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Killexams : Apple Essentials mission - BingNews https://killexams.com/pass4sure/exam-detail/9L0-509 Search results Killexams : Apple Essentials mission - BingNews https://killexams.com/pass4sure/exam-detail/9L0-509 https://killexams.com/exam_list/Apple Killexams : Junk science: Apple founder Steve Wozniak's mission to clean up space Privateer has just announced a partnership with Omega, which made the watch worn by the Apollo astronauts who walked on the moon © Provided by The Telegraph Privateer has just announced a partnership with Omega, which made the watch worn by the Apollo astronauts who walked on the moon

This article was first published on September 21st

The periphery of our planet is cluttered with rubbish. Pieces of old satellites and rockets circle the world, travelling at incomprehensible speed.

For anyone wishing to work there, or go beyond Earth's orbit - a surprising number these days - it's a burgeoning problem. Leaving Earth is like crossing a beach for a swim when a discarded beer can could hit you at 17,500mph. Worse still, every time space debris collides - or a government blows up a satellite to show its muscle - the problem grows exponentially, an effect known as the Kessler Syndrome. Anything longer than 1cm is potentially 'mission degrading' or 'mission terminating', but even flakes of paint have left divots in the windscreen of old space shuttles.

Confronting this problem, three stellar engineers have come to the Chamberlin Observatory in Denver, Colorado, partners in a new start-up, Privateer Space. In the middle is Steve 'Woz' Wozniak, who knows a fair bit about start-ups, having founded Apple in 1976, with his fellow college drop-out Steve Jobs. The second is the scientist and environmentalist Moriba Jah, a 'space heretic', according to the third, tech entrepreneur Alex Fielding.

Steve 'Woz' Wozniak founded Apple in 1976, with his fellow college drop-out Steve Jobs © Provided by The Telegraph Steve 'Woz' Wozniak founded Apple in 1976, with his fellow college drop-out Steve Jobs

They are an appealing team to have hanging on to the back of an orbiting rubbish truck, which is why the Hawaii-based Privateer is garnering a lot of interest right now. They have just announced a partnership with Omega, which famously made the watch worn by the Apollo astronauts who walked on the moon. 'This is very meaningful to us, because it's a connection that goes back to the watch that Buzz Aldrin wore,' says Wozniak. Although they won't reveal how much money they've raised, Fielding says Privateer is 'backed by fantastic Tier 1 venture capital firms globally', and points out, 'Steve, our president, is also a fantastic supporter.'

Assembled beneath the Chamberlin's 1894 telescope, Wozniak is big, bearded and benevolent, Jah is warmly irascible with dreads and jewellery-stretched earlobes, and Fielding, whose head vaguely resembles the rocket in The Adventures of Tintin's Explorers on the Moon, plays CEO, offering both the dream and a steady hand.

While Privateer is a classic tech start-up, for once they don't seem to want to move fast and break things: too much of that is already going on up there. What they want is to map as many pieces of debris in orbit as possible, along with size, shape and trajectory. But to achieve this, they need to build their own 'constellation' of satellites, and to pay for that by opening up space to us all - or at least access to the cameras that look down on us.

And that, of course, is controversial, even if Wozniak has a warm, soothing tone as he says, 'We intend to gain the reputation as Privateer being the steward of space.'

Jah fell in love with space while guarding nuclear missiles in Montana as a US Air Force recruit. During long nights 'keeping cows away from the silos', he would gaze up and imagine navigating the stars. After leaving the military, he got himself an education. The son of a Sierra Leonean father and Haitian mother, he became a navigation engineer on Nasa missions to Mars including the Mars Global Surveyor, Mars Odyssey and Mars Rover.

Jah was a navigation engineer on several Nasa missions to Mars, including the Mars Global Surveyor, Mars Odyssey and Mars Rover © Provided by The Telegraph Jah was a navigation engineer on several Nasa missions to Mars, including the Mars Global Surveyor, Mars Odyssey and Mars Rover

Now, at 51, a professor at the University of Austin at Texas, he is one of space's original thinkers, increasingly concerned about the mess we are making up there. 'Back in 2006, I saw the problem going on in space,' he says. 'And I juxtaposed that with issues on Earth, with landfill, with what we're doing to the oceans with plastics. It pissed me off. And I want to do something about it.'

A growing problem

The situation is growing worse. The state of 'low Earth orbit' - roughly between 100 and 1,250 miles above Earth's surface - is the subject of intense global concern. In the words of Darren McKnight, senior technical fellow at Privateer's US-based competitor LeoLabs, 'In certain regions we are running out of margin.'

In November last year, Russia mimicked the opening of the film Gravity when it exploded an old satellite, the Kosmos-1408, with a missile, sending debris everywhere and causing the crew of the International Space Station to shelter in its escape pods. This followed similar demonstrations by China in 2007 and the USA in 2008 (America has now vowed to end such activities). Each in its way added to the jetsam circling above us. According to the European Space Agency (ESA), 36,500 pieces of debris bigger than 10cm are up there, including several Russian rocket boosters the size of buses.

Those are just the bits that scientists can see. The ESA estimates that there are tens of millions of smaller pieces - a million of them over 1cm. Each will be travelling at horrendous speed, up to 20 times the velocity of a bullet, at least the one Dirty Harry liked to fire from his Magnum .44. Do you feel lucky, Major Tom?

According to the European Space Agency (ESA), there are 36,500 pieces of debris bigger than 10cm in low Earth orbit - ESA © Provided by The Telegraph According to the European Space Agency (ESA), there are 36,500 pieces of debris bigger than 10cm in low Earth orbit - ESA

Already the ISS, 250 miles up, has to manoeuvre several times a year to avoid collisions. And low Earth orbit is about to get more congested. At present there are about 8,800 satellites in this space, 2,600 of them already dead and in the words of Fielding, 'just junk'. Yet vast new constellations of satellites are being launched.

Elon Musk's Starlink communications system, currently providing comms aid to Ukraine, uses 2,700 satellites but he wants 40,000 more. Other groups, such as OneWeb and Amazon, plan constellations in the thousands. Industry certified say it's not inconceivable there will be 100,000 satellites in orbit by 2030.

That sort of Wild West expansion worries Jah: 'If we are going to explore space, do we keep doing what we always do when we explore a new domain, the "I own this," "I own that," the non-sharing and the polluting?' he asks. 'Indigenous people, when they interact with the environment, they don't just do a bunch of stuff saying, "It'll be fine." Their ability to keep on existing depends on a successful conversation with the environment. But that's not what we're doing in space.'

The solution

And so comes Privateer, with its base in Maui (no one can answer why we meet in Denver, beyond Wozniak having a new holiday home there that he doesn't actually have time to visit). 'Why call it Privateer?' I ask. 'Amazon was taken,' Fielding replies. At 44, Privateer's CEO is the youngest of the partners. He met Wozniak at Apple, and they obviously know each other well.

Tech entrepreneur Alex Fielding is the CEO of Privateer Space © Provided by The Telegraph Tech entrepreneur Alex Fielding is the CEO of Privateer Space

They started Wheels of Zeus together in 2001, a company that used GPS to track items (a little like Apple's Find My iPhone app). The name came because Wozniak owned the domain name woz.com, Fielding says with a laugh: 'Neither of us should work on branding.'

With Privateer, the idea is first to create a database of debris databases, drawing on every available resource to pinpoint as many pieces of space junk as possible. 'Because we are interested in making this information available to humanity in general, we won't say no to data whoever it is from,' says Jah, pointing out governments' inherent scepticism of each others' information.

The team then wants to iron out discrepancies between the various databases. 'We don't have agreement between the people tracking these things,' says Fielding. 'The gaps between where we think things are can be 200km. Then we don't treat things like the objects that they are in terms of size, shape and material properties. We treat them all like bowling balls.'

So phase two of the business plan requires Privateer to launch its own constellation of satellites, armed with sensors, starting later next year. The man responsible for designing them is Justin Bellucci, Privateer's senior director of engineering. 'We want satellites to map the debris,' he later tells me, 'and compare those measurements with what is being measured from Earth, reducing the margin of error.' They will offer this information cheaply to companies operating in orbit, forcing out those Fielding calls 'extortionists'.

They intend to work with other start-ups, which will actually remove the junk - for example ClearSpace, a Swiss company developing a spider-like robot that will grab debris, which was recently awarded an £86 million contract by the ESA to remove a 112kg section of rocket left over from a 2013 mission. ClearSpace also has a partnership with Omega , the watchmaker clearly hurry to keep its cosmic heritage up to date.

Meanwhile, Tokyo-based Astroscale has been developing both a docking system that it hopes will be installed on all future satellites allowing them to be collected later, and a magnetic spacecraft to attract smaller debris. It has won contracts from several national space agencies to study options for clearing up their leftovers.

Enough is going on around the world for McKnight to tell a conference recently, 'I love the fact that [the US] said, "Yes, we're concerned about picking up debris." But I will tell you, the US is woefully behind the rest of the world in this area.' (When I spoke to McKnight, he said he doesn't see Privateer as a competitor, though there may be some 'overlap', as LeoLabs relies on land-based radar.)

On the clock

Timing is at the heart of all this (which should please Omega). Because gravity will pull all debris back to earth eventually, lower Earth orbit is actually self-cleaning. But while anything below 375 miles will return within years, debris at the congested 500-mile zone will take centuries to fall, and anything above that, millennia.

The Privateer founders discuss the science behind this. 'Ask people whether the force of gravity on the International Space Station is around zero or about the same as on Earth,' says Wozniak. 'Most people say about zero, but it's about the same as on Earth. Instead of being 4,000 miles from the centre of Earth [as we are on the surface], it's 4,250 miles. It's almost the same distance.'

Jah adds, 'Things are in orbit exactly because of gravity, not because of the absence of it.' He points out that astronauts can somersault in the space station because they are in free fall around the planet, not because they are floating above it. 'We have astronauts to blame for that stupidity,' he goes on. 'Why do they keep on saying "zero gravity"? They tend to be fighter pilots - they don't know the physics really well.' His colleagues laugh a little nervously at this blasphemy.

A close-up view of the International Space Station © Provided by The Telegraph A close-up view of the International Space Station

Having changed the world with one of the earliest, most iconic personal computers, Wozniak at 71 spends most of his time on speaking tours. 'I don't get attracted to things like this very often,' he says. 'Knowing Alex, and knowing the way he thinks and what goodness means to him, that was the big attraction for me.'

He and Fielding are clearly very comfortable around each other. Fielding tells a confusing story of the two of them lost in Death Valley. Friends later called to suggest he shouldn't kill one of America's national treasures. Wozniak loves a joke. He hands me stickers to put in the loo of my plane home that read don't flush over cities.

Fielding may come to need Wozniak's hard-won shield against cynicism, as he makes it clear Privateer is a commercial enterprise. 'We're not building a non-profit,' he says. 'We want to do a lot of good in the world. But, you know, the good that we want to do has to be paid for.'

Accessibility to space

What this means is that Privateer's satellites will have cameras monitoring Earth. 'Talking with investors, seeing where the market's going, the thinking is, if we have satellites up there, why not also have sensors there, that can, you know, provide data,' says Bellucci.

With enough satellites looking down - they won't say how many but assure me they will all be designed not to add to the long-term clutter - they will create a camera system from space extensive enough for developers to create apps we can then all use.

By offering imagery from space cheaply, Fielding wants to make other companies' satellites obsolete, reducing overlaps. 'I mean why are there 40 satellites over Kyiv right now doing the same thing?' he asks. Researchers without government-sized budgets will be able to look down and see 'people doing bad things'.

This puts Privateer in the classic role of disruptor. 'What breaks open any industry is accessibility,' Fielding says. 'Right now if you take a photograph from space it costs thousands of dollars.'

There is a lot to commend it. Silicon Valley venture capitalist John Doerr recently gave $1.1 billion to Stanford University to create a climate school, saying, 'Climate and sustainability is going to be the new computer science.'

'We do most of that [research] from satellites,' says Fielding. 'Our ability to provide accessibility to space is critical. Going from Copernicus to Galileo to Greta Thunberg is a huge leap. But we are on that path.'

He goes on, 'What if a couple of kids at university in Boulder want to have an app that tracks dark ships [ships with their transponders turned off because their cargo is illegal]. You need a camera from space, you need an image classifier and you need a radio deck. What if, instead of millions of dollars, you can do that for the price of a pizza and a six pack of Coke?'

Jah says, 'We're after the removal of ignorance. The removal of ignorance results in the creation of knowledge.' Of course, it doesn't take a rocket scientist to see how such 'creation of knowledge' might be a further intrusion on humanity's already diminished privacy.

I'm trying to work this out when Wozniak helps by bringing us back to Earth with a cuddly bump. 'I've always been for the consumer,' he says. 'Like in that movie Spy Games, you could have little pictures from our satellites of a beachfront property you want to buy.'

'Exactly,' says Fielding.

We've moved a fair way from being the stewards of space, but Fielding insists there is no point in being beholden to the space industry for charity. 'If we don't do this, the future of humanity and our kids, that's at stake. That's a massive project. That's not something you can fake.'

So it turns out that the road to the heavens is paved with good intentions, just like the road to hell.

'The good news about our cameras looking at Earth is that the resolution is good enough to tell when crop yields aren't enough to feed a population or when water isn't enough to assure people won't go thirsty, but it's not a good enough resolution to stalk anyone,' says Fielding. But he adds, 'We can't look at every developer and every app to personally assure that their usage is what we'd want but we do have "terms of use" that prohibit bad people doing bad things broadly.'

Such thoughts on unintended consequences make me ask Wozniak if he feels Apple has been a force for good. He thinks about it and at last says yes, 'although there are a lot of things about Apple and, well, mainly the other big tech companies, that make life not that great. You know, unhappiness, a lot of work, frustration, why doesn't this work? Why am I, the human, not more important?'

Fielding jumps in: 'The technology that we bring into the world, it's like giving birth to a child - you don't know if you're giving birth to Greta Thunburg or Mother Teresa, Stalin or Hitler...'

'Or Facebook,' says Jah.

All laugh and Wozniak says, 'You know, Facebook had a good start, it was a great thing. But then it turned into something different, not what it started out to be.'

It's lucky the partners in Privateer are so virtuous, even if the company's name suggests otherwise.

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Mon, 03 Oct 2022 22:05:39 -0500 en-GB text/html https://www.msn.com/en-gb/money/technology/junk-science-apple-founder-steve-wozniaks-mission-to-clean-up-space/ar-AA12zFO5
Killexams : Apple cider vinegar deserves to be your best friend, here’s why Killexams : Apple cider vinegar deserves to be your best friend, here's why Wed, 12 Oct 2022 20:18:00 -0500 written by Ashleigh Nefdt en-US text/html https://www.womanandhomemagazine.co.za/past-features/applecidervinegar/ Killexams : Apple boom: Why community orchards are on the rise
  • By Helen Briggs
  • Environment correspondent

Traditional orchards are vanishing from the landscape, with an area the size of the Isle of Wight lost in a century.

But community orchards are booming, thanks in part to renewed interest in living off the land during Covid-19 lockdowns.

People are clubbing together to plant fruit trees on local green spaces, from village greens to schools.

This new generation of orchards is keeping old traditions alive and reviving Britain's "lost" apples.

Standing among the apple trees at Swan Barn Farm, Claire Matthes muses on the appeal of these timeless places.

"Being away from the usual hubbub of life, coming somewhere that's beautiful like this; outdoors, there's the birds, the animals, the human company as well - there's some something magical about it," she says.

Through the Community Orchard Project South East, she has set up more than a dozen community orchards in two years.

And today an army of volunteers is making the most of this year's bumper crop at an orchard on the edge of the Surrey Hills.

Image caption,

The orchard at Swan Barn Farm has grown from six to more than 100 trees

Set on a farm rescued by the National Trust, the site once had just six lonely apple trees, but now there are more than a hundred, bearing dozens of different varieties.

The air carries the smell of apples and the rhythmic whirr of the scratter, a century-old wooden apple press used to make juice.

"What better thing to do than come out here on a lovely day like today helping the environment, helping the community?" says one participant, looking up from chopping apples.

Image caption,

Chopped apples waiting to be pressed

The revival in community orchards is being fuelled by an interest in growing healthy local food, spurred in part by Covid lockdowns. With the cost-of-living crisis biting into people's food budgets, this year's bumper crop couldn't have come at a better time.

Claire Matthes says fruit from community orchards often goes to local meals-on-wheels services or to food banks. "How things are now with the cost of living, I think maybe there's more of a consciousness about not wanting fruit to go to waste," she says.

The Royal Horticultural Society (RHS) has seen an increase in gardening groups growing crops since the pandemic, including planting fruit trees and maintaining orchards.

"Many of these groups are hurry to reap the community and educational benefits of growing, caring for and harvesting their fruits but also the environmental and wildlife benefits of trees," says community programme manager, Pak Ling Wan.

Image caption,

Apples will be sweet with a good flavour this year

And in many instances, heirloom apples local to the area are being planted, helping to keep communities in touch with their food-growing heritage. The UK has an astonishing 2,000 or more heritage varieties of apple, many intricately connected with local history.

Take, for instance, the Beauty of Bath, Worcester Pearmain and Stoke Red, from the village of Rodney Stoke, near Cheddar. Then there's the Bloody Ploughman apple, an heirloom Scottish variety, and the Gennet Moyle, an old Somerset cider apple rescued from extinction.

The vast majority of these heritage apples never make it to the supermarket shelves and their names are disappearing from the lexicon. Jim Arbury of the RHS is on a mission to revive "lost" fruits through his remarkable knowledge of everything apple.

Image caption,

Jim Arbury in the orchard at RHS Garden Wisley, Surrey

We put this apple detective to the test - and using sight, taste and touch alone, he quickly identified two mystery apples from Swan Barn Farm as Court Pendu Plat, a popular Victorian apple that dates back to Roman times, and a sweet cooking apple, known as Rival.

And there's good news for apple connoisseurs everywhere, as can be seen from the pictures of apples on social media feeds.

Despite a summer of extreme weather - leading to stunted crops and shrunken vegetables - apples have fared pretty well overall, benefitting from a frost-free spring and long hours of summer sunshine.

"They're going to taste really good," says Jim Arbury. "They're going to be quite firm with good flavour and sweet: plenty of sugar in them."

All the better, he adds, for making apple juice and cider.

Follow Helen on Twitter @hbriggs.

Wed, 12 Oct 2022 01:49:00 -0500 en-GB text/html https://www.bbc.co.uk/news/science-environment-63160292.amp
Killexams : Apple seeds watchOS 9.1 developer beta 5

watchOS 9.1 beta 5 available for developers

The latest builds can be downloaded by developers taking part in the beta-testing program via the Apple Developer Center, or as an over-the-air update for any hardware that's already running the beta builds. Public beta versions of the releases generally arrive a short while after their developer counterparts, available through the Apple Beta Software Program website.

Both AppleInsider and Apple itself strongly advise users don't install beta operating systems, or beta software in general, on to "mission-critical" or primary devices, as there is the chance of issues that could result in the loss of data. Testers should instead use secondary or non-essential hardware, and to make sure they have sufficient backups of their important data at all times.

The latest builds can be downloaded by developers taking part in the beta-testing program via the Apple Developer Center, or as an over-the-air update for any hardware that's already running the beta builds. Public beta versions of the releases generally arrive a short while after their developer counterparts, available through the Apple Beta Software Program website.

Wed, 12 Oct 2022 01:20:00 -0500 en text/html https://appleinsider.com/articles/22/10/12/apple-seeds-watchos-91-developer-beta-5 Killexams : Fifth beta of watchOS 9.1 released by Apple for developer

Published: Published Date - 10:30 AM, Thu - 13 October 22

San Francisco: Tech giant Apple has released the fifth beta of watchOS 9.1 for developer testing.

According to AppleInsider, the latest builds can be downloaded by developers taking part in the beta-testing programme via the Apple Developer Center, or as an over-the-air update for any hardware already running the beta builds.

Public beta versions of the releases generally arrive a short while after their developer counterparts, available through the Apple Beta Software Program website.

The fifth beta of watchOS 9.1 arrives a week after the fourth, separately from the rest of the beta releases. Apple already released the latest betas for iOS 16.1, iPadOS 16.1, tvOS 16.1, and macOS Ventura on October 11.

The fourth watchOS 9.1 build number is 20S5072a, in place of 20S5063c.

The report does not indicate any new user-facing features. The update addresses bug fixes and other improvements.

As per the report, Apple strongly advises users not to install beta operating systems, or beta software in general, on “mission-critical” or primary devices, as there is the chance of issues that could result in data loss.

Testers should instead use secondary or non-essential hardware and make sure they have sufficient backups of their important data at all times.

Wed, 12 Oct 2022 17:00:00 -0500 en text/html https://telanganatoday.com/fifth-beta-of-watchos-9-1-released-by-apple-for-developer
Killexams : Apple issues developer beta 11 of macOS Ventura

macOS Ventura developer beta 10 now available

AppleInsider may earn an affiliate commission on purchases made through links on our site.

Apple is edging ever closer to the release of macOS Ventura, and has provided developer beta testers with a tenth build of the operating system.

The freshest betas can be pulled from the Apple Developer Center by developers signed up for the test program, or as an over-the-air update for devices already running beta software. Public betas typically appear a short time after the developer versions, and are downloaded through the Apple Beta Software Program website.

The eleventh beta replaces the tenth from October 4, which in turn took over from the ninth from September 27.

The eleventh beta build is number 22A5373b, replacing 22A5365d.

Final public versions of macOS Ventura are expected to arrive sometime in October. Apple also released beta builds for older operating systems containing similar security patches found in macOS 13. Those beta versions are macOS 11.7.1 and macOS 12.6.1, which will presumably be released alongside macOS 13.

New features included in macOS Ventura include Stage Manager app management and multitasking, Live Captions for video, Finder and System Settings changes, Spotlight updates, Continuity Camera that turns an iPhone into a webcam, Passkeys, and upgrades to Messages, and Safari, Photos, among other alterations.

AppleInsider, and Apple itself, strongly advise users avoid installing betas on to "mission-critical" or primary devices, as there is the small chance of data loss or other issues. Instead, testers should install betas onto secondary or non-essential devices, and to make sure there are sufficient backups of important data before updating.

Tue, 11 Oct 2022 01:08:00 -0500 en text/html https://appleinsider.com/articles/22/10/11/apple-issues-developer-beta-11-of-macos-ventura
Killexams : Why Empathy Is an Essential Part of Customer Experience

There are many strategies companies use to Improve the customer experience, from smart technology to introducing new services designed to help consumers save time on everyday activities. While each of these can have a positive impact on the overall consumer experience, few things are more important than customer service that offers a sense of empathy.

As Don McCarty, CEO of Infusion for Health explains, “Empathy can be the ultimate differentiator in your organization’s ability to provide great service to its clients. It is the key to understanding your clients and their unique wants, needs and challenges. And when you approach them in a way that reflects that understanding, it can become a true game-changer for you and them.”

Defining Empathy and Its Benefits

Empathy is generally defined as the ability to understand and share another person’s feelings. “That ability to understand and develop an affinity with someone is crucial in everyday life,” McCarty explains.

“Empathy is how we develop lasting connections with those around us. And while it’s not something we typically think of in a customer service experience, displaying empathy when a customer is having a problem or going through a hard time can have a dramatic influence on the entire tone of that experience.”

This is perhaps part of the reason why a University of Southern California study found that over one-third of all ads appeal to customers’ emotions — to create that powerful sense of connection. But in customer service, empathy can go even deeper.

McCarty offers this example of empathy in action: “At our company, we work with medical patients who are dealing with chronic conditions. Receiving medically necessary infusions can be an emotionally and physically challenging experience, so we decided to make empathy a core part of what we offer. We do this by ensuring that each of our employees is kind and professional when interacting with patients, and try to go the extra mile to make it as comfortable as possible with clean private rooms, snacks, entertainment and other perks to turn this into a positive experience for them.”

When the organization displays empathy, customers feel like their concerns are being heard and taken seriously, and that the company is doing everything in its power to help them, regardless of the situation.

Displaying empathy as part of the customer experience can also serve as a powerful positive differentiating factor for a brand. A PwC study reported that 64 percent of consumers in the United States felt that companies had “lost touch with the human element of customer experience.”

A company’s ability to demonstrate empathy can provide the connection that many consumers still deeply desire, even in a digital age. This can make all the difference in keeping customers coming back in the long run.

Making Empathy a Core Part of Your Customer Experience

Successfully developing an empathetic culture begins internally.

Notably, empathy has been cited as the most important leadership skill in business surveys, helping drive cooperation, engagement, innovation, inclusivity and more. Leadership must set the example in defining what empathy looks like by displaying it to their coworkers.

Of course, empathy must also become a core part of the business’s mission — a stated point of emphasis in how it treats its customers. Empathy in customer service can also be taught through coaching, seminars, online trainings and incentives such as public recognition or performance bonuses. For example, the Apple Genius training manual included an entire section on empathy.

The key is ensuring that employees understand how to demonstrate empathy to customers, and then supply them a reason for doing so, even when facing challenging customer circumstances.

“The key to empathy is listening—truly listening to what the customer is saying and feeling. This ensures that you actually understand your customers and their needs,” McCarty says.

“When you listen to what they want or need to have a better experience, you are better equipped to treat them with the dignity and care they deserve. It ensures that you respond appropriately to their needs so that every interaction is positive.”

Empathy can be an especially powerful tool when a customer is having a negative experience with a brand. Even when dealing with a difficult customer who challenges an employee’s explanations or solutions, practicing empathy can help customer service professionals understand the customer’s perspective, remain calm and respond appropriately in a way that helps address their concerns.

Unleash the Power of Empathy

While training your team to effectively implement empathy as part of each client interaction can take some time, it is well worth the effort. This is something McCarty has seen in his own company’s work.

“By expressing empathy to the patients we work with, they feel valued and respected. They know that we understand what they are going through and are trying to create as positive of an experience for them as possible. That makes all the difference for their outlook on their treatment, which ultimately creates better outcomes as well. That experience can’t be replicated or replaced.”

As you unleash the power of empathy in your own operations — no matter what type of products or services you offer — you can achieve similar positive results.

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Fri, 14 Oct 2022 03:39:00 -0500 en-US text/html https://innotechtoday.com/why-empathy-is-an-essential-part-of-customer-experience/
Killexams : ‘Andor’ episode 5: Of course the Rebellion includes a Theory Guy young man in forest © Provided by Daily Dot young man in forest

This post includes spoilers for Andor episode 5.

What's life like inside the Rebellion? The main Star Wars movies don't have time to go into it, but Andor picks up the slack. Preparing for an undercover mission on the planet Aldhani (aka Scotland), Cassian disrupts an already-tense atmosphere among his new Rebel allies. The resulting subplot is a combination of heist thriller and observational dramedy about the internal dynamics of an activist group.

Embedded on Aldhani for months, the team is less prepared than they wish to appear. Cassian is both an unwanted interloper and an essential asset, inspiring suspicion from Skeen (Ebon Moss-Bachrach), who quizzes Cassian on why he recognizes his prison tats. Meanwhile, team leader Vel Sartha (Faye Marsay) is hanging onto authority by the skin of her teeth, translating her stress into paranoia about Cassian hitting on her girlfriend.

Some of these characters have personal reasons for fighting the Empire, pushed to the brink by tragedy. Others are more enigmatic, with Karis Nemik (Alex Lawther) as the odd one out. While everyone else is focused on the mission at hand, Karis is a big-picture thinker. He's a Theory Guy; the Star Wars equivalent of someone who hands out PDFs of Marx.

karis nemik andor © Provided by Daily Dot karis nemik andor

"Nemik sees oppression everywhere," says Skeen, affectionately mocking. "He's writing a manifesto. Apparently, the only thing keeping us from liberty is a few more ideas."

In the same scene, writer Dan Gilroy deepens what might otherwise be a simple piece of exposition for the upcoming mission. "Can't be jammed or intercepted," Karis explains, introducing Cassian to an antique navigational device. "Something breaks, you can fix it yourself."

"Hard to learn," Cassian remarks. "Yes, but once you've mastered it, you're free," Karis replies. "We've grown reliant on Imperial tech and we've made ourselves vulnerable. There's a growing list of things we've known and forgotten."

He's essentially illustrating the difference between Gen-X and Gen-Z tech literacy. Twenty years ago, computer owners were more likely to know how to fix or modify their devices. Now, that's a niche skill. Companies like Apple design their products to discourage DIY repair, forcing users to rely on proprietary upgrades. The popularity of TikTok as a search engine represents a similar problem: An app that's addictively usable but factually unreliable, and whose inner workings are both obscure and riddled with bias. As Karis so neatly explains, learning an old-fashioned skill is often more useful than taking the easier route.

Pop culture has a habit of poking fun at this kind of thinking, painting characters like Karis as conspiracy theories and laughable eccentrics. The most notorious example is the way Harry Potter turns Hermione's anti-slavery crusade into a punchline. In what's now becoming a habit, Andor takes a more grown-up viewpoint. Karis is an amusingly earnest character, but it's also pretty clear that he's right. His role opens up new ways of looking at the Rebellion, providing a necessary contrast with the cynical attitude of our title character.

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The post ‘Andor’ episode 5: Of course the Rebellion includes a Theory Guy appeared first on The Daily Dot.

Wed, 05 Oct 2022 05:40:03 -0500 en-US text/html https://www.msn.com/en-us/news/technology/e2-80-98andor-e2-80-99-episode-5-of-course-the-rebellion-includes-a-theory-guy/ar-AA12DDmJ
Killexams : Amazon kicks off holiday shopping with Prime Early Access Sale — here are the top deals No result found, try new keyword!Amazon’s Prime Early Access Sale has entered its second day, but plenty of can’t-miss deals are still to be had. Mon, 10 Oct 2022 07:46:00 -0500 en-US text/html https://www.nydailynews.com/consumer-reviews/sns-bestreviews-best-amazon-prime-early-access-sale-deals-20221010-yfo4tw4gh5clpew45lmjynf7lu-story.html Killexams : Apple releases fifth beta of watchOS 9.1 for developer testing

The Cupertino based Apple releases fifth beta of watch OS 9.1 for developer testing. According to AppleInsider, the latest builds can be downloaded by developers taking part in the beta-testing programme via the Apple Developer Center, or as an over-the-air update for any hardware already running the beta builds.

Generally, Public beta versions of the releases arrive a short while after their developer counterparts, available through the Apple Beta Software Program website.

The fifth beta of watchOS 9.1 has arrived a week after the fourth, separately from the rest of the beta releases. Apple already released the latest betas for iOS 16.1, iPadOS 16.1, tvOS 16.1, and macOS Ventura on October 11.

The fourth watchOS 9.1 build number is 20S5072a, in place of 20S5063c. The report does not indicate any new user-facing features. The update addresses bug fixes and other improvements.

According to the report, Apple strongly advises users not to install beta operating systems, or beta software in general, on ‘mission-critical’ or primary devices, as there is the chance of issues that could result in data loss.

Testers should instead use secondary or non-essential hardware and make sure they have sufficient backups of their important data at all times.

Earlier this month, 9to5Mac reported that Apple has rolled out watchOS 9.1 beta 4 to public beta users, soon after rolling it out to developers. The latest beta update has brought stability improvements and bug fixes to the Apple Watch operating system. The Apple Watch owners, enrolling into watchOS public beta program and owning a compatible watch, can now download the latest beta version on their device, as per 9to5Mac.

Meanwhile, the watch OS 9 brought several new features such as QWERTY keyboard support, new watch faces, medication reminder, extensive sleep tracking and data analysis, redesigned Compass app and more.

Moreover, Apple has also added a new Low Power mode which allows users to extend the battery life of the Apple Watch by up to 36 hours. The Low power mode disables al the features on Apple Watch to offer improved battery life.

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Thu, 13 Oct 2022 10:11:00 -0500 en text/html https://www.livemint.com/technology/tech-news/apple-releases-fifth-beta-of-watch-os-9-1-for-developer-testing-11665656764330.html
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