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Exam Code: H12-821-ENU Practice test 2022 by Killexams.com team
HCIP-Datacom-Core Technology V1.0
HUAWEI plan
Killexams : HUAWEI plan - BingNews http://www.bing.com:80/news/search?q=HUAWEI+plan&cc=us&format=RSS Search results Killexams : HUAWEI plan - BingNews http://www.bing.com:80/news/search?q=HUAWEI+plan&cc=us&format=RSS https://killexams.com/exam_list/HUAWEI Killexams : The Fifth“Seeds For The Future” Program Held By Huawei In Azerbaijan Wrapped Up With Remarkable Closing Ceremony In Baku, Azerbaijan

(MENAFN- Trend News Agency)

On August 2st, 2022 the closing ceremony of“Seeds for the Future” Program took place in Baku, Azerbaijan.

The closing ceremony of the fifth“Seeds for the Future” Program brought together more than 80 people including Ambassador Extraordinary and Plenipotentiary of the People's Republic of China to the Republic of Azerbaijan Mrs. Guo Min, Vice President of Huawei Central Asia & Caucasia Area Mr. Liu Tong, representatives of the Ministry of Digital Development and Transport and the Ministry of Science and Education of Azerbaijan, Rectors of Azerbaijan State Oil and Industry University, Baku Higher Oil School, Azerbaijan Technical University and the National Aviation Academy, participants from various universities, as well as representitives of mainstream medias in Azerbaijan.

A total of 30 students from four leading universities of Azerbaijan (Azerbaijan State Oil and Industry University, Baku Higher Oil School, Azerbaijan Technical University, National Aviation Academy) participated in 'Seeds for the Future' training course online. Seeds for the Future is ICT Provider Huawei's global Corporate Social Responsibility flagship program around the world. (Huawei provided participants - who were university students majored in telecommunications - with free trainings on communications equipment and hands-on training.)

Ambassador Mrs. Guo Min conveyed congratulations on the successful implementation of the“Seeds for the Future” program and remarked that:
Huawei has been actively participating in the construction of the information infrastructure in Azerbaijan, continuously improving the country's communication facilities and environment and helping to cultivate more ICT talents. The“Seeds for the Future” program is a significant attempt by Huawei to enhance bilateral cooperation and increase people-to-people exchanges; additionally, it represents in microcosm how Chinese enterprises in Azerbaijan fulfill their social responsibilities and promote people-to-people and culture exchanges.

Addressing the purpose of the event, Mr. Liu Tong – Vice President of Huawei Central Asia & Caucasia Area highlighted the importance of the project:
In the past 18 years, more than 500 Azerbaijani engineers and more than 30 outstanding students from local universities have been selected by Huawei to get training in China. Advancements in the ICT industry and ICT education are integral part of the socioeconomic development for each country. The program is a crucial platform for sharing the latest ICT technologies and enriching students' hands-on experience. This program prepares them to work efficiently in ICT and mobile communications companies. Huawei plans to continue rolling out this program globally and strengthening local partnerships in the long run.

In Azerbaijan“Seeds for the Future” program was launched in 2016. In 2019, during the official talks, the President of the Republic of Azerbaijan Mr. Ilham Aliyev highly appreciated Huawei efforts for the successful implementation of the project. By the end of 2020, 36 students from Azerbaijan had successfully completed the program.

In 2022, to maintain continuity of the program during the COVID-19 pandemic, 'Seeds for the Future' program moved online for the first time to provide more students with diverse online educational resources. The scheme will offer undergraduate students a rich experience involving technology courses (including 5G, cloud, AI, etc.), leadership course, Chinese culture experiences, tech exhibition hall live visit, participation in“Tech4Good” group project and culture exchanges with outstanding peers around the world.

In the future Huawei remains committed to working with local partners to pursue more opportunities for talented youth to develop the ICT talent ecosystem through education and training.

MENAFN08082022000187011040ID1104660899


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Sun, 07 Aug 2022 20:20:00 -0500 Date text/html https://menafn.com/1104660900/The-FifthSeeds-For-The-Future-Program-Held-By-Huawei-In-Azerbaijan-Wrapped-Up-With-Remarkable-Closing-Ceremony-In-Baku-Azerbaijan
Killexams : TAT, Huawei partner digitally
Tourism Authority of Thailand governor Yuthasak Supasorn, second from left, and Huawei Technologies (Thailand) Chief Executive Officer Abel Deng, second from right, shake hands at the signing of a memorandum of understanding for ‘Digital Transformation and Innovation Development for Smart Tourism’ to promote the Thai tourism industry using advanced technologies from Huawei, including 5G, cloud, AI and AR/VR. The ceremony was presided over by Deputy Minister of Tourism and Sports Napintorn Srisanpang, first from left, and Jun Zhang, Vice President of Huawei Asia Pacific, first from right. (Photo: Chanat Katanyu)
Tourism Authority of Thailand governor Yuthasak Supasorn, second from left, and Huawei Technologies (Thailand) Chief Executive Officer Abel Deng, second from right, shake hands at the signing of a memorandum of understanding for ‘Digital Transformation and Innovation Development for Smart Tourism’ to promote the Thai tourism industry using advanced technologies from Huawei, including 5G, cloud, AI and AR/VR. The ceremony was presided over by Deputy Minister of Tourism and Sports Napintorn Srisanpang, first from left, and Jun Zhang, Vice President of Huawei Asia Pacific, first from right. (Photo: Chanat Katanyu)

The Tourism Authority of Thailand (TAT) has entered into its first-ever memorandum of understanding (MoU) for a digital tech partnership with Huawei Technologies (Thailand), the local unit of the global tech power­house, in a bid to drive tourism via digital transformation and innovation.

The MoU for “Digital Transformation and Innovation Development for Smart Tourism”, which was signed yesterday, is meant to level up tech support for the tourism industry, including 5G, cloud and AI as well as augmented reality and virtual reality.

TAT governor Yuthasak Supasorn said the MoU is an initial phase of the cooperation over one year.

“TAT serves as the main government agency that helps promote Thai tourism as per the TAT Corporate Plan 2023-2027, driving the “Thrive for Excellence” strategy with the aim of becoming a data-driven organisation,” he said.

It will create a new tourism ecosystem and drive tourism recovery with a V-shape prospect while helping power the country’s growth in line with the bio-circular-green economy, he said.

Mr Yuthasak said the country’s tourism industry has been hit by the pandemic for two years with the number of Chinese arrivals declining from an average of 100,000 daily before the pandemic to 20,000-30,000 per month at present, most of whom are students and those in business trips.

Abel Deng, chief executive officer of Huawei Technologies (Thailand), said digital technologies are reshaping the world.

“Huawei is committed to leveraging advanced technologies to heighten TAT’s position as the strategic leader driving Thailand towards being a world-class tourism destination,” he said.

Through the cooperation, TAT and Huawei are preparing to implement the “Amazing Thailand is just a phone call away” project, for which TAT will create a video ringback tone, a call-waiting video showcasing the beauty of Thai tourist attractions, culture, food and traditions to promote Thai tourism internationally through Thai 5G users using Huawei’s 5G as well as Huawei’s partner networks.

The two organisations also joined forces to bring 5G innovative technologies to stimulate Thai tourism through broadcasting the kingdom’s tourist attractions in real time on Huawei’s 5G network via TAT’s online media channels, including the Amazing Thailand YouTube channel and Amazing Thailand application, as well as through various online channels of strategic partners.

Mon, 08 Aug 2022 15:37:00 -0500 text/html https://www.bangkokpost.com/thailand/general/2364506/tat-huawei-partner-digitally
Killexams : Huawei signs off on Saudi data centre investment, set to finalise location

Dubai: Chinese tech giant Huawei will soon be taking a decision on where to locate a data centre in Saudi Arabia, its second in the Middle East. It was last year that it went operational in Abu Dhabi with the first data centre.

“We are in the final stages of the Saudi decision - the investment decision has already been made,” said Frank Dai, President of Huawei Cloud M.E. “All that’s left is where in Riyadh should the facility be built.”

“Saudi Arabia is one of the strategic markets we have to be in. With the date centre, our technical design team has to ensure the highest availability to our services.

“We will keep investing in the whole data and cloud computing space across the whole region. The Middle East remains central to our vision of how digital transformation can reshape economies, even change the world. This is only the beginning of what data-driven economies can achieve.”

Data centres and cloud are two of the buzzwords in the Gulf’s tech space, along with AI and Web3. Oracle, Amazon and Microsoft are all powering in, as are local entities such as Khazna Data Centres (a G42-e& enterprise) and Hussain Sajwani-owned Damac, which recently confirmed a $1 billion investment play on data centres.

Cloud ambitions

For Huawei, being an integral part of the data economy means having cloud for company. “To reach the ultimate goal of a real ‘intelligent’ world, digital infrastructure is the foundation,” said Dai. “More precisely, cloud technology is the foundation for that.”

Surely, digital infrastructure comes before everything else? “I will agree, but partially,” said Dai, who took over as regional head in October last.

“Cloud itself is part of that infrastructure. It not only provides computing storage capability, but if you look carefully, all of the latest IT technology innovations come from cloud and not from traditional tech. Whether you are talking about the latest breakthroughs in database, AI, all of these are from cloud services.

“This requires changes not only to business models. Data volumes are such that there has to be coexistence between different systems and those require big storage and processing capabilities. That, ultimately, comes from the cloud.”

recent decision to ban Chinese electronics companies from Canadian 5G networks has highlighted concerns that tightening national security rules are having a chilling effect on research in Canada.

In theory the new ban, which restricts the use of Huawei and ZTE components in federally regulated telecommunications networks, should not affect university research. It does not cover individual devices, nor target research collaborations with the companies. And it should have provided more clarity for researchers, said Tamer Özsu, director of the Waterloo-Huawei Joint Innovation Lab. “The federal government has taken a political decision and publicly announced it,” he said. “Now, the government is accountable for that decision and the discussion can take place in the public space addressing pros and cons.”

But in practice, it is contributing to a culture in which universities no longer want to accept funding from companies like Huawei. “The intelligence agencies are creating this atmosphere that leads university administrators to kill research projects and collaborations without taking a clear decision for which they would be accountable, at least in theory, to their faculty members,” said Dr. Özsu.

The U of Waterloo lab, for example, was set up in 2018 with $6.5 million from Huawei to support research on data management, programming languages and compiler technologies, among other topics. It has since funded 31 projects by 38 different faculty members, the majority of whom were early-career researchers. The lab was originally funded for three years, but university administrators have still not signed off on an extension proposed in June 2021, meaning the lab has not been able to start any new projects. The uncertainty, and the general sense that collaborating with companies like Huawei is somehow frowned upon, has led colleagues to pull out of potential collaborations, said Dr. Özsu.

Nick Manning, associate vice-president of communications at U of Waterloo, said the university does not normally comment on contractual matters. But he added that they are “closely following” the legislation. “No university has the ability to adequately assess national security situations, and as we receive advice from the government of Canada we act on that advice,” Mr. Manning said. “We have reached out to the appropriate government of Canada officials to seek their advice on this matter.”

No plans to end partnerships

Huawei spends about $25 million a year on research projects at dozens of Canadian universities. A spokesperson for the University of Toronto said that Huawei has sponsored about 150 projects by 42 researchers at the university, worth around $18 million over the past five years, and the university has no plans to end those partnerships unless the federal government tells them to. “The recent decision by the Canadian government is not directed at Canadian universities or the sponsorship of research in Canada,” they said. “In the event there are changes to government guidance regarding research sponsorship, we would of course respond and comply.”

McGill University, meanwhile, has a “very limited number” of research partnerships with Huawei at present, according to Claire Loewen, a spokesperson for the university. “As with all Canadian universities, McGill complies with federal guidelines and regulations on research partnerships. At this time no decision has been made on these current research initiatives,” she said.

The chill on research with companies like Huawei actually started long before the government announced the ban, said Christopher Parsons, who studies telecommunications and national security in the Citizen Lab at the U of T’s Munk School of Global Affairs. In July 2021, the Natural Sciences and Engineering Research Council launched the National Security Guidelines for Research Partnerships, which require all research project applications to NSERC’s Alliance program involving a private-sector partner to be assessed for potential national security risks.

Applicants should be “mindful of the government of Canada’s serious concerns about organizations, such as Huawei and ZTE, who could be compelled to comply with extrajudicial directions from foreign governments in ways that would conflict with Canadian laws or would be detrimental to Canadian interests,” said a spokesperson for NSERC.

Dr. Parsons and Dr. Özsu said many of the questions in the security assessment – such as whether any collaborators have connections to foreign intelligence agencies, or whether the applicant has read and understands the Export Canada Act – are difficult for university researchers to answer. “These are not people who are trained to be experts in this field,” said Dr. Parsons.

Vague rules on risk assessment

And there has been no clarity from the intelligence community on what criteria will be used to assess the risks, said Dr. Özsu. “If there are genuine concerns – and I’m sure there are – it’s incumbent on them to say what they are, and what we need to avoid,” he said.

The best practices for mitigating the risks suggested in the guidelines also don’t make a lot of sense from a university perspective, said Dr. Parsons. For example, they suggest that if a graduate student is staying late in the lab accessing more information than they formally require, they should be closely monitored as a potential risk – though Dr. Parsons said it is much more likely they are just an exceptional student trying to get ahead.

“It’s not malicious, it’s well-intentioned, but it fundamentally misunderstands how a university operates,” he said. “It risks casting a very broad net, and academics in Canada are rightly concerned.”

While the NSERC guidelines are only supposed to apply to grants with matching federal funding, Dr. Özsu said the chilling effect is trickling down to provincial funding as well, and university administrators are deferring to federal concerns even for entirely private grants. “It’s dangerous, the moment we give intelligence agencies that much control, even if it is implicit, over our research agenda, that’s bad,” he said. “We punch above our weight in Canada because we collaborate, and this has the potential to erode those collaborations.”

Wed, 03 Aug 2022 04:03:00 -0500 en-US text/html https://www.universityaffairs.ca/news/news-article/huawei-ban-adds-to-concerns-of-a-chill-effect-in-research-over-national-security-rules/ Killexams : Admitad wins Huawei Partner of The Year and takes collaboration to the next level

HEILBRONN, Germany, Aug. 8, 2022 /PRNewswire/ -- After a year of building numerous partnerships with brands across Europe, US, UK and Canada, IT-company Admitad and tech giant Huawei have decided to widen the geography of their cooperation. Companies are in the final stages of signing contracts that will cover the rest of the world, including promising regions like MENA, LATAM and others.

Admitad Logo

Earlier this year, Petal Search, a mobile search engine by Huawei, honoured Admitad with their Partner of the Year award. The amount of GMV generated by Petal Search users making online purchases through Admitad advertisers' stores doubled in H1 of 2022. Widening of collaboration will enable Petal Search to select partners from a full list of more than 30,000 brands and merchants across the globe.

Through PetalSearch, Admitad's advertisers gain exclusive access to the 40 million monthly active users of Huawei Petal Search across 170 countries, and more than 28 million monthly active users of Petal Maps.

The team behind Petal Search has the ambition of taking their rightful place among the world's top-tier search engines, shaking the market dominance of the likes of Google and Bing.

"Currently, the ads environment is configured in a way that not a single new search engine can survive without the support of these major dominant players. That´s not good. This is one of the reasons we decided to team up with Admitad. They provide our solution with additional monetisation options and an alternative way to develop our text ads service - through partnerships and direct collaborations with brands of all grades. Due to their level of flexibility and agility, we treat Admitad as an essential partner in our product innovation," explains Dr. Jaime Gonzalo, VP Huawei Mobile Services Europe.

CEO and founder of Admitad, Alexander Bachmann, notes the success of the current cooperation - the number of monthly clicks on advertisers' sites often ran into the tens of millions.

"We are thrilled to support the birth of a new 'supernova' in the search engine market. The Petal Search team is actively trying out new approaches, harnessing the expertise of Admitad managers and, as a result, users have a positive perception of customised ads. This is confirmed by their willingness to spend more - the AOV of Huawei customers is around $33, which is higher than the current average of $30 in partner marketing." - Alexander Bachmann

Huawei and Admitad expect an explosive growth of GMV in the second half of the year, especially Q4. By that time, the search engine will start partnerships with hundreds of new brands combined with a period of major sales. Another revenue-boosting factor will be a line of search engine monetisation tools that Admitad will roll out in the near future, including features inspired by their cooperation with Huawei.

Current plans include MonetizeSuggest, a tool for providing users research suggestions with embedded partner links, features based on data from various coupon and product feeds, and other useful options for search market players.

Logo - https://mma.prnewswire.com/media/1741632/Admitad_Logo.jpg

Cision

View original content:https://www.prnewswire.com/news-releases/admitad-wins-huawei-partner-of-the-year-and-takes-collaboration-to-the-next-level-301600752.html

SOURCE Admitad

Mon, 08 Aug 2022 02:00:00 -0500 en-US text/html https://finance.yahoo.com/news/admitad-wins-huawei-partner-takes-140000694.html
Killexams : Huawei Freebuds Pro 2 review: A compelling package
aa2020 recommended

The Huawei Freebuds Pro 2 are a compelling proposition that adeptly balances design, hardware, and software. They're clearly designed to take on the AirPods Pro, and succeed for the most part.

After a two-year break, Huawei is back with the second generation of its premium Freebuds Pro wireless earbuds. The Freebuds Pro 2 are packed with features and offer excellent sound quality, but the competition is stacked. Should you buy them? Find out in our Huawei Freebuds Pro 2 review.

What you need to know about the Huawei Freebuds Pro 2

huawei freebuds pro 2 11

Bogdan Petrovan / Android Authority

  • Huawei Freebuds Pro 2: £169 / €199 (~$207)

The Huawei Freebuds Pro 2 build upon the strong foundation of the original Freebuds Pro, which we reviewed in 2020. Huawei polished the design — literally and figuratively — and improved the feature set while keeping the same great audio quality and active noise cancellation (ANC) we loved on the 2020 model.

Huawei teamed up with audio company Devialet to tune the sound of the Freebuds Pro 2, as reflected in the dual branding on the case. It’s hard to say how much of an impact this collaboration had, but there’s no denying the Freebuds Pro 2 sound excellent.

The active noise-cancelling (ANC) on the Freebuds Pro 2 performs admirably, helped by the silicone tips that seal out much of the external noise. Switching between several ANC modes lets you pick the most comfortable level, and you can easily toggle the noise cancellation with a pinch on the earbuds’ stems.

The Huawei Freebuds Pro 2 build upon the strong foundation of the original Freebuds Pro.

The Freebuds Pro 2 are compatible with Android, iOS, and Windows devices, though feature parity between platforms is not perfect. Only Huawei phones running EMUI 12 or later get the complete feature set. Bluetooth connectivity through the high-resolution LDAC codec is available, though it will only be worth the battery trade-off if you listen from a high-resolution source.

Huawei claims a battery life of up to four hours when ANC is on (six and a half hours with ANC off) and up to 18 hours with ANC on (30 hours with ANC off) with the case included.

Available in white, gray, and blue color options, the Huawei Freebuds Pro 2 retail for around £170 in the UK and €200 in Europe. They will also launch in India and other markets around the world, though it seems unlikely they’ll be available in the US due to the fallout from the ongoing trade ban. They’re going up against serious competition, including the AirPods Pro, the Sony WF-1000XM4, and the brand new Google Pixel Buds Pro.

What’s good?

huawei freebuds pro 2 1

Bogdan Petrovan / Android Authority

The Freebuds Pro 2 look and feel premium. They are smooth and pleasantly rounded and feel very comfortable in the ear. You can choose from one of the three sizes of silicone ear tips. The largest set still felt a little small to me, but not to the point that they fell out of my ears. AI Life, Huawei’s companion app for audio products (Android, iOS), includes a “Tip fit test” feature that’s supposed to tell you which tip is best for the shape of your ear, but it was unreliable in my experience.

For this Huawei Freebuds Pro 2 review, I tested the minimalist Ceramic White version; the Silver Blue colorway will stand out more thanks to a color-shifting iridescent finish, while Silver Frost is a more stealthy and sober hue of gray.

Each earbud weighs about 6.1 grams, which is about the same as the AirPods Pro. Huawei claims to have moved the earbuds’ center of gravity to make them more stable in the ear. I was able to wear them for hours without discomfort. The charging case is smaller and lighter than the previous generation, and it’s more ergonomic too. I didn’t have issues removing and inserting the earbuds from the case as I did with the Freebuds Pro.

The Freebuds Pro 2 sound beautiful. On the tech side, Huawei talks about a long bevy of improvements and innovations centered on the dual driver. This comprises an 11mm quad-magnet driver for bass and other low notes and a planar diaphragm for the highs. The lows do get low — 14Hz, below the limit of human audibility, according to Huawei. Software equalizes the sound based on volume and the position of each earbud in the ear canal in real-time. The results are great — the sound is generally warm, the bass is satisfyingly deep, and vocals and mid-range complex layers of instruments come across clearly. Coupled with the effective insulation and ANC, it’s tough to fault the way the Freebuds Pro 2 sound.

The sound is generally warm, the bass is satisfyingly deep, and vocals and mid-range complex layers of instruments come across clearly.

Huawei says it’s improved the ANC on the Freebuds Pro 2 compared to the previous generation, and they now outperform the AirPods Pro in this area. In my experience, noise cancellation was highly effective without ever becoming a nuisance. When walking down a busy street or driving my car, I noticed a clear reduction in low humming noises, which let me enjoy my music at a lower volume. Having ANC on increases battery consumption, but the Freebuds Pro 2 mitigate this to some extent by adapting its intensity to the level of noise in the environment.

I liked the ability to control all the key functions of the Freebuds Pro 2 with gestures. You control the playback by pinching the earbuds’ stems, while pinching-and-holding cycles through the noise cancellation modes. You adjust the volume with swipes up and down the stems.

Calls sounded loud and clear on the Freebuds Pro 2. The person on the other end never had issues hearing me, even when I was driving in a car down the highway.

What’s not so good?

huawei freebuds pro 2 16

Bogdan Petrovan / Android Authority

I found the Freebuds Pro 2 battery life adequate for my needs, but they lag direct competitors in this regard. They are rated for four hours of listening with ANC, which is average (or slightly below) in 2022. For comparison, the Sony WF-1000XM4 are rated for up to eight hours of playback with ANC on, the Galaxy Buds Pro hit five hours, and the AirPods Pro four and a half hours. Even the original Freebuds Pro lasted longer, at five hours. On the bright side, the Freebuds Pro 2 charge very quickly — it only takes about 10 minutes to go from 0% to 50% (earbuds charging in the case), so at least you can go back to listening quickly.

Freebuds Pro 2 battery life is adequate, but it lags direct competitors in this regard

As with other Huawei headphones, you’ll only benefit from the Freebuds 2 Pro’s complete set of features if you use them with select Huawei phones, tablets, or PCs. The key functionality is available cross-platform, but check the “fine print” if there’s a particular feature you’re after.

Finally, I noticed some minor but annoying interruptions in playback when using the Freebuds Pro 2 with my laptop, but never with my phone. It’s hard to tell which device was to blame, but it’s something to be wary of if you plan on solely using them with a laptop.

Huawei Freebuds Pro 2 specs

Huawei FreeBuds 2

Size

Earbuds: 29.1 x 21.8 x 23.7mm
Case: 67.9 x 24.5 x 47.5mm

Weight

Earbuds: 6.1g
Case: 52g

Connectivity

Bluetooth 5.2
Dual device connection
Pop-up pair (on supported Huawei devices)
LDAC/AAC/SBC

Sensors

Touch: Pinch, swipe
Bone sensor/Accelerometer/Gyroscope sensor/Infrared sensor

Batteries

Per earbud: 55mAh
Charging case: 580mAh

4h of music playback per charge (ANC on)
6.5h of music playback per charge (ANC off)

30h of music playback with case included (ANC off)
18h of music playback with case included (ANC on)

Charging

USB-C, wireless charging (2W)
Charging time - earbuds in case: ~40 minutes
Charging time - case (no earbuds): ~1h

Speaker

11mm quad-magnet dynamic driver
planar diaphragm drive
14Hz ~ 48Hz

Audio

Active noise cancelling
Call noise cancelling

Water resistance

IP54

Colors

Silver Blue, Silver Frost, Ceramic White

Huawei Freebuds Pro 2 review: The verdict

huawei freebuds pro 2 5

Bogdan Petrovan / Android Authority

The Huawei Freebuds Pro 2 are a well-rounded package designed to please a wide userbase, and we say that as a compliment. They sound superb, they’re packed with features, and have decent battery life. They may not excel in any one area, but they are a compelling proposition that adeptly balances design, hardware, and software.

The Huawei Freebuds Pro 2 sound superb, they're packed with features, and have decent battery life

Huawei clearly set its sights on Apple and the AirPods Pro (£239) when it designed the Freebuds Pro 2. Feature for feature, the Freebuds are on par with the AirPods Pro while undercutting them in price by £70. If you’re okay with the platform-related limitations, the Freebuds Pro 2 look like the better choice for that reason alone, with the caveat that the AirPods Pro 2 (coming this fall) could change the terms of the equation.

If you want the best battery life, you should pass on the Freebuds Pro 2 and look instead at the Sony WF-1000XM4 (£250), Google Pixel Buds Pro (£179), or Bose Quietcomfort Earbuds (£249). That doesn’t mean the Freebuds Pro 2 have poor battery life — they should still be more than enough for most users. Also, Huawei’s earbuds are lighter and more discreet than these alternatives.

Don’t miss: The best headphone deals

Finally, it’s worth taking a look at the original Huawei Freebuds Pro. They’re currently available for as little as £80 and have slightly battery life. The ANC and sound improvements on the Freebuds Pro 2 may not be worth double the money.

Huawei Freebuds Pro 2

Excellent sound quality • Feature-rich • Lightweight and comfortable

A great pair of premium earbuds that undercuts the competition

Thanks to their great sound quality, effective active noise cancellation, and multitude of features, the Huawei Freebuds Pro 2 stand out in a crowded competitive field.

Top Huawei Freebuds Pro 2 questions and answers

The Huawei Freebuds Pro 2 are not waterproof, but they are water resistant. More accurately, the earbuds are rated IP54 or “splash resistant,” meaning they should handle the average rainy day or workout, but not full submersion or contact with a strong water jet. The case is not water resistant at all. Huawei warns that the water resistance on the Freebuds Pro 2 will decrease over time.

Yes, you can use the Freebuds Pro 2 with iPhones and iPads, as well as Mac computers. They will work like any Bluetooth headphones, but on iOS, they will not support all the features advertised by Huawei. Check the official product page for details.

The Freebuds Pro 2 support the LDAC, AAC, and SBC codecs. Using the AI Life app, you can toggle between LDAC (highest definition, highest battery consumption) and AAC. Most users will not notice the benefit of LDAC, so we recommend leaving the setting to AAC (standard definition). Check out this article for an explanation of the differences between codecs.

You can control the Freebuds Pro 2 by pinching the earbuds’ stem (one pinch: stop/play; two pinches: next track; three pinches: previous track); by pinching-and-holding (switch between ANC on, ANC off, and Awareness mode); and by swiping on the stems (volume up/down).

Yes, but it’s not called Transparency, which is Apple’s feature. Instead, it’s called Awareness mode, and it selectively pipes in voices and other sounds from the outside. This lets you chat or listen to announcements without removing your earphones.

Mon, 01 Aug 2022 23:22:00 -0500 en text/html https://www.androidauthority.com/huawei-freebuds-pro-2-review-3190338/
Killexams : Huawei MateView SE Features Rotatable Screen, AMD FreeSync, and eBook Mode

Huawei made a huge splash in Bangkok last week by launching a plethora of new devices for the Asia Pacific region. Five of them including the MateBook 16s, MateBook D16, MateBook X Pro (2022), MatePad Pro 11, and FreeBuds Pro 2 will be heading to Malaysia this month.

Alongside these five new devices, the company also launched the MateView SE monitor at the event. While it may be new for this region, the monitor has actually been released in Huawei’s native market of China back in May.

Huawei MateView SE

Huawei MateView SE

As opposed to previous models such as the MateView 4K and MateView GT, the SE is a much more modest and straightforward release. Featuring a 23.8-inch IPS panel with native Full HD resolution and 92% screen-to-body ratio, the strength of SE generally revolves around its output quality.

Huawei said that the SE’s display panel has 90% P3 colour gamut coverage and 100% for sRGB. Each SE has also been factory-calibrated to deliver Delta E’s colour accuracy rating of under two and the monitor also comes with an eBook mode that simulates the colour output to mimic e-ink display which would help reduce eye strains from prolonged viewing.

Huawei MateView SE
The MateView SE in standard output mode.
Huawei MateView SE
The MateView SE in eBook mode.

Together with the support for AMD FreeSync technology, the SE can deliver a maximum refresh rate of 75Hz. The monitor’s simplicity is further highlighted by the lack of additional I/O ports as the SE only has one DisplayPort as well as one HDMI port.

Furthermore, the standard variant of the SE only supports backward and forward tilting. To have the ability to rotate its screen or tweakable elevation, one has to opt for the variant that has the adjustable stand.

Huawei MateView SE
The MateView SE variant with an adjustable stand.
Huawei MateView SE
The MateView SE variant with a standard stand that is barely moveable.

Despite what is being mentioned on stage in Bangkok last month, Huawei has clarified to Lowyat.NET that the company has no plan to release the MateView SE in Malaysia anytime soon. Nevertheless, we will keep you posted if Huawei changes its plan for the monitor.

Follow us on Instagram, Facebook, Twitter or Telegram for more updates and breaking news. 

Sun, 31 Jul 2022 22:09:00 -0500 en-US text/html https://www.lowyat.net/2022/280566/huawei-mateview-se-rotate-freesync/
Killexams : Indian Ocean Region island states on Huawei’s radar for alleged surveillance activities A recent controversy over Huawei’s plan in Mauritius, a close strategic partner for India in the Indian Ocean Region, has brought to the fore the larger issue of cybersecurity, information security and electronic surveillance in Small Island Developing States, allegedly at the behest of China.

Huawei has a nearly two-decade old presence in Mauritius and the company states on its website that Huawei will play a key role in the installation of Safe City infrastructure to “transform Mauritius into a safe and stable country and make it the first African nation with integrated safety and intelligence”.

Huawei, in partnership with Mauritius Telecom, has proposed to build an all-cloud Safe City based on the concept of ‘one cloud and one pool’; harnessing centralised, mixed storage of videos, images, voice, and structured data gathered from multiple sources including surveillance cameras. Huawei claims that it is the only vendor in the industry that can simultaneously integrate converged command, intelligent surveillance, intelligent transportation, and cloud computing, and its Safe City solution has been deployed in 230 cities in more than 90 countries and regions.


This very technology has created controversy globally. But Huawei has always firmly rejected allegations about its special links with the Chinese Communist Party. Founded in 1987 by Ren Zhengfei, a former Deputy Regimental Head in the People’s Liberation Army, the company has steadily garnered a large share of the global market in past three decades. However, the company’s business and technology has come under scrutiny across the world including in India.

In 2016, Huawei Marine Networks teamed up with E-marine, the principal provider of submarine cable solutions in West Asia to complete the 260-km Avassa Submarine Cable System marine installation in Comoros Islands. In 2018, Comoros President Azali Assoumani, while on an official tour of China visited Huawei’s Beijing Executive Briefing Center. During the visit Assoumani said that his government expected to cooperate with Huawei to achieve the 2030 Strategic Vision in Comoros.

The company claims to serve 80 per cent of the Comoros’s population with its products and services. In neighbouring Madagascar, in 2015, a Smart City project was launched in partnership with the Huawei Group, and has since gathered pace. Reports indicated that in 2020, the nation’s senate had approved a US $ 42.7 mn deal to modernise the country’s public communications infrastructure with Huawei.

Mon, 01 Aug 2022 19:46:00 -0500 Dipanjan Roy Chaudhury en text/html https://economictimes.indiatimes.com/news/international/world-news/indian-ocean-region-island-states-on-huaweis-radar-for-alleged-surveillance-activities/articleshow/93293253.cms
Killexams : Why Indonesia Has Embraced Huawei

China is neither liked nor trusted in Indonesia. Yet Chinese tech firms—particularly Huawei and ZTE—have become trusted cybersecurity partners for the country. They provide the tech and the training for much of the workforce and the government officials charged with Indonesia’s cybersecurity. These Chinese tech successes in Indonesia offer sobering lessons for the United States, its allies, and its partners—not just in Indonesia, with a population of more than 270 million, but in the broader Indo-Pacific as well.

Unless policymakers in Washington take some pages from the Huawei and ZTE playbook, these Chinese tech titans will not face any serious competition as they maneuver to train vast swaths of the 21st century’s digital workforce. After all, the United States and its allies and partners have for years been in the business of walling themselves off from the perceived security vulnerabilities of dependence on Chinese technology.

Starting in the early 2010s, staunch U.S. allies such as Australia began limiting Huawei’s involvement in critical information communications technology infrastructure. This eventually culminated in strong restrictions—and sometimes outright exclusions—for Huawei and its peers such as ZTE.

China is neither liked nor trusted in Indonesia. Yet Chinese tech firms—particularly Huawei and ZTE—have become trusted cybersecurity partners for the country. They provide the tech and the training for much of the workforce and the government officials charged with Indonesia’s cybersecurity. These Chinese tech successes in Indonesia offer sobering lessons for the United States, its allies, and its partners—not just in Indonesia, with a population of more than 270 million, but in the broader Indo-Pacific as well.

Unless policymakers in Washington take some pages from the Huawei and ZTE playbook, these Chinese tech titans will not face any serious competition as they maneuver to train vast swaths of the 21st century’s digital workforce. After all, the United States and its allies and partners have for years been in the business of walling themselves off from the perceived security vulnerabilities of dependence on Chinese technology.

Starting in the early 2010s, staunch U.S. allies such as Australia began limiting Huawei’s involvement in critical information communications technology infrastructure. This eventually culminated in strong restrictions—and sometimes outright exclusions—for Huawei and its peers such as ZTE.

But for much of the developing world, the story could not be more different.

With a few notable exceptions including Vietnam and India, the developing world still welcomes Chinese tech companies as providers of sorely needed communications infrastructure and training. Huawei and ZTE have experienced among their warmest embraces in Indonesia. First entering the Indonesian market in the late 1990s and early 2000s, these companies have emerged as integral suppliers both of Indonesia’s essential communications infrastructure and the training that will empower the workforce of the country’s booming digital economy. Huawei, for example, already has by a wide margin the largest share of Indonesia’s telecom carrier equipment market.

As with many other developing countries, the relatively low price point of Huawei and ZTE kits is a big part of the appeal. By some estimates, Chinese communications infrastructure is as much as 30 percent cheaper than its competitors’.

Yet in setting out to document how senior Indonesian government officials approach the risks of technological reliance on Chinese companies for our new report, Localization and China’s Tech Success in Indonesia, we found that the reasons for the expansive role of China’s tech companies are more complex and numerous than price point. As our interviews with a wide range of Indonesian officials and experts made plain, Chinese tech companies are seen as partners to both realize Indonesia’s big digital economy goals and navigate its daunting cybersecurity challenges.

Although the digital economy is central to the Indonesian government’s plans for catapulting the country into the top 10 global economies by 2030, the country also faces a massive skills shortage in the field of information communications technology, with the World Bank projecting that it will need 9 million additional such workers by 2030.

Meanwhile, Indonesia is among the countries most vulnerable to cyberattacks globally. According to Indonesia’s National Cyber and Crypto Agency, the country experienced 1.4 billion cyberattacks or web traffic anomalies in 2021. In 2017, when the number of cyberattacks was closer to 200 million, they were estimated to have cost the country $34.2 billion.

Despite deep suspicion of Chinese tech companies among rich liberal democracies, Huawei and ZTE have presented themselves as the solution to Indonesia’s twin challenges of an impending tech skills shortfall and pervasive cyberattacks.

In 2020, Huawei pledged to train 100,000 Indonesians in essential digital skills, including cloud computing and 5G. Despite the ambitiousness of the move, Huawei is backing its pledges with resources.

We found that Huawei is partnering with local Indonesian universities to offer free short courses and certifications in app development and other key skills. One Indonesian academic we spoke to shared emails showing that Huawei is expanding its outreach by seeking to partner with more local universities and education providers.

Huawei is offering training to the Indonesian government as well, with the company reportedly having trained 7,000 officials since 2019. Indonesia has long been a victim of China’s sophisticated cyber-espionage. Despite this, Indonesia sees the training offered by Chinese tech companies as a solution to many of the country’s most severe cybersecurity challenges.

For Indonesia, the threat of state-based cyber-espionage is far down the list of security concerns when compared to cybercrime committed by nonstate actors, misinformation, and disinformation. In addition to financial losses for Indonesian companies and identity theft and fraud for ordinary Indonesians, these threats endanger the country’s social and political stability.

With Chinese tech companies offering the training, technology, and security practices to reduce vulnerabilities to cybercrime committed by nonstate actors and the skills and technology needed to manage the information domain, the Indonesian government sees firms like Huawei as partners. As a testament to this, the country’s National Cyber and Crypto Agency signed a memorandum of understanding with Huawei on cybersecurity capacity building in 2019. This agreement was then upgraded to a three-party agreement with a leading Indonesian technology institute in 2021.

For the United States or Australia, the notion that a cybersecurity agency would sign such an agreement with Huawei might seem absurd—especially considering that the Chinese government can compel Chinese companies to assist with its intelligence efforts.

But for Indonesia, these concerns about state security are trumped by the training and technology benefits that companies like Huawei provide. As one senior Indonesian government official said to us: “If we’re constantly afraid, our development will stagnate.”

If the United States and its allies and partners want to compete with China in developing countries such as Indonesia, then, much like Huawei, they need to get themselves in the business of offering tangible benefits that respond to real needs.

The U.S. government should partner with its leading tech companies to offer free or at least highly subsidized technical training programs in Indonesia and elsewhere in the Indo-Pacific. As well as subjecting the offerings from Chinese companies to some healthy competition, such initiatives would be welcomed by key U.S. allies and partners.

Countries such as Japan, Australia, and India are similarly concerned about the rise of Chinese tech companies across the Indo-Pacific and would strongly support such a U.S. initiative. Moreover, these countries could bolster such a U.S.-led effort by providing additional know-how, funding, and technology. Such a so-called minilateral initiative could also potentially be rolled into exiting Quad efforts to provide more public goods in the Indo-Pacific.

Rhetoric from the United States and like-minded countries about the rules-based international order and a free and open Indo-Pacific isn’t bad. But it won’t persuade developing countries to turn down tangible benefits like technology and training. To shift decision-making in Jakarta and elsewhere, Washington will need to step up with technology and training offers that provide a more appealing value proposition.

None of this is to say that strategic competition with China is the only reason for offering tech training programs in Indonesia and other developing countries in the Indo-Pacific.

Helping to upskill future generations of tech workers in the region is an unambiguously good thing. Many Indo-Pacific countries and their young populations will need these skills to realize their development goals in the global economy’s digital future.

But as well as the clear development rationale for providing these kinds of opportunities, there is a compelling realpolitik reason. Without training funded and supported by the United States and its allies and partners, Huawei and other Chinese tech companies will only increase their already strong influence over Indonesia’s—and the broader region’s—technology landscape.

The United States and its allies and partners have been missing in action on tech training in Indonesia and other key developing economies in the Indo-Pacific. It is time for them to get back in the game.

Thu, 28 Jul 2022 00:10:00 -0500 en-US text/html https://foreignpolicy.com/2022/07/28/indonesia-china-huawei-tech-cybersecurity/?tpcc=onboarding_trending
Killexams : TAT joins hands with Huawei to promote smart tourism

published : 8 Aug 2022 at 11:49

Tourism Authority of Thailand (TAT) and Huawei Technology (Thailand) sign a memorandum of understanding (MoU) for "Digital Transformation and Innovation Development for Smart Tourism", promoting innovative tourism through 5G networks.

Today, Napintorn Srisunpang, Deputy Minister of Tourism and Sports, presided over the signing ceremony of the MoU between the TAT, led by TAT Governor Yuthasak Supasorn, and Huawei Technology (Thailand) Co., Ltd., led by Chief Executive Officer Abel Deng and witnessed by Vice President of Huawei Asia Pacific Jun Zhang. This MOU will help promote Thai tourism industry through advanced technologies from Huawei, including 5G, Cloud, AI and AR/VR, in order to develop a Smart Digital Tourism Platform and a new tourism ecosystem. 

“According to Thailand’s 20-year National Strategy (2018-2037), tourism will play a pivotal role for the country’s sustainable development. As we aim to elevate the tourism industry and increase competitive advantages in the market, it is important to bring in innovative technologies to drive tourism. I am pleased that Huawei Technologies (Thailand) Co., Ltd. will take this opportunity to help drive Thai tourism through 5G technology support by applying new applications, multimedia and services that emerge from the future of high-speed networks to promote tourism marketing. We also aim to expand the tourism market and deliver ‘Meaningful Travel’ that will make Thai and foreign tourists aware of Thai tourism products and services.” said Mr Napintorn.

“As the main government agency who helps to promote Thai tourism under the TAT Corporate Plan 2023-2027 – ‘TAT is the strategic leader in driving Thailand toward experience-based and sustainable tourism’ – we aim to promote capabilities and innovative potential to drive the tourism ecosystem to be able to support tourists in a sustainable way. We have also developed the supply chain (Shape supply) and are driving the ‘Thrive for Excellence’ strategy with the aim of becoming a ‘Data Driven Organization’.” said Mr Yuthasak, the TAT governor.

To increase capabilities, elevate the tourism industry with innovative technologies and promote strategic markets - both in the domestic and Chinese tourism markets - TAT and Huawei Technologies (Thailand) Co., Ltd. signed an MOU for "DIGITAL TRANSFORMATION AND INNOVATION DEVELOPMENT FOR SMART TOURISM" that will be effective for 1 year from the signing date. This cooperation will create a digital alliance network that enables skill and expertise exchanges to help elevate technology and innovation for the tourism industry. It also supports technological developments such as 5G, Cloud, AI and AR/VR  for tourism, which will drive digital transformation across the tourism industry. In addition, TAT and Huawei are preparing to implement the ‘Amazing THAILAND is just a phone call away’ project, for which TAT will create a ‘Video Ring back Tone’, a call-waiting video showcasing the beauty of Thai tourist attractions, culture, food and traditions to promote Thai tourism internationally through Thai 5G users using Huawei’s 5G as well as Huawei's partner networks. Users will be able to obtain videos and images, free of charge.

Mr Abel said digital technologies are reshaping the world, and digital transformation has entered a golden age. Looking into the future, Huawei is committed to leveraging advanced technologies to heighten TAT’s position as the strategic leader driving Thailand towards being a world-class tourism destination.

In addition, both organizations have made a joint effort to bring 5G innovative technologies to stimulate Thai tourism through live broadcasting by highlighting stunning viewpoints at Thailand’s tourist attractions in real time on HUAWEI’s 5G network via TAT’s online media channels, including the ‘Amazing Thailand’ YouTube channel and ‘Amazing Thailand’ application, as well as through various online channels of strategic partners.

As a part of corporation, TAT will also host a field trip for  young contestants from the ‘Seeds for The Future’ program at Wat Phra Sri Rattana Satsadaram and Wat Phra Chetuphon Wimon Mangkalaram on 20 August 2022. This is Huawei’s largest-ever regional onsite Seeds for the Future event, which will gather 114 top students from 15 countries in the Asia-Pacific region for a 9-day digital camp in Thailand from Aug 19 to Aug 27. 

Seeds for the Future was first launched in Thailand in 2008. By the end of 2021, the program has been implemented in 150 countries and regions, reaching 12,000 students from over 500 universities. Through this program, TAT aims to deliver a new tourism experience that is more meaningful and memorable during this year’s regional event.

Sun, 07 Aug 2022 16:49:00 -0500 text/html https://www.bangkokpost.com/thailand/pr/2363896/tat-joins-hands-with-huawei-to-promote-smart-tourism
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