weight: 110 pounds

Pros

  • Super stable
  • Great included blade
  • Good price

Cons

  • Heavy
  • Blade crank and bevel adjustment really close together

Get the DeWalt table saw at Amazon, The Home Depot, or Lowe’s.

Photo: homedepot.com

This table saw does all the basics well. It’s got a large cut capacity, collapsible wheel kit, and good power and dust ejection. A 3½-inch cut capacity means a 4×4 can be cut in half. It’s a lot of saw for a great price.

However, the fit and finish were not top of the class. The fence is gummy and the table needed to be adjusted out of the box (it was easy to adjust and worked fine). It didn’t glide smoothly along the rails, and a fence that’s hard to move or needs adjustment is difficult for professional users.

It also has a soft start, which new table saw users may appreciate. The problem for us was—and this may well be subjective—it was too soft. It felt like we had to wait a couple of seconds for the blade to come up to speed. It’s certainly comfortable, but for experienced users putting a lot of lumber through a table saw, those extra seconds add up fast.

For weekend work and projects, this is plenty of saw.

Product Specs

  • Type: Benchtop
  • Blade size: 10 inches
  • Cutting depth: 3½ inches
  • Rip capacity: 30 inches
  • Weight: 95.08 pounds

Pros

  • A capable saw for very little investment
  • Detachable stand included
  • Soft start

Cons

  • Finicky fence
  • Needed adjustment out of the box

Get the Ridgid table saw at The Home Depot.

Photo: amazon.com

Skilsaw’s 8¼-inch table saw, scaled down from its 10-inch cousin, is a pleasure to use. The 8¼-inch platform cuts the vast majority of things table saws cut. The worm drive motor, which is plush to be sure but also a bit heavy, isn’t bad in this smaller platform tool. The saw is compact, easy to move, and is so pleasantly quiet at start-up that it’s a joy to use.

Combined with an outstanding fence and fantastic up-front locking mechanism, this saw can move from site to site, around the garage, or to a stationary place for long projects and deliver dependable performance.

While the saw did not ship with a stand, the roll cage is bored for a stand (which will make it heavier) and is available. The compact design is also great for storing the saw on a work truck.

Product Specs

  • Type: Benchtop
  • Blade size: 8¼ inches
  • Cutting depth: 2⅝ inches
  • Rip capacity: 25 inches
  • Weight: 44 pounds

Pros

  • Smooth power
  • Portable
  • Fantastic cord and fence

Cons

  • Higher price
  • Requires stand

Get the Skilsaw table saw on Amazon or at Lowe’s.

Our Verdict

Given all the things that table saws need to do, from ripping lumber to being mobile to being out of the way when not in use, the Skil table saw rocked it. Top-notch fold-out legs and a great dust chute means it performs the best quickly. For light-duty and home use, the Ryobi table saw is a nice entry-level saw at an affordable price.

How We Tested the Best Table Saws

First, we tried to think about as many table saw users as we could and which tools might best meet their needs, considering everything from safety to production to mobility (around the shop or jobsite, in and out of the truck, etc.).

We tested for power and vibration and even the included blades, plowing through pressure-treated southern yellow pine that had been left to dry out and harden for a month. We ran 1×8 material and looked for both smoothness and dust management (without a dust collection system) using cellular PVC deck boards.

We evaluated the included stands, switches, and adjustments and considered the overall feel using the tool for everything from weekend work around the house to building a deck or shed to a months-long setup for remodeling a house.

How We Chose the Best Table Saws

Within our team of writers, one of us is a former woodshop owner and one is a general contractor; therefore, we have extensive experience using table saws of different sizes. We understand the requirements of users and how various models provide for them. In addition, our team researched all the current tools available, so we were aware of the latest developments.

For the updates to this test, we ran 2-by pressure-treated lumber; 1×8 finger-jointed primed pine; plywood; and composite decking through each saw looking for everything from power and vibration to dust ejection and vibration. We evaluated adjustments, switches, and fence smoothness along the rails. We also considered mobility and storage.

Capacities

While depth of cut is important, most table saws are 10-inch models and specifications are very similar. While their primary function in home workshops and on jobsites is ripping dimensional lumber—which doesn’t require a huge rip capacity—ripping capacity varies tremendously and is a key feature for those who cut large sheet material. We were careful to source solutions for all types of users.

Size and Portability

For many users, a compact, portable table saw is the ideal solution. For others, physical size is less important than capacity and stability. We made sure to include a comprehensive selection to cover those who work with these saws on-site or in small spaces at home as well as those who have a large workshop available.

Brand and Value

We avoid cheap table saws, which are often poor in terms of durability and reliability. While buying from the leading table saw brands can mean you pay a little more, this almost always results in better long-term value.

Tips for Using and Maintaining Your Table Saw

Owners will doubtless spend many hours learning how to get the best from their table saw. The following quick tips provide a useful place to start:

  • Read the manual carefully even if you have owned a table saw before; there will often be differences. It’s important to understand the safety features and know how to maximize performance.
  • By law, all table saws must have a blade guard. Never operate the saw without it in place. The riving knife should only be removed if using a dado blade.
  • Always wear eye protection. Ear defenders are also a good idea.
  • Check the blade for damage before each work session. If there is a crack, missing teeth, or unexpected vibration, replace the blade immediately.
  • There’s an old woodworking adage that you should measure twice and cut once. This can also apply to setting up a table saw. Adjust and then check before making each cut.
  • Clean the table saw after use. Disconnect the power first, then use an ordinary nylon-bristle hand brush or cordless blower.
  • Learning how to make featherboards, push sticks, and table saw jigs can Excellerate safety, speed, and accuracy, particularly with repetitive tasks. It’s also very rewarding to make things yourself rather than buying them.
  • Blade choice can have a dramatic impact on performance, even if the diameter remains the same. You can read more about the best table saw blades in a separate article.

FAQs

The information above covers many of the key aspects of the best table saws as well as details on a range of high-quality options that will suit a variety of users. Although it will have answered the majority of questions that occur to potential buyers, some users might have more general-use questions. Some of the most popular questions have been answered below.

Q. What do I need to use a table saw?

Apart from protective goggles or safety glasses and a stand of some sort, everything you need should come with the saw. In addition to providing some basic tips for using the table saw above, there is a more in-depth beginner’s guide here.

Q. Can a 10-inch table saw cut a 4×4?

A few 10-inch table saws will cut a 4×4 in a single pass, but not many. Bear in mind that 4×4 refers to dimensioned lumber that is actually closer to 3½ inches square. A common maximum for 10-inch table saws is 3⅛ inches, though the cut can usually be completed by turning the material over and running it through the saw again.

Q. Can I put a table saw on a miter saw stand?

It might be possible, but it is not recommended. Miter saw bases are fixed differently, so the result would probably be unsafe.

Q. What can I use for a table saw stand?

A sturdy bench can work, and it isn’t difficult to find plans for DIY table saw stands. You could also consider investing in a purpose-built stand.

Q. Where should you stand when using a table saw?

You should usually stand behind the saw table and to the left of the blade. Make sure you are comfortable and not stretching. If working with large sheet material, it’s a good idea to have someone support it on the out-feed side.

Thu, 14 Jul 2022 14:23:00 -0500 en text/html https://www.bobvila.com/articles/best-table-saw/
Killexams : Electrifying 2024 Hyundai Ioniq 6 Offers Up To 320 HP And 379+ Miles Of Range

What elevates a car from ordinary to extraordinary? Is it design, luxury, performance, or some indefinable set of characteristics that push one model to transcend its competitors?

Those questions don’t have easy answers, but we bring them up because the new Hyundai Ioniq 6 is here to challenge convention.

While the automaker unveiled the model’s swoopy design last month, Hyundai is now following up with initial specifications as well as additional details about one of the sleekest EVs on the market.

Offers 379+ Mile Range And Up To 320 HP

Jumping right into the numbers, the entry-level variant features a 53 kWh battery pack and a rear-mounted electric motor. Hyundai didn’t say how powerful the latter is, but previously suggested the model will have around 215 hp (160 kW / 218 PS). Regardless of the final numbers, this version is expected to have an energy consumption of less than 14 kWh/62 miles (14 kWh/100 km) under the Worldwide Harmonized Light Vehicle Test Procedure (WLTP). This promises to make the Ioniq 6 one of the most energy-efficient EVs on the market.

Buyers will also be able to purchase a long-range variant, which uses a larger 77.4 kWh battery pack. This promises to increase the range to more than 379 miles (610 km) in the WLTP cycle and officials noted that’s roughly a 62 mile (100 km) improvement over the Ioniq 5. This increase is due to a variety of factors including efforts to Excellerate efficiency as well as a low drag coefficient of 0.21.

The long-range Ioniq 6 will be offered with rear- and all-wheel drive, and there will be a dual motor variant producing a combined output of 320 hp (239 kW / 325 PS) and 446 lb-ft (605 Nm) of torque. Those numbers may not seem too remarkable, but they’ll enable the car to run from 0-62 mph (0-100 km/h) in 5.1 seconds.

That’s an N level of acceleration and it’s only natural for there to be questions about a possible N variant. Officials didn’t want to spill the beans during a media briefing yesterday, but all indications are yes and we’ll learn more later this week.

On the syllabu of performance, the Ioniq 6 features an “EV Performance Tune-up” system. It’s a bit like a customizable driving mode as it enables owners to “freely adjust steering effort, motor power, accelerator pedal sensitivity, and driveline mode” via a few taps on the infotainment system.

It’s nice to see the latter and it’s no surprise the Ioniq 6 rides on the E-GMP architecture. The latter underpins the Ioniq 5 and Kia EV6 as well as the upcoming Ioniq 7.

The Ioniq 6 supports 400V and 800V charging, which is notable as 800V technology is largely limited to premium electric vehicles. This is a boon for consumers and the automaker noted a 350 kW DC fast charger will enable the car to go from a 10-80% charge in a mere 18 minutes.

Another interesting feature is the car’s vehicle-to-load function. It effectively turns the Ioniq 6 into a big battery as owners can purchase an accessory adaptor that enables the model to power everything from tools to lights to outdoor projectors.

A Design That Commands Attention

Getting back to the Ioniq 6’s most eye-catching feature is an exterior design that boasts “clean, simple lines and a pure aerodynamic form that Hyundai designers describe as Emotional Efficiency.”

Daring design is nothing new at Hyundai, as the sixth- and eighth-generation Sonata easily prove, but officials admitted they were “stretching their comfort zone” when it came to the Ioniq 6. However, more power to them as one look at the model will undoubtedly have people asking ‘What is that?’

Hyundai officials see design as a “brand distinguisher” and told us “absolutely” when asked if future Ioniq models will continue to have bold and distinctive designs such as those found on the Ioniq 5 and Ioniq 6.

In the case of the latter, the “electrified streamliner” is a sleek four-door coupe with flush-mounted door handles and graceful, uninterrupted lines. A lot of attention was focused on aerodynamics and the model features active air flaps, wheel gap reducers, and an elliptical wing-inspired spoiler. The model also boasts a “slight boat-tail structure”, underbody aerodynamics, and available digital side mirrors (depending on market).

Officials noted streamlined design dates back decades and gave the classic Saab 92 a nice hat tip. While the design is certainly unique, there’s Ioniq DNA in the form of over 700 Parametric Pixels which put on a light show when approaching.

In terms of size, the Ioniq 6 measures 191.1 inches (4,855 mm) long, 74 inches (1,880 mm) wide, and 58.9 inches (1,495 mm) tall with a wheelbase that spans 116 inches (2,950 mm). That means the car is 1.8 inches (46 mm) shorter than the Sonata, despite having a 4.2 inch (107 mm) longer wheelbase.

A Spacious, Eco-Friendly Interior

The bold design continues in the cabin as drivers will find a “furniture-style” dashboard that is topped by a freestanding display, which consists of a 12-inch digital instrument cluster and a matching 12-inch infotainment system. The latter features Android Auto and Apple CarPlay compatibility as well as “real-time travel radius mapping” based on the car’s current battery level. The latter isn’t the only handy feature as the navigation system will help drivers find the best route as well as charging stations along the way.

Lighting takes center stage as the Ioniq 6 features transparent accents, which allow colored light to shine through. This gives the car a club-like atmosphere and the Dual Color Ambient Lighting system offers six pre-selected themes as well as 64 different colors. The model also boasts a Speed Sync Lighting feature, which increases the brightness of the interior lighting the faster you go.

Elsewhere, the Ioniq 6 is equipped with special seats that are approximately 30 percent thinner than those used in conventional models. They promise to increase passenger space without sacrificing comfort. Customers can also opt for Relaxation Comfort seats, which automatically adjust to the ideal position for taking a quick break or a power nap while waiting for your vehicle to recharge.

Other highlights include minimalist switchgear, an eight-speaker Bose audio system, and four interactive pixel lights on the steering wheel which can relay charging information with a quick glance. Buyers will also find a sound enhancement system that provides a “spaceship-like sound” that varies based on your driving.

The Ioniq 6’s focus on sustainability extends beyond the electric powertrain as customers will find recycled PET fabric or eco-processed leather on the seats. They’re joined by a bio PET fabric headliner and carpeting made from recycled fishing nets.

Hyundai envisions the interior as a place for more than just driving. As they explained, the car can be used as a mobile office as the “bridge-type” center console has parallel bars that allow a laptop to be securely placed on top of them. Hyundai also briefly showed a “smart table,” which can be outfitted to help further increase productivity.

U.S. Launch Scheduled For Early 2023

Wrapping things up is an assortment of driver assistance systems such as Smart Cruise Control, Highway Driving Assist, and Forward Collision-Avoidance Assist with emergency braking. Buyers will also find Intelligent Speed Limit Assist, High Beam Assist, and Evasive Steering Assist.

They’re joined by Blind-Spot Collision-Avoidance Assist, a Blind-Spot View Monitor, Safe Exit Warning, and Remote Smart Parking Assist 2. Hyundai didn’t stop there as the model also has a Surround View Monitor, Forward/Side/Reverse Parking Collision-Avoidance Assist, and Rear Cross-Traffic Collision-Avoidance Assist.

The Hyundai Ioniq 6 will go into production in the third quarter and be available in a handful of markets by the end of the year. U.S. specifications are slated to be announced in December and the model will be launched in America in the first quarter of 2023 as a 2024 model. Hyundai hopes to offer the car in most states, although supply constraints could limit availability.

more photos...

Wed, 13 Jul 2022 13:30:00 -0500 en-US text/html https://www.carscoops.com/2022/07/the-electrifying-hyundai-ioniq-6-offers-up-to-320-hp-and-379-miles-of-range/
Killexams : HPBOSE 10th Result 2022 Date Confirmed? Know when HPBOSE will declare HP Board Class 10 Results No result found, try new keyword!How To Check HP Board Class 10 Results 2022 for Matric Exams? HPBOSE 10th Result 2022 ... students have been speculating the answer to this question for weeks now. The situation has been made ... Wed, 22 Jun 2022 20:34:00 -0500 https://www.jagranjosh.com/news/hpbose-10th-result-2022-date-confirmed-know-when-hp-board-will-declare-class-10-results-at-hpbose-org-163875 Killexams : Remoticon 2021 // Rob Weinstein Builds An HP-35 From The Patent Up

Fifty years ago, Hewlett-Packard introduced the first handheld scientific calculator, the HP-35. It was quite the engineering feat, since equivalent machines of the day were bulky desktop affairs, if not rack-mounted. [Rob Weinstein] has long been a fan of HP calculators, and used an HP-41C for many years until it wore out. Since then he gradually developed a curiosity about these old calculators and what made them tick. The more he read, the more engrossed he became. [Rob] eventually decided to embark on a three year long reverse-engineer journey that culminated a recreation of the original design on a protoboard that operates exactly like the original from 1972 (although not quite pocket-sized). In this presentation he walks us through the history of the calculator design and his efforts in understanding and eventually replicating it using modern FPGAs.

The HP patent ( US Patent 4,001,569 ) contains an extremely detailed explanation of the calculator in nearly every aspect. There are many novel concepts in the design, and [Rob] delves into two of them in his presentation. Early LED devices were a drain on batteries, and HP engineers came up with a clever solution. In a complex orchestra of multiplexed switches, they steered current through inductors and LED segments, storing energy temporarily and eliminating the need for inefficient dropping resistors. But even more complicated is the serial processor architecture of the calculator. The first microprocessors were not available when HP started this design, so the entire processor was done at the gate level. Everything operates on 56-bit registers which are constantly circulating around in circular shift registers. [Rob] has really done his homework here, carefully studying each section of the design in great depth, drawing upon old documents and books when available, and making his own material when not. For example, in the course of figuring everything out, [Rob] prepared 338 pages of timing charts in addition to those in the patent.

LED Driver Timing Chart

One section called the “Micro-Programmed Controller” is presented as just a black-box in the patent. This is the heart of the systems, and is essential to the calculator’s operation. However, all the other parts that talk to the controller were so well-described in the patent that [Rob] was able to back out the details. The controller, and all sections of the calculator, was implemented in Verilog, and tested on an instrumented workbench he built to test each module.

Once everything was working in the simulations, [Rob] set out to build a working model. TInyFPGA models were used, one for each custom chip. A few understandable departures were made from the original design. An 18650 lithium ion cell powers the board, kept topped off by a modern battery charging controller. The board is larger than the original, and yes, he’s using the Hackaday-obligatory 555 chip in the power-on circuit. In this short demonstration video, you can see the final prototype being put through its paces side by side with an original HP-35, working through examples from the owner’s manual.

This is an incredibly researched and thoroughly documented project. [Rob] has made the design open source and is sharing it on the project’s GitLab repository. [Rob]’s slides for Remoticon are not only a great overview of the project, but have some good references included. Its clear he has a real passion for these old calculators and has done a fantastic job exploring the HP-35. But even after three years, there’s more to come. He’s thinking about making a PCB version, and a discrete implementation using individual logic gates may be in the works.

We wrote about the history of the HP-35 before. And if you like hacking into these old calculators, check out our writeup of a similar dive into the Sinclair scientific calculator.

Wed, 13 Jul 2022 12:00:00 -0500 Chris Lott en-US text/html https://hackaday.com/2022/04/07/remoticon-2021-rob-weinstein-builds-an-hp-35-from-the-patent-up/
Killexams : HP Spectre x360 14 review: Is this premium 2-in-1 laptop worthy? No result found, try new keyword!Our HP Spectre x360 14 review answers that question, by looking at the laptop in its totality, including its design ... Meanwhile, in our standard test playing a downloaded Netflix movie on ... Mon, 22 Feb 2021 00:06:00 -0600 https://www.t3.com/reviews/hp-spectre-14
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