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Exam Code: GSEC Practice exam 2022 by Killexams.com team
Security Essentials Certification
GIAC Certification learner
Killexams : GIAC Certification learner - BingNews https://killexams.com/pass4sure/exam-detail/GSEC Search results Killexams : GIAC Certification learner - BingNews https://killexams.com/pass4sure/exam-detail/GSEC https://killexams.com/exam_list/GIAC Killexams : SANS GIAC Certification Guide: Overview and Career Paths

The SANS Institute was founded in 1989 to provide IT security and administration information and vendor-neutral training on those subjects. Since its inception, SANS has trained more than 165,000 individuals via in-class courses, training events, and technical conferences held throughout the world; self-paced online training (called SANS OnDemand); and interactive virtual training (called SANS vLive).

Course syllabus from the SANS Institute include security essentials, hacking techniques, intrusion detection and incident response, network defense, mobile device security, auditing, digital forensics and related security topics. The “information” component of SANS includes the SANS studying Room, an extensive library of downloadable security research documents; the Internet Storm Center, which monitors and reports on malicious attacks and provides weekly bulletins and alerts; free security policy templates; the CIS Critical Security Controls for cyber defense and more.

SANS formed the Global Information Assurance Certification (GIAC) program to act as the certification arm for its training courses, ensuring that individuals meet knowledge and skills standards in specific areas of IT security. More than 165,000 GIAC credentials have been issued. GIAC certifications are well known and highly respected among employers and the information security industry. Even the United States National Security Agency (NSA) recognizes GIAC certifications.

GIAC offers more than 30 security certifications across introductory, intermediate, advanced and expert levels. According to SANS, GIAC certifications are unique because “they measure specific skills and knowledge areas rather than general infosec knowledge.” That means a typical GIAC certification requires rigorous preparation and hands-on experience. That’s why SANS training comes highly recommended.

Note: Another component of SANS is the SANS Technology Institute, which offers one security-related master’s degree – the Information Security Engineering (MSISE). The SANS Technology Institute also offers five graduate certificate programs focused on Cybersecurity Engineering (CORE), Cyber Defense Operations, Incident Response, Industrial Control Systems Security, and Penetration Testing and Ethical Hacking.

SANS GIAC certification tracks

GIAC certifications fall within six specific domains, each with its own certification track:

  • Cyber Defense: Boasting 12 credentials (10 of which are advanced certs), the Cyber Defense certification family is the largest of the SANS GIAC certification domains. Cyber defense certifications are geared to professionals who identify and defend against cybersecurity threats.
  • Industrial Control Systems (ICS): SANS GIAC offers three ISC certifications, one at the intermediate and two at the advanced levels. ISC certifications are geared toward control system engineers and other security professionals charged with cyber security for control system infrastructures and technology along with automation security.
  • Penetration Testing: SANS GIAC-certified pen-test professionals possess the skills necessary to perform tasks that include evaluating attack techniques and methods, recommending security best practices to prevent security incidents, and formulating plans to defend against security incidents when they occur. With seven credentials, Penetration Testing is the second largest certification domain. Credentials are offered for a variety of scenarios, including web applications, mobile devices, Python coding, wireless networks, ethical hacking and more.
  • Digital Forensics and Incident Response: This domain targets InfoSec professionals, including IT administrators, security engineers and security analysts. Also included are law enforcement and legal professionals who respond to security incidents and related cyber breaches, conduct forensic investigations, and examine and gather incident artifacts and related evidence.
  • Developer: Developer certifications are aimed at developers and anyone else interested in building secure programs and applications. Three certs are offered – Java programming, web applications and .NET programming.
  • Management and Leadership:  The management and leadership domain is focused on professionals who may have (or lack) technical skills but provide managerial or project management support. They are also instrumental in developing and implementing security policies on an organizationwide basis. These credentials include certs for auditors, project managers, CISOs, data security law and InfoSec professionals.

Another certification “category” is the pinnacle GIAC certification – namely, the GIAC Security Expert (GSE). Some industry officials consider the GSE to be the premier security-related certification available today. Whereas most GIAC certifications can be achieved by passing a single multiple-choice exam, the GSE exam includes both a multiple-choice component and a hands-on lab.

SANS GIAC certification levels

SANS offers four levels of certifications, including introductory, intermediate, advanced and expert. The table below is a modified version of the GIAC certification roadmap,  which lists each certification by level and certification tracks.

Introductory Level

Cyber Defense

Intermediate Level

Cyber Defense

ICS

Penetration Testing

Digital Forensics and Incident Handling

Management and Leadership

Advanced Level

Cyber Defense

ICS

Penetration Testing

Digital Forensics and Incident Response

Developer

Management and Leadership

Other than the GSE, GIAC certifications require passing one exam and have no prerequisites. That said, GIAC highly recommends SANS training courses, especially for candidates who don’t have adequate hands-on experience and aren’t able to self-study.

Once an application has been approved, candidates have four months to attempt the associated exam. (GIAC does not administer exams immediately upon conclusion of a training event; candidates must wait at least seven days to sit for the exam.) The cost of each GIAC exam is currently $1,899, which includes two practice exams. The lab exam for the GSE is $2,459, and the written exam is $499. (Note: Students can purchase and take an exam as part of a training course, or they may purchase and take an exam by itself.)

SANS GIAC certification renewal

To remain certified, credential holders must renew their GIAC certifications every four years by earning 36 continuing professional education (CPE) credits. CPE credits may be earned by completing approved training or certifications, participating in continuing education, publishing a technical paper, completing certain graduate-level courses, getting community or work experience or participating in cyber range activities. A renewal fee of $429 is also required.

GIAC certifications cover the gamut of job roles in IT security today. GIAC-certified professionals work as security analysts or certified (two of the most common roles), information security engineers, network security admins, database administrators, developers, forensic specialists, risk managers and auditors.

Large organizations with security operations centers (SOCs) need SOC analysts, engineers and supervisors, as well as directors of cybersecurity. A bevy of companies also hire employees and consultants who perform incident response, penetration testing and the like.

With almost 314,000 security-related jobs open in the U.S. alone (and 3.5 million globally by 2021), a reasonably educated and experienced person stands a good chance of getting hired fairly quickly. Adding a security certification or two to your resume not only validates your skills, but it may get you noticed by a hiring manager or deliver you more leverage during salary negotiations.

SANS training courses and events vary in format and price, but candidates can expect to pay around $5,800 to $6,610 for a training course. Although the price tag is high, many candidates recommend SANS training for its quality and depth as well as its usefulness in eventually achieving GIAC certification. SANS instructors are usually industry experts and/or full-time security practitioners, and invariably get glowing reviews from course attendees.

Candidates who attempt GIAC certification exams should consider taking practice tests beforehand. A VCE exam mimics an actual exam and is, therefore, a terrific study aid. All GIAC certification attempts (except for the GSE) come with two free practice exams. A few practice tests are also included with training courses. Candidates who don’t take training can purchase practice tests for $159 each by clicking a link in their SANS/GIAC portal account.

Sun, 18 Sep 2022 12:00:00 -0500 en text/html https://www.businessnewsdaily.com/10786-sans-giac-certification-guide-overview-and-career-paths.html
Killexams : Best Digital Forensics Certifications

There is an appreciable number of available, high-quality certification programs that focus on digital investigations and forensics. However, there are also many certifications and programs in this area that are far less transparent and widely known.

There’s been a steady demand for digital forensics certifications for the past several years, mainly owing to the following:

  • Computer crime continues to escalate. As more cybercrimes are reported, more investigations and qualified investigators are needed. This is good news for law enforcement and private investigators who specialize in digital forensics.
  • There’s high demand for qualified digital forensics professionals because nearly every police department needs trained candidates with suitable credentials.
  • IT professionals interested in working for the federal government (either as full-time employees or private contractors) must meet certain minimum training standards in information security. Digital forensics qualifies as part of the mix needed to meet them, which further adds to the demand for certified digital forensics professionals.

As a result, there is a continuing rise of companies that offer digital forensics training and certifications. Alas, many of these are “private label” credentials that are not well recognized. Making sense of all options and finding the right certification for you may be trickier than it seems.

To help choose our top five certifications for 2019, we looked at several popular online job boards to determine the number of advertised positions that require these certifications. While the actual results vary from day to day and by job board, this should deliver you an idea of the number of digital forensic jobs with specific certification requirements.

Job board search results (in alphabetical order, by certification)*

SimplyHired   Indeed   LinkedIn Jobs   LinkUp  Total
Vendor neutral
CFCE (IACIS) 63 82 117 46 308
CHFI (EC-Council) 106 140 253 68 567
GCFA (SANS GIAC)  422 489 857 294 2,062
GCFE (SANS GIAC)  203 226 433 143 1,005
Vendor specific
ACE (AccessData) 25 29 31 12 97
EnCE (EnCase) 110 154 237 114 615

*We covered two GIAC credentials, presented together in a single GIAC section below.

Digital forensics is a relatively lucrative space for practitioners. The average salary for intermediate digital forensic jobs in the U.S. – $63,959, according to SimpyHired – trails that of network engineers, system administrators and project managers. However, a senior specialist or forensic analyst, whether working in the private industry or government channels, will often earn six figures in major metro areas. We found salaries on the high end running almost $107,000 for forensic analysts and more than $127,000 for digital forensic roles.

ACE: AccessData Certified Examiner

AccessData is the maker of the popular Forensic Toolkit (FTK) solution for digital investigations. The company also offers a variety of related products and services, such as AD Lab, AD eDiscovery, AD Enterprise and AD Triage.

The AccessData Certified Examiner (ACE) is worth pursuing for those who already use or plan to use FTK, which enjoys widespread use in law enforcement and private research and consulting firms. The certification requires one exam, which covers the FTK Imager, Registry Viewer, PRTK (Password Recovery Toolkit) and FTK Examiner Application/Case Management Window tools in detail. AccessData recommends basic to moderate forensic knowledge before attempting the exam. This includes an understanding of digital artifacts, Registry files, encrypting and decrypting files, hashing, attack types, using live and index searching, and other topics. See the latest ACE Study Guide for details.

Recertification is required every two years. Credential holders must pass the current ACE exam, which focuses on the most current versions of FTK and other tools, to maintain their credentials.

ACE facts and figures

Certification name AccessData Certified Examiner (ACE)
Prerequisites and required courses None; training recommended:

AccessData FTK BootCamp (three-day classroom or live online)

FTK Intermediate courses

Number of exams One exam (ACE 6); includes knowledge-based and practical portions

Registration required to receive a join code to access the testing portal

Cost per exam $100 (exam fee includes retakes and recertification exams)
URL http://accessdata.com/training/computer-forensics-certification
Self-study materials There is a link to the free ACE Study Guide is on the certification webpage. The testing portal includes study videos, lessons in PDF and a VCE exam (with an image file).

CFCE: Certified Forensic Computer Examiner

The International Association of Computer Investigative certified (IACIS) is the organization behind the Certified Forensic Computer Examiner (CFCE) credential. This organization caters primarily to law enforcement personnel, and you must be employed in law enforcement to qualify for regular IACIS membership.

A formal application form, along with an application fee, is necessary to join IACIS. Regular membership includes current computer/digital forensic practitioners who are current or former government or law enforcement employees or forensic contractors to a government agency. All other practitioners can apply for Associate membership to IACIS, provided they can pass a background check. Membership fees and annual renewal fees are required. IACIS membership is not required to obtain the CFCE credential.

To obtain the CFCE credential, candidates must demonstrate proficiency with CFCE core competencies. One option is IACIS’ Basic Computer Forensic Examiner (BCFE) two-week training course; it meets the 72-hour training requirement, costs $2,995, includes a free laptop and waives the IACIS membership fee for nonmembers. IACIS membership is required to attend the course. Candidates completing the training course can enroll directly in the CFCE program upon completion of the course. Those not attending the BCFE course may meet the 72-hour training requirement with a comparable course (subject to IACIS approval), pay a $750 registration fee, and successfully pass a background check to enroll in the CFCE program and sit for the exam.

The CFCE exam is a two-step testing process that includes a peer review and CFCE certification testing:

  1. The peer review consists of accepting and completing four assigned practical problems based on core knowledge and skills areas for the credential. These must be solved and then presented to a mentor for initial evaluation (and assistance, where needed) before being presented for peer review. Candidates have 30 days to complete each of the practical problems.
  2. Upon successful conclusion of the peer review, candidates automatically progress to the certification phase.
    • Candidates must begin work on a hard-drive practical problem within seven days of the completion of the peer review phase. Forty days are allotted to candidates to independently analyze and report upon a forensic image of a hard drive provided to them. Following specific instructions, a written report is prepared to document the candidate’s activities and findings.
    • Once that report is accepted and passed, the process concludes with a 100-question written exam (which includes true/false, multiple-choice, matching and short-answer questions). Candidates have 14 days to complete the written examination. A passing score of 80 percent or better is required for both the forensic report and the written exam to earn the CFCE.

Upon completion of both the peer review and the certification phase, candidates must submit a notarized form certifying that the practical and written exams were completed independently without assistance from anyone else.

Certificants must recertify every three years to maintain the CFCE credential. Recertification requires proof of at least 40 hours of professional education, a passing score on a proficiency test in the third year, proof of computer/digital forensics work experience, or passing scores on three proficiency tests within three years, and either three years of IACIS membership or payment of a $150 recertification fee.

Despite the time and expense involved in earning a CFCE, this credential has high value and excellent name recognition in the computer forensics field. Many forensics professionals consider the CFCE a necessary merit badge to earn, especially for those who work in or for law enforcement.

CFCE facts and figures

Certification name Certified Forensic Computer Examiner (CFCE)
Prerequisites and required courses Basic Computer Forensics Examiner (BCFE) training course recommended ($2,995)

72 hours of training in computer/digital forensics comparable to CFCE core competencies; BCFE training course meets training requirement

Without BCFE training: take a comparable course, pay $750 registration fee and pass a background check

Number of exams Two-part process: Peer review (must pass to proceed to subsequent phase) and certification phase (includes hard-drive practical and written examination)
Cost per exam Included in BCFE training; $750 for the entire testing process for those not attending BCFE training
URL https://www.iacis.com/certification-2/cfce/
Self-study materials IACIS is the primary conduit for training and study materials for this certification.

CHFI: Computer Hacking Forensic Investigator

The EC-Council is a well-known training and certification organization that specializes in the areas of anti-hacking, digital forensics and penetration testing. The organization’s Computer Hacking Forensic Investigator (CHFI) certification emphasizes forensics tools, analytical techniques, and procedures involved in obtaining, maintaining, and presenting digital forensic evidence and data in a court of law.

The EC-Council offers training for this credential but permits candidates to challenge the exam without taking the course, provided they have a minimum of two years of information security experience and pay a non-refundable $100 eligibility application fee.

The CHFI course covers a wide range of syllabus and tools (click the exam Blueprint button on the certification webpage). syllabus include an overview of digital forensics, in-depth coverage of the computer forensics investigation process, working with digital evidence, anti-forensics, database and cloud forensics, investigating network traffic, mobile and email forensics, and ethics, policies and regulations. Courseware is available, as well as instructor-led classroom training.

The EC-Council offers numerous other certifications of potential value to readers interested in the CHFI. These include the Certified Ethical Hacker (CEH), CEH (Practical), EC-Council Certified Security Analyst (ECSA), ECSA Practical, Certified Network Defender (CND) and Licensed Penetration Tester (LPT), Certified Application Security Engineer (CASE), and Certified Chief Information Security Officer (CCISO). It also offers credentials in related areas such as disaster recovery, encryption and security analysis. Visit the EC-Council site for more info on its popular and respected credentials.

CHFI facts and figures

Certification name Computer Hacking Forensic Investigator (CHFI) v9
Prerequisites and required courses Application with resume and current or previous employer info required.

Candidates must agree to the EC-Council Non-Disclosure, Candidate Application and Candidate Certification agreement terms.

Training recommended but not required:

  • Live, online instructor-led training (includes courseware, six months of iLabs access, exam voucher and test prep program; contact EC-Council directly for pricing)
  • iLearn self-paced class (includes one year of access to instructor-led training videos, courseware, six months of lab access and exam voucher; $1,899)
  • Self-study courseware ($677)
  • Mobile training (contact EC-Council for pricing information)

To challenge the exam without training, you must have two years of information security work experience and/or education to reflect specialization, pay a non-refundable application fee of $100, and complete the Exam Eligibility Application Form.

More information on the application process is located on the Application Eligibility Process webpage.

Number of exams One exam: EC0 312-49 (150 questions, four hours, passing score 70 percent, multiple choice). Available through the ECC exam portal.
Cost per exam $500 (plus $100 application fee; candidates who do not participate in training must pay a $650 exam fee plus $100 application fee)
URL https://www.eccouncil.org/programs/computer-hacking-forensic-investigator-chfi/
Self-study materials Visit the EC-Council Store and search for “CHFI” for preparation materials, including labs. Study guide and exam guides are available on Amazon, as well as some practice exams.

EnCe: EnCase Certified Examiner

Guidance Software, acquired by OpenText in 2017, is a leader in the forensics tools and services arena. Its well-known and widely used EnCase Forensic software helps professionals acquire data from many different types of devices, complete disk-level examinations and produce reports of their findings. The company also sells software for remote investigations (EnCase Endpoint Investigator), eDiscovery, risk management, mobile investigations and endpoint security.

The company’s certification program includes the Certified Forensic Security Responder (CFSR), EnCase Certified eDiscovery Practitioner (EnCEP) and EnCase Certified Examiner (EnCe). Available to professionals in the public and private sector, the EnCE recognizes an individual’s proficiency using EnCase Forensic software and mastery of computer investigation methodology, including evidence collection, preservation, file verification, file signatures and hashing, first responder activities, and much more.

To achieve EnCe certification, candidates must show proof of a minimum of 64 hours of authorized computer forensic training or 12 months of qualified work experience, complete an application, and then successfully complete a two-phase exam that includes a written and practical portion.

EnCE certifications are valid for three years from the date obtained. Recertification requires one of the following:

  • 32 credit hours of continuing education in computer forensics or incident response
  • A computer forensics or incident response-related certification
  • Attendance at an Enfuse conference (at least 10 sessions)

EnCE facts and figures

Certification name EnCase Certified Examiner (EnCe)
Prerequisites and required courses Required: 64 hours of authorized computer forensic training or 12 months of work experience in computer forensics

Training options through Guidance Software:

  • EnCE Prep Course (DF310), classroom, virtual classroom or on demand ($2,195)
  • EnCE Certification Bootcamp (aimed at new digital investigators) – includes DF120 (Foundations in Digital Forensics), DF210 (Building an Investigation) and DF310 ($5,085 for the bundle)

Completion of the EnCE application

Number of exams One two-phase exam:
  • Phase I written exam (180 questions, two hours, minimum passing score 80 percent), delivered via ExamBuilder
  • Phase II practical exam (18 questions, 60 days, minimum passing score 85 percent)

Passing the Phase I exam earns an electronic license to complete the Phase II exam.

Cost per exam $200 total, or $300 international

$75 renewal fee

URL https://www2.guidancesoftware.com/training/Pages/ence-certification-program.aspx
Self-study materials Study materials provided in Guidance Software courses. Check Amazon for availability of current and practice exams.

Learning On Demand subscription provides access to 400 courses across the OpenText Learning Services platform.

GCFA And GCFE Certifications

SANS is the organization behind the Global Information Assurance Certification (GIAC) program. It is a well-respected and highly regarded player in the information security field in general. SANS not only teaches and researches in this area, it also provides breaking news, operates a security alert service, and serves on all kinds of government, research and academic information security task forces, working groups, and industry organizations.

The organization’s incident response and forensics credentials include the following:

  • GIAC Certified Forensic Examiner (GCFE)
  • GIAC Certified Forensic Analyst (GCFA)
  • GIAC Reverse Engineering Malware (GREM)
  • GIAC Network Forensic Analyst (GNFA)
  • GIAC Advanced Smartphone Forensics (GASF)
  • GIAC Cyber Threat Intelligence (GCTI)

The intermediate GCFE and the more senior GCFA are the focus of this section. Neither credential requires taking SANS courses (which have a strong reputation for being among the best in the cybersecurity community, with high-powered instructors to match), but they are recommended to candidates and often offered before, during or after SANS conferences held around the U.S. at regular intervals.

Both the GCFE and GCFA focus on computer forensics in the context of investigation and incident response, and thus also focus on the skills and knowledge needed to collect and analyze data from Windows and/or Linux computer systems during such activities. Candidates must possess the necessary skills, knowledge, and ability to conduct formal incident investigations and advanced incident handling, including dealing with internal and external data breaches, intrusions, and cyberthreats; collecting and preserving evidence; understanding anti-forensic techniques; and building and documenting advanced digital forensic cases.

Most SANS GIAC credentials are valid for four years. Candidates may recertify for the GCFE and GCFA by earning 36 continuing professional experience (CPE) credits. In addition, credential holders must pay a certification maintenance fee of $429 every four years.

The SANS GIAC program encompasses more than 36 information security certifications across a broad range of syllabus and disciplines. IT professionals interested in information security in general, as well as digital forensics, would be well advised to investigate further on the GIAC homepage.

GCFE and GCFA facts and figures

Certification name GIAC Certified Forensic Examiner (GCFE)

GIAC Certified Forensic Analyst (GCFA)

Prerequisites and required courses None

GCFE recommended course: FOR500: Windows Forensic Analysis ($6,210)

GCFA recommended course: FOR508: Advanced Digital Forensics, Incident Response, and Threat Hunting ($6,210)

Number of exams One exam for each credential (115 questions, three hours, passing score of 71 percent)

Exams proctored by Pearson VUE. Registration with GIAC required to schedule an exam.

Cost per exam $769 if part of training/bootcamp

$1,899 (no training – referred to as a certification challenge)

Additional details available here.

URL www.giac.org
Self-study materials Practice tests available on the GIAC exam preparation page (two tests included in exam fee; additional practice tests are $159 each). Study guides and practice exams can be found on Amazon and other typical channels.

Beyond the top 5: More digital forensics certifications

There are lots of other certification programs that can help to further the careers of IT professionals who work in digital forensics.

One certification we’ve featured in the past is the CyberSecurity Institute’s CyberSecurity Forensic Analyst (CSFA). The CyberSecurity Institute provides digital forensic services aimed at law firms, businesses and individuals, and administers a small but well-respected certification program. The CSFA is designed for security professionals with at least two years of experience performing digital forensic analysis on computers and devices running the Windows operating system and creating investigative reports. Although the certification didn’t generate as many job board hits as our other featured certifications, the CSFA is still worth your attention.

The same goes for the Certified Computer Examiner (CCE) from the International Society of Forensic Computer Examiners, also known as ISFCE. The CCE is well recognized in the industry and in the law enforcement community as a leading credential for digital forensics professionals, but it fell a little short on job board hits during our review this year.

Other good certifications include the Professional Certified Investigator (PCI), a senior-level, vendor-neutral computer investigations and forensics credential available through ASIS International. The organization also offers the Certified Protection Professional (CPP), which includes an investigation component, and the Physical Security Professional (PSP) in its certification program. Forensics candidates can also pursue one of the High Tech Crime Network vendor-neutral certifications – the Certified Computer Crime Investigator or Certified Computer Forensic Technician, both of which have a Basic and an Advanced credential.

If you look around online, you’ll find numerous other forensics hardware and software vendors that offer certifications and plenty of other organizations that didn’t make the cut for the 2019 list of the best digital forensics certifications. But before you wander outside the items mentioned in this article, you might want to research the sponsoring organization’s history and the number of people who’ve earned its credentials, and then determine whether the sponsor not only requires training but stands to profit from its purchase.

You might also want to ask a practicing digital forensics professional if they’ve heard of the certifications you found on your own and, if so, what that professional thinks of those offerings.

Tue, 11 Oct 2022 12:00:00 -0500 en text/html https://www.businessnewsdaily.com/10755-best-digital-forensics-certifications.html
Killexams : The 4 types of learners—and how to know which you are Stacker Logo By Bekah Wright of Stacker | Slide 1 of 5: Have you ever wondered why some people seem to learn things faster than others? It may not be about being smarter—it could just mean that they process and learn information differently. Determined to help demystify the learning process, Neil Fleming and Colleen Mills, academics from New Zealand's Lincoln University in Canterbury, did a deep dive into the different ways individuals approach learning. They developed the VARK model based on their claim that "learners of all ages have different yet consistent ways of responding in learning situations."  The VARK model is an acronym for visual, auditory,  studying and writing, and kinesthetic types of learning styles. Neuro-linguistic programming, or NLP, was key to Fleming and Mill's research. Someetimes described as the "users manual for your mind," NLP has also been characterized by the Association for Neuro Linguistic Programming as a combination of theories, models, and techniques that can be used strategically to  Strengthen learning outcomes. It's important to note that not all educators buy into the idea of learning styles—whether VARK or other forms—as a proven teaching technique. Many educators also believe that people can build and strengthen different types of learning styles, even if they may not come naturally at first. From Fleming and Mill's perspective, using the VARK model to understand learning styles would help empower individuals to adjust their behavior to different learning environments. One  exact example of such an environment occurred during the height of the coronavirus pandemic: remote learning. This form of distance learning—which usually involves listening to lessons through video calls—might speak to certain styles such as auditory or visual learners. But for others, it may require supplemental materials to make the information stick. Keeping online learning varied, relevant, and engaging can keep students attuned in the classroom. What's your VARK style? Citing the VARK model, Tovuti LMS outlined the learning model's four core types of learning styles.

Have you ever wondered why some people seem to learn things faster than others? It may not be about being smarter—it could just mean that they process and learn information differently. Determined to help demystify the learning process, Neil Fleming and Colleen Mills, academics from New Zealand's Lincoln University in Canterbury, did a deep dive into the different ways individuals approach learning. They developed the VARK model based on their claim that "learners of all ages have different yet consistent ways of responding in learning situations." 

The VARK model is an acronym for visual, auditory, studying and writing, and kinesthetic types of learning styles. Neuro-linguistic programming, or NLP, was key to Fleming and Mill's research. Someetimes described as the "users manual for your mind," NLP has also been characterized by the Association for Neuro Linguistic Programming as a combination of theories, models, and techniques that can be used strategically to Strengthen learning outcomes.

It's important to note that not all educators buy into the idea of learning styles—whether VARK or other forms—as a proven teaching technique. Many educators also believe that people can build and strengthen different types of learning styles, even if they may not come naturally at first.

From Fleming and Mill's perspective, using the VARK model to understand learning styles would help empower individuals to adjust their behavior to different learning environments. One exact example of such an environment occurred during the height of the coronavirus pandemic: remote learning. This form of distance learning—which usually involves listening to lessons through video calls—might speak to certain styles such as auditory or visual learners. But for others, it may require supplemental materials to make the information stick. Keeping online learning varied, relevant, and engaging can keep students attuned in the classroom.

What's your VARK style? Citing the VARK model, Tovuti LMS outlined the learning model's four core types of learning styles.

© Canva
Tue, 13 Sep 2022 09:07:00 -0500 en-US text/html https://www.msn.com/en-us/news/technology/the-4-types-of-learners-and-how-to-know-which-you-are/ss-AA11N7v8
Killexams : Become a lifelong learner — you'll be a better partner at work

A wise sage once told me, "Education is what you have left over after you have forgotten everything you've learned."

My good friend Nido Qubein, a fellow member of the National Speakers Association and president of High Point University, explained the difference in education vs. training, as he views it: "Training is imitative; education is creative. The difference between a trained person and an educated person is the difference between a parrot and an orator."

His point was that once you learn a training procedure, you keep repeating it for as long as the task is useful. Training has a beginning and an end.

Education, on the other hand, teaches you to develop your own procedures, solve your own problems and move on to other challenges. Education is a process that has a beginning, but no end.

"In today's business world, a well-educated person is far more valuable than a well-trained person," Nido said. "Employees who are well-trained but not well-educated may perform their tasks with skill, but they aren't motivated to look beyond the specific task."

Researchers at the Pew Charitable Trust found that a four-year college degree helped protect young people from low-skilled jobs with lesser wages and unemployment. The U.S. Census Bureau estimates that a college graduate earns nearly $1 million more over a career than a high-school graduate.

Nido insists that education is more than a paycheck, though.

"When you get educated, you can become your best self in every possible way. Educated employees become partners," he said. "They see themselves as part of the organization. They share its goals, buy into its vision and exult in its success."

I will go one further than Nido Qubein: School ends, but education doesn't. You are not educated once for a lifetime. You should be educated all your life.

There is a famous story about Oliver Wendell Holmes Jr., one of America's most distinguished Supreme Court justices. Holmes was in the hospital when he was over 90 years old, and President Theodore Roosevelt came to visit him. As the president was ushered into the hospital room, there was Holmes studying a book of Greek grammar.

President Roosevelt asked, "Why are you studying about Greek grammar, Mr. Holmes?"

Holmes replied, "To Strengthen my mind, Mr. President." Ninety ... and still trying to learn something new!

Why not make continuing education a new priority?

Education is an investment. Consider it a capital improvement.

Please don't misinterpret these words as pertaining only to a college education. Any education — in the trades, self-guided or purely for a change of pace — is a critical part of our ongoing development. Studies have shown that we use a very small part of our brains, so there is plenty of room for more learning.

Take courses, either in a classroom or online. Go to seminars. Listen to educational and self-improvement podcasts. Network at trade group meetings. Upgrade your skills.

You cannot ever afford to rest on what you learned in high school or college. Enhance what you already know and pick up new material. Computers. Language. Public speaking. Writing. Continue your education.

Think about it: Once you have learned something, it's yours to keep forever — and use however you wish. You have the capacity to adapt knowledge to various situations, to apply what you have learned and Strengthen an outcome. Your education can pay for itself over and over.

Mackay's moral: Education is the gift that just keeps on giving.

Harvey Mackay is a Minneapolis businessman. Contact him at 612-378-6202 or e-mail harvey@mackay.com.

Sun, 18 Sep 2022 07:05:00 -0500 Harvey Mackay text/html https://www.startribune.com/become-a-lifelong-learner-youll-be-a-better-partner-at-work/600208044/
Killexams : Can You Get Car Insurance With A Learner’s Permit?

Editorial Note: We earn a commission from partner links on Forbes Advisor. Commissions do not affect our editors' opinions or evaluations.

New drivers with a learner’s permit should have car insurance while learning to drive, even though they are not yet fully licensed.

The good news is that teenage drivers with a permit may already be covered by a parent’s car insurance policy. If you are the parent of a freshly minted driver with a permit, adding them to your policy likely will not cost you anything. The rate increase will come later when the young driver gets their license.

Do You Need Auto Insurance With a Learner’s Permit?

Every driver on the road should have car insurance, including those driving with a learner’s permit.

Depending on the state, a teenager with a learner’s permit may not be legally required to have car insurance. But insurers typically require all drivers in your household to be listed on your insurance policy.

If someone with a learner’s permit is driving your car, it’s best to inform your insurance company. If you don’t inform your insurer and your teen gets in an accident, the insurance company could deny your claim.

When your child is ready to get their learner’s permit, call your insurance company to let them know. If, however, you do not want your teen on your policy, you should exclude the driver from coverage.

How Can You Get Insurance with a Permit?

Drivers with a permit can be added to a parent’s car insurance policy or they can buy their own.

Adding a permit holder to a parent policy

If your teen is a new driver who still lives at home, adding them to your car insurance policy is the easiest way to secure coverage.

Adding a driver with a permit to your existing policy likely won’t cost you anything until the driver gets their license. So, if your teen takes two years to learn how to drive with a permit, you can enjoy that time without an increase in your car insurance rate.

Related: Best cheap car insurance for teens

Buying your own car insurance policy

First-time drivers can buy their own car insurance policy, but this is usually more expensive than adding them to an existing parent’s policy.

Buying your own car insurance policy may be your only option if:

  • You are an adult driver with a permit
  • You are a teenage driver whose parents do not have car insurance
  • You are a young driver who does not share a permanent address with your parents
  • You are an emancipated minor
  • You’ve bought your own car

How Much Car Insurance Do Learner’s Permit Drivers Need?

Drivers who are learning with a permit will need to meet state minimum car insurance requirements, either through their parent’s policy or their own. Most states require a minimum amount of liability auto insurance, and some have additional requirements, such as personal injury protection coverage.

For instance, Florida requires drivers to have at least:

  • $10,000 in liability coverage for bodily injury damages for one person
  • $20,000 in bodily injury coverage per accident
  • $10,000 in liability coverage for property damage
  • $10,000 in personal injury protection coverage

If a new driver causes an accident, having only the state minimum amount of car insurance will likely not be enough. As a good rule of thumb, you should make sure to have enough liability insurance to cover what you could lose in a lawsuit after a car accident.

Related: How much car insurance do I need?

How Much Is Car Insurance for New Drivers with a Permit?

If you’re a parent, it likely won’t cost anything to add a new driver with a permit to your car insurance policy. But, once the driver becomes fully licensed, your car insurance premium will increase significantly.

Average rate increase to add a teen driver to a parent policy

How Can Parents Save on Car Insurance?

Parents adding a teen driver to their policy can save on car insurance by:

  • Shopping around. To find the best deal, take the time to compare auto insurance quotes from at least three or four different companies.
  • Signing up for a driver’s education program. Some insurers offer programs that help teen drivers and offer discounts for the teens who complete them.
  • Checking for discounts. Many insurers offer car insurance discounts that apply to teen drivers, such as good grade discounts and student away from home discounts.
  • Bundling your policies. You could save on premiums by buying auto insurance and homeowners insurance (or renter’s insurance) from the same insurer.
  • Driving safely. Insurance rates tend to go up after a speeding ticket or accident, so encourage safe driving habits for the whole family.

Best Car Insurance Companies 2022

With so many choices for car insurance companies, it can be hard to know where to start to find the right car insurance. We've evaluated insurers to find the best car insurance companies, so you don't have to.

Car Insurance for Permit Drivers FAQ

Does it make sense for a permit holder to buy their own car insurance?

No, it does not make sense for a permit holder to buy their own car insurance unless they have to.

Scenarios where a permit holder may be required to buy their own policy include if they don’t have a parent or guardian with auto insurance, they no longer live with a parent or they buy their own car.

Related: Tips for first-time car insurance buyers

When should a permit holder be added to a parent’s car insurance policy?

When your child gets their learner’s permit, you should notify your insurance company. As a driver using your car with your permission, they may be covered under your policy at no charge.

Once your child gets their driver’s license, you can add them to your car insurance policy as a listed operator. At that point, your insurance rate will increase.

Related: Best car insurance for teens

How much will a policy increase by adding a teen driver?

The average cost of adding a young driver—age 16 to 21—to a married couple’s car insurance policy is $1,951 a year, according to a Forbes Advisor analysis of rates from top 11 insurance companies across the nation.

With that in mind, those hoping to find the best cheap car insurance for teens should shop around and compare premiums with at least three or four different insurance companies.

Tue, 11 Oct 2022 01:52:00 -0500 Holly Johnson en-US text/html https://www.forbes.com/advisor/car-insurance/can-you-get-insurance-with-a-permit/
Killexams : How MNPS Is Investing in Its English Learners, and How It Could Do Better

Maria Paula Zapata

According to Metro Nashville Public Schools’ open data portal, of Nashville’s roughly 82,600 students, 22,069 — about 27 percent — are active English learners or have transitioned out of the district’s English Learners program within the past four years. These students bring 129 languages to the district and represent 145 countries. The top five most-spoken non-English languages are Spanish, Arabic, Kurdish, Somali and Burmese. 

But multilingual students represent much more than numbers and data points. They and their families have a lot to offer to the district. Former English learners include MNPS student board member Abenezer Haile and former student board member Angelie Quimbo. Quimbo was also a co-valedictorian at Hillwood High School — one of the 18 2021-22 valedictorians and salutatorians who, at some point in their education, received services through MNPS’ Office of English Learners. MNPS’ executive director of English Learners Molly Hegwood tells the Scene that many students who exit the EL program outperform their peers whose primary language is English.

Audrey Sika Mvibudulu-Feruzi was an EL student who later became an EL teacher, though she’s since moved out of the district. “Initially, when I went to college, I just wanted to be a general teacher,” Mvibudulu-Feruzi tells the Scene via Zoom. “After two years and a half in, I just told myself, ‘No, let me work with the EL population, that’s where my heart is at, that’s where I came from.’ ” Drawing from needs she had as a student, Mvibudulu-Feruzi created an afterschool program that helped EL students take charge of their education. 

There are many roles within the district that support EL students, from immigrant youth transition certified to EL teachers, parent outreach translators, student ambassadors and more. There’s also the more targeted Students With Interrupted Formal Education program for those who have large gaps in their education — typically refugees or asylees. The state requires a ratio of one EL teacher for every 35 students. MNPS has only 67 in-person interpreters to serve the thousands of students who are active or exact English learners — along with their families — but the district also utilizes an over-the-phone interpretation service, which it was able to expand using federal COVID-19 relief money. Those dollars also provided more opportunities for teachers to get EL certifications, but whether those resources will continue at this level when those dollars run out remains to be seen.

As is the case throughout MNPS, EL students could certainly benefit from more staff support. Though the district was not able to provide exact vacancy numbers in time for the publication of this article, Hegwood tells the Scene: “I wouldn’t say our staffing is any better or worse than any of the other areas. It’s very similar in the sense of trends across the district.” Efat Welson is an MNPS interpreter and a translator for the special education department. She tells the Scene she’d still like to see the district hire more interpreters — a request she made directly to the board of education in April.

EL teachers who work with students are not interpreters, and they don’t necessarily speak the languages of the students they serve. “Teacher fluency in the students’ native language is not required for strong English language instruction, but it certainly is a plus,” says former school board member Gini Pupo-Walker, who directs equitable-education advocacy group Education Trust in Tennessee. “That said, hiring bilingual staff at all levels is important and should be a priority for districts.” 

Serving multilingual families means more than providing interpreters and classroom assistance. It takes a spectrum of wraparound services to truly support students — EL and otherwise — but those services aren’t always executed perfectly. While the district has interpretation services, for example, it can be difficult for some families to know how to access them.

“I think there’s a lot of information that’s available — I don’t think there’s enough information that’s accessible,” says Maria Paula Zapata, director of programs at community nonprofit Conexión Américas. “And that point of, ‘How does it become accessible?’ I think is a greater question that we would need to involve families to really get at, like what does that mean?”

Conexión Américas has a Parents as Partners program that allows Spanish-speaking parents to connect with one another and learn about the school district. Zapata describes the program as a “really beautiful peer-to-peer model, where it’s not just a staff member saying, ‘Here’s what you need to do.’ But it’s actual parents saying, ‘Hey, I’ve gone through this program as well. I’ve had children in the school system … and here’s some things that we think can be helpful.’ ”

While programs like these are often helpful, they don’t exist in all languages spoken in the district. 

MNPS leverages outside support through its Community Achieves initiative, which connects students and their families with services that can tend to a range of needs. There’s also a collaborative effort from local organizations, led by Nashville’s teachers’ union, the Metropolitan Nashville Education Association, to implement their own community schools model.

Zapata notes that details matter. Bilingual signage and friendly staff can be the difference between a positive experience with the district or a negative one. “The warmth of your front office? It is a really big indicator of whether families feel included in your school,” she says. 

Like many students, English learners could benefit from more support. This can mean donating resources, donating money to organizations that support them, tutoring kids and responding to schools’ specific needs. Also, as Mvibudulu-Feruzi points out, “Just take the time to learn where children are coming from. … I know that when I was younger, when I had an educator … who was interested in my culture or interested in where I came from, or even interested in me having a different accent than the Southern accent … that brightened my day. That made me feel safer at school. [It’s also important to make sure you’re not] looping everyone into one culture because we don’t all have one culture, and even within a culture, there are subcultures.”

“We need to start seeing EL students not for the additional supports that they may need, but how much potential they have to shape and contribute to our community — if we deliver them all the things they need to be successful,” says Zapata. “If you want [a] multicultural, multilingual, diverse workforce … you need to invest in them now. Otherwise, we’re losing out on everything that we say we want for the future. And I think that that’s the most important [thing]. We’re not talking about poor little kids who don’t speak English now, we’re talking about the future of a multicultural workforce.”

Fri, 14 Oct 2022 05:52:00 -0500 en text/html https://www.nashvillescene.com/news/citylimits/how-mnps-is-investing-in-its-english-learners-and-how-it-could-do-better/article_63b4a83a-4684-11ed-a2e0-83a106c4a33c.html
Killexams : English Learner classes in Paso Robles support students learning a second language

Emberlynn Garcia is an example of success. She took an English Learner (EL) class in 6th grade at George Flamson Middle School in Paso Robles.

“It taught me how to perfect my English and how to write in English, how to do paragraphs, how to write a story, and that helped me a lot because in that class I was able to pass the exam, so I can get an elective,” said Cruz, who is now in 8th grade.

Cruz is one of five in her household where Spanish is the main means of communication.

Eustolia Garcia, Emberlynn’s mom, said she speaks Spanish to her kids because they are learning English at school. That way, she learns English from them while her children keep their Spanish.

Garcia, though, is a Spanish learner herself.

Garcia said her first language is Mixteco, a Mexican Indigenous Language. She understands what it means to learn a second language, but she is on a mission to get her family to be trilingual.

Garcia said she teaches her kids basic words in Mixteco, Spanish and English.

“I want to communicate with my grandparents because they talk Mixteco,” added Cruz.

According to the California Department of Education, 18% of all students enrolled in public schools across the state are English learners and for 82% of them, Spanish is their first language.

“We're always trying to promote the idea of being bilingual and knowing two languages and all the benefits that comes with it,” said Peter Perneel, an English Learner teacher at George Flamson Middle School.

According to the Paso Robles Joint Unified School District, there are 1,286 EL students at their schools.

The goal of an EL class is to get students reclassified.

“When a student is reclassified, it means that they are English proficient and they no longer need an ELD class for support, which means they are now able to take a mainstream class at their grade level and they may choose an elective,” explained Perneel.

Monica Pafumi, the principal at Virginia Peterson Elementary, gave a presentation during Tuesday’s board meeting about the number of students learning English.

“In 2021-2022 we reclassified 19 students from kindergarten to 5th grade,” explained Pafumi. “So far this school year, we have already reclassified 20 students from 1st to 5th grade and there are 10 more students that could be reclassified before the end of the year.”

“I believe last year at Flamson we had 52 students who were reclassified,” added Perneel.

(EL) teachers are encouraged to speak slowly and to enunciate clearly.

“You can also have the student take advantage of the teacher’s contextual clues such as facial expressions, also gestures, visuals, props,” said Perneel.

The COVID-19 pandemic created a huge disruption for students, especially EL students.

“We noticed that a lot of students, EL students that is, didn’t participate and they didn’t participate just because of the academics but also because they had other things to consider such as taking care of a little brother or sister. Some students were given hotspots by the district, but they had internet issues at home,” said Perneel.

Cruz relied on her older sister.

“We had a shared room, so I would be on this side, she would be on that side, and then when I wouldn’t understand anything I would be like, ‘when you were in middle school, did you do this? Can you help me?’” remembered Cruz.

Garcia, who studied to be a teacher in Mexico, would go above and beyond to be there for her kids.

She would ask her nieces or nephews for help with her kids’ English homework and is also taking English classes to be a resource for her children.

With the return of in-person classes, teachers are seeing the difference.

“Also when you put the students together you have the ability to have them check for understanding more frequently. We have the students orally responding, you have the students also being able to use their bodies to move around the room and to demonstrate their knowledge of the subject,” said Perneel.

Cruz is paying it forward with her younger siblings and other EL students.

“A lot of their homework is in English. I also go to this program called Youth Works, and I tutor kids,” Cruz explained.

Garcia said these classes are crucial for multilingual homes. She also said it opens up opportunities for the kids but also for the parents because students are often English to Spanish translators and vice versa.

Per state requirements, the district has an English Learner Advisory Committee (ELAC) and a District English Learner Advisory Committee (DELAC). Both are programs for parents to get involved.

For more information on how to get involved in those committees, click here.

Copyright 2022 Scripps Media, Inc. All rights reserved. This material may not be published, broadcast, rewritten, or redistributed.

Fri, 30 Sep 2022 10:34:00 -0500 en text/html https://www.ksby.com/news/local-news/english-learner-classes-in-paso-robles-support-students-learning-a-second-language
Killexams : One week to go before learner admission deadline

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Fri, 23 Sep 2022 01:01:00 -0500 en-US text/html https://www.iol.co.za/news/south-africa/kwazulu-natal/one-week-to-go-before-learner-admission-deadline-c2f42377-2a3c-44e3-8539-2ae58703b69c
Killexams : Atiku not learner, fit for presidency – Ologbondiyan

The spokesperson for the Atiku-Okowa Presidential Campaign Council, Kola Ologbondiyan, on Wednesday, said unlike other presidential aspirants, the Peoples Democratic Party flagbarer, Atiku Abubakar, was not a learner on the job.

He said the anguish and pains Nigerians are experiencing under the All Progressives Congress government will seize when Atiku becomes Nigeria’s president on May 29, 2023.
 
Ologbondiyan gave the assurance during an interaction with some PDP youths in Abuja.

He pointed out that the PDP and Atiku were thinking about the pains and sufferings the APC has inflicted on Nigerians in the last seven years.
 
He noted that the crowd that attended the party’s presidential campaign flag-off in Uyo, including other venues, was an indication of the approval of the Atiku/Okowa presidency in the build-up to the 2023 presidential election.
 
He said, “Among the arrays of presidential candidates, only Atiku Abubakar has the practicable plan on how to end the pains, the hunger, the starvation, the economic woes, the lower purchasing power and the sense of hopelessness which the APC administration has brought upon Nigerians.
 
“Atiku Abubakar has the experience of office, unlike the learners on parade, having been the Chairman of the National Economic Council. Nigerians can recall that those years, between 1999-2007, were the glorious years of our nation when we achieved unprecedented economic growth.
 
“In those years that Presidents elected on the platform of the PDP governed, life had meaning as our naira had value against foreign denominations; purchasing power was high; teachers had access to repayable loans and could build comfortable accommodation while those who desired to buy cars could afford them.”
 
He urged Nigerians not to vote for those who, within seven years, pulled the country from the “top to the bottom” among the comity of nations.

He urged Nigerians to continue to support the PDP and its candidates, adding that the party has solutions to the multitude of issues bedevilling the nation.

All rights reserved. This material, and other digital content on this website, may not be reproduced, published, broadcast, rewritten or redistributed in whole or in part without prior express written permission from PUNCH.

Contact: [email protected]

Wed, 12 Oct 2022 03:47:00 -0500 en-US text/html https://punchng.com/atiku-not-learner-fit-for-presidency-ologbondiyan/
Killexams : EDITORIAL - Learners left behind

The Philippine Star

September 20, 2022 | 12:00am

As world leaders including President Marcos gather this week for the annual United Nations General Assembly, those going through the visitors’ entrance at the UN headquarters in New York are greeted by an installation called a “Learning Crisis Classroom.”

The exhibit seeks to call global attention to the learning crisis that has been aggravated by the COVID-19 pandemic. A third of the desks in the classroom installation are the regular ones made of wood, with a backpack of the United Nations Children’s Fund on the chair beside the desk. This represents the one-third of 10-year-old children worldwide with minimum proficiency in studying comprehension – those who can read and understand a simple written story.

Two-thirds of the desks, however, are made of transparent material and are nearly invisible, representing the 64 percent of children worldwide, as estimated by the UNICEF, lacking that minimum proficiency. Before the pandemic, the figure was only about 50 percent.

The numbers are worse in the Philippines, where in-person learning partially resumed beginning last month after two years of mostly remote learning. In November last year, the World Bank estimated that learning poverty in the Philippines, which stood at 69.5 percent in 2019 before COVID struck, had worsened to a high 90 percent by August 2021. UNICEF, in a joint report with the UN Educational, Scientific and Cultural Organization, placed learning poverty at 85 percent in the Philippines as of February this year. Among the 122 countries covered by the report, the Philippines had the longest period of closure of in-person classes.

Philippine officials, aware that the typical Filipino household is large with members from several generations living together usually in cramped spaces, had opted for prolonged hybrid learning throughout the pandemic to protect children and vulnerable members of their households from COVID infection. But the cramped environment was also not conducive to proper learning. Combined with poor internet connection and other challenges posed by remote learning, the objective of ensuring that no child would be left behind amid the COVID lockdowns was not quite achieved.

While the need to protect children and their households from COVID infection has been acknowledged by child welfare advocates and education experts, they have also noted that many schools lacked the needed equipment, connectivity and educators’ skills sets to make distance learning work. Alongside the UN General Assembly, the Transforming Education Summit is being held in New York. The UNICEF is urging governments to invest in remedial and catch-up learning under a safe and supportive environment and to provide teachers the necessary equipment and upskilling for their tasks.

“Under-resourced schools, underpaid and underqualified teachers, overcrowded classrooms and archaic curricula are undermining our children’s ability to reach their full potential,” UNICEF executive director Catherine Russel said, as she stressed the need to reverse the current trend. “Low levels of learning today mean less opportunity tomorrow.”

Tue, 20 Sep 2022 00:00:00 -0500 text/html https://www.philstar.com/opinion/2022/09/20/2210835/editorial-learners-left-behind
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