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Cloud adoption has been a top priority for many enterprises in Asia for the last two years. In Singapore, nearly nine in 10 organizations are using cloud services. Today, cloud services are at the heart of digital transformation and any IT strategy.

With more and more organizations adopting cloud services, cloud security has moved to the forefront of discussions. Properly securing identities and utilizing modern authentication methods topped the list of concerns of IT professionals, according to the Cloud Security Alliance’s annual Top Threats to Cloud Computing: The Pandemic 11 report released in June 2022.

Against this backdrop, digital trust is essential to secure the applications deployed on the cloud infrastructure. Trust has become the indispensable element for security in the connected world: for securing users, applications, servers, connected devices, digital content and more.

Ingredients for successful implementation of digital trust in the cloud

Building digital trust requires putting in place the right elements that enable individuals and businesses to engage online with confidence that their footprint in the digital world is secure.

When applications are deployed in the cloud, they require a different security footprint since the network and physical servers that these applications are utilizing are no longer under the direct control of the enterprise that has deployed the applications. In other words, validated identities, modern methods of authentication between systems, encryption of data in transit and at rest, and operational integrity of systems are critical components to understand. These factors, together with having a scalable solution that adapts to each organization’s requirements, are the essential ingredients for digital trust to be successful while deployed in the cloud. Let’s see how:

Trusted Identities: Knowing who or what you are interacting with is an important element of maintaining online security and trust. Taking a step further, interacting with valid identities—such as an organization, an individual or an Internet connected device—plays a crucial role in establishing trust in the digital world. Cloud environments are prone to malicious activities based on fake identities. Thus, having a solution that can ensure valid identities with a high probability is a critical component of digital trust in the cloud.

Modern Authentication Protocols: The various cloud services that users have access to, such as applications, cloud storage, and other management interfaces, should utilize strong authentication protocols such as Public Key Infrastructure (PKI) to ensure the most secure access. A properly developed, deployed and maintained PKI platform is capable of ensuring that connections within, and to and from, a cloud infrastructure is authenticated.

Data Encryption: Encrypting information is another critical element for building digital trust because it protects data as it moves to and from cloud-based applications (data in transit), as well as when it is stored on the cloud network (data at rest). Once data is encrypted, only intended users can leverage the private key to decrypt the encrypted data, transforming the concealed information back into a readable format. Private keys are generated and shared only with trusted parties whose identity is established and Checked through PKI or some form of multi-factor authentication.

Operational integrity: The Cloud Security Alliance notes that breaches in the cloud usually happen due to poor authentication standards, weak passwords and poor digital certificate management processes. There are many attack vectors to systems running in the cloud, and if a breach occurs, it is crucial to know if a system has been compromised. If you are using a containerized solution for delivering your applications, container signing will enable you to know that the deployed container has not been modified, given that its digital signature is valid throughout the life of the container. Container signing is yet another solution based on PKI.

Scalable solution: The fifth ingredient for a successful implementation of digital trust in the cloud is having a scalable solution—one platform that is capable of managing multiple use cases such as validating users, providing secure and modern authentication protocols, and signing objects such as applications, containers, and documents. Such a platform is instrumental for any digital transformation, especially if you consider security as the core of this transformation.

To summarize, the first four ingredients enable us to know that an individual or a an Internet connected device is who they say they are, connections to and from servers on the cloud are properly authenticated, data that flows in and out of applications and while in transit and rest is encrypted, and an application deployed on the cloud has been distributed from an authentic source. A comprehensive platform such as PKI, most often administered via digital certificates, offers a way of achieving digital trust to help organizations establish trusted identity, encryption and integrity between people, systems and things. The fifth ingredient, having a scalable solution in place, enables organizations to accommodate expansion without hampering the existing workflow and ensuring that digital trust is never compromised.

#Digitaltrust is a necessary component of #cloud adoption and overall digital transformation, enabling companies to transfer critical processes online and create new forms of inter-organization connection. #cybersecurity #respectdataClick to Tweet

Digital trust to secure the cloud

Digital trust is a necessary component of cloud adoption and overall digital transformation, enabling companies to transfer critical processes online and create new forms of inter-organization connection. And it is essential to our connected future. Companies that are strategically investing in digital trust are positioning themselves now as stewards of a secure, connected world.

Mon, 10 Oct 2022 23:00:00 -0500 Dr. Avesta Hojjati en-US text/html https://www.cpomagazine.com/cyber-security/securing-the-cloud-with-a-digital-trust-approach/
Killexams : Why the Symantec Management Client Service Failed to Start

Avery Martin holds a Bachelor of Music in opera performance and a Bachelor of Arts in East Asian studies. As a professional writer, she has written for Education.com, Samsung and IBM. Martin contributed English translations for a collection of Japanese poems by Misuzu Kaneko. She has worked as an educator in Japan, and she runs a private voice studio out of her home. She writes about education, music and travel.

Fri, 14 Aug 2020 15:23:00 -0500 en-US text/html https://smallbusiness.chron.com/symantec-management-client-service-failed-start-78264.html
Killexams : Symantec Altiris Asset Management Suite 7.1

Managing vendor contracts, controlling hardware and software costs and optimizing IT assets to meet organizational requirements constitute critical chores for IT professionals. Symantec's Altiris Asset Management Suite 7.1 aims to remove the hassle from IT asset management by giving enterprises the detailed information they need to make smart, informed decisions. Such tools are a necessity in today's cost-conscious workplace.

Altiris Asset Management Suite (AMS) culls data from Symantec's Client Management Suite (CMS) and Server Management Suite (SMS). AMS also integrates with similar Microsoft discovery tools so IT departments can tap installed investments.

Advantages

IT departments often find it tough to tease out relationships between hardware, software, associated contracts, end users and user groups. Altiris AMS takes away the pain of guessing who has what system, who has what installed on their system and when their licenses are due for renewal.

The downloadable suite provides a wizard that assesses whether a system meets the minimum product requirements and will add any missing applications if prompted — a cool feature that saves the administrator time during installation. After ensuring that my hardware met the minimum product requirements prior to the installation, AMS downloaded successfully. The installation and initial setup were painless.

Why It Works for IT

AMS's user interface logically divides hardware and software. An application metering capability provides insight into which applications have been installed, which have been paid for and which are being used. Such information makes this a real cost-cutting tool for IT.

IT managers can also see the full cradle-to-grave lifecycle of an asset, including contracts of all types associated with hardware and software, purchase orders, service-level agreements, warranties and even retirement and disposal documentation.

Administrators can calculate total cost of ownership by factoring in discoverable data such as purchase costs, monthly maintenance fees or chargeback costs. It's possible to customize AMS to include fields specific to an organization and also add non-discoverable information to an asset, such as an additional cost center.

It's also possible to designate who may view asset information by groups, which proves useful for security. For example, IT staff can limit asset visibility of a branch office to authorized people in that office.

Disadvantages

AMS is optimized for and depends heavily on its associated Symantec discovery tools, CMS and SMS. Figuring out these dependencies may take a bit of time and some experimentation. According to Symantec, most deployments consist of AMS coupled with CMS.

Symantec Altiris Asset Management Suite 7.1

PRODUCT REQUIREMENTS: Altiris Asset Management Suite requires the Symantec Management Platform, which includes the Symantec Management Console, Database, Notification Server and Asset Management Suite components. The Management Server must be installed with .NET Framework 3.5 SP1 or above, Internet Explorer 7.0 or above, SQL Server 2005 or SQL Server 2008 and Windows Server 2008 R2 x64. The Workflow Server needs either Windows Server 2003 or 2008, SQL Server 2005, Windows Server 2008 R2, Windows IIS and Microsoft .NET Framework 3.5.

Tue, 06 Sep 2022 12:01:00 -0500 Alyson Behr en text/html https://statetechmagazine.com/article/2012/03/symantec-altiris-asset-management-suite-71
Killexams : Google Cloud Next 2022 – Customers Benefit From Enhanced AI Capabilities

This time of year is always busy with events, and every year Google Cloud Next, Google's annual Cloud event, has many exciting announcements. Usually, there are so many announcements that I could write a book on each.

A show highlight for me was the Six Five "On The Road" podcast with my co-host Daniel Newman joined by Vint Cerf, Chief Internet Evangelist at Google and one of the co-inventors of the internet. This conversation revolves around the journey from the creation of the internet to the development of the cloud. Just such an honor and privilege!

I want to cover some of the announcements that stuck out to me, particularly regarding Google's continued investment in its customers and partners. Let’s dive in.

Open data ecosystem

The digital transformation of businesses has turned data into digital gold, creating new business value in the cloud. Often, the biggest hurdle is data since it resides in multiple formats within a cloud or hybrid cloud system.

Along with Google's continued support of more than 40 data platform partners offering validated integrations through its Google Cloud Read-Big Query initiative, Google has announced its ability to analyze unstructured and streaming data in BigQuery. To put this into perspective, Google reports that up to 90% of all data from an organization is unstructured data.

Google's BigLake now supports all major data formats, including Apache Iceberg, and Linux Foundation Delta Lake, with APachi Hudi on the horizon. Google also announced a new integrated experience in BigQuery for Apache Spark that integrates SQL pipelines into BigQuery procedures. While unifying data becomes increasingly complex, Google makes it easier for organizations to access data.

Google has launched Vertex AI Vision, an extension of Vertex AI that helps data practitioners visualize data better. Google says it helps organizations build and deploy computer vision applications to understand and utilize data. I am curious to see Vertex AI built out in the cloud. As the number of IoT devices increases, I am interested to see what capabilities Vertex AI Vision has on IoT devices with cameras or even sensors for increasing the productivity and efficiency of a company through IoT insights.

I was also very impressed with Translation Hub, a drag and drop tool to translate end deliverables. For instance, I could drop a PDFd research paper into Translation Hub, choose which languages I want, and out pops 24 different white papers, each translated.

When an organization looks at its data and builds out the data ecosystem of applications and tools, the quickest and most efficient path toward business value must be top of mind. Google's ability to make data more accessible and make it easier for the organization to turn data into insights is why many growing businesses have chosen Google Cloud. Eight hundred software companies choose to build products on Google's Data Cloud.

Software Delivery Shield

The supply chain is one of the most challenging roads to navigate in this volatile economy. It is no secret that current events, especially within the last half-decade, have increasingly made it more difficult to predict and manage a supply chain. On top of this difficulty, an organization's supply chain infrastructure and software delivery pipeline are vulnerable to cyber-attacks.

Google announced Software Delivery Shield, which fully manages software supply chain security and offers modular capabilities for building secure cloud applications. What I like about the Software shield is that it is modular and proactive. It is modular for developers to access safe, fast, and customizable development environments. Google has proactively targeted security pain points within a supply chain. Google says it has built-in security measures such as VPC Service Controls, no local source code storage, private ingress/egress, forced image updates, and IAM access policies.

I also want to point out that Google has been working with the developer community, the public sector, and its partners to address these cybersecurity issues within the supply chain. It is part of Google's $10 billion commitment to advancing cybersecurity and has been working to establish industry-wide standards and frameworks for keeping supply chains secure. I believe Google has put much work into its end-to-end Software Delivery Shield with intentionality by listening to those affected by cyber-attacks.

Chronicle Security Operations

Google is also addressing cybersecurity threats concerning digital trends like hybrid work. Hybrid and remote work has made it more difficult for companies to manage and address security threats with assets not connected to a controlled and secure network.

Google announced Chronicle Security Operations, combining Chronicle's security information and event management (SIEM) tech with its security orchestration, automation, and response (SOAR) solutions from Google's exact Siemplify acquisition.

The challenge with addressing remote and hybrid work cyber security is that boundaries are blurred when home environments become work environments. I believe Google is addressing the challenge by keeping within the limits of the cloud and approaching hybrid and remote work from a reactive standpoint. The best approach to proactive cybersecurity is a quick and executable reactive approach. I believe Chronicle Security Operations is equipped with the right tools to quickly and intelligently address cybersecurity threats.

Accenture

Google announced that it is expanding its partnership with Accenture. Accenture is a consulting firm that offers digital, cloud, and security services. The new partnership investments, according to Google, include:

· Google Cloud Talent Creation: Accenture will expand to 15,000 Google Cloud certifications in application modernization, data analytics and AI, mainframe migration, cybersecurity, and sustainability.

· New Solutions Powered by Google Cloud: Accenture and Google Cloud will also develop solutions and accelerators for specialized industry use cases, such as customer transformation, sales, and marketing optimization, smart analytics, visual inspection, and more.

· New Global Innovation Hubs: Accenture and Google Cloud will invest further in new joint Innovation Hubs in Dublin and other global sites to rapidly iterate, pilot, and deploy innovative solutions on Google Cloud. A joint engineering center of excellence will address specialized technical use cases for data analytics, AI, ML, application modernization, infrastructure, security, and SAP.

· ai.RETAIL optimized for Google Cloud: Accenture's integrated retail platform, ai.RETAIL is optimized to harness Google Cloud's Product Discovery and Vertex AI capabilities to help companies Excellerate consumer engagement and conversions and make supply chains more sustainable.

I believe this partnership is beneficial on both ends. For Accenture, this partnership expands the knowledge and skills of its core value proposition within data analytics with one of the world's most advanced cloud, software, AI, and analytics companies. A reported 15,000 Google Cloud certifications and new join innovation Hubs across the globe.

Google, through Accenture, is expanding its reach across Accenture's offerings and deepening its influence on cloud industry standards. On top of this, Accenture and Google are working on new solutions that address industry use cases allowing Google to expand its cloud offerings across more customer needs.

Wrapping up

Google has continued to deepen its AI and analytics capabilities by expanding its open data ecosystem. It has included unstructured and streaming data in its BigQuery offering and added support for majors data formats like Apache Iceberg. The company has done quite well on landing with analytics and AI and then expanding into more “pedestrian” workloads like SAP.

Google has tackled cybersecurity challenges within supply chains with Software Delivery Shield and within hybrid and remote working environments with Chronicle Security Operations. Although I would prefer to see cybersecurity for hybrid and remote working environments addressed proactively, I believe Google Cloud addresses cybersecurity within its boundaries quickly and powerfully. While Google doesn’t talk about it, I will. When’s the last time we heard about a breach at Google? I’ll wait.

Google's strengthened partnership with Accenture is something I see as beneficial for the entire cloud industry. Google much wisdom within the cloud. If the goal is to develop a more innovative cloud industry through new solutions, education, and customer offerings, I believe the partnership enables these goals.

A common theme I saw throughout Google Cloud Next, even in announcements I did not cover, is that Google is investing in technologies that benefit its customers today versus tomorrow. This investment involves intentional partnerships and a focus on addressing the customer's needs. An open data ecosystem, secure supply chain, secure remote and hybrid work environment, and deepened partnership with Accenture are all investments in Google Cloud customers.

Note: Moor Insights & Strategy co-op Jacob Freyman contributed to this article.

Moor Insights & Strategy, like all research and tech industry analyst firms, provides or has provided paid services to technology companies. These services include research, analysis, advising, consulting, benchmarking, acquisition matchmaking, and speaking sponsorships. The company has had or currently has paid business relationships with 8×8, Accenture, A10 Networks, Advanced Micro Devices, Amazon, Amazon Web Services, Ambient Scientific, Anuta Networks, Applied Brain Research, Applied Micro, Apstra, Arm, Aruba Networks (now HPE), Atom Computing, AT&T, Aura, Automation Anywhere, AWS, A-10 Strategies, Bitfusion, Blaize, Box, Broadcom, , C3.AI, Calix, Campfire, Cisco Systems, Clear Software, Cloudera, Clumio, Cognitive Systems, CompuCom, Cradlepoint, CyberArk, Dell, Dell EMC, Dell Technologies, Diablo Technologies, Dialogue Group, Digital Optics, Dreamium Labs, D-Wave, Echelon, Ericsson, Extreme Networks, Five9, Flex, Foundries.io, Foxconn, Frame (now VMware), Fujitsu, Gen Z Consortium, Glue Networks, GlobalFoundries, Revolve (now Google), Google Cloud, Graphcore, Groq, Hiregenics, Hotwire Global, HP Inc., Hewlett Packard Enterprise, Honeywell, Huawei Technologies, IBM, Infinidat, Infosys, Inseego, IonQ, IonVR, Inseego, Infosys, Infiot, Intel, Interdigital, Jabil Circuit, Keysight, Konica Minolta, Lattice Semiconductor, Lenovo, Linux Foundation, Lightbits Labs, LogicMonitor, Luminar, MapBox, Marvell Technology, Mavenir, Marseille Inc, Mayfair Equity, Meraki (Cisco), Merck KGaA, Mesophere, Micron Technology, Microsoft, MiTEL, Mojo Networks, MongoDB, National Instruments, Neat, NetApp, Nightwatch, NOKIA (Alcatel-Lucent), Nortek, Novumind, NVIDIA, Nutanix, Nuvia (now Qualcomm), onsemi, ONUG, OpenStack Foundation, Oracle, Palo Alto Networks, Panasas, Peraso, Pexip, Pixelworks, Plume Design, PlusAI, Poly (formerly Plantronics), Portworx, Pure Storage, Qualcomm, Quantinuum, Rackspace, Rambus, Rayvolt E-Bikes, Red Hat, Renesas, Residio, Samsung Electronics, Samsung Semi, SAP, SAS, Scale Computing, Schneider Electric, SiFive, Silver Peak (now Aruba-HPE), SkyWorks, SONY Optical Storage, Splunk, Springpath (now Cisco), Spirent, Splunk, Sprint (now T-Mobile), Stratus Technologies, Symantec, Synaptics, Syniverse, Synopsys, Tanium, Telesign,TE Connectivity, TensTorrent, Tobii Technology, Teradata,T-Mobile, Treasure Data, Twitter, Unity Technologies, UiPath, Verizon Communications, VAST Data, Ventana Micro Systems, Vidyo, VMware, Wave Computing, Wellsmith, Xilinx, Zayo, Zebra, Zededa, Zendesk, Zoho, Zoom, and Zscaler.

Moor Insights & Strategy founder, CEO, and Chief Analyst Patrick Moorhead is an investor in dMY Technology Group Inc. VI, Dreamium Labs, Groq, Luminar Technologies, MemryX, and Movandi.

Mon, 17 Oct 2022 09:29:00 -0500 Patrick Moorhead en text/html https://www.forbes.com/sites/patrickmoorhead/2022/10/17/google-cloud-next-2022--customers-benefit-from-enhanced-ai-capabilities/
Killexams : Google Cloud Advances Digital Sovereignty and Cybersecurity Partnerships

SUNNYVALE, Calif., Oct. 11, 2022 — Google Cloud today announced a significant expansion of its trusted cloud ecosystem, highlighting new integrations and offerings with more than twenty partners focused on enabling greater data sovereignty controls, supporting Zero Trust models, unifying identity management, and improving endpoint security for global businesses.

Global businesses face growing challenges in cybersecurity and data protection, as cyber threats become increasingly sophisticated, hybrid work becomes the norm, and governments adopt new requirements for data sovereignty and control. Google Cloud provides businesses with industry-leading, end-to-end security capabilities to support customers across their cloud and on-premises environments—and today it is announcing a series of partnerships that extend its leadership as an open and trusted cloud.

By embracing its ecosystem of partners, Google Cloud is ensuring that global businesses have choice and flexibility to work with leading cybersecurity vendors and to deliver diverse sets of applications on infrastructure compliant with growing data protection requirements.

“Providing businesses with extensible cybersecurity solutions in the cloud, and a collaborative ecosystem of partners, is the only practical approach to addressing enterprises’ greatest cybersecurity challenges,” said Sunil Potti, VP, Cloud Security at Google Cloud. “Our partners play a critical role in keeping customers secure and compliant, whether enabling secure hybrid work, safeguarding critical infrastructure, or meeting stringent data residency requirements.”

“Success with today’s digital business platforms requires a connected and trusted ecosystem of partners to help ensure better security outcomes for customers,” said Prem Iyer, VP, GSI and CSP Ecosystems at Palo Alto Networks. “We remain committed to continuing our momentum with Google Cloud, delivering best-in-class solutions that simplify cloud security for our joint customers while improving their security posture.”

“The Symantec Enterprise Division and Google Cloud are committed to addressing critical requirements of governments and highly regulated industries to establish sovereignty over data at rest, in use, and in transit,” said Rob Greer, VP and GM at Symantec Enterprise Division, Broadcom. “The Google Cloud Ready–Sovereign Solutions program provides Symantec customers with a transparent and flexible approach to meet local data security and privacy laws, across our cybersecurity solutions.”

Bringing partner applications to European sovereign clouds

Google Cloud is announcing a new Google Cloud Ready–Sovereign Solutions program to help customers identify partner applications validated to be compatible with Google Cloud’s portfolio of Sovereign Solutions, including partner offerings from T-Systems in Germany and S3NS in France. This program will supply customers the confidence to continue using applications that are critical to their business while meeting their digital sovereignty objectives.

Today, a diverse group of software partners are committing to validate their platforms for this program, including Aiven, Broadcom (Symantec), Cloud Software Group (Citrix), Climate Engine, Commvault, Confluent, Datadog, DataIKU, Dell Technologies, Elastic, Fortinet, Gitlab, Iron Mountain, LumApps, MongoDB, NetApp, OpenText, Palo Alto Networks, Pega Systems, Siemens, SUSE, Thales, Thought Machine, Veeam, and VMware.

Expanding Zero Trust architecture with partners

Businesses around the world utilize Google Cloud’s BeyondCorp Enterprise Zero Trust solution to enable secure access to applications and resources and to safeguard data. In 2020, Google Cloud announced the BeyondCorp Alliance, creating an ecosystem of partners to help enable customers to integrate products and utilize information from leading security vendors including CrowdStrike, Palo Alto Networks, VMware, and more.

Today, Google Cloud is taking a significant step forward in the extensibility of its Zero Trust offerings by partnering with Palo Alto Networks to ensure customers can embrace a ZTNA 2.0 strategy, protecting all users and applications on devices connected across any network.

Simplifying identity management across platforms

Unified identity management is another critical component to secure hybrid work, because it safely eliminates the need to maintain separate user identities across multiple platforms. Alongside its own Identity and Access Management products, Google Cloud is announcing new integrations with ForgeRockJumpCloudOkta, and Ping Identity that will automatically extend identity management capabilities and policies to joint customers, adding significant value to investments customers have already made, and helping further secure commonly-used applications.

Improving endpoint security and operations

These partnerships build on Google Cloud’s existing ecosystem of endpoint and security operations partners. Strong endpoint protection helps businesses maintain data security while giving their workforces the flexibility to access key applications and information seamlessly across devices, including mobile phones, desktops, laptops, and more. Through its Chronicle Security Operations platform, Google Cloud offers a modern, cloud-first suite that better enables cybersecurity teams to detect, investigate, and respond to threats.

Google Cloud’s ecosystem of partners like CrowdStrike, Cybereason, and Fortinet integrate their platforms with Chronicle, ensuring customers have the flexibility and choice to modernize their endpoint security operations.

With the addition of Mandiant to Google Cloud, endpoint partners will also have opportunities to deepen their integrations with Google Cloud’s end-to-end security operations suite, with even greater capabilities to support customers across their cloud and on-premises environments.

Delivering implementation and managed services through systems integrators

Google Cloud’s top systems integrators including Deloitte will provide implementation customization and managed services for customers, bringing together Google Cloud’s capabilities in security analytics, threat intelligence, automation, and SecOps with those of its ecosystem to help customers more quickly prevent and respond to cyber threats.

Learn more about Google Cloud’s ecosystem of security partners here.

About Google Cloud

Google Cloud accelerates every organization’s ability to digitally transform its business. We deliver enterprise-grade solutions that leverage Google’s cutting-edge technology – all on the cleanest cloud in the industry. Customers in more than 200 countries and territories turn to Google Cloud as their trusted partner to enable growth and solve their most critical business problems.


Source: Google Cloud

Tue, 11 Oct 2022 04:04:00 -0500 text/html https://www.datanami.com/this-just-in/google-cloud-advances-digital-sovereignty-and-cybersecurity-partnerships/
Killexams : How automating vulnerability management reduces risk of cyberattacks

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Cybercriminals are growing ever more relentless and deft with their attacks, with data breaches and system disruptions due to cyberattacks rising every year. Therefore, finding and strengthening cybersecurity weak spots, or vulnerabilities, is key to thwarting these attacks. 

A key vulnerability is apps. Many organizations rely on productivity software and apps built in-house or from IT service providers to be competitive in today’s market. However, while these solutions boost productivity and employee and customer experiences, many of them have weak security measures that can expose the organization to cyberattackers.

Implementing a successful vulnerability management program is necessary for your overall IT risk management plan to protect your business from these threats. According to a report by Mordor Intelligence, the security and vulnerability management market is expected to reach $11.72 billion by 2026. 

Dealing with cybersecurity vulnerabilities, exploits and attacks is difficult since they are continuously evolving. New vulnerabilities and exploits are found daily, leading attackers to build innovative cyberthreats to exploit them. As a result, automated vulnerability management techniques like vulnerability testing and patch management are critical for mitigating emerging cybersecurity risks.

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If an organization doesn’t currently engage in vulnerability management, it’s essential to understand the potential consequences and how to develop a successful vulnerability management solution as part of your overall cybersecurity strategy.

How does vulnerability management work?

Vulnerability management can help identify security vulnerabilities in unpatched systems that, if exploited by adversaries, can put an entire enterprise environment at risk. Typically, vulnerability management is a foundational practice and an integral part of any standard cybersecurity initiative. 

However, constantly changing device demographics and increasing sophistication in cyberattack techniques, including an increase in exact multipronged attacks, are challenging existing vulnerability management practices. 

“Vulnerabilities open doors for attackers that are hidden from an organization. Even if attackers and organizations learn at the same time of a vulnerability, the attackers are faster to exploit than the organizations are to find and fix it,” said Kevin Haley, director of security response at Symantec.

According to Haley, robust vulnerability management is the only way for businesses to have a fair chance against attackers and mitigating such cyberthreats.

A vulnerability management program’s goal is to keep networks safe against known exploitations while ensuring compliance with regulatory obligations. This protects a business network from being breached through well-known vulnerabilities, making it much harder for cybercriminals to target the company. It can also help protect the business from penalties associated with regulatory noncompliance, saving money and your company’s reputation.

Steve Benton, vice president of Anomali Threat Research, said he believes that as much as vulnerability management programs are absolutely critical for data-driven businesses to mitigate cyberthreats, they also need to be intelligence-led. 

“Organizations supply themselves away too cheaply to attackers by not prioritizing mitigating vulnerabilities from their attack surface. Given the resource constraints all organizations face, you must have the means to determine and act on the vulnerabilities most likely to be exploited in attacks on your organization,” Benton told VentureBeat. 

Talking about how data-driven organizations can achieve best-in-class status for a vulnerability management program, Benton says that the vulnerability management cycle needs to be empowered and enabled by threat-relevant intelligence correlated to the organization’s attack surface and key assets. 

“Such precise and laser-focused assessment must be further translated into a verifiable patch/mitigation execution. Intelligence is the steel thread that will pump-prime best-in-class status,” said Benton. 

Key processes

A vulnerability management program may be built internally or by utilizing a vulnerability management service from a managed security service provider (MSSP).

When developing a program internally, several factors must be taken into account:

Identification: A vulnerability assessment is an essential first step in developing a vulnerability management strategy. Without a method for identifying weaknesses, your management approach will be a shot in the dark rather than an intelligent strategy. As a result, conduct an initial evaluation to discover vulnerabilities and be receptive to employee input if they uncover other problems. For a thorough assessment, it is critical to scan systems and programs that have network access and track the services that run on the network, including remote access portals, during this stage.

Analysis: The next step is to assess the risk of a vulnerability and estimate how much time, money or other resources would be required to rectify it. To determine these features, a team must discuss a few critical questions: How difficult would it be for an attacker to exploit this vulnerability? What danger does this vulnerability represent to our network or digital assets? Since each vulnerability is unique, it is critical to identify vital facts to make educated decisions with your vulnerability management team moving forward.

Treatment: The next step is to address any vulnerabilities discovered within the network, hardware or software. The following action plans should be used to prioritize vulnerabilities based on their severity:

  • Remediate: The ideal action plan for any possible risks discovered within a network is to completely resolve the vulnerability. If it is not feasible to resolve every vulnerability discovered, this should at least be the expectation when dealing with weaknesses that might cause significant damage to the organization.
  • Mitigate: If the full resolution isn’t possible for the vulnerability, a solution is to mitigate its potential impact on the enterprise. This action plan ultimately buys you time until a solution is found and helps your cybersecurity posture tremendously.
  • Acceptance: When the cost of fixing a vulnerability surpasses the potential harm of the exposure, it’s best to merely be aware of it.

To address vulnerabilities more effectively, it is critical to collaborate with an internal IT team to evaluate which vulnerabilities require immediate attention and remedy, which may simply be mitigated for the time being and which don’t warrant any action at all.

Continued reporting and monitoring: For continually developing cyberthreats, it’s critical not to stagnate in the vulnerability management program — something that may be avoided by periodically monitoring current vulnerabilities and scanning for new ones. Establish a simple approach to report potential vulnerabilities across all teams within your business by compiling reports of existing vulnerabilities and their plans of action. This will assist the internal IT staff in staying informed of current and prospective dangers.

According to Pete Chestna, CISO North America at Checkmarx, when designing a vulnerability management program, firms frequently spend too much time “managing” the vulnerabilities rather than addressing them.

“We need realistic goals based on the team’s maturity and the application’s importance. Any vulnerabilities that get to production by exception process or ‘management’ are probably there for good. So it’s important to be clear-eyed on that and refer from your data to confirm,” Chestna told VentureBeat.  

The role of automation

Since current threats need constant moderation, vulnerability management software can assist in automating this process. 

A vulnerability management program employs a vulnerability scanner and, in some cases, endpoint agents to inventory and identify vulnerabilities in multiple systems on a network. Vulnerability scanning uses an automated program to scan an organization’s IT networks, apps, devices, and other internal or external assets for potential security flaws and vulnerabilities.

Users receive a report at the end of each vulnerability scan that records the vulnerabilities discovered, as well as risk rankings for each vulnerability and security advice. Furthermore, the discovered vulnerability threats are evaluated in various contexts so that decisions regarding how to effectively handle them can be made.

“The idea behind automated vulnerability management programs (AVMPs) is to reduce the time it takes organizations to roll out patches,” Alon Nachmany, field CISO at AppViewX, told VentureBeat.  

Nachmany says that the remediation process where patches must be tested and deployed is time-consuming and could increasingly benefit from automation.

“[AVMPs] can help automate and ultimately reduce this process, rolling out patches much faster and plugging security holes that expose the company. In addition, automating the QA process for testing and the implementation factor would reduce the time it takes to secure the organization,” he said.

The impact and exploitability of a vulnerability are estimated by taking into consideration a variety of parameters such as ease of access, authentication, the diffusion of the vulnerability, the availability of mitigation, and others. 

The exploitability and impact are then combined to assign each vulnerability a severity score between 0.0 and 10.0. This is known as the CVSS score (common vulnerability scoring system). The vulnerabilities are further categorized as high, medium or low severity based on their CVSS score.

Vulnerabilities with a score of 7 to 10 are regarded as extremely serious, while a score of 4 to 6.9 are classified as medium and those with a value of 0 to 3.9 are classified as low. These scores enable developers and security professionals to prioritize vulnerabilities based on severity, ensuring that the most significant ones are handled first.

Forrester senior analyst, Erik Nost, said that many security teams today deal with staffing and skill shortages, and automating critical processes such as vulnerability management can aid such use cases.  

“Anything that removes manual effort is always helpful. However, dealing with today’s threat volume is almost impossible without automation. Scanning for assets, and vulnerabilities on them, is the most common process that is fully automated today,” Nost told VentureBeat. 

Future vulnerability management challenges

One of the critical future challenges for vulnerability management frameworks is the need for an integrated solution for supply chain attacks, said Rohit Dhamankar, VP of threat intelligence at Alert Logic. 

Dhamankar believes that supply chain attacks are a critical vulnerability that organizations need to address, as evidenced by the infamous Log4j critical vulnerability in December of 2021. “As organizations get more and more code-shared for development, it is necessary to know what software and packages are being used in the network directly or indirectly. It also highlights the boundary lines of shared responsibilities in this aspect,” he said. 

While automation can bring various benefits to the vulnerability management process for most medium- to enterprise-sized firms, it can also add potentially significant expenses, according to Jerrod Piker, competitive intelligence analyst at Deep Instinct.

“An organization must know what assets are the most important to protect so they can balance the cost of automation, whether it be through in-house or third-party solutions. This can only be achieved through the process of categorization and prioritization,” Piker explained.

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Sun, 25 Sep 2022 18:10:00 -0500 Victor Dey en-US text/html https://venturebeat.com/security/how-automating-vulnerability-management-reduces-risk-of-cyberattacks/
Killexams : Can IAM help save on cyber insurance?

Sponsored Feature Underwriters are continuing to feel the pinch as cyber insurance claims mount. That means customers are hurting too, with policies becoming more costly and insurers demanding more proof of cybersecurity. So how do organizations make better use of identity and access management to demonstrate their competency in protecting people's sensitive personal and financial data?

Darren Thomson is vice president of product marketing for identity security company One Identity, having previously held the role of EMEA CTO at Symantec before working at its cyber insurance analytics spin-off CyberCube. He explains that cyber insurance developed in the early 2000s as a way to hand off risk as cybersecurity concerns mounted.

"There comes a point where the simple choice between mitigating risks and ignoring them is not enough," he says. "People want to share or transfer that risk."

That point first came in 1997, when AIG launched the first documented internet security liability policy. It offered third-party risk coverage for technology services providers to reimburse their clients in the event of cybersecurity-related damage. In the mid-2000s, policies evolved to offer first-party risk, covering attacks against a policy holder's own business and broadening the target market beyond tech firms.

As cyber threats grew, so did the appetite for risk transfer, with the US Government Accountability Office (GAO) noting a dramatic increase in the proportion of insurance clients taking out cyber insurance policies. In 2016, just 26 percent of clients opted for this coverage with one large broker it studied. By 2021, that number had reached 47 percent.

The rise of enterprise ransomware

Transferring the risk to an insurance company helps to regulate a client's investment in cybersecurity, which in turns aids the avoidance of over- or under-investing in protective measures proportional to the risk. But what happens when the risks become too volatile for the insurers too?

That's what happened as ransomware evolved from attacks on individuals and small businesses into a mature criminal industry targeting bigger companies. Cyber crooks became more sophisticated, hitting larger organizations with deeper pockets. They also became more successful at it. The size of ransom demands rose accordingly from tens of thousands to millions. "Insurance companies didn't see that coming," says Thomson.

The other problem for insurers was complexity. Clients frequently add more tools and technologies to their sprawling infrastructures. The pandemic exacerbated the problem. As hybrid work became a necessity, the physical perimeter disappeared.

Companies supporting a hybrid workforce found themselves grappling with endpoints sitting on residential local area networks (LANS) used for both work and personal activities. Managing these devices' access to corporate information became more difficult. The change in infrastructure and access methods created yet more layers of security risk, making cyber risk transfer even more problematic for underwriters.

The problem of valuing cyber risk

Fairly assessing and pricing this risk has been tough for insurers, especially given the lack of available data. Actuaries have decades of data on car accidents and health conditions, but not much about cyber risk for example. Assessing the risk of cyber attack is more art than science, and the industry demand for the skills to support that process is high.

Insurers that charged too little for covering cybersecurity risk have found themselves shouldering an array of costs. Ransomware payments are perhaps the simplest to understand, but they're just one factor among many possible expenses. These include post-breach investigation and data recovery; loss of income from business disruption; breach notification costs; legal claims; and regulatory penalties. Supply chain attacks make third-party liability costs especially worrying for insurers, who face reimbursement costs for their clients' downstream users.

In May, Fitch Ratings found that reported cyber insurance claims had risen 100 percent annually in the past three years. Claims closed with payment grew by 200 percent annually over the same period, with 8,100 claims paid in 2021. This eats into insurers' profits. The direct loss plus defense and cost containment (DCC) ratio is the proportion of the earned premium paid out in claims expenses. Lower is better and in 2015-2019, the average figure was 42 percent. In 2021, it stood at 65 percent

Insurers naturally became obsessed with ransomware as payouts increased, recalls Thomson. This, along with other evolving security risks, transformed the still-nascent cyber insurance industry into a 'hard market'.

"A hard market is one that is difficult to comply with," he explains. One characteristic is the rising price of premiums.

The Council of Insurance Brokers and Agents has measured these increases. Its most exact Q1 2022 data showed a 27.5 percent quarter-on-quarter bump in premium prices for cyber insurance, following a 34.3 percent rise in Q4.

"The policies are highly priced and the payout limits are very low," continues Thomson. "So it's actually pretty hard for many organizations to get good coverage on cyber now."

Holding clients to account

The other reaction from insurers has been more scrutiny. Insurance companies are asking more detailed questions about their clients' cybersecurity posture before assuming their risk. They are also building more cyber assessment capabilities, ranging from auditing through to penetration testing and IT security consulting.

Increased insurer scrutiny means a lot more hoop-jumping for companies that were used to treating the premium payment as a simple hedge against attack. Now, they must demonstrate a robust approach to cybersecurity.

"A better security posture means higher coverage and/or lower rates," explains Thomson.

Insurance firms started establishing minimum requirements with checklists before verifying compliance. And clients which find themselves falling short must step up to address any issues if they want a reasonable cyber insurance policy.

Insurers are asking organizations to demonstrate their plans for disaster recovery for example. Backup and restoration too play a big part in that assessment, Thomson explains, prompting companies to demonstrate that they are regularly testing these capabilities.

Underwriters are paying extra attention to email security in their assessments, given the heavy use of phishing in ransomware and other cyber attacks.

Clients are under extra pressure to demonstrate that they're patching their systems regularly, which also increases attention on endpoint management and effective software inventory (you can't patch what you don't see).

Other focal points include classification schemes for networks, data, and systems, along with education and cybersecurity awareness programs for users.

The role of identity and access management

Thomson sees one of the most significant areas that companies can Excellerate upon is identity and access management. Solutions that stop attackers from getting onto the company network and accessing information inappropriately are of particular interest.

"IAM teams historically always struggled to show concrete benefits to the business," he says. "Now, with cyber insurance as a risk management requirement and potential savings on policies it's a much easier argument to win. IAM can clearly demonstrate value for the business."

Insurers are focusing on multi-factor authentication in their evaluations as they realize the growing importance of identity in cybersecurity posture. Harvesting some low-hanging fruits is mandatory, including multi-factor authentication (MFA) for the whole workforce.

"Most insurers now want to know that you have at least two factors of authentication in place for your users and your customers, if not multi-factor authentication," Thomson continues.

But not all MFA solutions are equal, and this choice can affect clients' cybersecurity protection. One common problem is the lack of support for on-prem devices. Many solutions will secure access to SaaS applications but can't protect access to the workstation you're sitting in front of. So the type of MFA you use affects issues on insurer checklists such as endpoint security management.

"One Identity managed to cover this capability gap by fusing together Defender (our on-prem 2FA) and OneLogin SaaS, creating a hybrid solution well suited to these hybrid needs," Thomson adds.

Increasing the focus on identity infrastructure

Some insurers are also acknowledging the need to enforce complex passwords and avoid default passwords or default accounts, One Identity says. Companies should also look at other areas, such as structured processes for handling joiners, movers, and leavers.

Insurers are already asking more questions about the management of access credentials on their cyber insurance premium questionnaires. They are becoming more interested in techniques ranging from password management through to privileged access management, and are asking companies to attest to their capabilities here too.

AIG asks clients about their techniques for managing privileged access credentials, including the use of access logging tools and secure storage mechanisms, for example. It also makes explicit reference to the use of MFA for workers remotely accessing corporate resources.

Active Directory or equivalent directory systems are foundational technologies when managing identity data and access privileges, so it's not surprising that this comes up in questionnaires. You'll find insurers asking about the number and types of accounts used on that system, Thomson says.

As technology moves on, he expects insurers to embrace other facets of identity management, such as passwordless technology.

"They [insurers] are aware of the trend and they're excited about the next phase," he says. "They're tracking the maturity of those solutions."

As underwriters continue to turn up the pressure on cyber insurance clients, we're seeing a traditionally conservative industry tackle the challenge of insuring against a dynamic, fast-moving set of risks. Ultimately, this will benefit everyone, increasing insurers' confidence in underwriting cyber risk while forcing clients to Excellerate their protection. Acquiring the right tools in areas such as IAM and IT management, combined with an appropriate risk management mindset, are critical for equitable, sustainable risk transfer.

Sponsored by One Identity.

Mon, 10 Oct 2022 20:10:00 -0500 en text/html https://www.theregister.com/2022/10/11/can_iam_help_save_on/
Killexams : Google looks to boost its security cred in the cloud

Cloud data breaches in the enterprise have skyrocketed in the last year — a worrying trend that’s led to the emergence of a host of new tools and services to help better secure that environment; as well as a major mobilization among cloud service providers to launch more specific tech to address the gap. Today comes the latest development on that front: Google Cloud is announcing a wide slate of security products and services, covering areas like supply chains; digital sovereignty; secure collaboration environments in the cloud; and a new security operations product. Announced at the company’s Google Cloud Next event, above all Google’s aim is to win over business by putting cybersecurity front and center for end users that are prioitizing it, too, and using it to guide their procurement strategies.

Below is a walk through the bigger announcements:

Software Delivery Shield is a new product Google Cloud is launching specifically to address supply chain security — ensuring that you are not picking up or passing on malware or other potentially harmful data as work is processed through a series of partners that do not normally work within the same computing environment. This is an emerging area that I’d say has definitely been on the rise with the arrival of “digital transformation” and an increasing number of organizations doing business in the cloud. Google presents this as a fully managed solution aimed at developers, DevOps and security teams that works within GKE, Cloud Code, Cloud Build, Cloud Deploy, Artifact Registry and Binary Authorization. It’s an area that has been covered also by a number of startups, including Endor, Chainguard, Phylum, Valence and many others. One point these will continue to have over Google is the fact that they have the scope (and potentially trust) to do an adequate job in hybrid and multi-cloud environments from multiple vendors.

While the supply-chain security product appears to have been built in house, Google Cloud is taking a different approach with another security launch, this one focused on digital sovereignty. Here it is working with more than 20 different software companies to build out a new “Sovereign Solutions” initiative: Aiven, Broadcom (Symantec), Cloud Software Group (Citrix), Climate Engine, Commvault, Confluent, Datadog, DataIKU, Dell Technologies, Elastic, Fortinet, Gitlab, Iron Mountain, LumApps, MongoDB, NetApp, OpenText, Palo Alto Networks, Pega Systems, Siemens, SUSE, Thales, Thought Machine, Veeam, and VMware are among them. It’s also adding integrations with companies like ForgeRock, JumpCloud, Okta, and Ping Identity to Excellerate sign-on flows.

The idea here is that a number of Google’s existing and potential customers are already using one or a combination of these companies, and so this is about integrating those solutions more deeply into Google’s cloud platform so that these companies can work more seamlessly (and of course adopt more Google Cloud products, now knowing that they can be used with their existing identity management and other protocols). The push to work with multiple providers is practical on another level: these are the apps that are used by companies to let them localize operations better for specific regions and use cases and users, so Google has to accommodate that to work with them on the bigger prize of winning more business overall.

Confidential space, meanwhile, is a new product that Google is launching as part of its Confidential Computing initiative, a push to build and provide more secure environments for those collaborating in the cloud and exchanging data as part of that process, by letting them keep that data constantly encrypted and secure.

This has been a very interesting area and aspect of the cybersecurity market in the last several years, raising lots of questions about how anonymized data can be in, for example, machine learning models that are trained specifically to figure out and shape identities out of sparse amounts of information. Approaches using cutting-edge algorithms and concepts like homomorphic encryption aim to bypass that issue by treating the data itself as salient, wrapped packages, and this is, not in so many words, what Google Cloud is also has been attempting to build here, starting with Confidential Virtual Machines (VMs) back in 2020, which kept data encrypted even while it was being processed. Today, this may be a priority only for a small segment of organizations that handle especially sensitive information; but judging by the evolution of data privacy and data protection, it is increasingly, and likely, going to become a more prominent aspect of the data protection regulatory environment, and therefore for a wider range of companies, too.

The last of the big security announcements at Google Cloud Next focuses on SecOps, specifically the expansion of its Chronicle Security Operations software suite, a cloud-native platform for cyber teams to monitor, detect, investigate and respond to cyberthreats “with the speed, scale, and intelligence of Google.” It’s another well-worn cybersecurity area that a number of startups have identified and built solutions to address over the years, and indeed that is precisely what Google tapped to build this product: Mandiant, which it acquired earlier this year for a whopping $5.4 billion, forms a cornerstone of Chronicle; as does Siemplify, another acquisition from earlier this year. Chronicle existed prior to today’s news; now Google’s bringing these different products together under that brand to strengthen the product and positioning of it.

Google looks to boost its security cred in the cloud by Ingrid Lunden originally published on TechCrunch

Tue, 11 Oct 2022 00:13:32 -0500 en-US text/html https://www.msn.com/en-us/news/technology/google-looks-to-boost-its-security-cred-in-the-cloud/ar-AA12PIE9
Killexams : Google Cloud Advances Partnerships with 20-Plus Software Companies Focused on Digital Sovereignty and Cybersecurity

At Next '22, Google Cloud announces updates to its trusted cloud ecosystem with new Sovereign Solutions initiative and partnerships spanning critical areas of cybersecurity

SUNNYVALE, Calif., Oct. 11, 2022 /PRNewswire/ -- Google Cloud today announced a significant expansion of its trusted cloud ecosystem, highlighting new integrations and offerings with more than twenty partners focused on enabling greater data sovereignty controls, supporting Zero Trust models, unifying identity management, and improving endpoint security for global businesses.

Google Cloud Logo (PRNewsfoto/Google Cloud)

Global businesses face growing challenges in cybersecurity and data protection, as cyber threats become increasingly sophisticated, hybrid work becomes the norm, and governments adopt new requirements for data sovereignty and control. Google Cloud provides businesses with industry-leading, end-to-end security capabilities to support customers across their cloud and on-premises environments—and today it is announcing a series of partnerships that extend its leadership as an open and trusted cloud.

By embracing its ecosystem of partners, Google Cloud is ensuring that global businesses have choice and flexibility to work with leading cybersecurity vendors and to deliver diverse sets of applications on infrastructure compliant with growing data protection requirements.

"Providing businesses with extensible cybersecurity solutions in the cloud, and a collaborative ecosystem of partners, is the only practical approach to addressing enterprises' greatest cybersecurity challenges," said Sunil Potti, VP, Cloud Security at Google Cloud. "Our partners play a critical role in keeping customers secure and compliant, whether enabling secure hybrid work, safeguarding critical infrastructure, or meeting stringent data residency requirements."

"Success with today's digital business platforms requires a connected and trusted ecosystem of partners to help ensure better security outcomes for customers," said Prem Iyer, VP, GSI and CSP Ecosystems at Palo Alto Networks. "We remain committed to continuing our momentum with Google Cloud, delivering best-in-class solutions that simplify cloud security for our joint customers while improving their security posture."

"The Symantec Enterprise Division and Google Cloud are committed to addressing critical requirements of governments and highly regulated industries to establish sovereignty over data at rest, in use, and in transit," said Rob Greer, VP and GM at Symantec Enterprise Division, Broadcom. "The Google Cloud Ready–Sovereign Solutions program provides Symantec customers with a transparent and flexible approach to meet local data security and privacy laws, across our cybersecurity solutions."

Bringing partner applications to European sovereign clouds
Google Cloud is announcing a new Google Cloud Ready–Sovereign Solutions program to help customers identify partner applications validated to be compatible with Google Cloud's portfolio of Sovereign Solutions, including partner offerings from T-Systems in Germany and S3NS in France. This program will supply customers the confidence to continue using applications that are critical to their business while meeting their digital sovereignty objectives.

Today, a diverse group of software partners are committing to validate their platforms for this program, including Aiven, Broadcom (Symantec),Cloud Software Group (Citrix), Climate Engine, Commvault, Confluent, Datadog, DataIKU, Dell Technologies, Elastic, Fortinet, Gitlab, Iron Mountain, LumApps, MongoDB, NetApp, OpenText, Palo Alto Networks, Pega Systems, Siemens, SUSE, Thales, Thought Machine, Veeam, and VMware.

Expanding Zero Trust architecture with partners
Businesses around the world utilize Google Cloud's BeyondCorp Enterprise Zero Trust solution to enable secure access to applications and resources and to safeguard data. In 2020, Google Cloud announced the BeyondCorp Alliance, creating an ecosystem of partners to help enable customers to integrate products and utilize information from leading security vendors including CrowdStrike, Palo Alto Networks, VMware, and more.

Today, Google Cloud is taking a significant step forward in the extensibility of its Zero Trust offerings by partnering with Palo Alto Networks to ensure customers can embrace a ZTNA 2.0 strategy, protecting all users and applications on devices connected across any network.

Simplifying identity management across platforms
Unified identity management is another critical component to secure hybrid work, because it safely eliminates the need to maintain separate user identities across multiple platforms. Alongside its own Identity and Access Management products, Google Cloud is announcing new integrations with ForgeRock, JumpCloud, Okta, and PingIdentity that will automatically extend identity management capabilities and policies to joint customers, adding significant value to investments customers have already made, and helping further secure commonly-used applications.

Improving endpoint security and operations
These partnerships build on Google Cloud's existing ecosystem of endpoint and security operations partners. Strong endpoint protection helps businesses maintain data security while giving their workforces the flexibility to access key applications and information seamlessly across devices, including mobile phones, desktops, laptops, and more. Through its Chronicle Security Operations platform, Google Cloud offers a modern, cloud-first suite that better enables cybersecurity teams to detect, investigate, and respond to threats.

Google Cloud's ecosystem of partners like CrowdStrike, Cybereason, and Fortinet integrate their platforms with Chronicle, ensuring customers have the flexibility and choice to modernize their endpoint security operations.

With the addition of Mandiant to Google Cloud, endpoint partners will also have opportunities to deepen their integrations with Google Cloud's end-to-end security operations suite, with even greater capabilities to support customers across their cloud and on-premises environments.

Delivering implementation and managed services through systems integrators
Google Cloud's top systems integrators including Deloitte will provide implementation customization and managed services for customers, bringing together Google Cloud's capabilities in security analytics, threat intelligence, automation, and SecOps with those of its ecosystem to help customers more quickly prevent and respond to cyber threats.

Learn more about Google Cloud's ecosystem of security partners here.

About Google Cloud
Google Cloud accelerates every organization's ability to digitally transform its business. We deliver enterprise-grade solutions that leverage Google's cutting-edge technology – all on the cleanest cloud in the industry. Customers in more than 200 countries and territories turn to Google Cloud as their trusted partner to enable growth and solve their most critical business problems.

 

Cision View original content to obtain multimedia:https://www.prnewswire.com/news-releases/google-cloud-advances-partnerships-with-20-plus-software-companies-focused-on-digital-sovereignty-and-cybersecurity-301645549.html

SOURCE Google Cloud

Tue, 11 Oct 2022 00:02:00 -0500 en text/html https://markets.businessinsider.com/news/stocks/google-cloud-advances-partnerships-with-20-plus-software-companies-focused-on-digital-sovereignty-and-cybersecurity-1031795627
Killexams : Software Asset Management Market with Tremendous growth by 2029 Scalable Software, Servicenow, Symantec

New Jersey, United States, Sept. 15, 2022 /DigitalJournal/ Software Asset Management (SAM) is the business initiative to recover budget and maximize value by actively governing and automating the provisioning, use and deployment of software licenses and subscriptions. The software asset management market is expected to increase in growth over the forecast period as the need for asset lifecycle management increases.

It is driven by an increase in the number of audits across an organization, the complexity of licensing systems, high licensing expenses and excessive regulations. Software management is gradually becoming an essential part of business strategies, with organizations allocating a significant portion of their IT budget to it. Companies are actively seeking software asset management solutions to manage and optimize IT assets to better cope with a rapidly changing environment.

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The Software Asset Management Market research report provides all the information related to the industry. It gives the markets outlook by giving authentic data to its client which helps to make essential decisions. It gives an overview of the market which includes its definition, applications and developments, and manufacturing technology. This Software Asset Management market research report tracks all the exact developments and innovations in the market. It gives the data regarding the obstacles while establishing the business and guides to overcome the upcoming challenges and obstacles.

Competitive landscape:

This Software Asset Management research report throws light on the major market players thriving in the market; it tracks their business strategies, financial status, and upcoming products.

Some of the Top companies Influencing this Market include:Scalable Software, Servicenow, Symantec, BMC Software, Flexera, IBM, Cherwell Software, CA Technologies, Aspera Technologies, Ivanti, Certero, Snow Software

Market Scenario:

Firstly, this Software Asset Management research report introduces the market by providing an overview that includes definitions, applications, product launches, developments, challenges, and regions. The market is forecasted to reveal strong development by driven consumption in various markets. An analysis of the current market designs and other basic characteristics is provided in the Software Asset Management report.

Regional Coverage:

The region-wise coverage of the market is mentioned in the report, mainly focusing on the regions:

  • North America
  • South America
  • Asia and Pacific region
  • Middle East and Africa
  • Europe

Segmentation Analysis of the market

The market is segmented based on the type, product, end users, raw materials, etc. the segmentation helps to deliver a precise explanation of the market

Market Segmentation: By Type

License Management, Audit and Compliance Management, Software Discovery, Metering, and Optimization, Contract Management, Configuration Management, Others

Market Segmentation: By Application

Government, BFSI, Healthcare & Life sciences, Retail & Consumer Goods, Telecom & IT, Manufacturing, Media & Entertainment, Education, Others

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An assessment of the market attractiveness about the competition that new players and products are likely to present to older ones has been provided in the publication. The research report also mentions the innovations, new developments, marketing strategies, branding techniques, and products of the key participants in the global Software Asset Management market. To present a clear vision of the market the competitive landscape has been thoroughly analyzed utilizing the value chain analysis. The opportunities and threats present in the future for the key market players have also been emphasized in the publication.

This report aims to provide:

  • A qualitative and quantitative analysis of the current trends, dynamics, and estimations from 2022 to 2029.
  • The analysis tools such as SWOT analysis and Porter’s five force analysis are utilized, which explain the potency of the buyers and suppliers to make profit-oriented decisions and strengthen their business.
  • The in-depth market segmentation analysis helps identify the prevailing market opportunities.
  • In the end, this Software Asset Management report helps to save you time and money by delivering unbiased information under one roof.

Table of Contents

Global Software Asset Management Market Research Report 2022 – 2029

Chapter 1 Software Asset Management Market Overview

Chapter 2 Global Economic Impact on Industry

Chapter 3 Global Market Competition by Manufacturers

Chapter 4 Global Production, Revenue (Value) by Region

Chapter 5 Global Supply (Production), Consumption, Export, Import by Regions

Chapter 6 Global Production, Revenue (Value), Price Trend by Type

Chapter 7 Global Market Analysis by Application

Chapter 8 Manufacturing Cost Analysis

Chapter 9 Industrial Chain, Sourcing Strategy and Downstream Buyers

Chapter 10 Marketing Strategy Analysis, Distributors/Traders

Chapter 11 Market Effect Factors Analysis

Chapter 12 Global Software Asset Management Market Forecast

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Thu, 15 Sep 2022 03:16:00 -0500 A2Z Market Research en-US text/html https://www.digitaljournal.com/pr/software-asset-management-market-with-tremendous-growth-by-2029-scalable-software-servicenow-symantec
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