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Solaris 9 Sun Certified System Administrator Part II
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Killexams : SUN Administrator helper - BingNews https://killexams.com/pass4sure/exam-detail/310-015 Search results Killexams : SUN Administrator helper - BingNews https://killexams.com/pass4sure/exam-detail/310-015 https://killexams.com/exam_list/SUN Killexams : Project SUN hosting Caregiver Stress Reduction class

Sat, 06 Aug 2022 01:30:00 -0500 en text/html https://www.daily-journal.com/life/family/project-sun-hosting-caregiver-stress-reduction-class/article_df8a1900-133e-11ed-8cd8-8702f2bc48cf.html Killexams : SUN Habitat for Humanity working on home in Sunbury

SUNBURY — A foreclosed home on Edison Avenue will have new occupants thanks to the SUN Habitat For Humanity.

Jay Helmer, administrator and development officer for the SUN Habitat For Humanity, said the group is now accepting applications for a partner family for a home at 1109 Edison Avenue.

Helmer said the group recently took over the property and is remodeling the entire structure.

“We are completely rehabbing the entire house and are looking for volunteers for the demo work,” he said.

“We are taking the home down to the studs and then building it back up with all new drywall, insulation, kitchen and new bathrooms.”

Helmer said the group, which is located on Old Trail, in Selinsgrove, started in the 1990s and has remodeled or built 36 homes. The projects help low- to moderate-income families have the opportunity to own their own homes.

“The goal is to build safe affordable housing meant to be permanent for families who have not owned a home before,” Helmer said.

“We are currently accepting applications to be a habitat partner family that meets the guidelines,” he said.

How the program works is an average family of three to four that has a total income of $30,000 or less would have the opportunity to get a zero interest 30-year mortgage at about $400 a month and the chance at being a homeowner, Helmer said.

“The idea is to take folks from substandard housing to safe, decent affordable housing,” he said.

“This is for low-to-moderate-income range families that traditionally couldn’t go to a bank and get a mortgage and these are most often first-time homeowners.”

A second part of the program is the new owners must complete 250 hours helping with the rehabbing of the home, Helmer said.

Helmer said since the program began in the Valley, more than $2 million has been put back on the tax rolls in various communities throughout the Valley.

The current project in Sunbury will be the sixth home the organization has rehabbed.

The group also purchased a vacant lot on 11th and Reagan Street where Helmer said he hopes to be able to build a brand new home for a family that meets the criteria.

Sunbury City Councilman Jim Eister said the group does an excellent job.

“Through the years, they have done numerous projects and have helped so many families,” he said. “They do an excellent job and have been an asset to the city.”

To find out more information or to apply, visit www.sunhabitat.org

Fri, 08 Jul 2022 09:43:00 -0500 en text/html https://www.dailyitem.com/news/sun-habitat-for-humanity-working-on-home-in-sunbury/article_211f8de0-fe32-11ec-bc17-736c4146e765.html
Killexams : Lake County’s new sustainability manager wants to help build a “more equitable, beautiful, natural world” No result found, try new keyword!New Lake County sustainability manager Robin Grooms believes now is the time for decisive action for a healthy environment. Thu, 04 Aug 2022 09:03:37 -0500 en-us text/html https://www.msn.com/en-us/news/us/lake-county-e2-80-99s-new-sustainability-manager-wants-to-help-build-a-e2-80-9cmore-equitable-beautiful-natural-world-e2-80-9d/ar-AA10jNud Killexams : Inside a Baltimore County schools job fair, staffing shortages attract teachers ahead of a new academic year No result found, try new keyword!Amid widespread staffing shortages of educators, bus drivers and other essential staff, the County school system has launched weekly recruitment events around the district to put candidates directly ... Fri, 05 Aug 2022 08:48:00 -0500 en-us text/html https://www.msn.com/en-us/news/us/inside-a-baltimore-county-schools-job-fair-staffing-shortages-attract-teachers-ahead-of-a-new-academic-year/ar-AA10m2xb Killexams : Lauded charter school leader Tim King forced out after an investigation into sexual misconduct

A Chicago Public Schools inspector general’s report substantiating allegations of inappropriate sexual conduct with a student forced Tim King, the lauded head of a prominent charter school network, to resign last week, sources told WBEZ.

King, who founded Urban Prep Academies, was celebrated nationally for getting 100% of the school’s all-Black male students into college. King developed an innovative program that instilled pride in Black boys, who faced some of the worst outcomes in CPS, and, among many awards, was named Hero of the Year by People Magazine.

Sources with knowledge of the confidential report, who spoke only on condition of anonymity, said the Chicago board of education received the inspector general’s report in July.

The school district instructed the charter school Wednesday to inform parents of the investigation’s findings but said charter school officials declined. The district sent a letter instead.

“Nothing is more important to Chicago Public Schools than student safety in our schools,” reads the CPS letter to parents. “Chicago Public Schools is working with UPA (Urban Prep Academies) to ensure that all UPA students are safe and that their rights are protected.”

The letter, which does not name King, states that district investigators substantiated the claims on June 30. “Based on interviews and documentation, the IG’s office concluded that the administrator engaged in an inappropriate relationship with a 16-year-old UPA student and engaged in other misconduct involving the victim.”

The letter tells parents the administrator is barred from having contact with Urban Prep students and is prohibited from entering all CPS facilities.

King had wanted to continue working to raise money for the charter schools with the Urban Prep Foundation, he told WBEZ Monday. But CPS is barring him from any connection with the charter school and placing a do not hire on his record.

According to sources, the OIG report said King “groomed” a student, starting when he was 16 years old. The sources said the report outlined years of alleged inappropriate sexual activity. King also provided financial support to the student after graduation, the sources said. WBEZ has not seen the report.

Through his attorney, King denied all allegations.

“It is a sad day in Chicago that a man who has done so much to help young Black men in Chicago is being targeted,” said Andy DeVooght, the attorney.

DeVooght called the inspector general’s report a “kangaroo” investigation and full of holes. He said to the extent that King helped the young man in question, it was with private donations through an alumni program. Many former students, most of whom are low income and need support beyond high school, have been helped through the program, he said.

King’s attorney said the Illinois Department of Children and Family Services had previously investigated allegations of sexual abuse but did not substantiate them. He does not face criminal charges.

Chicago Public Schools CEO Pedro Martinez pledged last year, during a scandal at Marine Leadership Academy, to take swift action and be transparent in cases of sexual misconduct.

Charter schools are part of Chicago Public Schools. Last year, the school district provided about $8.6 million to Urban Prep to provide education to students who attended two of its three schools. The third campus is funded by the state.

King served as both the chief executive officer and president of the charter school network, a setup that school district officials previously criticized for creating a conflict of interest.

“We intend to clear his name,” DeVooght said. The attorney added that there have been no other allegations in King’s 30-year career.

In the letter to parents Wednesday, CPS officials said they told Urban Prep to dismiss King after the substantiated findings by the inspector general. However he appealed the inspector general’s findings to the CPS’ Title IX coordinator who rejected King’s appeal, according to CPS. After that, King resigned.

King Is exiting Urban Prep at a critical time. Urban Prep has spent years in financial turmoil and has had to get cash advances and take out high interest loans to make payroll, according to a memo obtained by WBEZ. It also has seen its student enrollment dwindle as Black families have left the city, taking available students with them.

The two campuses that are authorized by CPS are up for renewal next year.

Sarah Karp covers education for WBEZ. Follow her on Twitter @WBEZeducation and @sskedreporter.

Wed, 03 Aug 2022 08:54:00 -0500 en text/html https://www.wbez.org/stories/star-chicago-charter-school-head-tim-king-forced-out/cdfe3ec4-50e2-4de1-9c17-7f3f3f9902e5
Killexams : Sexual misconduct investigation forces out lauded charter school leader Tim King, sources say

A Chicago Public Schools inspector general’s report substantiating allegations of inappropriate sexual conduct with a student forced Tim King, the lauded head of a prominent charter school network, to resign last week, sources told WBEZ.

King, who founded Urban Prep Academies, was celebrated nationally for getting 100% of the school’s all-Black male students into college. King developed an innovative program that instilled pride in Black boys, who face some of the worst outcomes in CPS, and, among many awards, was named “Hero of the Year” by People magazine.

Sources with knowledge of the confidential report, who spoke only on condition of anonymity, said the Chicago Board of Education received the inspector general’s report in July.

The school district instructed the charter school Wednesday to inform parents of the investigation’s findings but said charter school officials declined. The district sent a letter instead.

“Nothing is more important to Chicago Public Schools than student safety in our schools,” reads the CPS letter to parents. “Chicago Public Schools is working with UPA [Urban Prep Academies] to ensure that all UPA students are safe and that their rights are protected.”

The letter, which does not name King, states that district investigators substantiated the claims on June 30.

“Based on interviews and documentation, the IG’s office concluded that the administrator engaged in an inappropriate relationship with a 16-year-old UPA student and engaged in other misconduct involving the victim.”

The letter tells parents the administrator is barred from having contact with Urban Prep students and is prohibited from entering all CPS facilities.

King had wanted to continue working to raise money for the charter schools with the Urban Prep Foundation, he told WBEZ Monday. But CPS is barring him from any connection with the charter school and placing a “do not hire” on his record.

According to sources, the inspector general’s report said King “groomed” a student, starting when he was 16. The sources said the report outlined years of alleged inappropriate sexual activity. King also provided financial support to the student after graduation, the sources said. WBEZ has not seen the report.

Through his attorney, King denied all allegations.

“It is a sad day in Chicago that a man who has done so much to help young Black men in Chicago is being targeted,” said Andy DeVooght, King’s attorney.

DeVooght called the inspector general’s report a “kangaroo” investigation and said it is full of holes. He said to the extent that King helped the young man in question, it was with private donations through an alumni program. Many former students, most of whom are low income and need support beyond high school, have been helped through the program, he said.

King’s attorney said the Illinois Department of Children and Family Services had previously investigated allegations of sexual abuse but did not substantiate them. King does not face criminal charges.

Chicago Public Schools CEO Pedro Martinez pledged last year, during a scandal at Marine Leadership Academy, to take swift action and be transparent in cases of sexual misconduct.

Charter schools are part of Chicago Public Schools. Last year, the school district distributed about $8.6 million to Urban Prep to provide education to students who attended two of its three schools. The third campus is funded by the state.

King served as both the chief executive officer and president of the charter school network, a setup that school district officials previously criticized for creating a conflict of interest.

“We intend to clear his name,” DeVooght said. The attorney added there have been no other allegations in King’s 30-year career.

In the letter to parents, CPS officials said they told Urban Prep to dismiss King after the substantiated findings by the inspector general. However, he appealed the inspector general’s findings to the CPS’ Title IX coordinator, who rejected King’s appeal, according to CPS. After that, King resigned.

King is exiting Urban Prep at a critical time. Urban Prep has spent years in financial turmoil and has had to get cash advances and take out high-interest loans to make payroll, according to a memo obtained by WBEZ. It also has seen its student enrollment dwindle as Black families have left the city, taking students with them.

The two campuses that are authorized by CPS are up for renewal next year.

Sarah Karp covers education for WBEZ.

Wed, 03 Aug 2022 11:05:00 -0500 en text/html https://chicago.suntimes.com/education/2022/8/3/23290651/tim-king-urban-prep-academies-cps-charter-public-school-investigation
Killexams : Dorsey says experience as student, parent, teacher and administrator gives her unique view on how to help Carroll schools

Editor’s note: The Carroll County Times is profiling candidates for the Carroll County Board of Education leading up to the July 19 primary elections. In the nonpartisan race, voters may choose three candidates on their primary election ballots. The top six vote-getters will advance to the general election. Seven candidates are running for three open seats: Tara Battaglia, Patricia Dorsey, Amanda Jozkowski, James Miller, Pat Sands, Tom Scanlan and Steve Whisler. Katie Speert is also listed on the ballot but withdrew from the race in June.

Patricia Dorsey is finishing her first term as a member of the Carroll County Board of Education, and says she still has more work to do for the school system. Dorsey, of Westminster, is running for reelection to her seat, hoping to help with continued recovery from the COVID-19 pandemic.

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Dorsey was the top vote-getter in the 2018 election and is no stranger to CCPS. She was once a student in Carroll County schools, then worked as a teacher, assistant principal and principal in the system for almost 40 years. She also knows what it is like to be a parent in CCPS, as her two children attended and graduated from Carroll’s public schools.

Her extensive teaching experience, coupled with her administrative career have allowed her to have a “very keen understanding” of the inner workings of the school system, Dorsey said.

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“I bring the vision not just of what it takes to have good instruction in the classroom as a teacher, but I know how to observe, evaluate and report on it … I have all those pieces in my background,” Dorsey said. “I don’t think there is anyone (else) who’s running (for the Board of Education) that has been at the level where they not only participated as a teacher in the system but also had part of their job to go in to observe and evaluate the teaching staff.”

Dorsey, a lifelong Carroll County resident and 1968 graduate of South Carroll High School, earned a bachelor’s degree from Morgan State College (now known as Morgan State University), a master’s from Western Maryland College (now known as McDaniel College) and a doctorate from the University of Maryland, College Park.

Dorsey said that she wants to use her expertise to move the school system past problems wrought by the pandemic.

“During the pandemic, we just lost a little bit of our academic footing and I think there was a period of time when we loosed the requirements/standards a bit because everyone was dealing with how we were going to handle the virus … I think we can get try to back to where we were before that and even go farther, if we can,” she said.

If reelected to the Board of Education, Dorsey said she plans to focus on student achievement.

“I feel like I still have something to contribute and I’d like to continue to provide back to the system and community which have given so much to me,” she said.

Sun, 10 Jul 2022 18:00:00 -0500 en-US text/html https://www.baltimoresun.com/maryland/carroll/education/cc-school-board-race-dorsey-20220711-jkn2ub4msja47pxu7ht7bczxn4-story.html
Killexams : Broward County leaders must address animal shelter issues | Opinion

Thanks to the Sun Sentinel for bringing the investigative story about the complete mismanagement of Broward County’s pet shelter to its readers. This article shared the many concerning and unacceptable issues with our current shelter director.

Now it is time for our county administrator to address the performance of Broward County Animal Care Director Emily Wood. There are questions that need and deserve immediate answers: Why is Wood still employed as our shelter director? What has she accomplished since her arrival that has her supervisor supporting her so completely? Can county leadership share why they support her when there is so much data showing her to be a failure? If the official complaint filed against Wood proves that she referred to her assistant director as a “bull dyke,” will the county terminate Wood’s employment immediately for her abusive and degrading treatment of a subordinate?

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Under her direction, pets are left in cruel and inhumane situations. She offers no support to residents who desperately seek help. She has unilaterally decided that the Broward police departments do her job and hold and rehome stray pets. Where are all the programs and promises that Wood made during her interview process? What is she doing to help our community? We deserve to know.

Wood is a wordsmith extraordinaire. Her responses are filled with industry buzz words that sound good to the untrained ear, but in reality have zero substance. Because she is an expert word manipulator, Wood should be required to share substantiating data whenever she’s talking about shelter programs and operations.

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Wood’s lack of desire to work with her biggest and best resource — the community — directly correlates to why she is failing miserably. She spends more time retaliating against volunteers, rescuers and advocates than she does helping the pets and residents of Broward County.

Wood should be judged by county leadership after obtaining answers to these questions:

  • What measures were used and what data was supplied that supported her performance evaluation?
  • What programs has she created and successfully implemented? How have they helped Broward’s residents and pets?
  • What new community partnerships or collaborations has she created? Have her programs increased volunteerism?
  • How many new grants has she applied for and received that helped our community?
  • Have her programs resulted in adoptions sufficient to help keep the shelter from reaching capacity?
  • Is the number of free and affordable spay-neuter surgeries available to our community growing to meet the needs of a population of 2 million people?

Your Broward County tax dollars pay Wood’s salary. The residents have a right to know if she is earning that salary. Broward County leaders should hold her accountable if she is not. If Wood is not doing the job she was hired to do, and promised to do, then it is time she be removed and replaced with a more qualified and compassionate candidate. It is unacceptable that our pets suffer while she is paid $156,000 to mismanage a community resource like our pet shelter.

Meredith Bruder is the director of Pets’ Broward, a private, nonprofit animal rescue organization.

Wed, 27 Jul 2022 03:03:00 -0500 en-US text/html https://www.sun-sentinel.com/opinion/commentary/fl-op-com-broward-animal-shelter-20220727-fh6waeocrfanjn3slroyrdmg4u-story.html
Killexams : Vice President Harris visits South Florida to tout $1 billion plan for climate-related disasters

Vice President Kamala Harris flew to South Florida on Monday to talk up a $1 billion Biden Administration program to help deal with the growing intensity of hurricanes, wildfires, extreme heat and other disasters that threaten communities nationwide.

Her arrival came hours after the White House announced a national funding plan that would benefit all 50 states, as well as Washington, D.C. and three territories including Puerto Rico.

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At the same time, a new long-term funding bill designed to mitigate climate change remained in limbo in Washington — it received surprise support from U.S. Sen. Joe Manchin (D-W.Va.), but needs additional agreement from Democratic holdout Sen. Kyrsten Sinema of Arizona.

Harris was joined at a Florida International University climate-related event by Homeland Security Secretary Alejandro Mayorkas, Federal Emergency Management Agency Administrator Deanne Criswell and National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration Administrator Richard Spinrad.

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“Here in Florida, every year, more and more powerful hurricanes and tropical storms make landfall on the coast,” Harris told her FIU audience.

“In accurate days, deadly floods have swept through Missouri and Kentucky, washing away entire neighborhoods, leaving at least 35 dead including babies, children,” she said. “So, the devastation is real.  The harm is real.  The impact is real.  And we are witnessing it in real-time.

“Earlier today, at the National Hurricane Center, I received a briefing on extreme weather fueled by climate change. And the takeaway is clear: As the climate crisis gets worse, extreme weather will pose a rapidly growing danger to a rapidly growing number of communities.”

She said the administration “remains committed” to addressing them by making financial grants available to communities “disproportionately impacted by the climate crisis.”

“These investments are one part of a larger fight.” Harris said. “The most effective way to protect our nation is not only to address the effects of climate disasters but to address the cause of the climate crisis itself.”

Along that vein, she reiterated the administration’s goal of cutting greenhouse gas emissions in half “by no later than 2030,” and to reach “net zero emissions” by no later than 2050.

“Some say that is an ambitious goal,” Harris said. “I say it is doable. It is doable.”

She made a pitch for the continued development of electric vehicles, noting she sponsored the first bill to develop electric school buses while she was in the U.S. Senate. She drew cheers when she said 50 of them will soon take to the roads in Miami-Dade County.

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Earlier, the vice president visited the National Hurricane Center a short distance from the FIU main campus in West Miami-Dade County, where she discussed extreme weather events nationally, such as the deadly flooding in Kentucky and Missouri and the protracted wildfires in California.

“Communities across our nation are experiencing first-hand the devastating impacts of the climate change and the related extreme weather events that follow — more energized hurricanes with deadlier storm surges, increased flooding and a wildfire season that’s become a year-long threat,” Criswell said.

The administration’s grant plan, dubbed the Building Resilient Infrastructure and Communities Program, will receive twice the funds it did in 2021.

“President Joe Biden and Vice President Kamala Harris have been clear that climate change is a crisis,” the White House said in its Monday statement.

“The Biden-Harris Administration is taking action to make communities across America more resilient to climate change, especially as millions of Americans live under heat advisories … [and] wildfires threaten communities big and small,” the statement added.

The federal money, among other things, would upgrade responses to wildfires, make aid to underserved communities a priority and curb losses to infrastructure.

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The administration is also coordinating federal efforts on flood resilience and ensuring that federal investments include safety standards for flooding and sea-level rise.

South Florida has already benefited from the federal plan. Last year, for example, the South Florida Water Management District received $50 million for a flood mitigation program in Miami-Dade County, according to the FEMA website. The district, the largest of five in the state, covers 16 counties from Orlando to the Florida Keys and serves 9 million people.

The project, the only one last year to receive funding in South Florida, is located in a region where real estate development along the waterfront “has created a high-risk flood zone for communities,” FEMA says in its project description.

The project involves the installation of “a living shoreline” to reduce erosion, elevate canal banks, build a levee for storm surge protection, and replace a pump station “that will convey flood waters to tide when downstream water elevations are too high to allow gravity flow.”

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“Combined with sea level rise, these problems are only going to increase. Rapid urbanization since the pandemic has put pressure on the current systems, making new repairs to existing structures needed for optimization,” according to the description.

“Extensive land development and population increases within the area have already exceeded the original design assumptions of structures to mitigate for flooding,” the description says. “Significant changes in climate conditions and sea level rise have also impacted the area and are limiting flood protection operations.”

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Over the weekend, Biden’s surprise deal with Manchin to spend $369 billion over 10 years to offset climate change came under attack from conservatives and others who oppose it.

In her Miami speech, Harris urged Congress to quickly pass it.

But the administration must now persuade Sen. Kyrsten Sinema of Arizona to back the spending as part of a broader law called the Inflation Reduction Act, which is valued at $739 billion. The bill must garner all 50 Democratic votes in the Senate, as Republicans are unified in their opposition.

As of Monday, the senator was undecided, according to national news reports.

“Sen. Sinema does not have comment as she’s reviewing the bill text and will need to see what comes out of the parliamentarian process,” a spokesperson for the senator told Fox News Digital.

Mon, 01 Aug 2022 11:02:00 -0500 en-US text/html https://www.sun-sentinel.com/news/fl-ne-kamala-harris-fiu-climate-20220801-waschv5wxrhpzpmllodmsu3e4y-story.html
Killexams : SUN: Navajo Code Talker's death leaves just 3 from group, New mail policy for New Mexico prison raises questions, + More

Navajo Code Talker Samuel Sandoval dies; 3 left from groupBy Felicia Fonseca, Associated Press

Samuel Sandoval, one of the last remaining Navajo Code Talkers who transmitted messages in World War II using a code based on their native language, has died.

Sandoval died late Friday at a hospital in Shiprock, New Mexico, his wife, Malula told The Associated Press on Saturday. He was 98.

Hundreds of Navajos were recruited from the vast Navajo Nation to serve as Code Talkers with the U.S. Marine Corps. Only three are still alive today: Peter MacDonald, John Kinsel Sr. and Thomas H. Begay.

The Code Talkers took part in every assault the Marines conducted in the Pacific, sending thousands of messages without error on Japanese troop movements, battlefield tactics and other communications critical to the war's ultimate outcome. The code, based on the then-unwritten Navajo language, confounded Japanese military cryptologists and is credited with helping the U.S. win the war.

Samuel Sandoval was on Okinawa when got word from another Navajo Code Talker that the Japanese had surrendered and relayed the message to higher-ups. He had a close call on the island, which brought back painful memories that he kept to himself, Malula Sandoval said.

The Navajo men are celebrated annually on Aug. 14. Samuel Sandoval was looking forward to that date and seeing a museum built near the Navajo Nation capital of Window Rock to honor the Code Talkers, she said.

"Sam always said, 'I wanted my Navajo youngsters to learn, they need to know what we did and how this code was used and how it contributed to the world,'" she said Saturday. "That the Navajo language was powerful and always to continue carrying our legacy."

Sandoval was born in Nageezi near Chaco Culture National Historical Park in northwestern New Mexico. He enlisted in the Marine Corps after attending a Methodist school where he was discouraged from speaking Navajo. He helped recruit other Navajos from the school to serve as Code Talkers, expanding on words and an alphabet that an original group of 29 Navajos created.

Sandoval served in five combat tours and was honorably discharged in 1946. The Code Talkers had orders not to discuss their roles — not during the war and not until their mission was declassified in 1968.

The roles later became an immense source of pride for Sandoval and his late brother, Merrill Sandoval, who also was a Code Talker. The two became talented speakers who always hailed their fellow Marines still in action as the heroes, not themselves, said Merrill Sandoval's daughter, Jeannie Sandoval.

"We were kids, all growing up and we started to hear about the stories," she said. "We were so proud of them, and there weren't very many brothers together."

Sandoval was curious, always studying the local newspapers, and attending community, veterans, Code Talker and legislative meetings. He enjoyed traveling and sharing what he learned, grounded in his Diné beliefs and the Navajo way of life, said one of his daughters, Karen John.

"It was engrained early in me, to be part of the community," she said. "He was really involved in a lot, some of which I couldn't comprehend as a kid."

Samuel Sandoval often told his story, chronicled in a book and documentary of the same name — "Naz Bah Ei Bijei: Heart of a Warrier" — at the Cortez Cultural Center in Cortez, Colorado. He had a favorite folding chair there with vinyl padding and took coffee black, said executive director Rebecca Levy.

Levy said Sandoval's talks drew dozens of people, some of whom had to be turned away because of space limitations.

"It was a great opportunity for people who understood how important the Navajo Code Talkers were to the outcome of the war, in our favor ... to thank him in person," Levy said.

Sandoval's health had been declining in accurate years, including a fall in which he fractured a hip, Malula Sandoval said. His last trip was to New Orleans in June where he received the American Spirit Award from the National World War II Museum, she said. MacDonald, Kinsel and Begay also were honored.

Sandoval and his wife met while he was running a substance abuse counseling clinic, and she was a secretary, she said. They were married 33 years. Sandoval raised 11 children from previous marriages and in blended families, John said.

Navajo President Jonathan Nez said Sandoval will be remembered as a loving and courageous person who defended his homeland using his sacred language.

"We are saddened by his passing, but his legacy will always live on in our hearts and minds," Nez said in a statement.

Navajo Nation Council Speaker Seth Damon said Sandoval's life was guided by character, courage, honor and integrity, and his impact will forever be remembered.

"May he rest among our most resilient warriors," Damon said in a statement.

Funeral services are pending.

New mail policy for New Mexico prison inmates in questionBy Dan McKay, Albuquerque Journal

Humanitarian concerns are being raised about a new prison policy in New Mexico that provides inmates with photocopies of their personal mail – never the actual mail itself – as part of a plan to limit the flow of drugs into New Mexico prisons.

Initial data doesn't show an immediate impact on the drug positivity rate of inmates.

Legislators worry it might weaken meaningful communication between inmates and families that is key to rehabilitation, including small keepsakes like a child's drawing.

"It seems so draconian to find that inmates could no longer get drawings from their kids," said state Rep. Gail Chasey, an Albuquerque Democrat who presided over a accurate hearing concerning the Corrections Department.

Corrections officials have defended the policy as a necessary step to curb drug use and protect the health of people living or working inside state prisons.

They said some inmates had received letters soaked in narcotics — such as fentanyl or synthetic cannabis — and burned them to inhale the smoke.

Starting earlier this year, people who want to mail a letter to a New Mexico inmate must now send it to an address in Florida, where a private company photocopies the material and then mails it back to the state prison system.

It costs the state about $3.50 per inmate each month, regardless of whether the inmate receives any mail, for the Securus mail system. The cost could reach somewhere in the neighborhood of $160,000 a year, depending on the number of inmates in the system.

The change also restricts what kind of mail inmates may receive, with greeting cards, for example, no longer accepted, according to legislative records.

Wence Asonganyi, health services administrator for the Corrections Department, said the mail changes came after prison leaders determined they had to act amid a rise in symptoms among inmates consistent with a drug overdose.

"It is quite disturbing when on a weekly basis you get numbers of suspected overdoses within the prison system across the state, and all you have is a plan is to take them to a hospital or provide first aid," Asonganyi said. "You know that's not sustainable. You know that's not good care."

He said the Corrections Department had seen a substantial drop in medical incidents related to drug use following enactment of the new mail policy.

Legislative analysts offered a different assessment. They said the positivity rate from random drug tests of inmates hadn't shown an immediate improvement, according to quarterly reports issued by the department.

Asonganyi contends the drug positivity rate isn't the right way to measure the program's success because some of the drugs have been altered in a way that makes them hard to identify in a normal drug screening.

Legislative analysts, in turn, suggested the Corrections Department propose a better way to measure the program's success, if they have more meaningful data.

The legislators at the accurate hearing said they will further scrutinize the policy.

Chasey, who leads the House Judiciary Committee, said New Mexico's revenue boom should allow for new investments to Improve the prison system. She suggested there might be another safe, cost-effective way to screen the mail.

"I certainly don't want to put staff at risk, and I don't want inmates at risk," Chasey said. "We'd like to try to help."

Rep. Antonio "Moe" Maestas, D-Albuquerque, asked whether the out-of-state photocopying of mail was authorized by state law. Corrections officials said the law is silent on the issue.

Diana Crowson, whose son is an inmate at the state prison in Santa Fe, said the new policy has disrupted mail service to inmates. Keeping in touch with family, she said, is an important way to reduce recidivism for people released from custody.

"Not only the inmates," Crowson said, "but the families are suffering from this."

California not counting methane leaks from idle wellsBy Drew Costley, Associated Press

California claims to know how much climate-warming gas is going into the air from within its borders. It's the law: California limits climate pollution and each year the limits get stricter.

The state has also been a major oil and gas producer for more than a century, and authorities are well aware some 35,000 old, inactive oil and gas wells perforate the landscape.

Yet officials with the agency responsible for regulating greenhouse gas emissions say they don't include methane that leaks from these idle wells in their inventory of the state's emissions.

Ira Leifer, a University of California Santa Barbara scientist said the lack of data on emissions pouring or seeping out of idle wells calls into question the state's ability to meet its ambitious goal to achieve carbon neutrality by 2045.

Residents and environmentalists from across the state have been voicing concern about the possibility of leaking idle or abandoned wells for years, but the concerns were heightened in May and June when 21 idle wells were discovered to be leaking methane in or near two Bakersfield neighborhoods. They say that the leaking wells are "an urgent public health issue," because when a well is leaking methane, other gases often escape too.

Leifer said these "ridealong" gases were his biggest concern with the wells.

"Those other gases have significant health impacts," Leifer said, yet we know even less about their quantities than we do about the methane.

In July, residents who live in the communities nearest the leaking wells protested at the California Geologic Management Division's field offices, calling for better oversight.

"It's clear that they are willing to ignore this public health emergency. Our communities are done waiting. CalGEM needs to do their job," Cesar Aguirre, a community organizer with the Central California Environmental Justice Network, said in a statement.

Robert Howarth, a Cornell University methane researcher, agreed with Leifer that the amount of methane emissions from leaking wells isn't well known and that it's not a major source of emissions when compared with methane emissions from across the oil and gas industry.

Still, he said, "it's adding something very clearly, and we shouldn't be allowing it to happen."

A ton of methane is 83 times worse for the climate than a ton of carbon dioxide, when compared over twenty years.

A 2020 study said emissions from idle wells are "more substantial" than from plugged wells in California, but recommended more data collection on inactive wells at the major oil and gas fields throughout the state.

Robert Jackson, a Stanford University climate scientist and co-author on that study, said they found high emissions from some of the idle wells they measured in the study.

In order to get a better idea of how much methane is leaking, the state of California is investing in projects on the ground and in the air. David Clegern, a spokesperson for CARB, said the agency is beginning a project to measure emissions from a sample of properly and improperly abandoned wells to estimate statewide emissions from them.

And in June, California Governor Gavin Newsom signed a budget that includes participation in a global effort to slash emissions called the Methane Accountability Project. The state will spend $100 million to use satellites to track large methane leaks in order to help the state identify sources of the gas and cap leaks.

Some research has already been done, too, to find out how much methane is coming from oil and gas facilities. A 2019 Nature study found that 26% of state methane emissions is coming from oil and gas. A new investigation by the Associated Press found methane is billowing from oil and gas equipment in the Permian Basin in Texas and companies under report it.

Howarth said even if methane from idle oil and gas wells isn't a major pollution source, it should be a priority not just in California, but nationwide, to help the country meet its climate pledges.

"Methane dissipates pretty quickly in the atmosphere," he said, "so cutting the emissions is really one of the simplest ways we have to slow the rate of global warming and meet that Paris target."

A new Senate proposal would provide hundreds of millions dollars to plug wells and reduce pollution from them, especially in hard hit communities.

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