Free 1Z0-605 PDF and VCE at killexams.com

Create sure that a person has Oracle 1Z0-605 Exam Questions of actual questions for the particular Siebel 7.7 Business Analyst Core Cheatsheet before you choose to take the particular real test. All of us give the most up-to-date and valid 1Z0-605 questions and answers that will contain 1Z0-605 real examination questions. We possess collected and produced a database associated with 1Z0-605 practice test from actual examinations having a specific finish goal to provide you an opportunity to get ready plus pass 1Z0-605 examination upon the first try. Simply memorize our own 1Z0-605

Exam Code: 1Z0-605 Practice test 2022 by Killexams.com team
Siebel 7.7 Business Analyst Core
Oracle Business syllabus
Killexams : Oracle Business syllabus - BingNews https://killexams.com/pass4sure/exam-detail/1Z0-605 Search results Killexams : Oracle Business syllabus - BingNews https://killexams.com/pass4sure/exam-detail/1Z0-605 https://killexams.com/exam_list/Oracle Killexams : Disruptive Technologies and New Business Models

Emerging technologies such as the Internet of Things, Artificial Intelligence, Machine Learning, among others are transforming economic structures and business models, writes Emma Okonji

The migration from analogue to digital technology, occasioned by the evolution of emerging technologies, is one big thing that has transformed businesses and economies globally and within Nigeria.

Software application developers are busy thinking of new ways of transforming businesses and economies, using digital technology solutions. And Nigeria, just like other developing countries of the world, is beginning to take advantage of the emerging technologies to further transform businesses and the Nigerian economy.

While Internet of Things (IoT) is driving global connectivity and developing communication between humans and devices, Artificial Intelligence (AI) and Machine Learning (ML) are the latest technologies through which machines are developed in the form of robotics that have the capacity and artificial intelligence to multitask and perform human activities in all aspect of human endeavours.

Through these technologies, businesses are scaling up faster, and human interface in business is gradually being reduced, while giving room for greater work efficiency, thereby saving cost for organisations and economies.

Technology experts have strongly advised organisations to either embrace emerging technologies or lose grip of their businesses and stand the risk of being overtaken and left behind in today’s world, where technology is driving everything.

In this regard, Oracle is a technology company that has developed lots of technology solutions that solve specific challenges, thereby enhancing businesses and economies.

Oracle has been in Nigeria for several years, doing the business enterprise solution applications that are helping businesses to grow and make more profit, while enhancing customers’ experience.

Giving testimony of how Oracle solutions have impacted on the business of the Nigerian Custom Service during the 2018 Oracle Impact Technology Summit organised for organisations and partners by Oracle Technology Company in Lagos recently, the Assistant Comptroller General of the Nigerian Customs Service, Benjamin Terseer Aber, spoke on how the deployment of Oracle solutions helped Customs to raise as much as N140 billion in one month, precisely in the month of August 2018, for the federal government, which sums up to N1.7 trillion yearly, if the solution is deployed in the next one year.

According to Aber, Customs service was generating less than N400 billion in one year as at 2005, before the deployment of the technology solutions from 2013.

“We have since moved from manual documentation to automated documentation. We have deployed software solutions from Oracle that manages both the front-end and the back-end services of Customs,” Aber said.

Giving details of how the technology automation works, Aber said, “business automation remained key for us at Customs to enable us move away from manual processes of clearing of goods.”

“What we did was to introduce the Nigeria Integrated Customs Information System (NICIS 11) software application from Oracle to connect all government agencies on the same platform to enable us interface electronically with all other government agencies that are involved in controlling international trade transactions.

“When a clearing agent makes bank payment to Customs or to any of the government agencies and the bank uploads the payment on the NICIS 11 platform, we automatically see the payment derails online, and this has compelled all clearing agents that do clearing business with Customs to be transparent without trying to cut corners and short-changing government.”

He said the Customs also used another technology tool called Tax Identification Number (TIN).
Country Manager, Oracle Nigeria, Mr. Adebayo Sanni, said in today’s development, technology innovation is not only transforming businesses, but also transforming the way individuals work, play and learn.
According to him, Oracle Impact Technology Summit was designed to bring future technology to meet the needs of today’s businesses.

The Era of Robotics
One of the greatest advancements in technology, is the use of robotics to perform most of the human tasks across all walks of life, be it in manufacturing, medicine, judiciary and in telecommunications, among others.
Robots that have more sensory capacities than humans are being developed today to assist human in performing most of the human tasks, through AI.

Based on the excess memory it has, it can study human behaviour in order to perform human tasks perfectly. Robots are known to interface with human as front desk machine that could provide answers to any questions raised in seconds, since it has inbuilt memory with excess capacities.

In most cases, robots are used to perform human tasks in the factory like processing and packaging in manufacturing and assembling factories.

Although many have argued that robotics, through Artificial Intelligence, will take away human jobs and create unemployment for the citizens, but technology experts have said robots would only complement human efforts and create new forms of jobs for citizens, since the robots are controlled by humans. The bottom line, according to technology experts, is the ability to achieve work efficiency, scalability and profitability.

In judiciary, there are cases where robots are used to try court cases and pass judgements in few days as against the elongated court cases that are handled by human lawyers and judges.

At a recent judicial workshop organised for judges on legal issues in telecommunications, the Managing Partner, Technology Advisors, Basil Udotai, had advised judges to embrace AI in the prosecuting of legal cases and in passing legal judgments, as AI has become the global norm for the judicial system.

DSN Bootcamp and AI initiative
Just last week, the Data Science Nigeria (DSN) held its annual summit which also focused on AI in driving development, and addressing specific challenges.

Worried about the inability of Nigeria to meet its financial inclusion target by 2020, considering the large number of Nigerians that are still financially excluded and do not have access to banks and credit facilities, DSN assembled 150 Nigerians for training on AI.

Executive Director, SystemSpecs, Mr. Deremi Atanda, described AI as a dimension of technology that extends the human capacity to look through unlimited data and then develop machines with capacities to perform certain tasks, at a very fast rate, using the unlimited data.

The convener, DSN Bootcamp, Mr. Olubayo Adekanmbi, said the Data Science Nigeria Artificial Intelligence Bootcamp was conceived to complement the initial skills that most of “our start-ups acquired when they were in school. According to him, the current syllabus of our university system does not cover global contents in terms of technology evolution.”

“So in order to bridge that gap, we decided to float DSN AI Bootcamp to further train Nigerians who have basic skills in computing, to enable them be at pal with their colleagues from other parts of the developed world.
“The essence is to train and raise quality students who can use Machine Learning and Artificial Intelligence to solve Nigeria challenges, create employment and develop solutions that will address specific challenges in the country, like financial inclusion challenges.

“Poverty is a serious challenge in Nigeria and the poor ones do not have access to funds and they are highly excluded from the digital inclusivity in the Nigerian financial sector. So the 150 candidates were also trained on how to use AI and ML to generate data that would be analysed to address the digital inclusion challenges of Nigeria,” Adekanmbi said.

FinTech as Disrupters
Also, since their emergence, financial technology companies (fintechs) have caused a lot of positive disruptions in the financial services sector, where they have created technology solutions that have changed the way banks operate and attend to their customers.

Through fintech solutions, bank customers can stay in the comfort of their homes and offices and transact financial business with their banks, using their mobile phones, without going to the banking hall.
A lot of new banking solutions have been developed that are currently driving financial services in Nigeria and in other countries of the world.

The President of Institute of Software Practitioners of Nigeria (ISPON), who doubles as the Chief Executive Officer of Precise Financial Service (PFS), Dr. Yele Okeremi, called on banks and other financial institutions, to see fintech players as their business partners and collaborate with them to further enhance financial transactions in the banking sector, through their technology solutions.

AI and ML
Addressing the usefulness of ML and AI, in a recent statement, the Managing Director, Technology Accenture Nigeria, Niyi Tayo said both would become key enablers in a new era of digital experiences and value propositions, but the revolution needs a human touch.

According to him, even though both ML and Al would be key requirements in today and future business, the digital revolution needs a human touch.

Tayo, said AI would continue to expand into every facet of our lives, driving better business decisions and user experiences throughout a wide range of markets and industries.

“AI has effectively become a new user interface, making our interactions with the increasingly advanced technologies that surround us easier and more seamless. Intelligent digital assistants like Google Now in our smartphones, is helping us reach out to others, find information, make notes and navigate the physical world.
“Meanwhile, Amazon Alexa and Google Home have given us the ability to order goods and services without ever seeing a screen,” he said.

“These developments are constantly making it easier to use advanced technology effectively. Instead of adapting to our machines, we are teaching our machines to adapt to us. But as we train our artificial intelligences to approve loans, identify job candidates and treat patients, we must be mindful of our responsibility to society.
“In a future where AI has the power to facilitate every touch point from commerce to public services, we must strive to ensure it remains a force for good. We, therefore, have to nurture our AI as with great power comes great responsibility,” Tayo added.

Unlocking the ‘Black Box’
According to Tayo, it was time for Nigerians and the rest of the globe to start unlocking the power of technology that has remained coded in the ‘Black Box’ for ages.

Training AI is a complicated process. Take deep learning, for instance: a pattern recognition method that mimics the way the human brain works and applies those principles to neural networking.

“This technique has allowed businesses to make substantial progress in highly complex fields such as image recognition. Where humans see a cat, a goat or a tomato, a computer will only see a field of pixels.
“Deep learning has given computers the ability to recognize what those pixels represent – but we can’t fully explain how the system works, even though we programmed the basics ourselves,” he said.

He added, “This is a surprisingly common phenomenon. The neural network powering Google Translate invented its own common language to aid in translations, even though it wasn’t specifically instructed to do so.
“Naturally, this lack of insight into the inner workings of AI is rarely a problem when the results are positive. If efficiency is up and users are happy, why worry,” he asked.

He therefore advised Nigerians to join the new wave of technology and match towards rapid growth and profitability.

In order to seize the growth opportunities that AI provides, Tayo advised companies to address core ethical considerations and establish a set of value-driven requirements to guide the deployment of their AI.

Sat, 06 Aug 2022 11:59:00 -0500 en-US text/html https://www.thisdaylive.com/index.php/2018/10/18/disruptive-technologies-and-new-business-models/
Killexams : Leaked Oracle organizational charts show the 30 people running its all-important cloud, tech teams after its big reorg
  • Leaked org charts show Oracle's cloud leaders after major organizational changes at the company.
  • Oracle earlier this week began layoffs that could affect thousands of employees globally.
  • The cuts came after Oracle quietly reorganized its cloud unit to focus on new core initiatives.

An internal Oracle organizational chart seen by Insider shows the 30 people running Oracle's all-important technical and cloud sides of the business after the company quietly reorganized them in June.

Oracle earlier this week began layoffs that could affect thousands of employees globally, primarily in its marketing, advertising, and customer experience units. But the Oracle Cloud Infrastructure has been virtually unaffected by layoffs, multiple employees told Insider. OCI is the cloud taking on Amazon Web Services, Microsoft Azure, and Google Cloud, and it's the business where Oracle's biggest hopes for growth are pinned. 

Instead, Oracle reorganized OCI to focus on what it describes as "four pillars" — infrastructure, security and developer services, core platforms, and data and emerging services, an internal email seen by Insider said. Matt Ryanczak, a top executive who managed the operations and support organization, left the company after he was moved under Jae Evans, Oracle's chief information officer, another internal email showed.

But changes at the top of this unit have been going on for months. In March, Don Johnson, Oracle's cloud and AI leader, stepped down from the platform and AI-services organization that he formed about a year prior, leaving only the Oracle Cloud Infrastructure boss Clay Magouyrk in charge of the company's cloud unit. In an internal email at the time, Johnson said he would advise on healthcare initiatives.

It wasn't the first time Johnson had stepped back from a role leading OCI. In June 2020, Johnson told employees that he was stepping down from direct leadership of the cloud unit to pursue new projects within Oracle, tapping Magouyrk to replace him. Johnson returned in December 2020 to start the new cloud and artificial-intelligence organization that he described in an email to employees as "an extension of OCI, not a division of it." 

Now, the org chart shows, Johnson has about 1,200 reports, including those leading healthcare, engineering, and artificial-intelligence teams.

Magouyrk, meanwhile, now leads all of OCI's 10,500 employees, the org chart shows. Greg Pavlik is leading the largest team within OCI, with about 3,500 reports. Magouyrk elevated Pavlik in the recent reorganization to become senior vice president of OCI, so he now runs a combined OCI Infrastructure and core-services org.

The below org chart focuses on the people running the technical and cloud side of Oracle's business, so it doesn't include CEO Safra Catz, who is generally considered to run the finance, sales, and marketing sides of the business. The chart features the people who report up to Larry Ellison, the chairman and chief technology officer; Johnson; and Magouyrk, as depicted on the company's internal org chart.

Do you work at Oracle or have insight to share? Contact the reporter Ashley Stewart via the encrypted messaging app Signal (+1-425-344-8242) or email (astewart@insider.com).

Fri, 05 Aug 2022 03:17:00 -0500 en-US text/html https://www.businessinsider.com/leaked-oracle-org-charts-show-cloud-tech-leaders-after-reorg-2022-8
Killexams : A syllabus your students won’t ignore

The first day of class is often a chore. Faculty and students spend time reviewing policies and requirements from a detailed paper syllabus. Digital syllabuses let faculty simplify material — meeting requirements but immediately engaging with students. Faculty can link collateral materials like detailed policies and resources, make a more attractive syllabus, and introduce themselves as much or as little as they want.

When George "Guy" McHendry Jr., Ph.D., first began teaching, he spent the first day of class walking his students through a lengthy printed syllabus detailing everything from the class calendar to the grading scale. "It's a terrible way to start the class," said McHendry, an associate professor of communication studies at Creighton University in Omaha, Neb. "It's boring for the students. It's boring for me."

He decided to change that. "For decades in academia, faculty have been trying to find ways to get students to read the document throughout," said McHendry. "A 14-page document full of paragraphs and paragraphs of policies is really a difficult genre for students to engage with."

McHendry decided to go digital. Unable to find a suitable template, he made his own. Along the way, he became a guide to scholars looking to spice up their syllabuses. He now operates Interactive Syllabus, a free resource with a downloadable template that others can use.

Stephanie Gomez, Ph.D., an assistant professor of critical media studies at Western Washington University in Bellingham, Wash., hasn't handed out a paper syllabus in a decade. She started using McHendry's template in 2018. "When I read about the interactive syllabus, I knew that it was something that I had to try," said Gomez. Now, "I use the first day of class to do more community-building activities and start to get to know my students."

For Melanie McNaughton, Ph.D., a professor of communication studies at Bridgewater State University in Bridgewater, Mass., going digital made sense. She is mostly teaching a generation that grew up with the internet and smartphones. "Students are like the rest of us; they want stuff on-demand," she said. "You're up late working on a paper and you want a resource. I can link to all of these resources from a syllabus, and students can access it on their own time when it suits them."

A digital syllabus also offers the chance to showcase your personality. McNaughton's syllabus includes pictures of her traveling and her pets to humanize her in a friendly but professional way. "You want to balance what you're sharing with students," she said. "Pets are innocuous."

To go digital and make your syllabus more engaging, follow this advice: 

Don't be afraid. You don't have to be tech-savvy to be successful, said McNaughton. She uses Populr.me a micropublishing site that lets users drag-and-drop sections into a digital syllabus. "You don't have to have any design skills," she pointed out.

Kay Gowsell, CPA, CGMA, an associate professor of accounting at the University of Cincinnati Blue Ash College, in Blue Ash, Ohio, created an introductory PowerPoint presentation with a voice-over explanation of the syllabus highlights. To help students save time, she links to the college's required assignment platform as well as online resources. Students can easily access the syllabus via the class learning management system, she said.

Be brief. Schools may require a lot of information on the syllabus — from academic dishonesty policies to mental health support resources, but you don't want to make students scroll endlessly. "It doesn't need to be too long or too obnoxious," McHendry said.

Hyperlinks are a distinct advantage with digital syllabuses. Instead of including certain information, see if you can link to it. Gomez embeds hyperlinks so students can follow the link if they want the information. "I try to make the syllabus as streamlined as possible because students don't really want to spend a lot of time on it," said Gomez.

Think visually. Going digital allows you the opportunity to make your syllabus more attractive. "We know that marketing and branding visually matters to a lot of people, but we don't apply that to education," McNaughton said. "The assumption is that [a well-designed digital syllabus] is higher-quality. It gives students a sense of confidence and a willingness to engage."

Check your links. Hyperlinks change, so periodically check that the links you provide are active. McNaughton maintains a page that is accessible to multiple classes via a single link. She uses this page for the meatier policies and documents that students may not need all the time. When link updates are needed, she can make them once, instead of having to do so for every class.

Start a dialogue. McHendry uses his syllabus to interact with students. He asks for preferred names and pronouns, and if there's anything else that he needs to know. Some students voluntarily reveal issues that they might not have otherwise, ranging from family health issues to past traumas, information that is kept confidential. "Some students share things they're really struggling with that puts them on my radar," he said. "I can supply them a little extra attention if needed."

He also asks for the best way to reach everyone for urgent matters. "I will always default to email, but many of our students just don't prefer to communicate that way," he explained.

Be yourself. Use a digital syllabus to stand out. What you include depends on the image you want to present, McNaughton said. "How much of your identity do you want to wear on your sleeve?" she said. "I'm not sure there's a one-size-fits-all answer."

Dawn Wotapka is a freelance writer based in Atlanta. To comment on this article or to suggest an idea for another article, contact Courtney Vien at Courtney.Vien@aicpa-cima.com.

Mon, 08 Aug 2022 00:02:00 -0500 text/html https://www.journalofaccountancy.com/newsletters/academic-update/digital-syllabus.html
Killexams : Oracle lays off hundreds of employees

Oracle Corp. ORCL, +0.39%  laid off hundreds of employees this week as the business software provider prioritizes its healthcare IT services and cloud businesses, according to people familiar with the company’s actions.

The job cuts principally hit staff at Oracle’s advertising and customer experience group, the people said. The group sells services to help clients analyze data about their customers and target advertising to those customers.

Oracle’s job cuts come as the company is putting increased emphasis on cloud healthcare services after recently receiving regulatory approval for its $28.3 billion deal for electronic-medical-records company Cerner Corp. They are hitting a unit that has become less central to the company at a time the digital ad market also is in turmoil. The layoffs were earlier reported by The Information.

The Austin, Texas-based company is the latest in the growing field of tech companies across an array of activities to slow hiring or cut staff. Last month, Microsoft Corp. MSFT, +0.71% said it would be cutting less than 1% of its total workforce of about 181,000 employees.

Robinhood Markets Inc. HOOD, -5.43% this week said it was slashing about 23% of its full-time staff as the online brokerage reacts to a sharp slowdown in customer trading activity. In June, Netflix Inc. NFLX, -1.52% said it was laying off about 300 employees, following a round of layoffs of 150 people in the previous month.

An expanded version of this story appears on WSJ.com.

Popular stories from WSJ.com:

Fri, 05 Aug 2022 08:24:00 -0500 en-US text/html https://www.marketwatch.com/story/oracle-lays-off-hundreds-of-employees-11659731052?mod=mw_latestnews
Killexams : Information Systems

MSc PG Certificate PG Diploma

2022 start September 

Information School, Faculty of Social Sciences

Aimed at graduates from any discipline, this course will teach you to design and implement information systems and effective project management techniques alongside practical computing skills, including computer programming. The MSc and PG Diploma awards are CILIP accredited.

Course description

By the end of the course, you'll have an in-depth understanding of information systems within an organisational context, emphasising issues related to information, people, information technologies and the business environment. You'll have gained practical skills related to the design and analysis of information systems. Your knowledge and skills will be highly valued in industry, commerce and academia.

We have world-leading research groups in areas such as database systems, information retrieval, speech recognition, information extraction and information management. This means you'll not only gain knowledge of the well-established fundamentals, but also the most current and advanced theories and techniques.

The course focuses on core subjects in information systems including information systems modelling, project management and the impact of information systems on organisations and society. These are complemented by practical skills in computer programming and the study of professional issues in computing.

You can then tailor the course to your own interests by choosing from more specialised subjects including those with a more technical focus such as database design and human-computer interaction, or subjects that focus on how information management can be used to benefit organisations through digital business and business intelligence.

If you have two or more years' relevant work experience in the information sector and wish to study for a higher degree, you may be interested in our Professional Enhancement programme. The programme is designed for people already in work who want to further their careers, and allows greater freedom in module choice in recognition of your existing expertise.

Accreditation

CILIP accredited for the MSc and PG Diploma awards

Modules

A selection of modules are available each year - some examples are below. There may be changes before you start your course. From May of the year of entry, formal programme regulations will be available in our Programme Regulations Finder.

You’ll need 180 credits to get a masters degree, with 75 credits from core modules, 45 credits from optional modules and a dissertation (including dissertation preparation) worth 60 credits.

Core modules:

Professional Issues

This module aims to promote an awareness of the wider social, legal and ethical issues of computing. It describes the relationship between technological change, society and the law, emphasising the powerful role that computers and computer professionals play in a technological society. It also introduces the legal areas which are specific and relevant to the discipline of computing (e.g., intellectual property, liability for defective software, computer misuse, etc) and aims to provide an understanding of ethical concepts that are important to computer professionals, and experience of considering ethical dilemmas.

15 credits
Information Systems Modelling

To consider the role of information modelling within the organisation and provide an appreciation of the rigorous methods that are needed to analyse, design, develop and maintain computer-based information systems. The course is intended to provide an introduction to information modelling techniques. Students gain experience in applying the wide range of systems analysis methods. Students cover subjects including: soft systems analysis; structured systems analysis methodologies; business process modelling; data flow modelling and object-oriented approaches (e.g. RUP/UML).

15 credits
Information Systems in Organisations

This module integrates subjects of organisation, management, and information systems, with an aim to offer the students an integrated set of concepts and tools for understanding information systems in organisations. During this module students will explore basic management and organisational theories and examine the impact of information systems on organisations. This course introduces key concepts which will be explored further in other modules on the information Management and Information Systems programmes.

15 credits
Information Systems Project Management

This module aims to provide a broad understanding of the fundamentals of project management as they apply to the development of Information Systems (IS). The module uses a flexible approach combining face-to-face seminars with web-based learning material. The module will begin with an overview of the principles involved in IS project management; followed by a discussion of IS development methodologies and their different characteristics and specialisms. The rest of the module will discuss the requirements for various project control activities, including estimating development resources, risk management, guidelines for system quality assurance, and various project control techniques that have been developed in recent years. The module will culminate with a review of human resource management issues.

15 credits
Information Systems and the Information Society

The module develops students' critical understanding of the impact of information and communication technologies (ICTs) on social change in 'the Information Society'. Work will revolve around three key themes: the digital divide, community and digital rights.

15 credits
Research Methods and Dissertation Preparation

This module assists students in the identification of, and preparation of a dissertation proposal. Students will: learn about: on-going research in the School; identify and prepare a dissertation proposal; carry out a preliminary literature search in the area of the dissertation research topic; and be introduced to the use of social research methods and statistics for information management.

15 credits
Dissertation

This module enables students to carry out an extended piece of work on an Information School approved topic, so that they can explore an area of specialist interest to them in greater depth. Students will be supported through tutorials with a project supervisor, will apply research methods appropriate to their topic, and implement their work-plan to produce an individual project report. Students will already have identified a suitable Topic and designed a project plan in the pre-requisite unit Research Methods and Dissertation Preparation.

45 credits

Optional modules - one from:

Foundations of Object Oriented Programming

This module introduces the foundations of object-oriented programming using the language Java. The emphasis of the module is on software engineering principles, and concepts underpinning object-oriented design and development are introduced from the outset. By the end of the module, you will be able to design, implement and test moderately complex Java programs.

15 credits
Introduction to Programming

This module introduces students with little or no programming experience to the general purpose programming language Python. Python is popular and easy to learn for developing a wide range of information systems applications. The skills and understandings required to program in Python are valued by organisations and transfer to most other programming languages.

15 credits

Optional modules - two from:

Digital Business

The module addresses both theoretical and practical aspects of digital business. The module will cover the latest business trends and business models adopted by ecommerce companies so that students are able to recognise and relate to the current practice in business.  The module aims to equip the students with theoretical and business knowledge and entrepreneurial skills to understand and manage new ways of doing business in the digital economy.

15 credits
Researching Social Media

The module will examine the key theoretical frameworks and methods used in social media studies. Students will explore the following questions: 1) What can be learnt about society by studying social media? 2) How should researchers construct ethical stances for researching sites such as Facebook and Twitter? 3) What are the traditional and digital research methods and tools that can be applied to conduct research on social media? 4) What are the strengths and weaknesses of these methods?

15 credits
Information Governance and Ethics

This module explores a) the emergence of information and data as an economic resource; b) the governance challenges and ethical issues arising from organizations' systematic capture, processing, and use of information and data for organizational goals, e.g. value, risk, accountability, ownership, privacy etc; c) governance, ethical, legal and other frameworks relevant to the capture, processing and use of information and data within organizational and networked contexts; and d) technologies and techniques used in the governing and governance of information and data. Case examples from a number of domains, e.g. business, government, health, law, and social media illustrate the subjects investigated.

15 credits
Business Intelligence

We will cover the principles and practices of gathering and synthesizing business intelligence from the external environment, including organisations,  competitive intelligence operations, environmental scanning activities, market intelligence, and strategic intelligence using open source information. A  secondary focus for the module is the role of BI software in organizations to collect and analyse internal information. This module aims to provide students with an understanding of the ways in which business people use information and of how information is used to support strategic decision- making. Students will learn how to carry out effective searches using both free and fee-based resources, and will study key issues concerning the value, cost and availability of information. The module will concentrate primarily on external information resources but also covers the ways in which information internal to   an organisation can be used strategically to enhance competitive advantage. Students will learn through a combination of lectures and practical exercises, and  will have opportunities to develop expertise in using business-focused electronic information services.

15 credits
ICTs, Innovation and Change

This module aims at examining and exploring how organizations and human activity systems cope with change due to the new implementation or updating of Information Systems and Information and Communication Technologies (ICTs). This change occurs in complex social environments and has cultural, political, structural and ethical impacts that need to be carefully managed. The module will examine and explore how both managers and Information Systems practitioners can be better prepared for the unpredictability, unintended outcomes and possible harmful consequences of change caused by the introduction or update of Information Systems and ICTs. Therefore, the module aims at providing an understanding of both approaches and techniques for the management of this change.

15 credits
Database Design

Effective data management is key to any organisation, particularly with the increasing availability of large and heterogeneous datasets (e.g. transactional, multimedia and geo-spatial data). A database is an organised collection of data, typically describing the activities of one or more organisations and a core component of modern information systems. A Database Management System (DBMS) is software designed to assist in maintaining and utilising large collections of data and becoming a necessity for all organisations. This module provides an introduction to the area of databases and database management, relational database design and a flavour of some advanced subjects in current database research that deal with different kinds of data often found within an organisational context. Lectures are structured into three main areas:¿An introduction to databases¿The process of designing relational databases¿Advanced subjects (e.g. data warehouses and non-relational databases)The course includes a series of online tasks with supporting 'drop in¿ laboratories aimed at providing you with the skills required to implement a database in Oracle and extract information using the Structured Query Language (SQL).

15 credits
User-Centred Design and Human-Computer Interaction

Interface design and usability are central to the experience of interacting with computers. The module introduces usability principles and the design process for interactive systems exploring four major themes. Firstly, user psychology and cognitive principles underlying interface design. Secondly, user interface architectures, modes of interaction, metaphors, navigational structures. Thirdly, the user interface design process including task analysis, modelling constructs and prototyping techniques. Fourthly, the evaluation of user interfaces covering concepts of usability, goals and types of evaluation. The module focus is on the underlying principles of HCI and user-centred design approach with practical sessions to demonstrate these principles.

15 credits

Other courses:

Postgraduate Certificate requires a total of 60 credits
Postgraduate Diploma requires a total of 120 credits

The content of our courses is reviewed annually to make sure it's up-to-date and relevant. Individual modules are occasionally updated or withdrawn. This is in response to discoveries through our world-leading research; funding changes; professional accreditation requirements; student or employer feedback; outcomes of reviews; and variations in staff or student numbers. In the event of any change we'll consult and inform students in good time and take reasonable steps to minimise disruption. We are no longer offering unrestricted module choice. If your course included unrestricted modules, your department will provide a list of modules from their own and other subject areas that you can choose from.

Open days

An open day gives you the best opportunity to hear first-hand from our current students and staff about our courses. You'll find out what makes us special.

Upcoming open days and campus tours

Duration

  • 1 year full-time
  • 2 years part-time
  • 3 years part-time

Teaching

A variety of teaching methods are used, combining lectures from academic staff and professional practitioners with seminars, tutorials, small-group work and computer laboratory sessions. There is strong emphasis on problem-solving and individual aspects of learning, with the expectation that you will engage in independent study, memorizing and research in support of your coursework.

Teaching consists of two 15-week semesters, after which you will write your dissertation.

Assessment

Assessments vary depending on the modules you choose but may include essays, report writing, oral presentations, in-class tests and group projects.

There is also a dissertation of 10–15,000 words, which provides the opportunity, under one-to-one supervision, to focus in depth on a Topic of your choice. You may choose to carry out your dissertation with an external organisation, for instance if you are a Professional Enhancement student, your project could be directly related to your own work situation. In the past, students who have carried out such dissertations have welcomed the opportunity to tackle real-life problems.

Your career

After completing the course, you'll be equipped to pursue a variety of roles across a wide range of industries. Our students have found work as business or data analysts, IT business consultants, information systems managers and in enterprise architecture.

Department

The University of Sheffield Information School is ranked number one in the world for library and information management in the QS World University Rankings by subject 2021. These rankings are based upon academic reputation, employer reputation and research impact.

The school has been at the forefront of developments in the information field for more than fifty years. The subject is characterised by its distinctive, interdisciplinary focus on the interactions between people, information and digital technologies. It has the ultimate goal of enhancing information access, and the management, sharing and use of information, to benefit society.

When you come to study with us you'll be an integral part of our research culture. The school is your home and we pride ourselves on the friendliness and helpfulness of our staff.

We offer an outstanding academic education through a wide range of taught postgraduate degrees which embed the principles of research-led teaching.

When you join any of our degree programmes you'll develop a critical understanding of current issues in library and information management. You'll benefit from being taught by staff who are undertaking leading-edge research and who have many links with industry.

As part of our mission to provide world-quality university education in information, we aim to inspire and help you pursue your highest ambitions for your academic and professional careers.

Entry requirements

Main course

You’ll need at least a 2:1 in any subject. Relevant work experience is an advantage but we’ll supply consideration to candidates without experience.

Professional Enhancement

This is a different route to the main course. It's aimed at those who already have relevant work experience.

To apply for this course you need either:

  • an undergraduate degree in any subject discipline and at least 2 years' relevant work experience.
  • an undergraduate degree in any subject together with an acceptable relevant professional qualification and at least 2 years' relevant work experience.
  • an undergraduate degree in any subject area, and at least 5 years' relevant work experience.

If you do not have an undergraduate degree but have other qualifications and substantial relevant work experience you may be considered for entry onto the Postgraduate Certificate or Diploma courses.

Overall IELTS score of 6.5, with a minimum of 6.0 in each component.

Pathway programme for international students

If you're an international student who does not meet the entry requirements for this course, you have the opportunity to apply for a pre-masters programme in Business, Social Sciences and Humanities at the University of Sheffield International College. This course is designed to develop your English language and academic skills. Upon successful completion, you can progress to degree level study at the University of Sheffield.

If you have any questions about entry requirements, please contact the department.

Apply

You can apply for postgraduate study using our Postgraduate Online Application Form. It's a quick and easy process.

Applications close on Friday 5 August 2022 at 5pm.

Apply now

Any supervisors and research areas listed are indicative and may change before the start of the course.

Our student protection plan

Recognition of professional qualifications: from 1 January 2021, in order to have any UK professional qualifications recognised for work in an EU country across a number of regulated and other professions you need to apply to the host country for recognition. Read information from the UK government and the EU Regulated Professions Database.

Thu, 01 Oct 2020 03:20:00 -0500 en text/html https://www.sheffield.ac.uk/postgraduate/taught/courses/2022/information-systems-msc-pg-certificate-pg-diploma
Killexams : Big sales pitch

Hunter Davis is standing in front of dozens of classmates, portraying a professor in a high-energy play about how a group of ambitious and insightful college students thinks it has come up with the perfect investment vehicle for the world’s second-richest man, a man already considered to be the world’s greatest investor.

But Davis, a Kansas University finance major cast as the vaunted, self-confident and caffeinated “Professor Snickers,” still isn’t sold on the idea.

“Let’s get real,” a hyped-up Davis says, having already beer-bonged a can of Lipton Iced Tea in front of his fictional class and real-life classmates, during a dress rehearsal last week. “The day Warren Buffett buys Pella is the day the Jayhawks beat Nebraska in football.”

Laughs come from every corner of the room, both at the silliness of Davis’ portrayal and the hope his line reveals.

Warren Buffett is scheduled to see two plays performed by Mark Hirschey's finance class. This one features Aaron Arnett as Bobby

That’s because Davis and his fellow classmates know they’ll be on a bus Friday to Nebraska, ready to put their research and dignity on the line for a chance to convince the famed “Oracle of Omaha” to buy into their plan.

Buffett, chairman and chief executive officer of Berkshire Hathaway Inc., is scheduled to welcome more than 100 KU students to his Omaha offices for a visit Friday. It will be the culmination of a semester spent researching companies, fine-tuning reports and putting together performances that just might earn them an approving nod – and an agreement to invest – from the 75-year-old market guru who will be listening intently in the audience.

The students understand the stakes. If Buffett follows through on one of the class’ suggestions – to buy into Pella Corp., Schwan Food Co. or both – everyone in the class would get a B share of Berkshire, the Omaha-based investment operation that already owns the likes of Dairy Queen, GEICO Insurance, Nebraska Furniture Mart, and has stakes in dozens of commercial giants from Anheuser-Busch to Wal-Mart.

Friday’s closing price for a Berkshire B-share: $2,907.

“He gets a million reports every day,” says Davis, who admits to never having acted before, but can’t wait to pitch an idea to an influential audience of one. “This is a once-in-a-lifetime opportunity.”

‘Buffett Investment Project’

On paper, the class looks like a fairly typical numbers-crunching exercise. In FIN 400: Security Analysis, advanced undergraduates are exposed to the theory and practice of such analysis, with a focus on understanding “asset pricing in dynamic financial markets” to bridge early lessons of investment theory to the practice of stock selection and active portfolio management.

That’s what the syllabus says.

Mark Hirschey, a distinguished professor of business at Kansas University, encourages students to be creative. They gathered last week at Summerfield Hall to compete for leading roles in a production to be presented Friday to multibillionaire investor Warren Buffett.

But read deeper into the document and the class’ tangible purpose comes into focus, known simply as “Buffett Investment Project.”

Mark Hirschey – Anderson Chandler Distinguished professor of business at KU and real-life inspiration for Davis’ “professor Snickers” – makes the terms of the class project easy to understand:

¢ In 2003, students from the University of Tennessee met with Buffett, gave him a copy of the autobiography of Clayton Homes founder Jim Clayton and then reaped the benefits when Buffett bought into the manufactured-housing operation: Each of the students received Berkshire B shares, and the professor received an A share.

¢ Heading into this fall semester, Buffett owned 476,102 shares of Berkshire A stock, with each one worth $90,700.

“Most of you have heard of a ‘cool million,'” Hirschey writes. “Think of Buffett’s holdings in Berkshire Hathaway as a frozen solid $43.2 billion. You might even say that Buffett has 43.2 billion reasons to think his stock-picking and private-company investment ideas are better than anything suggested by anyone else.

“In fact, the idea that a class of students could come up with anything interesting for Buffett to ponder is so far-fetched that it makes one want to take up bowling, or pinochle, or pinocchio.”

Or acting.

15 minutes for fame

Students in the class are responsible for putting together not only investment proposals, on paper, for Buffett to consider. They also assemble 15-minute presentations, or skits, that could be performed for a man whose money, knowledge and advice they seek.

KU senior Hunter Davis plays Professor

That’s why dozens of students packed into a small lecture room a week ago tonight at Summerfield, anxious about the opportunities ahead. Four groups had reached the finals: one for Harley-Davidson, two for Schwan Food Co. and the last for Pella Corp.

Davis’ group, dubbed “The Berkshire Boys,” lays out the case for Pella by following the class model. Davis, as Professor Snickers, questions six students playing the role of students, each of them hoping to convince Buffett to buy into the pervasive – and private – maker of windows and doors.

Through turns both comical and informational, the students make their case:

¢ With the residential market being Pella’s largest, a recent downturn in the market could make the company’s anticipated acquisition price an especially good value of $1.75 billion – in line with Buffett’s belief of 11 times pre-tax earnings.

¢ Pella’s annual sales are $2 billion and have quadrupled since 1997 – well ahead of one of Pella’s biggest competitors, Anderson Windows.

¢ Pella’s energy-efficient doors and windows are attracting commercial buyers, a market with plenty of room to grow.

Better yet, a student says, Pella could be an even better investment than Microsoft Corp.

“The only windows in the world that are better than Microsoft’s are made by Pella,” the student says, to more laughter.

Double feature ahead

The performances reveal plenty of financial effort but even more laughs. One group plays off “The Apprentice” and asks contestants to show why they would be the best to make an investment pitch to Buffett on behalf of Schwan Food Co. Another puts Buffett’s face on photos taken at the Sturgis motorcycle rally, hoping to steer him toward buying shares in Harley-Davidson.

But two productions are chosen by Hirschey to take the stage in front of Buffett next week.

In one, students stage a mock wedding to celebrate the happy merger of “Bobby Berkshire” and “Susie Schwan,” representative of the home-delivery food company. Elvis Presley officiates the ceremony, while a host of representatives of Berkshire holdings – a World War I flying ace for Red Baron Pizza, “Bessie the Cow” for Dairy Queen and the robot-dancing gecko for GEICO insurance – while the two “consummate their merger.”

In the other, Hunter and his fellow students poke fun at the whole class, while focusing on the information and research that could let their hard work pay off.

After their rehearsal, “The Berkshire Boys” are reminded that KU did manage to snap its 36-year losing steak to Nebraska in football by beating the Cornhuskers, 40-15, in Lawrence.

“What’s cooler than this?” said Jim Bridges, a senior from Oklahoma City and member of “The Berkshire Boys.” “We get to put this one on our resume: Presented an investment idea to Warren Buffet. And it’ll be cool just to be in his presence. He’s the second-richest guy in the world and the greatest investor ever.”

Hirschey, having observed the skits with a smile and a discerning eye, looks forward to loading up two buses for the trek to Omaha. He knows the students both deserve the chance to make their pitches and to learn life lessons from an investment sage.

“He’s a very generous person,” Hirschey says. “It’s phenomenal.”

Fri, 05 Aug 2022 12:00:00 -0500 en-US text/html https://www2.ljworld.com/news/2005/nov/27/big_sales_pitch/?ku_news
Killexams : Information Management

MSc PG Certificate PG Diploma

2022 start September 

Information School, Faculty of Social Sciences

Prepare for your future career with the world’s number one school for Library and Information Management (QS Rankings 2021). Learn the core concepts and principles related to the systematic design and implementation of information, knowledge and data environments in organisational and networked contexts. The MSc and PG Diploma awards are CILIP accredited.

Course description

Ready yourself for a wide variety of organisational and consultancy roles that demand expertise in information and knowledge management. The emphasis of the programme is on developing your knowledge, skills and experience of design, implementation, management and governance effective information environments. This includes examining their purposes, functions and processes and mediating between information users, resources and systems in both organisational and networked contexts.

You'll also acquire practical experience in the use of new information and communications technologies and develop personal awareness and skills relevant to information management in a variety of workplace roles.

You'll learn basic foundations of information management concerning the systematic acquisition, storage, retrieval, processing and use of data, information and knowledge, in support of decision-making, sense-making and organisational goals.

If you have two or more years' relevant work experience in the information sector and wish to study for a higher degree, you may be interested in our Professional Enhancement programme. The programme is designed for people already in work who want to further their careers and allows greater freedom in module choice in recognition of your existing expertise.

Accreditation

The MSc and PG Diploma programmes are accredited by the Chartered Institute of Library and Information Professionals (CILIP).

Modules

A selection of modules are available each year - some examples are below. There may be changes before you start your course. From May of the year of entry, formal programme regulations will be available in our Programme Regulations Finder.

You’ll need 180 credits to get a masters degree, with 60 credits from core modules, 60 credits from optional modules and a dissertation (including dissertation preparation) worth 60 credits.

Core modules:

Information and Knowledge Management

This module addresses both the oretical and practical aspects ofmanaging information and knowledge in organisations, enqabling you to engagecritically with a number of current issues and debates in this field. It isdesigned around case studies of well known organisations and involves thedevelopment of skills in analysis and formulation of strategies fororganisational development. Assessed work focuses also on skills in reviewingthe domain and on the development of conceptual models for information andknowledge management.

15 credits
Information Retrieval: Search Engines and Digital Libraries

Information Retrieval (IR) systems are ubiquitous as searching has become a part of everyday life. For example, we use IR systems when we search the web, look for resources using a library catalogue or search for relevant information within organisational repositories (e.g. intranets). This module provides an introduction to the area of information retrieval and computerised techniques for organising, storing and searching (mainly) textual information items.

Techniques used in IR systems are related to, but distinct from, those used in databases. The emphasis for IR systems is to find documents that contain relevant information and separate these from a potentially vast set of non-relevant documents. The content of the module falls into two main areas: (1)  fundamental concepts of IR (indexing, retrieval, ranking, user interaction and evaluation) and (2) applying IR in specific contexts, bias in information retrieval, and dealing with non-textual and non-English content (multimedia and multilingual IR).

15 credits
Information Systems in Organisations

This module integrates subjects of organisation, management, and information systems, with an aim to offer the students an integrated set of concepts and tools for understanding information systems in organisations. During this module students will explore basic management and organisational theories and examine the impact of information systems on organisations. This course introduces key concepts which will be explored further in other modules on the information Management and Information Systems programmes.

15 credits
Information Governance and Ethics

This module explores a) the emergence of information and data as an economic resource; b) the governance challenges and ethical issues arising from organizations' systematic capture, processing, and use of information and data for organizational goals, e.g. value, risk, accountability, ownership, privacy etc; c) governance, ethical, legal and other frameworks relevant to the capture, processing and use of information and data within organizational and networked contexts; and d) technologies and techniques used in the governing and governance of information and data. Case examples from a number of domains, e.g. business, government, health, law, and social media illustrate the subjects investigated.

15 credits
Research Methods and Dissertation Preparation

This module assists students in the identification of, and preparation of a dissertation proposal. Students will: learn about: on-going research in the School; identify and prepare a dissertation proposal; carry out a preliminary literature search in the area of the dissertation research topic; and be introduced to the use of social research methods and statistics for information management.

15 credits
Dissertation

This module enables students to carry out an extended piece of work on an Information School approved topic, so that they can explore an area of specialist interest to them in greater depth. Students will be supported through tutorials with a project supervisor, will apply research methods appropriate to their topic, and implement their work-plan to produce an individual project report. Students will already have identified a suitable Topic and designed a project plan in the pre-requisite unit Research Methods and Dissertation Preparation.

45 credits

Optional modules - one from:

Introduction to Programming

This module introduces students with little or no programming experience to the general purpose programming language Python. Python is popular and easy to learn for developing a wide range of information systems applications. The skills and understandings required to program in Python are valued by organisations and transfer to most other programming languages.

15 credits
Website Design and Search Engine Optimisation

This module aims to teach the key principles of search engine optimised (SEO) and user-centred website design; including areas of search optimised and accessible design, content strategy, requirements analysis, user experience, and Web standards compliance. Students will have opportunities to apply this knowledge to authentic design problems and develop web authoring skills valued by employers. In particular, students will be introduced to the latest web mark-up languages (currently HTML5 and CSS3) and issues surrounding long-term search ranking, globalisation, internationalisation and localisation - with a business focussed context.

15 credits
Information Systems Modelling

To consider the role of information modelling within the organisation and provide an appreciation of the rigorous methods that are needed to analyse, design, develop and maintain computer-based information systems. The course is intended to provide an introduction to information modelling techniques. Students gain experience in applying the wide range of systems analysis methods. Students cover subjects including: soft systems analysis; structured systems analysis methodologies; business process modelling; data flow modelling and object-oriented approaches (e.g. RUP/UML).

15 credits

Optional modules - three from:

Information Visualisation for Decision-Making

Organisations are nowadays challenged by the volume, variety, and speed of data collected from systems in internal and external environments. This module will focus on i) theoretical and methodological frameworks for developing visualisations; ii) how visualisations can be used to explore and analyse different types of data; iii) how visualisations can turn data into information that can be used to offer critical insights and to aid in decision-making by managers and others. Its module content includes: how to design visualisations, how to create and critique different visualisations, as well as good practices in information visualisation and dashboard design.

15 credits
Information Systems Project Management

This module aims to provide a broad understanding of the fundamentals of project management as they apply to the development of Information Systems (IS). The module uses a flexible approach combining face-to-face seminars with web-based learning material. The module will begin with an overview of the principles involved in IS project management; followed by a discussion of IS development methodologies and their different characteristics and specialisms. The rest of the module will discuss the requirements for various project control activities, including estimating development resources, risk management, guidelines for system quality assurance, and various project control techniques that have been developed in recent years. The module will culminate with a review of human resource management issues.

15 credits
Digital Business

The module addresses both theoretical and practical aspects of digital business. The module will cover the latest business trends and business models adopted by ecommerce companies so that students are able to recognise and relate to the current practice in business.  The module aims to equip the students with theoretical and business knowledge and entrepreneurial skills to understand and manage new ways of doing business in the digital economy.

15 credits
Researching Social Media

The module will examine the key theoretical frameworks and methods used in social media studies. Students will explore the following questions: 1) What can be learnt about society by studying social media? 2) How should researchers construct ethical stances for researching sites such as Facebook and Twitter? 3) What are the traditional and digital research methods and tools that can be applied to conduct research on social media? 4) What are the strengths and weaknesses of these methods?

15 credits
ICTs, Innovation and Change

This module aims at examining and exploring how organizations and human activity systems cope with change due to the new implementation or updating of Information Systems and Information and Communication Technologies (ICTs). This change occurs in complex social environments and has cultural, political, structural and ethical impacts that need to be carefully managed. The module will examine and explore how both managers and Information Systems practitioners can be better prepared for the unpredictability, unintended outcomes and possible harmful consequences of change caused by the introduction or update of Information Systems and ICTs. Therefore, the module aims at providing an understanding of both approaches and techniques for the management of this change.

15 credits
Database Design

Effective data management is key to any organisation, particularly with the increasing availability of large and heterogeneous datasets (e.g. transactional, multimedia and geo-spatial data). A database is an organised collection of data, typically describing the activities of one or more organisations and a core component of modern information systems. A Database Management System (DBMS) is software designed to assist in maintaining and utilising large collections of data and becoming a necessity for all organisations. This module provides an introduction to the area of databases and database management, relational database design and a flavour of some advanced subjects in current database research that deal with different kinds of data often found within an organisational context. Lectures are structured into three main areas:¿An introduction to databases¿The process of designing relational databases¿Advanced subjects (e.g. data warehouses and non-relational databases)The course includes a series of online tasks with supporting 'drop in¿ laboratories aimed at providing you with the skills required to implement a database in Oracle and extract information using the Structured Query Language (SQL).

15 credits
Academic and Workplace Library, Information and Knowledge Services

This module introduces students to the purposes, functions and practices of a range of academic research and other specialist library and information/knowledge services in the public and private sectors. It considers the challenges of delivering and developing services in a demanding, fast-moving and complex environment. Lectures are combined with sector-based case studies presented by visiting speakers drawn from diverse backgrounds giving extensive opportunities for interaction with specialist practitioners.

15 credits
User-Centred Design and Human-Computer Interaction

Interface design and usability are central to the experience of interacting with computers. The module introduces usability principles and the design process for interactive systems exploring four major themes. Firstly, user psychology and cognitive principles underlying interface design. Secondly, user interface architectures, modes of interaction, metaphors, navigational structures. Thirdly, the user interface design process including task analysis, modelling constructs and prototyping techniques. Fourthly, the evaluation of user interfaces covering concepts of usability, goals and types of evaluation. The module focus is on the underlying principles of HCI and user-centred design approach with practical sessions to demonstrate these principles.

15 credits
Archives and Records Management

This module prepares students for roles within archives and records management, with emphasis on archives.  Students will develop knowledge and awareness of key theories and practices in archives and records management. The module introduces students to some of the principal issues surrounding the provision of archives and records management services and the challenges of meeting user needs within an organisational context. In addition to presenting the fundamental principles the second part of the module focuses on specific subjects of interest, such as: community archiving, digital preservation, web archiving and oral history collecting.

15 credits

Other courses

Postgraduate Certificate requires a total of 60 credits
Postgraduate Diploma requires a total of 120 credits

The content of our courses is reviewed annually to make sure it's up-to-date and relevant. Individual modules are occasionally updated or withdrawn. This is in response to discoveries through our world-leading research; funding changes; professional accreditation requirements; student or employer feedback; outcomes of reviews; and variations in staff or student numbers. In the event of any change we'll consult and inform students in good time and take reasonable steps to minimise disruption. We are no longer offering unrestricted module choice. If your course included unrestricted modules, your department will provide a list of modules from their own and other subject areas that you can choose from.

Open days

An open day gives you the best opportunity to hear first-hand from our current students and staff about our courses. You'll find out what makes us special.

Upcoming open days and campus tours

Duration

  • 1 year full-time
  • 2 years part-time
  • 3 years part-time

Teaching

A variety of teaching methods are used, combining lectures from academic staff and professional practitioners with seminars, tutorials, small-group work and computer laboratory sessions.

There's a strong emphasis on problem-solving and individual aspects of learning, with the expectation that you’ll engage in independent study, memorizing and research in support of your coursework.

Teaching consists of two 15-week semesters, after which you’ll write your dissertation.

Assessment

Assessments vary depending on the modules you choose but may include essays, report writing, oral presentations, in-class tests and group projects.

There's also a dissertation of 10–15,000 words, which provides the opportunity, under one-to-one supervision, to focus on a Topic of your choice. You may choose to carry out your dissertation with an external organisation, for instance if you are a Professional Enhancement student, your project could be directly related to your work situation. In the past, students who have carried out such dissertations have welcomed the opportunity to tackle real-life problems.

Your career

We're the leading school of our kind in the UK and have a global reputation for excellence. Our MSc develops the skills you need to work in the fast-paced and evolving field of information management. After completing the course, you'll be equipped for a career in industry or research.

Our graduates have gone on to careers that include:

  • Project Manager, IBM
  • Metadata Specialist, The British Library
  • Wealth Planning Manager, China Merchants Bank
  • IT Director, Lloyds Banking Group
  • Business Analyst, Citibank
  • Director of Communications, Harvard University
  • Head of Library and Information Services, Foreign and Commonwealth Office
  • Vice-President, Goldman Sachs Japan Services Co.
  • Product Engineer, BenQ
  • Management Trainee, Jumei.com

Career pathways

Our modules prepare you for a range of career pathways, including the following. If you're interested in one of these career pathways, your tutors will recommend the most suitable module choices.

Digital Business

This involves managing and delivering products and services. Possible job titles include:

  • e-commerce manager
  • digital product/service delivery manager
  • digital marketer
  • digital product owner

Information Technology

This involves working with organisations to make improvements using information technologies. Possible job titles include:

  • business analyst
  • systems analyst
  • IT project manager
  • database administrator
  • operational researcher

Information Science

Information scientists manage an organisation's information resources and make sure they're readily available. Possible job titles include:

  • information manager
  • information officer
  • knowledge manager
  • management information analyst
  • information governance officer
  • business intelligence officer
  • reporting analyst
  • information analyst
  • data privacy analyst

Read more about careers in information

PhD student and Librarianship MA graduate Itzelle Medina Perea shares her experiences of studying at the Information School.

Facilities

We invested a six-figure sum to create leading-edge, flexible and technology-rich facilities for learning and teaching that are consistent with our reputation as a modern, highly respected and world-leading school. The new facilities include the iLab, the iSpace and a computer laboratory for collaborative learning.

We have three research labs on-site with workspace for over 80 researchers and a dedicated IT support team to assist with technical queries and requests. 

We also have a number of other newly-refurbished spaces which are available to all our researchers.

More about the Information School facilities.

Department

The University of Sheffield Information School is ranked number one in the world for library and information management in the QS World University Rankings by subject 2021. These rankings are based upon academic reputation, employer reputation and research impact.

The school has been at the forefront of developments in the information field for more than fifty years. The subject is characterised by its distinctive, interdisciplinary focus on the interactions between people, information and digital technologies. It has the ultimate goal of enhancing information access, and the management, sharing and use of information, to benefit society.

When you come to study with us you'll be an integral part of our research culture. The school is your home and we pride ourselves on the friendliness and helpfulness of our staff.

We offer an outstanding academic education through a wide range of taught postgraduate degrees which embed the principles of research-led teaching.

When you join any of our degree programmes you'll develop a critical understanding of current issues in library and information management. You'll benefit from being taught by staff who are undertaking leading-edge research and who have many links with industry.

As part of our mission to provide world-quality university education in information, we aim to inspire and help you pursue your highest ambitions for your academic and professional careers.

Entry requirements

Main course

You'll need at least a 2:1 in any subject.

You do not need work experience.

Professional Enhancement

This is a different route to the main course. It's aimed at those who already have relevant work experience.

To apply for this course you need either:

  • an undergraduate degree in any subject discipline and at least 2 years' relevant work experience, or
  • an undergraduate degree in any subject together with an acceptable relevant professional qualification and at least 2 years' relevant work experience, or
  • an undergraduate degree in any subject area, and at least 5 years' relevant work experience.

If you do not have an undergraduate degree but have other qualifications and substantial relevant work experience you may be considered for entry onto the Postgraduate Certificate or Diploma courses.

Overall IELTS score of 6.5, with a minimum of 6.0 in each component or equivalent.

Pathway programme for international students

If you're an international student who does not meet the entry requirements for this course, you have the opportunity to apply for a pre-masters programme in Business, Social Sciences and Humanities at the University of Sheffield International College. This course is designed to develop your English language and academic skills. Upon successful completion, you can progress to degree level study at the University of Sheffield.

If you have any questions about entry requirements, please contact the department.

Apply

You can apply for postgraduate study using our Postgraduate Online Application Form. It's a quick and easy process.

Applications close on Friday 5 August 2022 at 5pm.

Apply now

Any supervisors and research areas listed are indicative and may change before the start of the course.

Our student protection plan

Recognition of professional qualifications: from 1 January 2021, in order to have any UK professional qualifications recognised for work in an EU country across a number of regulated and other professions you need to apply to the host country for recognition. Read information from the UK government and the EU Regulated Professions Database.

Thu, 01 Oct 2020 03:20:00 -0500 en text/html https://www.sheffield.ac.uk/postgraduate/taught/courses/2022/information-management-msc-pg-certificate-pg-diploma
Killexams : National Marine Dredging Group selects Oracle cloud applications for business efficiency No result found, try new keyword!By utilising a wide range of applications for finance, supply chain, HR and customer service, NMDC will be able to simplify and integrate critical business processes ... Tue, 09 Aug 2022 01:05:42 -0500 en-ae text/html https://www.msn.com/en-ae/money/news/national-marine-dredging-group-selects-oracle-cloud-applications-for-business-efficiency/ar-AA10tb1r?fromMaestro=true Killexams : Oracle layoffs also may be affecting Cerner employees No result found, try new keyword!As Oracle cuts jobs in its quest to eliminate $1 billion in expenses, some of those reductions may creep into its new Cerner unit. Thu, 04 Aug 2022 00:55:00 -0500 text/html https://www.bizjournals.com/kansascity/news/2022/08/04/oracle-cerner-job-layoffs.html Killexams : TikTok picks Oracle over Microsoft in sales bid
 The Trump administration has threatened to ban TikTok by mid-September and ordered ByteDance to sell its US business, claiming national-security risks due to its Chinese ownership.
The Trump administration has threatened to ban TikTok by mid-September and ordered ByteDance to sell its US business, claiming national-security risks due to its Chinese ownership.
Washington, Sep 14 (AP) The owner of TikTok has chosen Oracle over Microsoft as its preferred suitor to buy the popular video-sharing app, according to a source familiar with the deal. Microsoft announced Sunday that its bid to buy TikTok has been rejected, removing a leading suitor for the Chinese-owned app a week before President Donald Trump promises to follow through with a plan to ban it in the US.

Microsoft said in a Sunday statement that TikTok's parent company, Bytedance, "let us know today they would not be selling TikTok's US operations to Microsoft."

The Trump administration has threatened to ban TikTok by mid-September and ordered ByteDance to sell its US business, claiming national-security risks due to its Chinese ownership. The government worries about user data being funneled to Chinese authorities. TikTok denies it is a national-security risk and is suing to stop the administration from the threatened ban.

Walmart had planned to partner with Microsoft on the deal. It's not clear if Walmart is still interested. Oracle has declined to comment.

TikTok also declined comment Sunday.

Microsoft said Sunday it was "confident our proposal would have been good for TikTok's users, while protecting national security interests." The company said it "would have made significant changes to ensure the service met the highest standards for security, privacy, online safety, and combating disinformation." (AP) SMN SMN


Follow and connect with us on , Facebook, Linkedin, Youtube
Sun, 13 Sep 2020 18:29:00 -0500 en text/html https://brandequity.economictimes.indiatimes.com/news/digital/tiktok-picks-oracle-over-microsoft-in-sales-bid/78100732
1Z0-605 exam dump and training guide direct download
Training Exams List