No more exam failing with 9L0-622 PDF Questions by killexams.com

We now have valid and upwards currently 9L0-622 Exam Concerns. killexams.com provides the specific in addition to most recent 9L0-622 Practice Test that will practically contain just about all tricky questions. With all the practice of the 9L0-622 test dumps, a person Does not have in order to bother about your real 9L0-622 exam. Simply, a person needs to devote 10-24 hours in order to memorize our 9L0-622 PDF Questions in addition to answers before a person actually face an authentic exam.

Exam Code: 9L0-622 Practice exam 2022 by Killexams.com team
Xsan 2 Administration
Apple Administration outline
Killexams : Apple Administration outline - BingNews https://killexams.com/pass4sure/exam-detail/9L0-622 Search results Killexams : Apple Administration outline - BingNews https://killexams.com/pass4sure/exam-detail/9L0-622 https://killexams.com/exam_list/Apple Killexams : This Is When Apple Stock Will Outperform The S&P 500

When will Apple stock outperform the S&P 500 again? I found important clues by going back to 2007 and looking at the data. Here is what investors should know.

As the old saying goes, history does not repeat, but it often rhymes. This is why I like to look at the past performance of Apple stock  (AAPL) - Get Apple Inc. Report and compare it to the S&P 500  (SPY) - Get S&P 500 ETF TRUST ETF Report to understand when shares are most likely to produce strong gains.

Today, I go back to 2007, the year that the original iPhone was unveiled, and try to understand: under what circumstances has AAPL outperformed the broad market in the past decade and a half? Could doing so provide a clue as to when shares will impress once again?

Figure 1: This Is When Apple Stock Will Outperform The S&P 500 Unsplash © Provided by Apple Maven on The Street Figure 1: This Is When Apple Stock Will Outperform The S&P 500 Unsplash

(Read more from Apple Maven: AAPL Bears Do A Happy Dance: Were They Right?)

AAPL does not merely follow the market

Those familiar with the capital asset pricing model must have heard of the concept of beta. This statistical metric informs the sensitivity of one stock’s price, for example, to the movements of the overall stock market.

For instance, Apple stock’s beta is approximately 1.2. This means that for every increase or decrease of 1% in the S&P 500, investors should expect AAPL to also rise or decline, but by 1.2% instead – that is, 1% times the 1.2 beta.

The problem is that beta simplifies things a bit too much, as it establishes a static relationship. Look more closely at the different periods, and one can see that Apple’s outperformance or underperformance relative to the market is not easily caputurd by beta.

The scatter plot below shows the relationship between the 12-month rolling returns in SPY (horizontal axis) vs. those of Apple stock (vertical axis).

If AAPL consistently produced 1.2 times the performance of the S&P 500, the dots would line up perfectly in ascending fashion, from left to right. They do, to be fair, but only minimally. The very low r-squared of 0.02 suggests that the connection between the two is largely immaterial.

Figure 2: Scatter plot: AAPL outperformance vs. SPY returns. DM Martins Research © Provided by Apple Maven on The Street Figure 2: Scatter plot: AAPL outperformance vs. SPY returns. DM Martins Research

In other words: if the S&P 500 is up 10% over 12 months, it is far from a certainty that Apple will be up 12%. Therefore, I don’t think it is fair to say that AAPL will outperform the S&P 500 once the broad market heads higher, merely as a result of the former’s sensitivity to the latter.

Look for company-specific catalysts

The following graph seems to point us in a different (and better) direction. The chart shows AAPL’s rolling 12-month outperformance or underperformance since 2007. I have highlighted the outliers in the bullet points below:

Figure 3: AAPL rolling 12-month outperformance vs. SPY. DM Martins Research © Provided by Apple Maven on The Street Figure 3: AAPL rolling 12-month outperformance vs. SPY. DM Martins Research

What do the above points have in common? Apple stock deviated substantially from the performance of the S&P 500 when meaningful, company-specific events took place: from the launch of the iPhone to outperformance during the Great Financial Crisis to stock splits.

This should provide us with a clue as to what could happen next. AAPL is most likely to beat the market, in my view, as a result of company-specific factors – and not market-wide events – that can range from substantially better-than-expected quarterly results to the launch of new products or services that could surprise (positively) its investors.

What could these next catalysts be? A killer holiday quarter? The launch of a mixed reality device? The announcement of a new venture involving automated vehicles? It is hard to tell for sure, but taking a few guesses can be an interesting exercise.

So, let me know your thoughts below.

Ask Twitter

Historically, AAPL has beaten the S&P 500 following meaningful, company-specific events – the launch of the iPhone in 2007 and the stock split in 2020, for example. What do you think will be the next major catalyst that drives outperformance?

Land a Top Equity Research Job with Peak Frameworks

Equity research is a great career path that combines deep industry analysis and financial modeling, while exposing you to the strategic frameworks of many different types of investors in the stock market.

Many students have used the Peak Frameworks Equity Research course to break into the industry out of school, or to transition into the field from a non-finance career path. The lead instructor has experience working at Goldman Sachs and J.P. Morgan and was involved in the recruiting process at both banks, so you’ll get a comprehensive view of the skills you need to get and prepare for an interview.

To learn more, click on this link and use the code APPLEMAVEN10 for 10% off the course.

Peak Frameworks © Provided by Apple Maven on The Street Peak Frameworks

(Disclaimers: this is not investment advice. The author may be long one or more stocks mentioned in this report. Also, the article may contain affiliate links. These partnerships do not influence editorial content. Thanks for supporting the Apple Maven)

Wed, 05 Oct 2022 03:12:00 -0500 en-US text/html https://www.msn.com/en-us/money/topstocks/this-is-when-apple-stock-will-outperform-the-s-26p-500/ar-AA12Czi7
Killexams : Apple workers in Oklahoma vote for company's second U.S. union store

A shopper looks at a wall fully occupied with iPhone case covers at the American multinational technology company Apple store in Hong Kong. China's consumer prices rose at a slower-than-expected pace in August amid heatwaves and Covid-19 flare-ups, while producer inflation eased to the lowest since February 2021, official data showed.

Budrul Chukrut | Lightrocket | Getty Images

Employees at an Apple store in Oklahoma City voted on Friday to join a union, marking the second unionized Apple store in the U.S.

The vote is a defeat for Apple, which has opposed unionization efforts around the country. It's a win for Communications Workers of America, which now represents the workers at an Apple store after separate unionization efforts at stores in Georgia and New York City stalled.

The tally was 56 votes in favor and 32 opposed. Approximately 94 employees were eligible to join CWA. Voting took place earlier this week.

"The Penn Square Apple retail workers are an amazing addition to our growing labor movement, and we are thrilled to welcome them as CWA members," CWA Secretary-Treasurer Sara Steffens said in a statement.

"We believe the open, direct and collaborative relationship we have with our valued team members is the best way to provide an excellent experience for our customers, and for our teams," Apple said in a statement, adding that since 2018 it has increased its starting wages in the U.S. by 45%.

The National Labor Relations Board will certify the votes in the coming week. After that, Apple is required to bargain with the union over working conditions.

Apple has opposed the union, according to a CWA filing earlier this month, which alleged that Apple management held anti-union meetings and threatened to withhold perks from stores that unionized.

Apple's first unionized U.S. store, represented by the International Association of Machinists and Aerospace Workers in Maryland, is preparing to begin formal negotiations with Apple. According to Bloomberg News, Apple told staff there that it would not get some perks such as tuition pre-payment or access to online courses, because it would need to be negotiated with the union.

Apple is one of the most valuable companies in the world, reporting over $365 billion in global sales in 2021. It has about 270 stores in the U.S.

Fri, 14 Oct 2022 14:30:00 -0500 en text/html https://www.cnbc.com/2022/10/14/apple-workers-in-oklahoma-vote-for-companys-second-us-union-store-.html
Killexams : Apple Inc. (NASDAQ:AAPL) Shares Purchased by Litman Gregory Wealth Management LLC

Litman Gregory Wealth Management LLC raised its position in shares of Apple Inc. (NASDAQ:AAPLGet Rating) by 1.2% in the second quarter, according to its most exact 13F filing with the Securities & Exchange Commission. The firm owned 25,371 shares of the iPhone maker’s stock after purchasing an additional 290 shares during the period. Litman Gregory Wealth Management LLC’s holdings in Apple were worth $3,469,000 at the end of the most exact quarter.

Other hedge funds and other institutional investors have also recently bought and sold shares of the company. Donald L. Hagan LLC increased its holdings in shares of Apple by 0.3% during the 1st quarter. Donald L. Hagan LLC now owns 18,220 shares of the iPhone maker’s stock valued at $3,181,000 after acquiring an additional 61 shares during the last quarter. Goodwin Daniel L grew its stake in Apple by 0.5% in the 1st quarter. Goodwin Daniel L now owns 12,761 shares of the iPhone maker’s stock valued at $2,230,000 after buying an additional 62 shares during the last quarter. Opus Capital Group LLC raised its holdings in Apple by 0.3% in the 1st quarter. Opus Capital Group LLC now owns 19,081 shares of the iPhone maker’s stock worth $3,332,000 after acquiring an additional 63 shares during the period. Norwood Financial Corp raised its holdings in Apple by 0.9% in the 1st quarter. Norwood Financial Corp now owns 7,025 shares of the iPhone maker’s stock worth $1,227,000 after acquiring an additional 65 shares during the period. Finally, Investors Research Corp boosted its holdings in Apple by 0.4% during the first quarter. Investors Research Corp now owns 16,117 shares of the iPhone maker’s stock valued at $2,814,000 after acquiring an additional 66 shares during the period. 57.72% of the stock is owned by institutional investors and hedge funds.

Analysts Set New Price Targets

A number of research firms have recently commented on AAPL. Monness Crespi & Hardt initiated coverage on Apple in a research note on Thursday, September 8th. They issued a “buy” rating and a $174.00 price objective on the stock. set a $175.00 price target on Apple in a report on Friday, July 29th. Sanford C. Bernstein set a $170.00 price target on shares of Apple in a research report on Monday, September 12th. Bank of America lowered shares of Apple from a “buy” rating to a “neutral” rating and decreased their price target for the stock from $185.00 to $160.00 in a research report on Thursday, September 29th. Finally, KeyCorp raised their price target on shares of Apple from $177.00 to $185.00 and gave the stock an “overweight” rating in a research report on Friday, August 19th. Two investment analysts have rated the stock with a sell rating, seven have issued a hold rating, twenty-two have issued a buy rating and one has given a strong buy rating to the company. According to data from MarketBeat.com, the company presently has a consensus rating of “Moderate Buy” and an average price target of $180.35.

Apple Stock Performance

Shares of Apple stock opened at $138.38 on Monday. The firm has a fifty day moving average of $156.16 and a two-hundred day moving average of $153.31. The stock has a market capitalization of $2.22 trillion, a price-to-earnings ratio of 22.84, a PEG ratio of 1.76 and a beta of 1.25. Apple Inc. has a 52 week low of $129.04 and a 52 week high of $182.94. The company has a debt-to-equity ratio of 1.63, a quick ratio of 0.82 and a current ratio of 0.86.

Apple (NASDAQ:AAPLGet Rating) last issued its earnings results on Thursday, July 28th. The iPhone maker reported $1.20 EPS for the quarter, beating the consensus estimate of $1.14 by $0.06. The company had revenue of $82.96 billion during the quarter, compared to analysts’ expectations of $82.97 billion. Apple had a net margin of 25.71% and a return on equity of 152.97%. The business’s revenue for the quarter was up 1.9% compared to the same quarter last year. During the same quarter in the previous year, the company posted $1.30 EPS. As a group, equities research analysts predict that Apple Inc. will post 6.11 EPS for the current year.

Apple Dividend Announcement

The company also recently disclosed a quarterly dividend, which was paid on Thursday, August 11th. Investors of record on Monday, August 8th were given a $0.23 dividend. This represents a $0.92 dividend on an annualized basis and a dividend yield of 0.66%. The ex-dividend date was Friday, August 5th. Apple’s dividend payout ratio is currently 15.18%.

Insider Activity at Apple

In related news, SVP Deirdre O’brien sold 176,299 shares of the company’s stock in a transaction on Monday, October 3rd. The shares were sold at an average price of $142.16, for a total value of $25,062,665.84. Following the completion of the sale, the senior vice president now owns 136,290 shares in the company, valued at approximately $19,374,986.40. The transaction was disclosed in a filing with the SEC, which is available through this link. In related news, SVP Deirdre O’brien sold 176,299 shares of the company’s stock in a transaction on Monday, October 3rd. The shares were sold at an average price of $142.16, for a total value of $25,062,665.84. Following the completion of the sale, the senior vice president now owns 136,290 shares in the company, valued at approximately $19,374,986.40. The transaction was disclosed in a filing with the SEC, which is available through this link. Also, CFO Luca Maestri sold 96,735 shares of the company’s stock in a transaction on Wednesday, August 17th. The shares were sold at an average price of $174.95, for a total transaction of $16,923,788.25. Following the completion of the sale, the chief financial officer now owns 110,673 shares of the company’s stock, valued at approximately $19,362,241.35. The disclosure for this sale can be found here. Insiders sold a total of 298,034 shares of company stock worth $46,105,704 in the last quarter. Corporate insiders own 0.06% of the company’s stock.

About Apple

(Get Rating)

Apple Inc designs, manufactures, and markets smartphones, personal computers, tablets, wearables, and accessories worldwide. It also sells various related services. In addition, the company offers iPhone, a line of smartphones; Mac, a line of personal computers; iPad, a line of multi-purpose tablets; AirPods Max, an over-ear wireless headphone; and wearables, home, and accessories comprising AirPods, Apple TV, Apple Watch, Beats products, HomePod, and iPod touch.

Recommended Stories

Want to see what other hedge funds are holding AAPL? Visit HoldingsChannel.com to get the latest 13F filings and insider trades for Apple Inc. (NASDAQ:AAPLGet Rating).

Institutional Ownership by Quarter for Apple (NASDAQ:AAPL)

Receive News & Ratings for Apple Daily - Enter your email address below to receive a concise daily summary of the latest news and analysts' ratings for Apple and related companies with MarketBeat.com's FREE daily email newsletter.

Sun, 16 Oct 2022 20:10:00 -0500 Defense World Staff en text/html https://www.defenseworld.net/2022/10/17/apple-inc-nasdaqaapl-shares-purchased-by-litman-gregory-wealth-management-llc.html
Killexams : Fiscal policy under Marcos: Budget, taxes, debt a risky mix

MANILA, Philippines – Fiscal policy refers to how governments use expenditure and taxation to influence a country’s economic conditions. It is a critical component of an administration’s development plan; its spending priorities and corresponding resource mobilization have short- and long-term consequences on employment, inflation, investment, growth, and economic progress.

On one side of fiscal policy is spending. Government expenditure is an important lever to drive employment. According to the latest Labor Force Survey, an estimated 4.27 million people in the Philippines worked for government or government corporations. This accounts for over nine percent of the country’s employment. National Accounts also show that government spending made up about 15.3 percent of Gross Domestic Product in 2021.

While the sheer size and impact of government expenditures is apparent, the new administration must be strategic in the way that it prioritizes its programs and allocates its resources accordingly. The National Expenditure Program (NEP) of the Department of Budget and Management (DBM) outlines total new appropriations worth P5.268 trillion for Fiscal Year 2023, with P3.002 trillion allocated for departments and agencies and P1.257 trillion as special purpose funds. In evaluating the proposed budget, one must ascertain whether these allocations strategically address the country’s current economic and developmental state, especially in the context of pursuing a post-pandemic recovery.

The other side of fiscal policy is taxation: how effectively does the government consolidate resources to fund its delivery of programs and services? After passing significant tax reforms during the previous administration, the government was able to collect total revenues worth P3.005 trillion in 2021, which is a revenue-to-GDP effort of 15.5 percent. A post-COVID recovery strategy, however, will necessarily entail stimulating the economy and providing social safety nets. Spending thus outpaced revenues by P1.67 trillion for a deficit ratio of 8.6 percent of GDP. 

When the government spends more than it collects in revenue, it must borrow either domestically or from foreign creditors. As a consequence of the exact above-average deficits, outstanding debt has risen to P13.206 trillion as of June 2022, from a pre-pandemic level of P8.220 trillion by the end of 2019. The debt-ratio has increased from 42 percent of GDP to 64 percent of GDP.

While borrowing is not inherently bad, it is sustainable only if the government can Boost its capacity to pay its debts, either by increasing its revenue effort or by accelerating economic growth. DBM’s fiscal consolidation and resource mobilization plan seeks to achieve both of these goals simultaneously by continuing the pursuit of tax reforms that will make the country’s tax systems simpler, fairer, and more efficient.

Given the importance of fiscal policy, it is worthwhile to track the country’s current fiscal and economic conditions, as well as the new administration’s proposed spending priorities and tax policies. Due to time constraints, however, our team decided to focus on the country’s present fiscal and economic health for the first part of our report, and on the 2023 National Expenditure Program for the second part. 

The big economic picture

Prior to the COVID-19 pandemic, the Philippines had sustained economic growth during the past decade. But due to pandemic-induced lockdowns, supply chain disruptions, and global uncertainty, the Philippines experienced its worst economic recession since World War II (or as far back as data are available).

Chart

During the previous decade (2010 to 2019), revenue effort averaged 14.5 percent while expenditure effort averaged 16.6 percent, resulting in an average deficit ratio of 2.1 percent.

Chart
Chart

The Duterte administration pushed an expansionary fiscal policy strategy reliant on infrastructure spending, which it dubbed Build, Build, Build. In order to fund its development strategy, the previous administration also enacted the Tax Reform for Acceleration and Inclusion or TRAIN law. The TRAIN law included reforms to the personal income tax, excise taxes, and VAT, along with other tax administration reforms, as well as funds earmarked for cash transfers to the poorest households. This resulted in an increased government revenue effort, albeit with a larger expenditure effort as well.

Chart

As a result of the COVID-19 pandemic, however, economic activities were restricted and the economy largely contracted. This had two major implications on the country’s fiscal situation. First, since economic output fell, the tax base also fell. This resulted in lower total revenues for 2020. Second, in order to mitigate the long-term adverse health and economic impacts of the pandemic, the government had to pursue expansionary fiscal policy. Bayanihan I (RA 11469) was enacted on March 25, 2020, and Bayanihan II (RA11494) on July 27, 2020, in order to reallocate funds toward health expenditures and pandemic response, as well as to provide direct subsidies or ayuda to those affected.

Chart

Since 2020, the economy has somewhat recovered, although we are continuing to feel the impact of COVID-19. The percentage of Filipino families below the poverty line rose from 12.1 in 2018 to 13.2 in 2021. The fiscal deficit increased to 3.4 percent of GDP in 2019 to 8.6 percent in 2021. As a result, the country’s outstanding debt has risen to P13.206 trillion as of June 2022, from a pre-pandemic level of P8.220 trillion at the end of 2019. This represents an increase in debt-to-GDP from 42 percent to 64 percent during that period. 

Chart

Right to Know, Right Now! (R2KRN) Coalition/Rappler.com

This piece is republished with permission from the Action for Economic Reforms and the Right to Know, Right Now! (R2KRN) Coalition. The R2KRN Coalition is a network of advocates campaigning for the passage of the Freedom of Information law and the promotion of FOI practice in the country.

Sun, 16 Oct 2022 23:00:00 -0500 en-US text/html https://www.rappler.com/business/newsbreak-explainers-marcos-jr-fiscal-policy-budget-taxes-debt-risky-mix/
Killexams : Kandji gives boost to Apple mobile device management security

AppleInsider may earn an affiliate commission on purchases made through links on our site.

Mobile device management provider Kandji has launched Device Harmony, a platform that aims to add more security to an MDM system that will benefit both enterprise IT and InfoSec teams.

Kandji's Device Harmony is built on the belief that existing MDM systems don't service both general IT teams and those in InfoSec managing security. While IT manages the usability of devices on the network, InfoSec have to monitor and defend against attacks and other security risks on the network.

With two fairly different aims, the two teams would typically work fairly separately. "But today, IT and InfoSec teams must work together to keep their company and users both secure and productive," according to founder and CEO Adam Pettit. "To win now, these teams need shared data and systems."

Device Harmony connects together a number of tool and feature categories into one bundle: Device Management, Vulnerability Management, Endpoint Detection and Response, Endpoint Visibility, and Endpoint Compliance. Using shared intelligence, automation, and cross-functional workflows, the teams can work together using the same tools and with little in the way of compromise.

"With Device Harmony, these teams can unlock a comprehensive view of every endpoint and create a shared reality between IT and InfoSec, so they can recognize and remediate risks within a single platform, reducing the gap between identifying and addressing issues," continued Pettit.

The founder continued "Now, IT and InfoSec teams can work together to navigate their fleets and take action, while providing users with the most elegant, Apple-native experience possible while maintaining a strong security posture."

The Vulnerability Management of Device Harmony now provides a full view of vulnerabilities across macOS, descriptions, history, severity, affected software, and devices where that software is installed. Teams can then use Kandji to mitigate the vulnerability by upgrading and blocking apps, and running scripts to uninstall apps.

Rather than a periodic scan, Kandji instead uses a lightweight service within the Kandji Agent running on the Mac. Leveraging Apple's Endpoint Security framework, the agent listens for application-related events to work out if new vulnerabilities have been introduced or patch, with insights provided in real time.

The Endpoint Detection and Response pillar uses the agent to monitor all files and application on the Mac in real time, providing a detailed view of detected events, threat names and classification, and other relevant actions to the main system. The agent can then terminate malicious processes, and quarantine files.

The approach also uses pre-execution and post-execution methodologies, with the former able to take down "almost all malware variants" and reduce the risk of malware running before security software can stop it. Post-execution, there is the detection of threats without needing to see the malware beforehand, by looking for actions that malware typically takes while executing.

All of the Device Harmony capabilities are being deployed through the Kandji Agent, built using Swift. Apple's technologies that are exclusive to MDM solutions are also being used to ensure the agent is alive and installed.

The Vulnerability Management and Endpoint Detection and Response arms of Device Harmony are being rolled out to select customers of Kandji, with general availability to all users within a few weeks. Endpoint Visibility and Endpoint Compliance will be previewed to customers in early 2023.

Mon, 03 Oct 2022 17:53:00 -0500 en text/html https://appleinsider.com/articles/22/10/03/kandji-gives-boost-to-apple-mobile-device-management-security
Killexams : After missing out on a bite of the apple in 2022, Brewers management must reflect and adapt © Michael McLoone-USA TODAY Sports

The 2022 season was a failure at the big-league level for the Milwaukee Brewers.

For the first time since 2017, the Brewers will not play postseason baseball. After winning 95 regular-season games last year, they finished 86-76, lost the division to the Cardinals by seven games, and fell one game short of the Phillies for the newly-instituted third Wild Card.

For an organization attempting to win a World Series, that is not good enough.

Adding to the frustration is that they squandered a franchise-record 32-18 start through their first 50 games. The Brewers went 54-58 the rest of the way in an extended display of inconsistent and lackluster play. Injuries, underperformance, controversial transactions, and surprisingly blunt comments by players to the media made the team difficult to watch even as they remained squarely in the hunt for a postseason spot.

The Brewers had plenty of chances to right the ship, and they responded by repeatedly tripping over their own feet.

On September 1, they were 2.5 games behind the Phillies for the final Wild Card and 3.5 games behind the Padres. The Phillies went 14-17 the rest of the way, and the Padres went 16-14.

That was enough to provide the Brewers a good deal of control over their destiny, but they failed to take advantage of the opportunity. They concluded the season by going 17-16, dropping series against the Diamondbacks, Rockies, and Marlins along the way, and were eliminated on Monday night.

As the year progressed, the Brewers settled into a pattern of one step forward, one step back. They rarely played complete baseball.

Perhaps the best assessment of the season came from Christian Yelich, who relayed that this year’s team struggled to find its identity.

Yelich noted that the teams that took the Brewers to the postseason in exact years had a discernable formula for winning games, but this year’s group did not.

That assessment is correct. The 2022 Brewers were not a bad team but lacked a clear strength. Offensively, they finished with a 104 wRC+ and ranked 11th of 30 teams in runs scored. While that’s a hair better than average, it’s nothing exciting.

The same was true for the pitching staff, which finished seventh with a 95- ERA. Defensively, the Brewers also ranked seventh in Defensive Runs Saved and in FanGraphs’ Defensive Runs Above Average metric.

The Brewers were inconsistent in all areas of the game. When the dust settled, they were okay at hitting, okay at pitching, okay defensively, and exceptional at nothing. Looking back, it’s hardly surprising that the sum of those parts produced a decent but unspectacular record.

Okay was not the expectation, and it was not enough to get the Brewers into the postseason. How did they wind up playing okay baseball with no clear winning formula to guide them?

The front office must analyze the season from start to finish to answer that question and make the necessary changes to avoid a similar fate in 2023.

Let’s start at the beginning.

To identify how they wound up without an identity, one must revisit the intended formula for this year’s team.

The Brewers excelled last season as a team built on run prevention. Their 83 ERA- and 26.3 RA9-WAR (Wins Above Replacement derived from runs allowed per nine innings) trailed only the Dodgers and Giants. They had a below-average offense but an elite pitching staff. The hitters knew they only had to scratch across a few runs and let the pitching do the rest.

This year’s unit was to follow the same formula. The front office made that clear by making minimal effort to Boost the offense with external additions. Turning Jackie Bradley Jr. into Hunter Renfroe was a nice move, but it effectively maintained the status quo in right field after Avisail Garcia departed as a free agent. It was expected that the Brewers would find a replacement.

The Brewers’ self-touted major acquisition was the signing of Andrew McCutchen after the new collective bargaining agreement introduced the designated hitter in the National League.

In a season that featured multiple controversial transactions, the front office and coaching staff exhibited perhaps their worst decision-making process of the year with the signing and deployment of McCutchen.

While no longer the star-caliber player he was for much of the 2010s with the division-rival Pittsburgh Pirates, McCutchen still had a reputation for doing damage against left-handed pitching. He owned a career 158 wRC+ against southpaws, including a fantastic 169 mark in 2021.

On the flip side, McCutchen was no longer a capable hitter against right-handed pitching. He had limped to a 78 wRC+ against right-handers over his last two seasons combined.

The Brewers struggled against left-handers in 2021, and McCutchen was a great choice to help them out in a limited role as a platoon bat. Instead, they counted on him to be one of their best hitters against right-handers, batting him cleanup against same-handed pitching for most of the season.

When asked about his platoon splits in spring training, the Brewers justified their decision by claiming that McCutchen’s 2021 batted ball data against right-handers included encouraging signs and pointed toward some poor luck. His Statcast numbers refuted that claim.

There was no reason to believe that McCutchen would suddenly turn back the clock against right-handers at age 35, yet the Brewers counted on him to do precisely that. Unsurprisingly, he did not meet those unrealistic expectations. McCutchen actually improved dramatically against right-handers, but his 95 wRC+ against them in 2022 was still subpar. Relying on him to produce in the cleanup spot until September was a foolish plan from day one.

Making matters worse, because they saw him as a run producer, the Brewers encouraged McCutchen’s new approach of being more aggressive on pitches in the zone. This change lowered his walk rate from 14.1% to 9.8% and his on-base percentage from .334 to .314. By getting on base less, McCutchen could not maximize the skill he still possessed: his excellent speed.

The utilization of McCutchen never made sense, and the underwhelming results should surprise no one.

Nonetheless, the blueprint for the roster as a whole was reasonable. Nearly the entire pitching core—including each of Milwaukee’s top five starting pitchers—was returning. The returning cast and their success throughout the previous regular season made it an easy choice to run it back with another team specializing in run prevention.

The run-prevention unit did not need to match its 2021 dominance perfectly. The expectation was that a Christian Yelich bounceback and full seasons of Willy Adames and Rowdy Tellez would help the Brewers Boost upon their 92 wRC+ as a team from the previous season and push them closer to a league-average output. There was room for slight regression on the pitching side.

Through the first 50 games of the season, the plan continued to work just as well as it did the previous year. The Brewers ranked fourth in baseball with an 81 ERA- and 8.1 RA9-WAR.

It was around this time that the injury bug hit. On May 22, Freddy Peralta left his start against the Nationals with a lat strain. The injury would keep him out until August.

Later that same week, Brandon Woodruff departed with a sprained ankle. While recovering, he was diagnosed with Raynaud’s syndrome, and the search for treatment extended his time on the injured list.

With two of their best starters out of action, the Brewers turned to prospect Ethan Small. Craig Counsell stated in spring training that the organization expected Small to make starts for them throughout the year.

Small had yet to correct his control issues in the minor leagues, and they reared their head in his debut. He issued four walks in just 2 23 innings. The Brewers optioned him back to Triple-A, where his season quickly fell apart. He limped to a 5.98 ERA over his final 64 23 minor-league innings.

Small made just one more big-league appearance in a July 26 spot start. The organization ultimately moved him to a relief role to finish the season.

With Small having pitched his way out of the team’s plans, the Brewers had to look farther down their depth chart for rotation help.

Minor-league journeyman Jason Alexander made his big-league debut on June 1. While he successfully danced around a concerning K/BB ratio and WHIP through his first handful of starts, the thin ice quickly gave out. In 18 games (11 starts), Alexander posted a 5.40 ERA and 5.35 FIP.

The injuries worsened in both the rotation and the bullpen. Trevor Gott, Jandel Gustave, Luis Perdomo, and Miguel Sanchez joined Jake Cousins, who suffered a UCL injury at the start of May, on the injured list.

In response, the Brewers claimed Chi Chi Gonzalez off waivers from the Minnesota Twins to provide some innings out of the bullpen. A few days later, Aaron Ashby hit the injured list while Woodruff was still on his rehab assignment, forcing the Brewers to turn to Gonzalez for two spot starts.

Woodruff returned after a month-long absence and pitched to a stellar 2.38 ERA and 2.79 FIP over his final 18 starts. However, Milwaukee suffered another blow a few days later when Adrian Houser hit the injured list with a flexor strain and missed nearly two months.

Ashby returned from the injured list the day after Houser’s diagnosis, but that still left the club with four starters for five rotation spots. Alexander continued to receive starts but was optioned on July 18 after his second seven-run performance in three outings.

Unsurprisingly, the injuries and subsequent depth shortage coincided with declining performance. The Brewers lost eight straight games in early June and finished the month 12-15. They rebounded slightly in July but still went an underwhelming 13-11.

At this point, the trade deadline was approaching.

Before recapping the deadline, one must outline the state of the club on July 31, the day before the Brewers made their first deadline move.

The rotation was thin, but Freddy Peralta recently began a rehab assignment. In the bullpen, injuries and inexperience made for a shaky situation in middle relief. Things were not stable on the back end, either, as Josh Hader coughed up 13 runs in 8 13 innings in July.

Offensively, the Brewers ranked ninth among all teams in wRC+ (107), fifth in runs scored (472), and fourth in home runs (139). While they lacked a high-end bat, they had at least one hitter at every position who was at least average offensively by wRC+.

Unlike past seasons, the Brewers lacked a true black hole at any position. Their weakest link was in center field, where Tyrone Taylor took over starting duties after Lorenzo Cain was designated for assignment.

That’s not to say the offense was perfect. How the team scored many of its runs raised concerns that their overall numbers masked some flaws. Milwaukee did a good portion of its damage against the Pirates and Cincinnati Reds, who possessed two of baseball’s worst pitching staffs.

The Brewers also stood out from other contending teams for the wrong reasons. They struggled to score against teams with records of .500 or better, and their offense was among the worst in the game against left-handed pitching.

Those concerns were valid, but there was a compelling argument that the Brewers needed pitching more than they needed offense.

Furthermore, the expanded postseason created a seller’s market that was not ideal for a small-market team looking for bats. The list of notable right-handed hitters who were flipped is underwhelming.

There were some bigger fish like Josh Bell and Trey Mancini, but the Brewers would have needed to outbid the San Diego Padres and Houston Astros.

Brandon Drury would have been a nice fit, but the Reds may not have been open to trades within the division. Furthermore, there was reason to be skeptical about the sustainability of a career year at hitter-friendly Great American Ballpark.

The rest of the pool consisted mainly of hitters who were not a lock to be better than Milwaukee’s in-house options.

In past seasons, the Brewers swung deals for veteran bats like Mike Moustakas and Eduardo Escobar. These hitters added length to the lineup, and the Brewers acquired them in exchange for Brett Phillips, Jorge Lopez, and Cooper Hummel, all of whom were upper minors players who did not have a future in Milwaukee.

This year, there was no Moustakas or Escobar who could be had for a Four-A player.

Under David Stearns, the Brewers have never been interested in parting with their better prospects for rental bats who do not move the needle significantly. This year would be no exception.

With all these factors in mind, the brain trust pivoted to fortifying the bullpen.

They initiated this bullpen rebuild in a stunning fashion by trading Hader to the Padres for a four-player return of Taylor Rogers, Dinelson Lamet, Esteury Ruiz, and Robert Gasser.

Hader had long been the subject of trade rumors, but seeing the Brewers pull the trigger in the middle of a playoff race was jarring.

Contrary to how many perceived the deal, it was not motivated by a desire to save money. If avoiding paying Hader was a top priority for the Brewers, they would have moved him before his salary increased to $11 million in arbitration ahead of the season. They also would not have taken on Lamet’s remaining salary to make it a wash for both teams’ 2022 payrolls.

It was not an indicator that the Brewers were giving up on a contending season, either. In addition to Rogers, they also swung deals for Matt Bush and Trevor Rosenthal to fill the Hader-sized hole in the bullpen.

As Stearns explained, the Hader trade was part of the organization’s attempt to win now and in the future.

The Brewers have no interest in rebuilding. They also know that postseason baseball features an element of randomness. Many times, it’s the hottest team that wins the World Series, not the best team in the playoff pool. The Braves were not the favorites to win in 2021, nor were the Nationals in 2019.

In other words, anything can happen once you’re in the bracket.

The Brewers have determined that the best way to bring a championship to Milwaukee is not to pour all of their resources into a relatively short window and risk coming away with nothing before having to begin a rebuild.

Instead, they are more likely to win it all by repeatedly making it into the postseason with the expectation that they will eventually be the team that gets hot and benefits from the right breaks.

Stearns used the analogy of taking as many bites of an apple as possible to describe the strategy. While the phrase quickly gained notoriety as the 2022 Brewers spiraled toward their eventual demise, the process is sound.

The goal at the deadline was to Boost both the current and future teams with the trade options the Brewers had available to them. There was reason to believe that the deals they made would accomplish both objectives.

There was evidence that Hader had peaked, and it was time to get something back in return. His arm slot rose, which reduced the deception in his delivery. This change, combined with Hader’s annual midseason command struggles, produced his rough July and a nightmare start to his Padres career.

Despite those struggles, Hader’s departure still left a hole in the bullpen. The Brewers knew that and addressed it with their remaining acquisitions.

No one would match Hader’s dominance at the height of his powers, but there was ample evidence that Rogers, Bush, and Rosenthal could fill in admirably.

Rogers’ 4.35 ERA with the Padres was underwhelming, but his 2.34 FIP was far more encouraging. Bush had arguably the best raw stuff of any reliever on the market. Rosenthal was a riskier acquisition due to his injury history. Still, he was closing in on a return, and the pitch tracking metrics on his fastball in bullpen sessions aligned closely with the numbers he averaged during his excellent 2020 season. Furthermore, his late start to the season meant he would be fresher than most relievers in October, allowing him to shoulder a heavier workload.

The shakeup was a bit risky, but if the trio of acquisitions performed as reasonably expected, the Milwaukee bullpen would be in better shape than it was before the deadline. While none of the three would be as individually dominant as Hader, they would provide Craig Counsell more depth and flexibility in the late innings. Three reliable high-leverage arms are arguably better than one elite closer.

Meanwhile, Gasser and Ruiz both worked their way up to Triple-A by the season’s end. The former could be a fixture in the big-league rotation for years to come, and the latter could make an impact in the outfield and on the basepaths. Bush is controlled through the 2024 season, positioning him to help the team beyond 2022.

There was a strategy behind the Brewers’ trade deadline. Unfortunately, the short-term results did not pan out.

The inescapable fact is that despite the plan, the deadline additions did not Boost the Brewers in 2022. Instead, they hurt the big-league team.

After joining the Brewers, Rogers increased his slider usage, and his strikeout rate jumped to an excellent 36%. His Called Strike Plus Whiff rate (CSW%) in Milwaukee was a phenomenal 37.1%.

Unfortunately, those improvements were counteracted because Rogers inexplicably couldn’t keep the ball in the park.

At the time of the trade, Rogers boasted a career 0.8 HR/9 and allowed just one home run in 41 13 innings as a Padre. With the Brewers, he allowed six home runs in 23 innings for a 2.35 HR/9.

Rogers’ previously strong control evaporated in a September 20 outing against the New York Mets when he issued three straight walks before allowing a go-ahead grand slam to Francisco Lindor. He was limited to a low-leverage role over the season’s final two weeks.

Bush showcased his electric raw stuff after the trade, posting a 31.2% strikeout rate. However, his control took a turn for the worse. His walk rate increased from 6.6% to 8.6%, and he allowed six home runs of his own by making too many mistakes in the strike zone.

Rosenthal was on the verge of his 2022 debut when he suffered a season-ending lat injury similar to Peralta’s.

Rogers and Bush combined for a 4.89 ERA with the Brewers, and Rosenthal never threw a pitch.

The Brewers led the league with 16 blown saves after the deadline. Their bullpen had the fourth-worst negative Win Probability Added in that span. Those blown leads were a major driving force behind Milwaukee’s ceding of the division to the red-hot Cardinals and their eventual elimination.

Meanwhile, injuries continued to ravage the starting rotation. Peralta, Houser, Ashby, and Eric Lauer all spent additional stints on the injured list, and the bullpen was not in a position to handle the added stress.

Hader rebounded out west to allow one earned run in his final 11 13 regular-season innings, striking out 14 and picking up seven saves. At the end of the day, Bush and Rogers hurt the Brewers more than Hader hurt the Padres.

Beyond the statistical impact, the Hader trade sent shockwaves throughout the clubhouse. That wasn’t especially surprising. It was an unconventional move.

That unconventional nature made it imperative that Brewers leadership communicate with the clubhouse to explain the trade and clarify that they still wanted to win in 2022 and had faith in the current group.

As more comments surfaced from the locker room, it became clear that management failed miserably on the communication front.

The rawest statements came from Lauer, who accused the front office of shrugging off the clubhouse impact of the trade and failing to communicate with players.

If true, such neglect is inexcusable. There was a reasonable explanation for trading Hader and acquiring Rogers, Bush, and Rosenthal. The same does not hold true for the lack of concern shown for the clubhouse impact of the bullpen overhaul.

That’s the long-winded summary of why the front office made the moves they did this season and how everything went south. Where do the Brewers go from here?

Blowing up the front office and coaching staff in response to the 2022 season would be foolish for two reasons.

The first reason is their history. Stearns, Matt Arnold, Counsell, and the host of analysts and coaches who report to them have ushered in the most successful era of Brewers baseball in franchise history. After a two-year rebuild, the team returned to competitiveness in 2017, and this season snapped a streak of three postseason appearances in three full seasons.

That’s no small feat. These executives and coaches have a solid track record. Their success has earned them enough trust that their jobs should not be in jeopardy after their first disappointing season.

The second reason is that Mark Attanasio already committed to the “bites of the apple” approach, which is inherently long-term because it aims to build an open-ended competitive window. Bailing on such a plan because it did not work once relatively early in the process would be an overreaction demonstrating a misunderstanding of the plan itself.

That does not mean that Brewers management can shrug this season off. They must work to make this year the exception rather than the norm. There ought to be an expectation that the front office will assess why things went wrong this time around and identify what they can change to avoid a reoccurrence.

In terms of deviation from the plan, run prevention is where the 2022 Brewers went wrong. Their strength was no longer a strength, stripping them of their identity as a team.

Injuries left Counsell shorthanded for prolonged stretches and forced him to turn to unlikely sources for innings. Alexander logged the fourth-most innings pitched on the staff from June 1 through the end of the season. That was not by design.

There is only so much the Brewers could have done to minimize the harm of these injuries, but in hindsight, it’s fair to wonder if they should have placed more emphasis on veteran depth.

The Brewers have had plenty of success in the past by relying on young pitchers to make an immediate impact in the big leagues. Woodruff and Corbin Burnes cracked the big-league bullpen in 2018 and quickly worked their way into higher-leverage roles.

They likely forecasted a similar trajectory for Ashby and Small, but the former struggled with inconsistency that is more typical of an inexperienced pitcher, and the latter fell apart shortly after a very brief opportunity. The combination of injuries and miscalculated development forced them to turn to Alexander more than they would have liked.

It was a similar story in the bullpen. The Brewers have had plenty of success with reclamation projects. This season, half of their bullpen consisted of these scrap heap pickups.

Given the fickle nature of relievers, it makes sense to roll the dice on some potential breakout arms rather than tie up significant money to more well-known bullpen pieces. However, the Brewers may have taken that approach too far, and their inexperience in the middle innings ultimately haunted them.

Next are the questions concerning the trade deadline additions. Why did Rogers turn into a home run machine? Why did Bush’s control take a turn for the worse? If there’s an answer beyond small trial size randomness, what can the Brewers learn from it?

It’s worth noting that Stearns’ track record is mixed at best when it comes to midseason reliever trades. Bush could still right the ship with a strong 2023, but Rogers joins Daniel Norris, John Curtiss, Ray Black, and Jake Faria on the list of regrettable bullpen acquisitions made within the past few seasons.

Do the Brewers need to reevaluate their criteria for trading for relievers, or is the midseason relief market a risky game worth avoiding altogether? If the latter, the Brewers may benefit from signing a couple of proven arms to build a more stable bullpen that will not require many reinforcements in late July.

While the offense largely met expectations, there remains ample room for improvement on that front. Ideally, the Brewers will add a real impact bat instead of pretending they acquired one in McCutchen. One bigger bat, such as Jose Abreu, would go a long way toward boosting the lineup.

Even if they don’t make such a signing, it would hardly be a shock if the Brewers project their 2023 lineup to be the best of the Stearns era. They’re confident in their young outfield prospects and perhaps expect them to provide the offensive spark that takes some pressure off the pitching.

Finally, what has the front office learned about clubhouse management from the Hader fallout? Stearns quickly acknowledged his failure to anticipate and respond to it.

The aftermath of the trade likely will not deter the front office from making controversial moves in the future, but it should serve as a wake-up call that there is a right way and a wrong way to handle the human element aspect of such transactions.

Perhaps the player response also exposed poor leadership within the clubhouse and will prompt some roster turnover that improves the culture.

Don’t expect the 2022 season to drastically alter the Brewers’ approach toward building a roster and reaching a World Series. That’s okay.

An organizational overhaul is not necessary. A few adjustments here and there can go a long way.

As the Brewers move forward, here are a few reminders.

Pitching development remains their strength as an organization, and they should (and will) continue to embrace that.

They will stick to the “bites of the apple” approach because they believe it gives them the best chance of winning a ring.

Part of that approach includes not thinking in terms of strict competitive windows. Regardless of what the Brewers do over the offseason, understand that they will not do anything out of a desire to build a superteam in 2023 nor an intention to rebuild.

The Brewers want to build sustained success and win a World Series. Maybe this season taught them some lessons to help them achieve that goal.

Fri, 07 Oct 2022 01:00:00 -0500 en-US text/html https://www.msn.com/en-us/sports/mlb/after-missing-out-on-a-bite-of-the-apple-in-2022-brewers-management-must-reflect-and-adapt/ar-AA12Hwvi
Killexams : Apple store workers in Oklahoma to vote on labor union

CNN  — 

Apple workers in Oklahoma City are set to vote this week on whether to form the second-ever labor union at one of the tech giant’s US stores.

The Apple store workers in Oklahoma are seeking to gain representation with the Communication Workers of America union. Voting is set to take place on Thursday and Friday, with the vote-tally scheduled for Friday evening. Just under 100 employees at the Apple store in the Penn Square Mall are eligible to vote in this union election.

Earlier this year, Apple store workers at a mall in Towson, Maryland, made history when they voted to become the first unionized Apple store in the United States. The move was lauded by President Joe Biden, among others. In late June, the National Labor Relations Board officially certified the union election win, paving the way for the workers and Apple management to negotiate their first contract.

The organizing efforts at Apple stores come amid the backdrop of a tidal wave of workplace activism emerging at major companies from Amazon to Starbucks after the pandemic exposed new pressures on frontline workers and a tight labor market gave these workers new leverage.

Leigha Briscoe, a worker at the Oklahoma Apple store, said that their group was inspired to organize after “seeing what was happening in the labor movement across the United States with other large corporations.”

“Particularly watching Amazon and Starbucks has been the two that really stuck out to me,” she said. “That really kind of brought to light the possibility of us being able to do that in our store.”

Watching these other workers seize new power via organizing also helped in “shifting my view of what a labor union was, and seeing that, ‘Hey, this is something that can still be done in the modern workforce,’” Briscoe added. “That’s really what kind of helped me see that this was going to be valuable for our team, and I think it’s safe to say that a lot of our other team members were also watching that happen as well, and that kind of inspired them in the same way as it has me.”

“Fundamentally, what we’re looking for is being able to have a seat at the table and negotiate what our experience looks like,” she said.

An Apple spokesperson did not respond to a request for comment on the Oklahoma City vote. Ahead of the union election at the Maryland store earlier this year, Apple said in a statement that it deeply values its retail team members and emphasized that it offers a “very strong compensation and benefits for full time and part time employees.”

One of the worker organizers at the Maryland location previously told CNN that “compensation is important” but “the most important” goal was “having a say” in store policies that impact staff.

Patrick Hart, another worker at the Oklahoma City Apple store, echoed that sentiment. Hart said he was tired of hearing from his managers that “that’s just how it is” when he raised concerns or brought feedback to them about their workplace experiences. He said they are seeking more of a voice in their workplace with their unionization efforts.

Hart also emphasized that he was inspired by the resurgence of the organized labor movement, and especially efforts to unionize Amazon warehouses. The new labor push comes as union membership overall in the United States has plummeted in exact decades. The unionization rate for all wage and salary workers in the United States last year was some 10.3%, Bureau of Labor Statistics’ data indicates, compared to 20.1% in 1983, which was the first year comparable data was available.

After taking inspiration from others, Hart said he hopes that their efforts in Oklahoma can similarly embolden fellow workers to band together – no matter what industry they may be in.

“I want everyone to realize unions aren’t just for those bad and hard workplaces, it is for everyone in America, we have the right to unionize,” Hart said. “I just want people to realize that, because it can do a lot of good for a lot of people who feel they’re stuck in their workplace.”

Hart continued: “They don’t have to leave their job, they can just make their current one a better place.”

Thu, 13 Oct 2022 01:47:00 -0500 en text/html https://edition.cnn.com/2022/10/13/tech/apple-store-union-oklahoma/index.html
Killexams : Apple faces another union challenge – this time at Oklahoma store

Apple workers in Oklahoma City are set to vote this week on whether to form the second-ever labor union at one of the tech giant’s US stores.

The Apple store workers in Oklahoma are seeking to gain representation with the Communication Workers of America union. Voting is set to take place on Thursday and Friday, with the vote-tally scheduled for Friday evening. Just under 100 employees at the Apple store in the Penn Square Mall are eligible to vote in this union election.

Earlier this year, Apple store workers at a mall in Towson, Maryland, made history when they voted to become the first unionized Apple store in the United States. The move was lauded by President Joe Biden, among others. In late June, the National Labor Relations Board officially certified the union election win, paving the way for the workers and Apple management to negotiate their first contract.

Biden on Apple workers voting to unionize: ‘I’m proud of them’

The organizing efforts at Apple stores come amid the backdrop of a tidal wave of workplace activism emerging at major companies from Amazon to Starbucks after the pandemic exposed new pressures on frontline workers and a tight labor market gave these workers new leverage.

Leigha Briscoe, a worker at the Oklahoma Apple store, said that their group was inspired to organize after “seeing what was happening in the labor movement across the United States with other large corporations.”

“Particularly watching Amazon and Starbucks has been the two that really stuck out to me,” she said. “That really kind of brought to light the possibility of us being able to do that in our store.”

Amazon workers across NC reach out to group seeking to organize union in Garner

Watching these other workers seize new power via organizing also helped in “shifting my view of what a labor union was, and seeing that, ‘Hey, this is something that can still be done in the modern workforce,'” Briscoe added. “That’s really what kind of helped me see that this was going to be valuable for our team, and I think it’s safe to say that a lot of our other team members were also watching that happen as well, and that kind of inspired them in the same way as it has me.”

“Fundamentally, what we’re looking for is being able to have a seat at the table and negotiate what our experience looks like,” she said.

An Apple spokesperson did not respond to a request for comment on the Oklahoma City vote. Ahead of the union election at the Maryland store earlier this year, Apple said in a statement that it deeply values its retail team members and emphasized that it offers a “very strong compensation and benefits for full time and part time employees.”

One of the worker organizers at the Maryland location previously told CNN that “compensation is important” but “the most important” goal was “having a say” in store policies that impact staff.

Patrick Hart, another worker at the Oklahoma City Apple store, echoed that sentiment. Hart said he was tired of hearing from his managers that “that’s just how it is” when he raised concerns or brought feedback to them about their workplace experiences. He said they are seeking more of a voice in their workplace with their unionization efforts.

Hart also emphasized that he was inspired by the resurgence of the organized labor movement, and especially efforts to unionize Amazon warehouses. The new labor push comes as union membership overall in the United States has plummeted in exact decades. The unionization rate for all wage and salary workers in the United States last year was some 10.3%, Bureau of Labor Statistics’ data indicates, compared to 20.1% in 1983, which was the first year comparable data was available.

Starbucks loses a round in battle with unions, will reinstate 7 fired workers

After taking inspiration from others, Hart said he hopes that their efforts in Oklahoma can similarly embolden fellow workers to band together — no matter what industry they may be in.

“I want everyone to realize unions aren’t just for those bad and hard workplaces, it is for everyone in America, we have the right to unionize,” Hart said. “I just want people to realize that, because it can do a lot of good for a lot of people who feel they’re stuck in their workplace.”

Hart continued: “They don’t have to leave their job, they can just make their current one a better place.”

The-CNN-Wire™ & © 2022 Cable News Network, Inc., a Warner Bros. Discovery Company. All rights reserved.

Thu, 13 Oct 2022 02:02:00 -0500 en-US text/html https://wraltechwire.com/2022/10/13/apple-faces-another-union-challenge-this-time-at-oklahoma-store/
Killexams : Mosyle Unifies Apple Device Security and Management for Schools with OneK12

First Apple Unified Platform for K-12 Combines Device Management, Content Filtering, Endpoint Security and More; Company Rolls Out Updates to Mosyle Manager

WINTER PARK, Fla., October 11, 2022--(BUSINESS WIRE)--Mosyle, the leader in modern Apple MDM and security, today announced the general availability of a public and extended beta of OneK12, the first and only Apple Unified Platform for educational institutions. The new platform integrates device management, content filtering, endpoint security, Single Sign-On, application management, and classroom management on a single Apple-only solution. The company also announced several enhancements to Mosyle Manager, its flagship mobile device management (MDM) offering for K-12 schools across the globe.

"Mosyle got its start in education, and we’re deeply passionate about ensuring teachers, students and parents have the safest and best possible experience with their Apple devices, anywhere they go," said Alcyr Araujo, founder and CEO at Mosyle. "OneK12’s ability to deliver complete management, advanced content filtering and robust protection makes this vision possible. It also tackles many problems plaguing schools today, including access to inappropriate content, cyberattacks and poor device performance."

OneK12 combines six disparate solutions into a single platform to provide IT teams with:

  • Enhanced Device Management: Delivers full MDM for macOS, iOS and tvOS, zero-touch deployment, automated ongoing management, screen sharing, and support for shared devices, all purpose-built for K-12 workflows and use cases.

  • Content Filtering: Offers encrypted DNS functionality that automates web filtering and encryption exclusively on Apple endpoints used in education. By focusing on the device instead of the network, students and teachers get fast, secure and reliable web privacy and security at school, on the go or at home.

  • Endpoint Security: Provides next-generation AI-based malware protection, automated security compliance review and remediation, user privilege management and online threat protection to keep students and teachers safe.

  • Single Sign-On: Mosyle Auth 2 offers the control of macOS LoginWindows, creating another level of security while giving teachers and students the simplicity of using school-provided credentials to authenticate Macs.

  • Classroom Management: Enables teachers to customize device preferences during class time. With the click of a button all devices in the class will be configured to meet the teacher's expectations, saving more time for learning.

  • Application Management: Includes a robust set of application management features, allowing customers to remotely deploy, update and manage any compatible app on Apple devices regardless of its availability on Apple's App Store.

To continue to meet the growing demand for supporting K-12 Apple devices, the company also introduced a brand-new interface that will be available for both education products, Mosyle Manager and Mosyle OneK12. The update is designed to deliver an improved user experience and make it easier for IT teams to manage fleets of Apple devices at school.

With the release of the public beta of Mosyle OneK12, Mosyle is also making Mosyle Embark available for education customers. Mosyle Embark is a new workflow tool for Macs designed to enhance first day experiences by guiding and informing teachers and students during the configuration of their new Mac. Mosyle Embark will be available for all future OneK12 customers.

Today more than 20,000 schools trust Mosyle to manage and secure millions of Apple devices daily. The educational updates come on the heels of a $196 million Series B funding round and the launch of Mosyle’s Apple Unified Platform for business.

To learn more about Mosyle, Mosyle Manager and OneK12, visit https://school.mosyle.com/.

About Mosyle
Businesses and educational institutions rely on Mosyle to manage and secure their Apple devices and networks. Backed by the best customer support in the industry, Mosyle’s Apple Unified Platform delivers a new approach to Apple device management and security that is more powerful, efficient and affordable than legacy solutions. To learn more about Mosyle for enterprises, visit business.mosyle.com. To learn more about Mosyle for education, visit school.mosyle.com.

View source version on businesswire.com: https://www.businesswire.com/news/home/20221011005811/en/

Contacts

Media:
Jason Vancura
fama PR for Mosyle
Mosyle@famapr.com

Tue, 11 Oct 2022 21:05:00 -0500 en-US text/html https://finance.yahoo.com/news/mosyle-unifies-apple-device-security-130000186.html
Killexams : Apple supplier TSMC Records 80% Surge In Q3 Net Profit — What The Company Expects In Q4

Apple Inc. AAPL-supplier Taiwan Semiconductor Mfg. Co. Ltd. TSM recorded an 80% surge in its third-quarter net profit at NT$280.87 billion ($8.81 billion).

What Happened: This is the company’s strongest growth in two years, supported by strong sales of its advanced chips used in data centers and electric cars, reported Reuters.

Gross margin for the quarter stood at 60.4%, operating margin came in at 50.6%, while net profit margin stood at 45.8%, the company said in a statement.

See Also: Compare Online Investing Brokers

While companies like Advanced Micro Devices Inc. AMD and Micron Technology Inc. MU have warned of weakening demand, analysts believe TSMC's strong order book could be attributed to its dominance in making some of the world's most advanced chips, the Reuters report said.

Wendell Huang, VP and Chief Financial Officer of TSMC, said, “Our third quarter business was supported by strong demand for our industry-leading 5nm technologies.”

“Moving into fourth quarter 2022, we expect our business to be flattish, as the end market demand weakens, and customers’ ongoing inventory adjustment is balanced by continued ramp-up for our industry-leading 5nm technologies,” Huang said.

Based on the company’s current business outlook, management expects the fourth-quarter revenue to be between $19.9 billion and $20.7 billion.

Read Next: Apple supplier TSMC And Other Chip Suppliers' Stocks Plunge After US Curbs On China

© 2022 Benzinga.com. Benzinga does not provide investment advice. All rights reserved.

Thu, 13 Oct 2022 00:28:00 -0500 text/html https://www.benzinga.com/markets/asia/22/10/29247290/apple-supplier-tsmc-reports-80-rise-in-q3-net-profit-heres-what-the-management-said-about-q4-expecta
9L0-622 exam dump and training guide direct download
Training Exams List