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Exam Code: AWS-CDBS Practice test 2022 by Killexams.com team
AWS-CDBS AWS Certified Database-Specialty (DBS-C01)

Format : Multiple choice, multiple answer
Type : Specialty
Delivery Method : Testing center or online proctored exam
Time : 180 minutes to complete the exam

Introduction
The AWS Certified Database - Specialty (DBS-C01) examination is intended for individuals who perform in a database-focused role. This test validates an examinees comprehensive understanding of databases, including the concepts of design, migration, deployment, access, maintenance, automation, monitoring, security, and troubleshooting.

Response Types
There are two types of questions on the examination:
 Multiple choice: Has one correct response and three incorrect responses (distractors).
 Multiple response: Has two or more correct responses out of five or more options.
Select one or more responses that best complete the statement or answer the question. Distractors, or incorrect answers, are response options that an examinee with incomplete knowledge or skill would likely choose. However, they are generally plausible responses that fit in the content area defined by the test objective.
Unanswered questions are scored as incorrect; there is no penalty for guessing.

The AWS Certified Database - Specialty (DBS-C01) examination is a pass or fail exam. The examination is scored against a minimum standard established by AWS professionals who are guided by certification industry best practices and guidelines.
Your results for the examination are reported as a score from 100–1,000, with a minimum passing score of 750. Your score shows how you performed on the examination as a whole and whether or not you passed. Scaled scoring models are used to equate scores across multiple test forms that may have slightly different difficulty levels.
Your score report contains a table of classifications of your performance at each section level. This information is designed to provide general feedback concerning your examination performance. The examination uses a compensatory scoring model, which means that you do not need to “pass” the individual sections, only the overall examination.

Domain 1: Workload-Specific Database Design 26%
Domain 2: Deployment and Migration 20%
Domain 3: Management and Operations 18%
Domain 4: Monitoring and Troubleshooting 18%
Domain 5: Database Security 18%
TOTAL 100%

Domain 1: Workload-Specific Database Design
1.1 Select appropriate database services for specific types of data and workloads
1.2 Determine strategies for disaster recovery and high availability
1.3 Design database solutions for performance, compliance, and scalability
1.4 Compare the costs of database solutions
Domain 2: Deployment and Migration
2.1 Automate database solution deployments
2.2 Determine data preparation and migration strategies
2.3 Execute and validate data migration
Domain 3: Management and Operations
3.1 Determine maintenance tasks and processes
3.2 Determine backup and restore strategies
3.3 Manage the operational environment of a database solution
Domain 4: Monitoring and Troubleshooting
4.1 Determine monitoring and alerting strategies
4.2 Troubleshoot and resolve common database issues
4.3 Optimize database performance
Domain 5: Database Security
5.1 Encrypt data at rest and in transit
5.2 Evaluate auditing solutions
5.3 Determine access control and authentication mechanisms
5.4 Recognize potential security vulnerabilities within database solutions

AWS Certified Database-Specialty (DBS-C01)
Amazon Database-Specialty techniques
Killexams : Amazon Database-Specialty techniques - BingNews https://killexams.com/pass4sure/exam-detail/AWS-CDBS Search results Killexams : Amazon Database-Specialty techniques - BingNews https://killexams.com/pass4sure/exam-detail/AWS-CDBS https://killexams.com/exam_list/Amazon Killexams : Here’s what type of data Amazon devices are collecting about you

The Washington Post Technology Columnist Geoffrey Fowler joins Yahoo Finance Live to discuss Amazon’s digital surveillance network and what type of data Amazon is collecting about consumers.

Video Transcript

- All right. Well, while you might soon be able to be unboxing some of these new shiny Amazon devices, the online retail giant's slew of smart home devices are collecting a treasure trove of data from its millions of customers. So what does Amazon know about you? And what's it doing with that information? Well, joining us now to discuss this is "Washington Post" technology columnist Geoff Fowler. Good to have you on the show. Obviously, even when we were looking at the data, 12% of the purchases made there for Amazon Prime on these smart devices. I've got a Ring. I've got an Echo. What information do these devices collect for Amazon?

GEOFF FOWLER: Well, are you ready to get a little creeped out? Because I spent the last couple of weeks just trying to tally it all up. I'm a tech columnist. And I have many of these products in my own home or I've used them over the years. So I just tried to add it all up. And I made a little list to share with you. Just the top level here is Amazon-- if you get their dream home, if you buy all their gadgets, they'll gather data about you when you're talking, when you're sleeping, when you walk by them, when you show your face, when you cough, when you snore, when you come home or leave home, when you turn on the lights, when you turn up the heat, when you play music, when you watch TV.

I mean, I could keep going and going and going with this list. The point is Amazon has pushed much further than any other big tech company not only to make devices for the smart home, but also to make sure that they're collecting data out of them that they can use for their own purposes.

- I have to point out Jeff Bezos happens to own the "Washington Post." So it's listening to you right now, maybe the boss is. After knowing all this, do you still have an Amazon smart device plugged in your home? And what was the most concerning form of data that it is recording?

GEOFF FOWLER: Yeah. So I think the one that is the most popular in America is the Echo Speaker. It's, in fact, one of the best-selling speakers of all time. I do have some in my house. I'm a little bit unusual because I'm the tech guy for the "Washington Post." So my job is to have all of the things. So I also have the Apple one and I have the Google one. In terms of what is the most disturbing kind of information, for me, it's the stuff where Amazon just doesn't even deliver you a choice for them to collect all this data and to keep it.

For example, their ring doorbells and security cameras, they used to tell people that, oh, you're totally in control of what happens with that data. But we've now learned that there are about a dozen cases so far this year where Amazon has just hand it over that footage to police without the permission of their owners. So I think stuff like that is really the areas where Americans are going to get kind of upset here.

- So, Jeff, two things. Is this something that people can opt out of if they're not comfortable with that? And also, from what I understand, Amazon doesn't sell the data. So then what are they actually doing with it?

GEOFF FOWLER: Yeah. So two really good points. This is sort of what Amazon always likes to say. It's actually lines that they borrowed from Facebook before. Facebook also doesn't sell our data, yet they seem to have found plenty of use for it. And Facebook also offers you lots of little opt-out buttons. The truth is the defaults matter. And the defaults for many of Amazon's services just collect a lot more data. They just know that you're not going to bother to go in and change the setting that tells them not to keep recordings of stuff that goes on in your house, for example.

So, yes, you can do it. And, in fact, we made a guide at the "Washington Post" as our privacy reset guide where we'll walk you through a bunch of the settings you can adjust for Amazon to get them to collect less data. But most people really just aren't going to take the time. And that's kind of the problem.

- And now they've got this $140 Halo Rise, which tracks your breathing during your sleep. God knows what else. To what end? What do you think Amazon is trying to accomplish here?

GEOFF FOWLER: Amazon is-- it understands that data is power. It's the oil of our economy. And with all of this data about our lives, they can do a lot of stuff. I mean, many of their more accurate acquisitions, in fact, and products have involved our bodies. They're trying to buy One Medical. They bought PillPack, the pharmacy company.

Products like the Halo, and they also have a Halo Tracker, are gathering data about their body. One of their visions is to become kind of the eye doctor and to be able to do that, to be able to provide useful information to people, they just need to know a lot about our bodies. So we are giving it to them. And in some cases, we're paying them to let them gather data about us that they can then analyze and try to use and sell back to us later.

- Makes me feel even worse. We've talked about Echo and Ring. But even things like like smart blinds. For people who are sort of drawing comparisons with things like Skynet and sort of wondering where does this go from here, where does this-- in terms of AI and robotics. You've got your Roomba being now nosy as it's vacuuming your house. How should consumers take this? What should they take away from this report?

GEOFF FOWLER: Yeah. I think a couple of things. First of all, everybody's going to have to make their own decisions about what they're comfortable with a company knowing about them, and also what they're comfortable with one of the largest corporations in human history knowing about them. Amazon should get some pressure back from us for those of us who think that it's collecting too much and storing too much. And they should be hearing this. So I hope they're listening to our conversation here today because I think a lot of their customers feel this way.

The other thing is they don't have to design their products this way. We're often kind of given false choices as tech consumers that, well, either they're going to take all our data or we won't get to live in the future. And it's just not true. They don't have to design their products. And in fact, some of their competitors have not. If you look at the way that Apple, for example, handles a lot of smart home devices and data, they work very hard to make sure that they're not storing it, that they're not keeping it. So I think it's really just about us as consumers pushing back and saying, hey, we have some rights here too, Amazon.

- Of course, everybody wants your data, including Meta, who rolled out this new VR headset. $1,500. You got to try this thing out. Your thoughts on it. And your thoughts on the metaverse, where we are right now.

GEOFF FOWLER: Yeah. Well, since we were just talking about privacy, I'll tell you the one eyebrow-raising thing about this new headset is that it contains a whole bunch of cameras now on the inside that are looking at your eyes, your eyebrows, your cheeks, your mouth, you name it. And it's kind of a lot of information to know about our bodies. And I was really not satisfied with Meta's answer about how they were going to keep that data private.

So they say they're going to process it on the device. But they're still letting apps have access to it. So the question is, are we in a near future where, let's say, you're watching Netflix and Netflix could gather data about when you laugh at certain points in the show or when you're crying because that's the kind of thing that this technology would enable.

On the metaverse more broadly, it's been seven years since the first Facebook Oculus product came out, the Rift. I reviewed that at the time. And when I was sitting down looking through the six demos that Meta gave me of the new Quest Pro, I was kind of struck by we haven't really gotten very far. I think the term I used in my review for the post was it's the meh-taverse. It just doesn't really push the boundary that far yet. It's never felt further away, the idea that the metaverse is a place where lots of us in our normal everyday lives and our jobs and being creative are going to use this thing. It feels like they've really got a long ways to go.

- A long, long way to go. "Washington Post" tech columnist Geoff Fowler. Great to have you, man. I appreciate it.

GEOFF FOWLER: You bet.

Thu, 13 Oct 2022 08:56:00 -0500 en-US text/html https://finance.yahoo.com/video/type-data-amazon-devices-collecting-204727028.html
Killexams : ‘Millions of people’s data is at risk’ — Amazon insiders sound alarm over security

YOUR ORDER HISTORY. Your credit card information. Even your intimate health data.

Amazon is amassing an empire of data as the online retailer ventures into ever more areas of our lives. But the company's efforts to protect the information it collects are inadequate, according to insiders who warn the company's security shortfalls expose users' information to potential breaches, theft and exploitation.

The warnings about privacy and compliance failures at Amazon come from three former high-level information security employees — one EU-based and two from the U.S. — who told POLITICO they had repeatedly tried to alert senior leadership in the company's Seattle HQ, only to be sidelined, dismissed or pushed out of the company in what they saw as professional retaliation.

The EU-based employee is fighting the terms of their departure from Amazon through European courts. All three spoke on condition of anonymity out of concern they could face retaliation or difficulties in the job market for discussing the details of non-public legal proceedings.

Put together, their accounts paint a picture of a corporate culture at Amazon that they say prioritizes growth over other factors, such as the security of customers' information, compliance with rules designed to safeguard that data and the careers of employees the company hired specifically to flag problems.

“Imagine if a company the size of Amazon had a breach? The issue is millions of people's personal identifiable information is at risk,” the first former U.S.-based information-security employee said.

A spokesman for Amazon said that maintaining customers' trust by protecting their privacy and ensuring the security of their data is a "long-standing top priority" for the company.

"These inaccurate, unsubstantiated and dated claims don’t reflect our commitment to keeping personal information safe. Amazon has comprehensive, long-established privacy and security policies, procedures and technologies in place. We regularly audit our services to ensure compliance and have zero tolerance for employees at all levels who do not follow our policies," he said.

At a time when lawmakers and government officials are ramping up scrutiny of tech companies on both sides of the Atlantic, the employees' complaints are likely to strike a chord with regulators.

While Amazon has faced plenty of heat over its labor practices — including alleged efforts to suppress union activity at its warehouses — its handling of data has received less attention.

Yet the company is one of Big Tech's most powerful players when it comes to data, thanks to the hoards of customer information it collects via its e-commerce platform, its online advertising business and its gigantic cloud computing arm, Amazon Web Services.

Garfield Benjamin, a British academic who has previously written about Amazon’s privacy lapses, said that the company's "disregard for privacy and security" was indicative of a "big problem."

“It seems bizarre — although perhaps unfortunately all too common — that a company so intent on making data its primary business should have such poor practices,” Benjamin said when shown POLITICO’s findings. He added, "Is their hubris so great, their assumed power so unassailable, that they see themselves as completely untouchable?”

The consequence for consumers is more than potential loss of trust in Amazon's privacy and security practices. The company's practices leave it vulnerable to potential breaches or hacks that could put highly sensitive information into the hands of malicious actors.

The data Amazon holds includes order history, payment information, data collected through its advertising business and, for sellers on its platform, forms of identification. In the wrong hands, it could be held for ransom against the threat of online publication; deployed to defraud people; used to get access to other online accounts; or leveraged in phishing attacks in which stolen data is used to trick victims into paying a fee or revealing even more sensitive information.

More broadly, the accounts raise questions about what corporate values are rewarded at a company that has risen quickly to become the world's dominant e-commerce player.

Data labyrinth

ACCORDING TO THE TWO U.S. information-security employees, data is at risk because Amazon has a poor grasp of what data it has, where it is stored and who has access to it.

“If you wanted to do a 'right to be forgotten,' it would be next to impossible for Amazon to identify all of the places where your data resides within their system,” said the first former U.S.-based employee. The right to be forgotten, or right to have data erased, is a key tool for citizens under several privacy regimes, including in Europe and California. 

The second U.S.-based information-security professional confirmed Amazon's shaky understanding of what reams of personal information it holds. “Amazon has grown so fast, it doesn't know what it owns …  They don't know where their data is at, so they don’t know if they are protecting it correctly,” the person said.

The company’s track record on key data-security principles — controlling who has access to what data, patching vulnerabilities, ability to detect hacks, even whether passwords are changed regularly — came in for particular flak from all of the insiders who, together, have decades of experience in the area of information security.

“The quality of the controls that Amazon has in place is appalling. We found hundreds of thousands of accounts where the employee is no longer there but they still have system access,” said the first former U.S.-based employee, adding that such a vast number was possible because of Amazon's massive workforce and rapid staff turnover. Amazon said it has strict procedures in place when employees leave the company that remove their access.

Amazon has struggled to patch vulnerabilities in its systems. According to internal security reports from 2016 and 2017 seen by one of the former employees, the company declared that it was managing to patch between 55 to 70 percent of its systems. The first former U.S.-based employee likened that to leaving a house with several windows and doors open.

“Amazon’s information technology general controls, considering my experience and where I've been in the past, would not have passed muster with most auditors,” the first former U.S.-based employee said. "They were just poorly managed." 

Weak controls mean the company may not even detect a hack. An internal Amazon memo seen by one of the former employees from June 2018 deemed there was a “very high” possibility of critical financial loss or reputational damage to the business because of the company’s “inability to identify adversarial events.”

Amazon said it was not aware of the reports and does not believe the claims to be accurate. It said that any historic concerns that are flagged through routine internal reporting would be fixed, which is the purpose of these processes.

The second former U.S.-based employee confirmed that Amazon fails to properly control access to systems, and that, in a company whose workforce has grown to more than 1 million, reams of personal information are accessible to people who do not have the appropriate role or responsibility. 

“You've got tens of thousands of … teams connecting to big data," said the second former U.S.-based employee. "You should have a way to follow all the different types of data. From a technology point of view, you need to know where the data is going and how it's being protected. That does not exist,” they said.

The former employees were careful to distinguish between issues around Amazon’s internal approach to data compliance and the company’s leading track record in data-security engineering — visible through the products and services developed by AWS. 

AWS’s cloud computing products are used by the likes of the U.S. government, and are widely seen as world-beating in terms of data security. One ex-employee described the security tools at Amazon’s disposal as “second to none,” but they said the strength of AWS tools in keeping systems secure is still dependent on how the end user applies them. They also noted that AWS is largely run separately from the rest of the company.

The issue, they said, is that Amazon's data-security capabilities are undermined by the willingness of the company to override internal controls.

For instance, according to two of the former information-security professionals, data needed for new projects was sometimes improperly classified so that it would go through fewer internal checks.

The company said this is false. A spokesperson said it has comprehensive privacy and security policies, procedures and technologies in place that are observed by executives at all levels. The company regularly audits services to ensure compliance and employees may not be involved in decision-making outside of their role’s remit.

'Woefully behind'

EUROPE'S DATA-PROTECTION RULEBOOK, the General Data Protection Regulation (GDPR), is credited by many for putting privacy on the agenda — especially within company boardrooms, where the fines of 4 percent of global turnover introduced by the legislation are often perceived as an existential threat.

Even so, it was only in late April 2018 — weeks before the regulation came into force — that Amazon created a dedicated team in the information-security department to address the incoming regulation. “The organization was woefully behind,” said the first former U.S.-based employee. Amazon said it had long-standing privacy and security teams and made a standard organizational change to centralize privacy resources in 2018.

The former EU-based employee and others had made numerous attempts to highlight Amazon’s GDPR risk and compliance gaps well in advance of the May 2018 deadline, only to be knocked back, according to two of the former employees.

Documents and quarterly reports sent to senior executives — including Jeff Wilke, the CEO of Amazon's worldwide consumer business, General Counsel David Zapolsky and Chief Financial Officer Brian Olsavsky — laid out the firm’s GDPR risks and gaps, as well as many of the issues detailed in this article. Amazon said the allegations appear to refer to regular reporting that any responsible company would engage in to keep leadership apprised of important issues, and demonstrates that it correctly provides updates to leadership.

The EU-based former insider was among several information-security employees who repeatedly escalated the risks the company faced in failing to meet EU data-protection standards, according to two of the former employees and legal documents seen by POLITICO.

The EU-based employee is currently in legal proceedings about the terms of their departure in a Luxembourg court. Another security professional settled with the company after being told by the senior leadership of the Amazon legal department to “stand down” because that person's efforts to highlight GDPR compliance issues did not meet whistleblower-level requirements, according to legal documents and the first U.S.-based former employee. Amazon said it can't comment on individual employees but that it disputes that anyone was prevented from sharing concerns.

Those hoping that tough EU regulators stand ready to take Amazon to task over any data abuses risk disappointment. More than two years after GDPR came online, Amazon’s lead regulator in Europe, Luxembourg’s data-protection authority, has yet to issue a single fine — against anyone. 

A commissioner at the Luxembourg authority said in late December that they were barred from saying how many investigations they have against Amazon by local law, but said that the first fines would land before the end of 2020. A spokesperson at the agency said in January the first fines would land "very soon."

Feeling undermined

THE EU-BASED FORMER EMPLOYEE also raised the alarm over Amazon's compliance with myriad other EU and Luxembourg rules.

Amazon leadership in Seattle undermined the former EU employee's ability to act as an internal control function in violation of its regulator-approved governance model for the business unit in Luxembourg, two of the former employees said.

For instance, email chains seen by POLITICO show Amazon leadership in the U.S. saying they would need to approve and have the final say on audit commitments for the Luxembourg-regulated entity, in violation of requirements to retain decision-making within the control functions of the unit.

Other email chains show management in Seattle granting itself permission to review and approve access to data requests for the Luxembourg unit that should have been handled by local employees, according to internal policies and regulatory requirements.

The former EU-based employee also ran into trouble when trying to hire team members. They were first told that they must hire into the Seattle office if they wanted to increase headcount, even though the new recruits would be working on European matters for the Luxembourg regulated entity.

“I thought at first it’s a joke … It’s a different time zone and a different culture. The term ‘personal data’ for instance means something different in the U.S. to Europe,” the former EU-based employee said.

In another instance, email chains show that Amazon's Seattle leadership changed an employee's contract so that they would be contractually barred from handling sensitive matters for the Luxembourg unit, against the wishes and without the knowledge of the EU-based employee in charge of the team and in violation of policies and regulatory requirements.

The EU-based employee said they felt action like this was designed to undermine and starve the local team of resources.

Luxembourg’s data-protection authority hasn't issued any fines against Amazon | Julien Warnand/EPA

Amazon rejected the claims and said it has strong and appropriate controls that abide by EU and Luxembourg regulations, which it regularly reviews to ensure it has the right teams and resources in place. It said that where appropriate, concerns are escalated to the company's head office, showing how seriously it takes information security. It said there is no requirement that all staff need to be in the EU and where this is required the company abides by relevant rules and regulations.

But, according to accounts by the former U.S. employees, being undermined as a line of control in the e-commerce giant's governance model was not isolated to Luxembourg.

“I was championing a number of issues that my team was raising … and multiple times, we were overwritten. Sometimes, to the point where ... inaccurate or incomplete reports were sometimes submitted to regulatory authorities,” said the first former U.S.-based employee.

The employee added that information was kept from them by senior leadership, hampering their ability to report properly to regulators. In one case, they said they were told only after regulatory filings were completed that the company had been inappropriately monitoring systems for two years.

Both former U.S.-based employees were told at one point by their direct management to “stop looking for problems,” even though they were required to do exactly that under multiple laws, regulations and industry requirements and despite the fact that they could be personally liable for issues.

All three employees said they felt they would be kept out of the loop so that they couldn’t raise issues or even perform their roles as a control function in Amazon’s governance model. They would find that they hadn’t been invited to meetings, hadn’t been asked to contribute to reports or hadn’t been given the right information. 

A spokesperson for Amazon said employees were not sidelined, but were expected to work within their agreed remit.

Culture wars

AMAZON PUTS GREAT STOCK in its 14 "leadership principles," which every employee is supposed to follow, and against which they are measured. The principles include "customer obsession," "are right, a lot," "frugality" and "earn trust." All the former employees said they felt those principles were used against them in retaliation for highlighting issues with compliance or security.

For instance, those seeking funding would sometimes come up against senior managers citing the need for "frugality."

All the former employees said that securing resources to fix issues was tough and that projects would sometimes get shut down or deprioritized halfway through because it would be deemed that the problem was too large. 

For example, an initiative to automate access to data and system controls was “severely underfunded,” said the first former U.S.-based employee. The second U.S.-based employee recounted being told by their manager that the system they were trying to secure was “too big.” 

Each of the employees who spoke to POLITICO said they had been sidelined or eventually forced out because they had raised concerns about the state of the company's data security or its ability to comply with regulations.

They said reprisals intensified after attempts to use multiple avenues to escalate their concerns.

The second U.S.-based ex-employee flagged an insecure payments encryption protocol in 2014 only to have to re-raise the issue in 2016 and then again in 2018 before it got fixed. In that case, Amazon had successfully lobbied the standards body to get a two-year extension to fix the issue. An internal statement at the time said that to get the fix done on time would have meant stopping payments in a significant number of developing markets.

“We had an insecure vulnerability that we knew about for five years," the second former U.S.-based employee said. "That's unacceptable. I mean, we knew about it."

The employee said that they were told they weren’t a “team player” and had not “earned trust” for raising issues. 

Other Amazonian cultural keystones were also used against them, all the former employees said. The former EU-based employee was told they were not “customer obsessed” because their insistence that data be encrypted would have delayed a project, even though encryption was a legal requirement.

The second U.S. former employee said they would be put to work on projects that were below their pay grade, only tangentially linked to the role they were hired for, or told to stop working on projects that had identified issues. This mirrored an account of another employee recounted in legal documents seen by POLITICO.

A spokesperson for Amazon said that no employees left the company because they had raised concerns around data-security regulatory compliance. They said the claims appeared to come from employees who had ongoing performance issues at the company and decided to leave.

Management material

ALL THE EMPLOYEES WHO SPOKE TO POLITICO attributed the company being unwilling to fix issues or deliberately hiding them most directly to a strata of management that sits between the highest levels of the company — which includes vice presidents, senior vice presidents and Jeff Bezos himself — and the rest of the company.

They said that a “cut throat” competitive culture meant that there was jostling in the mid-level layer directly above them for promotions and funds. This meant that there was pressure to report wins over losses and downplay issues within the company — as well as to regulators.

“We were seen to be undermining portions of the organization by saying, 'Your baby's ugly,'" said the first former U.S.-based employee. "We were saying we can't meet this regulatory requirement because we know we can't do this, and individuals responsible for those things take offense."

Nevertheless, the former EU-based employee and the first former U.S.-based employees felt their experiences indicate that the problem goes deeper than that mid-level layer of management. 

“I gave Amazon every chance to show me it wasn’t the case ... by escalating to various internal control functions within the company, by escalating to the global risk-management committee of the company and finally by engaging formal procedures. They could have come back and said, ‘Hey look, we agree there's a problem, we will work on solving it,' but they didn't. Instead they asked me to leave the company,” said the former EU-based employee.

Amazon engaged in the “systematic eradication” of those who raised compliance issues, said the first former U.S.-based employee. “The organization eats its own to quiet the noise of these issues. And then papers over them,” they said.

The second U.S.-based former employee said that a company of Amazon’s stature should have top-level data security. “A little slipup in Amazon is losing hundreds of thousands, if not millions, of people's data," they said. "There's no excuse for a company that is profitable in the numbers we're talking about.”

CORRECTION: This story has been corrected to clarify that the EU-based employee is contesting the terms of their departure, not their dismissal.

Want more analysis from POLITICO? POLITICO Pro is our premium intelligence service for professionals. From financial services to trade, technology, cybersecurity and more, Pro delivers real time intelligence, deep insight and breaking scoops you need to keep one step ahead. Email [email protected] to request a complimentary trial.
Fri, 14 Oct 2022 07:56:00 -0500 en-US text/html https://www.politico.eu/article/data-at-risk-amazon-security-threat/
Killexams : Amazon SNS Introduces Message Data Protection to Discover Sensitive Data in Motion

Amazon SNS recently announced the public preview of message data protection. Identifying PII data and other sensitive information in flight, the new SNS feature leverages pattern matching, machine learning models, and data protection policies to simplify data protection and compliance in applications that exchange high volumes of data.

One of the first managed services on AWS, SNS uses the publish/subscribe model for delivery of messages, supporting both standard and FIFO topics. For standard subjects only, owners can now enable message data protection to scan messages in real-time for sensitive data and provide detailed audit reports or block the message delivery. Otavio Ferreira, senior software development manager at AWS, and his team explain:

With message data protection for SNS, you can scan messages in real time for PII/PHI data and receive audit reports containing scan results. You can also prevent applications from receiving sensitive data by blocking inbound messages to an SNS Topic or outbound messages to an SNS subscription. Message data protection for SNS supports a repository of over 25 unique PII/PHI data identifiers. These include people’s names, addresses, social security numbers, credit card numbers, and prescription drug codes These capabilities can help you adhere to a variety of compliance regulations, including HIPAA, FedRAMP, GDPR, and PCI.

Source: https://docs.aws.amazon.com/sns/latest/dg/sns-message-data-protection-policies.html

Customers can define an audit policy to determine whether any of the systems are inadvertently sending or receiving sensitive data or use a block policy to prevent the delivery. Other supported data identifiers include credentials, such as AWS secret access keys, and device identifiers, such as IP address and MAC address. David Boyne, senior developer advocate at AWS, tweets:

This is pretty neat. Using policies to detect PII information and audit or block messages in flight is awesome. Great for EDA applications as you scale them in orgs, it's so easy to add PII information into messages/events, be interesting to see this being used

Discussing possible use cases, Ferreira and his team write:

Consider an application that processes a variety of transactions for a set of health clinics, an organization that operates in a regulated environment. Compliance frameworks require that the organization take measures to protect both sensitive health records and financial information.

The new CloudWatch metrics MessageWithFindings and MessageWithNoFindings track how frequently PII/PHI data is published to an SNS Topic and the amount of sensitive data published to a topic.

Source: https://aws.amazon.com/about-aws/whats-new/2022/09/amazon-sns-preview-message-data-protection-sensitive-data-in-motion/

Amazon SNS message data protection is currently available in a subset of AWS regions. The pricing of the new feature is based on the amount of payload data scanned, with a minimum of 1KB of message scanning, and the amount of audit report data generated: with prices depending on the region, message scanning starts at 0.08 USD per GB and audit reporting starts at 0.19 USD per GB.

During the preview, message data protection does not support the PublishBatch API for inbound messages.

Sun, 18 Sep 2022 15:13:00 -0500 en text/html https://www.infoq.com/news/2022/09/amazon-sns-data-protection/
Killexams : Amazon salaries revealed: See how much engineers, data scientists and thousands of other employees at the e-commerce and cloud giant make

Amazon Development Center US

People working on the second floor of the Amazon Spheres building in Seattle.
LINDSEY WASSON/Reuters

Business Intelligence Analysts

Business Analyst II: $69,826 to $138,000
Business Intelligence Engineer I: $58,094 to $137,000
Business Intelligence Engineer II: $78,562 to $160,000

Computer and Information Research Scientists

Applied Scientist I: $80,870 to $175,000
Applied Scientist II: $101,587 to $210,000
Applied Scientist III: $139,339 to $250,000
Research Scientist I: $91,874 to $180,000
Research Scientist II: $101,587 to $190,000

Computer and Information Systems Managers

Manager II, Software Development: $127,629 to $220,000
Manager III, Software Development: $124,155 to $287,000
Product Manager II - Technical: $113,152 to $180,000
Senior manager, software development: $160,000 to $295,000
Technical Program Manager III: $130,021 to $225,000

Computer Hardware Engineers

Hardware Development Engineer II: $102,648 to $185,000

Database Administrators

Database Engineer III: $152,000 to $227,000

Database Architects

Data Engineer II: $132,100 to $168,900

Graphic Designers

UX Designer I: $43,451 to $143,000
UX Designer II: $51,854 to $184,000
UX Designer III: $70,387 to $176,300

Information Security Analysts

Security Engineer I: $67,392 to $190,000
Security Engineer II: $88,296 to $196,400

Network and Computer Systems Administrators

System Admin/Engineer II: $77,022 to $160,000

Operations Research Analysts

PMT III - External Services: $84,822 to $205,000
Product Manager III: $84,822 to $132,600
Product Manager Technical III -External Services: $90,896 to $236,000
Program Manager II: $88,275 to $135,000
Program Manager III: $87,090 to $158,500

Software Developers, Applications

Front-End Engineer I: $64,376 to $164,000
Front-End Engineer II: $92,685 to $220,000
Principal software development engineer: $160,000 to $298,266
Software Development Engineer I: $60,341 to $185,000
Software Development Engineer II: $86,632 to $223,600
Software Development Engineer III: $118,373 to $250,200
Technical Program Manager I: $97,760 to $144,000
Technical Program Manager II: $80,059 to $173,000

Software Developers, Systems Software

Quality Assurance Engineer II: $119,350 to $140,000
Solution Architect II: $92,685 to $180,000
System Development Engineer I: $75,192 to $160,000
System Development Engineer II: $87,485 to $195,000

Statisticians

Data Scientist I: $67,725 to $150,000
Data Scientist II: $77,189 to $180,000

Amazon Web Services

Amazon Web Services CEO Adam Selipsky.
Noah Berger/Getty Images

Business Intelligence Analysts

Business Analyst I: $45,282 to $95,000
Business Analyst II: $70,075 to $125,000
Business Intelligence Engineer I: $45,282 to $145,000
Business Intelligence Engineer II: $67,995 to $160,000
Business Intelligence Engineer III: $92,602 to $165,000
Support Engineer I-External: $58,094 to $82,472
Support Engineer I–External: $58,094 to $92,000
Support Engineer II-External: $76,856 to $102,740

Computer and Information Research Scientists

Applied Scientist I: $81,307 to $182,000
Applied Scientist II: $88,504 to $206,600
Research Scientist I: $89,877 to $170,000
Research Scientist II: $100,963 to $178,000

Computer and Information Systems Managers

Manager II, Software Development: $127,629 to $175,000
Manager III, Software Development: $153,920 to $287,100
Principal, solutions architect: $150,000 to $225,800
Product Manager II - Technical: $127,629 to $165,610
Product Manager III - Technical: $120,598 to $193,731
Technical CSM II: $130,021 to $174,678
Technical CSM III: $159,994 to $180,000
Technical Program Manager II: $127,629 to $178,224
Technical Program Manager III: $152,000 to $225,000

Computer Systems Analysts

Enterprise Account Engineer II: $85,301 to $165,000
Enterprise Account Engineer III: $94,203 to $195,000
Enterprise Act Engineer II: $118,470 to $160,000
Enterprise Act Engineer III: $116,667 to $187,000
Solutions Architect I: $67,475 to $185,000
Solutions Architect II: $80,267 to $204,300
Solutions Architect III: $85,654 to $235,300
Support Engineer I-External: $49,546 to $127,500
Support Engineer II-External: $84,843 to $160,000

Database Administrators

Data Engineer II: $102,294 to $195,000
Support Engineer II–External: $83,907 to $140,000

Database Architects

Data Engineer I: $58,094 to $150,000
Data Engineer II: $76,856 to $170,000

Graphic Designers

UX Designer II: $67,933 to $176,000

Information Security Analysts

Security Engineer I: $67,392 to $150,000
Security Engineer II: $88,296 to $200,000

Information Technology Project Managers

Product Manager III: $122,400 to $144,000

Market Research Analysts and Marketing Specialists

Functional Marketing II: $69,514 to $145,000
Product Marketing III: $66,123 to $191,500

Marketing Managers

Product Manager III: $136,000 to $206,000

Network and Computer Systems Administrators

Cloud Support Engineer I: $71,573 to $95,800
Cloud support engineer II: $102,700 to $142,800
Support Engineer - External I: $66,685 to $101,300
Support Engineer II-External: $71,573 to $128,500

Operations Research Analysts

Engagement Manager: $72,634 to $167,500
PMT III - External Services: $102,315 to $226,500
Principal Technical Business Development: $114,774 to $240,000
Product Manager II: $89,107 to $172,000
Product Manager III: $104,374 to $195,000
Program Manager II: $71,469 to $140,000
Program Manager III: $104,374 to $160,000
Sales Analyst I: $55,869 to $85,000
Sales Operations I: $54,371 to $105,000
Sales Operations II: $68,411 to $169,500
Sales Operations III: $104,374 to $199,000
Technical Business Developer II: $68,411 to $165,000
Technical Business Developer III: $82,181 to $200,000
Technical CSM III: $146,827 to $210,000

Sales Engineers

Technical Business Developer III: $160,000 to $180,800

Software Developers, Applications

Enterprise Act Engineer I: $67,995 to $128,160
Enterprise Act Engineer II: $75,629 to $185,000
Enterprise Act Engineer III: $89,045 to $205,800
Front-End Engineer I: $74,734 to $150,000
Front-End Engineer II: $90,750 to $200,000
IT App Development Engineer I: $67,995 to $135,000
IT App Development Engineer II: $91,874 to $150,000
Manager III, Software Development: $130,894 to $185,000
Software Development Engineer I: $59,717 to $180,000
Software Development Engineer II: $87,485 to $225,000
Software Development Engineer III: $109,138 to $261,500
Support Engineer I - External: $76,898 to $119,350
Support Engineer II - External: $94,037 to $140,000
Support Engineer III - External: $76,898 to $130,900
Technical Program Manager II: $75,858 to $178,700

Software Developers, Systems Software

Professional Services I: $50,586 to $160,000
Professional Services II: $69,514 to $195,000
Professional Services III: $94,806 to $222,000
Quality Assurance Engineer II: $119,350 to $157,500
Solution Architect I: $64,064 to $130,000
Solution Architect II: $73,944 to $200,000
Solution Architect III: $94,806 to $225,566
System Development Engineer I: $72,384 to $160,000
System Development Engineer II: $90,397 to $174,800

Statisticians

Data Engineer I: $77,189 to $150,000
Data Engineer II: $91,021 to $175,800
Data Engineer III: $95,867 to $206,500
Data Scientist II: $70,512 to $185,000
Manager III, Data Engineering: $104,832 to $230,000

Validation Engineers

Industry Specialist II: $84,906 to $167,000

Amazon.com Services

Amazon's retail CEO Doug Herrington.
Amazon

Accountants and Auditors

Financial Analyst I: $49,670 to $83,000
Financial Analyst II: $60,882 to $130,000
Financial Analyst III: $72,072 to $150,000
Manager III, Finance: $78,645 to $190,000
Tax Analyst II: $73,486 to $94,200
Tax Analyst III: $87,797 to $129,900

Auditors

Financial Analyst II: $60,882 to $100,000

Business Intelligence Analysts

Business Analyst I: $38,958 to $110,000
Business Analyst II: $53,102 to $143,000
Business Analyst III: $67,267 to $155,000
Business Intelligence Engineer I: $38,958 to $155,000.00
Business Intelligence Engineer II: $58,178 to $182,000
Business Intelligence Engineer III: $89,835 to $196,000
Data Engineer II: $78,562 to $195,000
IT Support Engineer I: $26,770 to $66,934.40
Manager III, Business Intelligence: $132,000 to $178,400
Manager III, Business Intelligence Engineer: $85,155 to $212,000

Civil Engineers

Data Center Infrastructure Engineer II: $120,110 to $152,000

Computer and Information Research Scientists

Applied Scientist I: $62,483 to $212,750
Applied Scientist II: $78,291 to $220,000
Applied Scientist III: $121,846 to $260,000
Data Scientist I: $81,307 to $165,000
Data Scientist II: $113,277 to $178,547
Manager III, Applied Science: $142,626 to $192,400
Research Scientist I: $70,366 to $167,600
Research Scientist II: $84,427 to $212,800
Research Scientist III: $130,146 to $185,000

Computer and Information Systems Managers

Director, Software Development: $153,920 to $312,500
Manager II, Software Development: $97,614 to $220,000
Manager III, Software Development: $127,629 to $305,422
Principal Product Manager - Technical: $160,000 to $243,000
Principal Software Development Engineer: $148,310 to $222,500
Principal Technical Program Manager: $141,357 to $239,400
Product Manager II - Technical: $98,904 to $201,100
Product Manager III - Technical: $121,118 to $235,200
Senior Manager, Product Management - Technical: $160,000 to $288,113
Senior Manager, Software Development: $128,190 to $340,000
Technical Program Manager II: $127,100 to $197,800
Technical Program Manager III: $120,203 to $231,400

Computer Hardware Engineers

ASIC II: $151,008 to $205,000
ASIC III: $151,008 to $240,500
Hardware Development Engineer I: $83,179 to $165,000
Hardware Development Engineer II: $78,458 to $185,000
Hardware Development Engineer III: $109,928 to $200,000

Computer Network Architects

Network Development Engineer I: $75,795 to $160,000
Network Development Engineer II: $105,622 to $212,056
Network Development Engineer III: $134,846 to $185,280

Computer Occupations, All Other

Business Analyst I: $45,282 to $76,000
Business Intelligence Engineer I: $45,282 to $72,696
Business Intelligence Engineer II: $70,346 to $130,000

Computer Systems Analysts

Solutions Architect II: $80,267 to $170,000
Solutions Architect III: $172,000 to $239,000
Support Engineer I-External: $72,779 to $114,100
Support Engineer II: $72,301 to $103,200
Support Engineer IV: $89,600 to $155,000

Computer Systems Engineers/Architects

Support Engineer III: $88,005 to $99,008

Data Warehousing Specialists

Data Engineer I: $115,000 to $152,000
Data Engineer II: $70,346 to $195,000

Database Administrators

Data Engineer I: $52,998 to $160,000
Data Engineer II: $81,640 to $180,000
Database Engineer II: $83,366 to $139,500
Manager III, Data Science: $116,168 to $215,300
Support Engineer IV: $75,088 to $148,800

Database Architects

Data Engineer I: $50,565 to $172,000
Data Engineer II: $69,826 to $205,600
Data Engineer III: $99,008 to $180,000

Economists

Economist I: $45,614 to $185,000
Economist II: $92,248 to $190,000
Economist III: $123,594 to $183,480

Electrical Engineers

Hardware Development Engineer II: $96,741 to $185,000

Financial Analysts

Financial Analyst III: $96,533 to $132,600

Financial Managers

Financial Analyst III - MBA: $129,043 to $139,500
Manager III, Finance: $143,000 to $172,152
Senior Manager, Finance: $149,000 to $166,000

Graphic Designers

Designer II: $65,333 to $145,000
UX Designer I: $29,827 to $131,677
UX Designer II: $44,741 to $173,500
UX Designer III: $70,387 to $211,000
UX Researcher II: $44,741 to $145,000

Human Resources Specialists

HR Assistant III: $27,186 to $48,984
HR Generalist III: $71,531 to $175,000
HR Specialist II: $64,251 to $97,000
Recruiter II: $47,715 to $110,000
Recruiter III: $70,366 to $160,000

Industrial Engineers

Industrial Designer I: $60,778 to $115,000
Industrial Designer II: $72,821 to $150,000
Industrial Designer III: $115,128 to $163,200

Information Security Analysts

Industry Specialist II: $141,100 to $160,000
Security Engineer I: $67,392 to $200,000
Security Engineer II: $91,333 to $185,000
Security engineer III: $160,000 to $180,000

Information Technology Project Managers

Principal product manager, technical: $119,475 to $168,834
Product manager II, technical: $78,562 to $175,000
Product manager III, technical: $85,155 to $235,000
Technical Program Manager I: $50,315 to $147,000
Technical Program Manager II: $78,562 to $180,000
Technical Program Manager III: $78,562 to $193,400

Lawyers

Legal Counsel II: $72,758 to $160,000
Legal Counsel III: $105,747 to $164,700

Logisticians

Instock Manager II: $73,798 to $112,000
Instock Manager III: $62,005 to $160,000
Manager I, Operations: $35,526 to $63,100
Manager II, Operations: $48,922 to $84,615
Manager III, Operations: $59,342 to $105,664
Operations Engineer I: $35,568 to $75,878
Operations Engineer II: $48,547 to $107,500
Operations Engineer III: $66,186 to $155,000
Procurement Specialist II: $48,922 to $92,000
Product Manager III: $128,000 to $162,300
Program Manager II: $81,600 to $105,000
Program Manager III: $118,250 to $160,000
Senior Manager, Pathways Operations: $92,602 to $170,391
Site Manager, Operations: $77,168 to $105,664
Supply Chain Manager I: $35,568 to $84,080
Supply Chain Manager II: $47,590 to $120,000
Supply Chain Manager III: $63,523 to $141,900

Logistics Engineers

Operations Engineer II: $48,547 to $113,500

Market Research Analysts and Marketing Specialists

General Marketing II: $55,453 to $100,000
General Marketing III: $43,534 to $185,000
Instock Manager II: $50,731 to $120,000
Product Manager II: $73,424 to $127,900
Product Manager III: $67,475 to $160,000
Product Marketing III: $74,090 to $183,000
Retail Rotation Program - MBA: $83,533 to $132,600
Retail Vendor Manager III: $97,718 to $148,000

Marketing Managers

Instock Manager III: $117,500 to $170,000
Product Manager II: $96,158 to $140,000
Product Manager III: $128,000 to $200,000
Product Manager III - Technical - MBA: $134,139 to $204,000
Retail Rotation Program - MBA: $79,955 to $132,600
Senior Manager, Product Management: $149,100 to $203,341

Network and Computer Systems Administrators

Support engineer II: $93,400 to $97,000
System Admin/Engineer II: $71,531 to $155,300

Occupational Health and Safety Specialists

Manager II, Safety: $54,600 to $82,500
Safety Specialist I: $46,405 to $64,626

Operations Research Analysts

Account Manager II: $68,411 to $111,000
Account Rep II: $83,595 to $91,042
Business Analyst I: $68,370 to $82,100
Business Analyst II: $38,938 to $122,000
Business Intel Engineer II: $96,480 to $146,900
Business Intelligence Engineer II: $75,670 to $154,500
Manager II, Risk: $88,275 to $122,000
Manager III, Program Management: $57,595 to $153,000
PMT III - External Services: $104,374 to $225,000
Principal Product Management: $120,494 to $184,850
Principal Program Management: $101,213 to $206,500
Product Manager II: $88,275 to $160,000
Product Manager II - Technical: $88,275 to $186,000
Product Manager III: $102,315 to $190,000
Product Marketing II: $88,275 to $114,800
Program Manager I: $20,259 to $100,700
Program Manager II: $38,938 to $145,000
Program Manager III: $57,595 to $182,000
Risk Manager II: $68,162 to $120,000
Risk Manager III: $84,822 to $181,500
Senior Manager, Product Management - Tech: $120,494 to $270,000
Senior Manager, Program Management: $120,494 to $195,000
Technical Program Manager III: $84,822 to $211,200

Purchasing Managers

HW Commodity Specialist II: $101,754 to $140,000
HW Commodity Specialist III: $130,333 to $165,000

Software Developers, Applications

Front-End Engineer I: $75,795 to $171,000
Front-End Engineer II: $86,632 to $223,600
Front-End Engineer III: $123,614 to $225,000
IT App Analyst: $97,760 to $125,000
IT App Analyst II: $98,550 to $160,000
IT App Development Engineer I: $52,790 to $150,000
IT App Development Engineer II: $67,933 to $185,000
Manager II, Software Development: $119,350 to $152,80
Manager III, Software Development: $114,234 to $185,000
Manager III, Technical Program Management: $109,138 to $254,500
Principal Product Management: $145,454 to $205,000
Principal Software Development Engineer: $126,838 to $247,100
Product Manager III - Technical - MBA: $118,373 to $166,500
Senior Manager, Software Development: $119,350 to $185,000
Software Dev Engineer I: $97,760 to $177,500
Software Dev Engineer II: $144,000 to $216,500
Software Development Engineer I: $50,190 to $212,000
Software Development Engineer II: $66,477 to $223,600
Software Development Engineer III: $96,450 to $260,000
Support Engineer III: $62,462 to $120,800
Support Engineer IV: $80,163 to $120,000
Technical Program Manager I: $75,462 to $180,000
Technical Program Manager II: $87,485 to $195,000
Technical Program Manager III: $119,350 to $193,100

Software Developers, Systems Software

Hardware Development Engineer II: $119,350 to $136,500
Hardware Development Engineer III: $145,400 to $172,000
Manager II, Quality: $119,350 to $168,470
Manager III, Quality: $109,138 to $221,400
Professional Services II: $94,037 to $174,000
Quality Assurance Engineer I: $57,470 to $169,300
Quality Assurance Engineer II: $75,462 to $185,000
Quality Assurance Engineer III: $97,760 to $180,300
Software development engineer I: $67,018 to $200,000
Software development engineer II: $90,750 to $195,000
Software development engineer III: $109,138 to $250,000
Solutions Architect II: $98,550 to $177,000
Solutions Architect III: $109,595 to $239,000
System Development Engineer I: $62,462 to $168,000
System Development Engineer II: $79,310 to $196,000
System Development Engineer III: $117,686 to $225,000

Software Quality Assurance Engineers and Testers

Quality Assurance Engineer I: $50,315 to $106,000
Quality Assurance Engineer II: $78,562 to $130,000

Statisticians

Data Engineer I: $45,032 to $162,540
Data Engineer II: $61,318 to $185,000
Data Engineer III: $89,960 to $206,100
Data Scientist I: $56,534 to $178,400
Data Scientist II: $59,155 to $212,800
Data Scientist III: $104,832 to $200,000
Manager III, Data Engineering: $76,190 to $201,813
Senior Manager, Data Engineering: $116,979 to $226,100

Stock Clerks and Order Fillers

Manager I, Operations: $22,006 to $30,389

Supply Chain Managers

Program Manager III: $132,600 to $150,000
Supply Chain Manager II: $104,500 to $155,480
Supply Chain Manager III: $124,800 to $155,000

Training and Development Specialists

Research Scientist I: $49,795 to $155,000

Transportation, Storage, and Distribution Managers

Manager I, Operations: $46,904 to $178,000
Manager II, Operations: $64,900 to $85,571
Manager III, Operations: $83,491 to $130,650
Pathways Operations Manager - MBA: $82,659 to $152,300
Product Manager III: $120,370 to $155,000
Program Manager II: $88,700 to $129,800
Program Manager III - MBA: $77,771 to $163,300.00
Senior Manager, Operations: $90,230 to $149,600

Validation Engineers

Hardware Development Engineer I: $64,189 to $145,000
Hardware Development Engineer III: $105,643 to $178,000
Industry Specialist II: $85,946 to $165,800

Sun, 02 Oct 2022 21:35:00 -0500 en-US text/html https://www.businessinsider.com/amazon-salaries-pay-compensation-engineers-data-scientists-analysts-2022-9
Killexams : Amazon knew seller data was used to boost company sales

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Amazon CEO Jeff Bezos told U.S. lawmakers last year that the company has a policy prohibiting employees from using data on specific sellers to help boost its own sales. 

“I can’t guarantee you that that policy has never been violated,” he added.

Now it's clear why he chose his words so carefully. 

An internal audit seen by POLITICO warned Amazon's senior leadership in 2015 that 4,700 of its workforce working on its own sales had unauthorized access to sensitive third-party seller data on the platform — even identifying one case in which an employee used the access to Improve sales. 

Since then, reports of employees using third-party seller information to bolster Amazon's own sales and evidence of lax IT access controls at the company suggest that efforts to fix the issue have been lackluster.

The revelations come as trustbusters worldwide are increasingly targeting Amazon, including over how it uses third-party seller data to boost its own offerings. The European Commission opened an investigation into precisely this issue in November 2020, with preliminary findings suggesting Amazon had breached EU competition law.

“This is fuel for the suspicions I had,” Dutch internet entrepreneur Peter Sorber said when told about the audit. Sorber sold children's clothes on Amazon, but 18 months after setting up his "Brandkids" store on the platform and entering the required sales data, his products disappeared from the search rankings.

“You cannot ask a retailer to show his entire story with all sales statistics and then show that to your own purchasers. This is worse than not done. This is simply unfair competition,” Sorber said.

An Amazon spokesperson said that like all companies, it audits its policies for compliance and makes improvements based on its findings. "This includes Amazon’s internal seller data protection policy, which limits the use of seller data.”

Amazon has long denied reports that employees access data on individual sellers to develop competing products. Instead, it says it uses aggregated data in a way that is common across retail.

But according to the internal audit document, Amazon bigwigs including Jeff Wilke, the company’s number two until he left in March this year, and current General Counsel David Zapolsky knew that insufficiently robust access restrictions meant scores of insiders could inappropriately access seller-specific data. 

“Permissions are not adequately restricted, making it possible for unauthorized users to view Seller-specific information such as performance history and authentication keys, edit inventory levels and pricing, and manage returns,” reads the report, which noted that an earlier internal audit had identified similar failings in 2010.

“We identified one Vendor Manager who inappropriately reviewed a Seller’s on-hand inventory to Improve the likelihood and timing of the Vendor Manager winning buy-box,” the 2015 report said, in reference to a much coveted listing that sellers on the platform compete fiercely over since it drives 80 percent of sales.

Lax controls

Amazon said it would not comment on any action taken against the vendor manager in question for reasons of privacy. It said its employees are only permitted to use seller-specific data to support that seller, to protect Amazon’s customers or to run Amazon’s store by, for example, deciding how to allocate inventory space among sellers within a warehouse.

A former employee cast doubt on Amazon's internal controls.

“There was an access control system that allowed people who had the motivation to be good at their job to take data they weren't supposed to have,” said a person who worked in information security at Amazon after the report came out and spoke on a condition of anonymity because of fear of retaliation. 

Despite knowing about insufficient access restrictions as far back as 2010, court cases, media reports and accounts of employees since then suggest that Amazon has done too little to prevent its retail staff from inappropriately using seller information to boost its own sales.

In the 2015 audit, Amazon middle management acknowledged and set out a plan to remedy the problems raised in the report. But the former information security insider called the follow-up “murky” and said problems related to the digital tool used to access accounts lasted at least until 2018.

"Compliance for the sake of compliance was not well-received [by Amazon leadership]. Compliance that could meet business goals could have some success," said the information security professional, who had raised the issue of access restrictions internally.

Regulators have been circling around Amazon’s dual role as a platform and seller for some time. 

The European Commission in November 2020 pressed charges against the tech giant for "systematically relying on non-public business data of independent sellers who sell on its marketplace, to the benefit of Amazon's own retail business, which directly competes with those third-party sellers."

While acknowledging that data on individual sellers is part of the investigation, EU Competition Commissioner Margrethe Vestager, when issuing the charges, said her case against Amazon “is more on big data” — or the e-commerce platform's analysis of large data sets to drive decision-making.

Asked if the EU executive had reviewed the audit report as part of its Amazon data probe, the Commission said it “cannot comment on leaked documents” and that its “investigation is ongoing.”

Two people familiar with the matter said the Commission has seen the report.

EU competition experts argue that going after the use of individual data would be the easier way for the Commission to take on Amazon.

“The use of aggregate data is more difficult because the average supermarket does it too,” said a lawyer who reviewed POLITICO’s findings on a condition of anonymity because his firm represents a complainant in the case.

'Spoofing' issue

While Amazon's dual role as a platform and seller has become a high-profile concern of antitrust watchdogs on both sides of the Atlantic, the digital tool that made abuse possible has so far received little public attention.

The vendor manager singled out in the audit report used this tool — internally referred to as "spoofer access" — to conceal their identity and access the account as the seller, to view and edit the account profile, the inventory and the pricing of the products and to cancel orders.

According to industry standards, account access should be limited to certain people within the company. But the audit report said that Amazon left its spoofer access wide open to unauthorized access by employees across the world — including in China — to access and modify sensitive information.

It’s not the first time the way Amazon controls access to its systems internally has faced heat.

In a POLITICO investigation published in February, former information security insiders accused Amazon of exposing millions of people’s data to breaches because it fails to properly police access.

In that report, a second former high-level information security insider described the quality of access controls that Amazon has in place as “appalling,” and that they “would not have passed muster with most auditors.” A third insider confirmed that reams of personal information were accessible to people who did not have the appropriate role or responsibility. Amazon rejected those allegations.

“All Amazon's tools are built in such a way that you can use them for whatever purpose you want them to. That is the basic principle of how Amazon grew that quickly,” the first insider said.

Not only did spoofing leave few digital traces for sellers, it also hampered Amazon's ability to monitor abuse, with the 2015 audit detailing how activity logs were "only retained for 30 days, and do not provide sufficient data to investigate Spoofer activity.” This could imply that actual abuse was much more widespread than the single case identified in the report, which would correspond to many third-party sellers’ suspicions. The company declined to comment on whether the spoofer tool is still used internally.

Occasionally, stories of Amazon's internal access woes have reached the outside world, with several cases of fraud and pranks from angry employees making headlines.

As recently as September 2020, U.S. authorities accused Amazon insiders of leaking reams of data, shutting down third-party seller accounts and manipulating product reviews in return for bribes in a scheme that lasted three years and resulted in around $100 million in losses for the sellers and the company.

In January 2016, a story went viral of an Amazon customer in Ireland who complained about the service and later discovered a giant dildo was added to his shopping cart, probably by the employee who felt offended.

Amazon’s system of spoofer access seems to have been publicly name-checked only once, after an FBI agent discovered Amazon employee Vu Anh Nguyen used the access to "falsely and fraudulently issue $96,508.13 in refunds to himself and others."

When Amazon itself fell victim to spoofing in 2003, because fraudsters had used its identity to send huge amounts of spam emails, Amazon’s current head of legal David Zapolsky said: “Spoofers lie about who's really sending these emails. Spoofing is forgery, and we're going after spoofers to the full extent of the law."

Want more analysis from POLITICO? POLITICO Pro is our premium intelligence service for professionals. From financial services to trade, technology, cybersecurity and more, Pro delivers real time intelligence, deep insight and breaking scoops you need to keep one step ahead. Email [email protected] to request a complimentary trial.
Thu, 13 Oct 2022 22:44:00 -0500 en-US text/html https://www.politico.eu/article/amazon-seller-data-company-sales/
Killexams : Tour Amazon’s dream home, where every appliance is also a spy

You may not realize all the ways Amazon is watching you.

No other Big Tech company reaches deeper into domestic life. Two-thirds of Americans who shop on Amazon own at least one of its smart gadgets, according to Consumer Intelligence Research Partners. Amazon now makes (or has acquired) more than two dozen types of domestic devices and services, from the garage to the bathroom.

All devices generate data. But from years of reviewing technology, I’ve learned Amazon collects more data than almost any other company. Amazon says all that personal information helps power an “ambient intelligence” to make your home smart. It’s the Jetsons dream.

But it’s also a surveillance nightmare. Many of Amazon’s products contribute to its detailed profile of you, helping it know you better than you know yourself.

Amazon says it doesn’t “sell” our data, but there aren’t many U.S. laws to restrict how it uses the information. Data that seems useless today could look different tomorrow after it gets reanalyzed, stolen or handed to a government. (Amazon founder Jeff Bezos owns The Washington Post.)

We each have to decide how much of our lives we’re comfortable with one company tracking. Scroll below to see what Amazon’s products and services could reveal about you.

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Echo speaker

Among the best-selling speakers in history, Echos respond to the wake word “Alexa” to summon the voice assistant to play music, answer questions, shop and control other devices.

What it knows: Collects audio recordings through an always-on microphone; keeps voice IDs to differentiate users; detects coughs, barks, snores and other sounds; logs music and news consumption; logs smart-home device activity and temperature; detects presence of people though ultrasound.

Why that matters: It counts snores? Yes, if you turn that on. Alexa can hear more than you might realize.

Amazon touts privacy controls like a physical microphone mute button, but when I downloaded my Alexa voice history, I found the Echo had recorded many sensitive conversations after its microphone activated unintentionally. (Amazon says its systems now double check whether you intended to say the wake word and label accidental recordings.)

Only after years of criticism did Amazon add a setting to not keep any audio recordings.

“Providing customers with transparency and control over their information has always been incredibly important to Amazon, and we believe we’ve been very good stewards of peoples’ data,” says spokeswoman Kristy Schmidt.

Ring doorbell

Acquired by Amazon in 2018, Ring doorbells have tiny cameras inside that let you live-stream, record and interact with whomever is at your doorstep — even if you’re not home.

What it knows: Live and recorded video, audio and photos of the outside of your house; when people come and go and you receive packages; status of linked devices like lights.

Why that matters: You’re not the only one who wants to peer through your doorbell. Police have made tens of thousands of requests for Ring video clips, and Amazon has handed footage to police without owners’ permission at least 11 times this year. (Amazon says it reserves the right to respond to emergency police requests when they relate to matters of life and death.)

Ring brought surveillance cameras to millions of more homes, igniting a privacy debate about recording neighbors without permission.

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Fire TV or Omni TV set

The streaming devices allow you to watch video from Amazon and other services on any TV. The dedicated Omni TV set also contains microphones to talk to Alexa, displays information, and even springs to life when someone enters the room.

What it knows: What and when you stream on Prime Video; when you open or close third-party streaming apps; records audio for Alexa queries; the Omni TV also records information about what specific programs you watch using an over-the-air antenna.

Why that matters: It can reveal your interests, politics, joys and embarrassments — and it’s easy to forget Amazon is helping your TV watch back.

Kindle or Fire Tablet

They are Amazon’s answer to Apple’s iPad for memorizing books, using apps or streaming entertainment.

What it knows: What and when you read and watch entertainment and news; when you open, close and how long you use third-party apps; your location.

Why that matters: Amazon knows exactly how fast you read and how far you actually got through your last novel. Kindles and Fire Tablets are another way Amazon gets to know your tastes, which helps it sell you things.

Smart lights, switches or shades integrated with Alexa

Connecting these devices to Alexa allows you to control and automate your home, such as making lights turn off on a schedule, operate by voice or activate automatically when triggered by another sensor or device. Amazon says Alexa can interoperate with over 140,000 products.

What it knows: When and where in your house you turn lights on or off; energy use.

Why that matters: These devices add to a body of seemingly meaningless data that could help Amazon make inferences about daily rituals, power use and more. Amazon says it doesn’t use this data for advertising.

Unlike the privacy settings for Alexa voice recordings, Amazon offers no way to tell it to stop storing data from connected smart-home devices. (You can only set it to auto-delete after 3 or 18 months.) When I downloaded the data Amazon had collected about the third party Alexa-connected devices in my house, it contained more than 600,000 data points since 2019.

“Data enables, improves, and personalizes the features and experiences our customers enjoy,” says Schmidt, the Amazon spokeswoman.

Halo band

A health-tracking bracelet with a microphone and an app that tells you everything that’s wrong with you.

What it knows: Your activity and movement; heart rate; weight; sleep patterns; your voice (for tone analysis); images of your body for estimating body fat; food consumption, preferences and shopping lists.

Why that matters: Amazon wants to be your artificial-intelligence doctor, or, at least, life coach. But the Halo band can be invasive. Amazon says it doesn’t sell your body data, share it without your permission or use it to target you with sales pitches — but that still leaves plenty of other ways for the company to mine your information.

Echo Show

An Alexa smart speaker with a camera and screen for video calls, recipes and sharing family information.

What it knows: Collects most of the data from standard microphone-equipped Echo speakers, along with facial recognition maps for individual users (stored and processed locally); records video of areas in view of the camera; logs how you interact with on-screen widgets and skills; detects smoke alarms, glass-breaking or other activities.

Why that matters: The addition of a camera gives Amazon another view into your home. On some Echo Show models, the camera is always passively scanning for movement or faces, and Amazon could retain records about the faces it sees.

Echo devices also use your life to feed advertising. Researchers recently discovered Amazon uses data from how you interact with Alexa to target ads you see on Amazon and other sites where Amazon places ads. (You can opt out of Amazon ad profiling at this link if you log in.)

“We don’t sell customer data to third parties or use customer data for purposes that haven’t been disclosed to customers,” Schmidt says.

Echo Auto

A small speaker that brings Alexa to the car by tethering to your smartphone for a data connection.

What it knows: Collects most of the data from standard microphone-equipped Echo speakers, along with the location of your car; whom you call with Alexa.

Why that matters: Cars can reveal a lot about their owners, such as where they work, play and shop, and how they drive. Echo Auto gives Amazon the ability to record your car’s location while you’re on the road, and Amazon wouldn’t say how much of that data it keeps.

Garage door with Alexa or Amazon Key integration

The system allows you to open and close your garage door over the internet and share access for package deliveries through Amazon’s Key service.

What it knows: When you open and close the garage door; when you get deliveries.

Why that matters: You’re basically giving Amazon a key to your house and allowing it to know when you come and go.

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Eero WiFi router

Another Amazon acquisition, Eero is a mesh-router system that can help ensure coverage gets to every corner of your house.

What it knows: Information about devices connected to your home network; statistics about data usage; performance statistics, including network speeds and internet service provider.

Why that matters: Eero started out as a less-invasive product, but questions linger about how Amazon could make use of information about the devices on your network.

Roomba vacuum cleaner

A vacuum cleaner that automatically roams around your house to clean, which Amazon is acquiring in a still-pending deal for $1.7 billion.

What it knows: Camera identifies obstacles and layout of rooms and furniture; when, how often and where you clean.

Why that matters: When the deal was announced, some Roomba owners balked at the idea that Amazon might gain access to maps of their home, created by the robots to help them clean. Even the vacuum data adds to Amazon’s inferences about your cleaning — and mess. Amazon declined to comment on the Roomba’s data practices because the acquisition has not closed.

Toilet with Alexa integration

The system allows you to create personalized settings for your toilet, including a preferred temperature and ambiance. You can even flush it with your voice.

What it knows: When you flush, or activate a cleansing spray or heated seat.

Why that matters: You can’t get much more intimate than your bathroom time.

Ring camera and spotlight

Online security cameras, some with motion-activated lights.

What it knows: Live and recorded video, audio and photos of outside or inside your house; radar to detect and identify activity; status of linked devices, like lights.

Why that matters: Ring video isn’t just staying inside the home. Amazon recently turned Ring clips into a reality TV comedy show, which frames surveillance as fun.

Ring also keeps records of some of what it learns from your cameras. When I downloaded my Ring data (use this link to obtain yours), it included more than 25,000 entries for each time its cameras noticed motion outside my home. Ring wouldn’t delete those records without deactivating the entire account.

Ring security system

A network of alarms and sensors that work with Ring cameras and can be connected to a monitoring service to request help from police or other emergency services.

What it knows: When you are home or away; when motion, window and door sensors are activated; your location; status of linked devices, like lights.

Why that matters: For greater security, Ring wants you to collect even more data about your home and its inhabitants. But it offers one nod to privacy: The Ring Alarm Pro version gives you the ability to store and process Ring video locally instead of in Amazon’s remote systems, making it harder for others (including law enforcement) to access the records.

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Echo Frames

These glasses, with built-in speakers and a microphone, take voice commands any time, anywhere.

What it knows: Collects most of the data from standard microphone-equipped Echo speakers, collected directly from your face.

Why that matters: Smart glasses raise surveillance concerns, because it isn’t necessarily clear to those around you that the device could be recording them. Amazon says Frames are designed to respond only to queries initiated by the voice of their owner.

Ring Always Home Cam drone

A quadcopter with a camera that flies around the inside of your house to show you what’s going on when you’re not around.

What it knows: Live and recorded video along trained flight paths; layout of house for flight patterns; works with Ring Security System to know when there’s movement inside the house.

Why that matters: A drone brings Ring surveillance inside the home and leaves almost no corner unobserved. Could this device also be a gateway for Amazon to get people more comfortable with the idea of its delivery agents or workers coming inside homes?

Amazon said it would have more information about how its drone works when it launches.

Halo Rise

A bedside lamp that helps people track their sleep cycles and wake up gently with light.

What it knows: Radar reports on the nocturnal activity of the person sleeping closest to it; when you go to bed and wake up; able to interact with other Alexa-operated smart-home devices.

Why that matters: This device doesn’t use a camera or sensor on your body, but it still gathers lots of data about your breathing and movement, and it generates inferences about your wellness from them. Amazon says it doesn’t share this intimate data without your explicit permission, and its employees cannot identify the customers associated with Halo data.

Smart Soap Dispenser

A bottle that automatically dispenses soap, lights up a 20-second timer and can direct an Echo speaker to begin playing songs or jokes while you wash.

What it knows: When you wash your hands through a motion detector.

Why that matters: We don’t know what Amazon could do with data about your personal hygiene. Amazon says it needs the hand-washing data to help provide functionality.

One Medical membership or Amazon Pharmacy

One Medical is a nationwide subscription-based primary care provider that leans into technology for in-person, digital, and virtual care services. It is being acquired by Amazon in a still-pending deal. Amazon Pharmacy allows prescriptions to be shipped to your house, built out of an online pharmacy called PillPack.

What it knows: The services know your medical history, medications and body measurements. Amazon Pharmacy knows when and how often you order drugs.

Why that matters: Your body is the latest frontier for Amazon’s data ambitions. “As required by law, Amazon will never share One Medical customers’ personal health information outside of One Medical for advertising or marketing purposes of other Amazon products and services without clear permission from the customer,” said the company when it announced the acquisition. While your health information is covered by a federal privacy law, tech companies like Amazon are experts at getting around its limitations by convincing people to share their personal data for purposes that aren’t covered by the law.

Dash Smart Shelf

This shelf fits into your pantry and monitors when you’re running low on a particular product, so Amazon can automatically reorder.

What it knows: What products are on your shelf; when you’re running low or completely out of the product; when you’ve bought more.

Why that matters: This is one device where it’s clear why Amazon wants to have the data: to sell you more stuff from Amazon.

Whole Foods

Amazon bought the grocery chain in 2017 for more than $13.7 billion and offers Prime members home grocery delivery.

What it knows: What you purchase and eat, if you enter a Prime membership discount code at checkout; the details of your hand used for palm payment verification in some stores.

Why that matters: Your grocery purchases deliver Amazon insight into your lifestyle, which Amazon says it uses to make product recommendations.

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Smart Air Quality monitor

The system measures five key areas of air quality and can automatically turn on a nearby fan or a purifier if the air quality drops.

What it knows: Sensor readings about particulate matter, volatile organic compounds, carbon monoxide, humidity and temperature stored for 30 days.

Why that matters: Amazon even knows about the air that you breathe, although it says it doesn’t use that data for advertising.

Basics Microwave

It’s a microwave that connects to WiFi, so you can heat up your food by asking Alexa to do it with the right settings.

What it knows: What and how long you’re cooking, if it’s operated through Alexa; how much popcorn you eat with an automatic reorder service.

Why that matters: The upside: You don’t have to look up how long to cook a potato. The downside: Amazon will now have a record of every time a family with this microwave cooks a potato.

Smart Thermostat

The device allows you to set up programs to optimize energy use and control your heater or air conditioner from afar.

What it knows: Home temperature; “hunches” about when you’re home, away or asleep; energy use.

Why that matters: The small data points can look meaningless, but they add up to a picture of your daily routines.

Astro robot

A domestic robot that uses cameras and other sensors to navigate your house (but doesn’t vacuum).

What it knows: Live and recorded video inside your house through a periscope camera on autonomous and directed patrols; layout of house; sound triggers, such as glass breaking or smoke alarms; presence and faces of people (through a visual ID processed on device); audio recordings of Alexa queries.

Why that matters: Robots look cute, but Astro is the culmination of Amazon’s surveillance capabilities. Astro recently gained the ability to be controlled by remote security guards for monitoring and even responding to situations. Nobody ever thought of Rosie the robot on Jetsons as a security guard, but so far, that’s Amazon’s most persuasive use for a domestic robot.

Wed, 12 Oct 2022 13:09:00 -0500 en text/html https://www.washingtonpost.com/technology/interactive/2022/amazon-smart-home/
Killexams : BMW, Amazon Web Services collaborate on vehicle data software
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Amazon Web Services Inc. will collaborate with the BMW Group to create cloud software to deliver and manage data generated by connected vehicles.

The software is designed to aggregate vehicle data from multiple sources to expedite development of features and enhance software life cycle management. The software will also provide after-sale vehicle and driver-personalization features via over-the-air updates, Amazon said.

Most automakers have for years understood the value of data to their business, said Alex Oyler, director automotive technology research and consulting firm at SBD Automotive.

"But practical challenges in the collection and distribution of this data in a safe, secure and compliant manner presented economic and logistical challenges that have been difficult to overcome," Oyler said.

The availability of automotive-specific cloud services and the advent of in-vehicle data processing technologies make it possible for automakers like BMW to capitalize on vehicle data assets, he said.

The software automatically collects vehicle data in real time, examines the health of the source and manages access to the data to meet governance policies, AWS said. It uses AWS security protocols and process the data according to privacy requirements and individual client preferences.

AWS processing capabilities such as analytics, machine learning, and computing allow BMW Group to use the data to develop new vehicle features and applications. Only certified in BMW Group divisions such as data science, artificial intelligence, business intelligence and vehicle application development will have access to the data, AWS said.

Neue Klasse will process around three times the vehicle data compared to the current generation of connected BMW vehicles, said Nicolai Krämer, vice president of Vehicle Connectivity Platforms for BMW Group.

"Rapid, data-fueled innovation is critical to unlocking next-generation vehicle capabilities for automotive organizations," said Sarah Cooper, general manager of AWS Industry Products in a statement.

BMW will be the first to deploy the software. It will be offered to other automakers to add features such as electric vehicle range enhancements and machine learning for autonomous operation throughout the vehicle life cycle, AWS said.

Thu, 13 Oct 2022 11:03:00 -0500 en text/html https://www.autonews.com/mobility-report/bmw-amazon-collaborate-vehicle-data-software
Killexams : Amazon shoppers shrug off second Prime Day sale

A worker delivers Amazon packages in San Francisco, California, US, on Wednesday, Oct. 5, 2022. Amazon's Prime Early Access Sale is on through Oct. 12 to boost sales among cost-conscious consumers who are expected to start their holiday shopping even earlier this year.

Bloomberg | Bloomberg | Getty Images

Amazon shoppers appear to have shrugged off promotions for discounted phone chargers and air fryers during this week's Prime Day-like sales bonanza.

The 48-hour event, dubbed the Prime Early Access sale, ran through Wednesday. For Amazon, the event tested how members of its Prime subscription program would respond to two major discount events in the same year, after the company's main Prime Day sale in July.

Amazon on Thursday said that tens of millions of Prime members ordered more than 100 million items from third-party vendors. It disclosed little else about the results, such as sales figures.

But data collected by third-party analysts gives a deeper look into how the Prime Day sequel went over with shoppers compared to Amazon's sales event in July.

Sales during this week's event seemed "lighter" compared to Prime Day in July, Bank of America analysts said. They estimate Amazon brought in $5.7 billion in revenue from the Prime Early Access Sale vs. $7.5 billion in July.

Commerce data company Klover said it observed slower spending and volume, noting transaction frequency was down 30% between the July event and October event.

The average spend per order during the Prime Early Access Sale was $46.68, down from $60.29 on Prime Day, according to market research firm Numerator. Meanwhile, most categories saw a decline in sales relative to the July sale — exceptions included toys; baby items; and books, video and other media, Numerator found.

Not everyone is convinced that the Amazon sale was a flop. Even if the 48-hour event failed to exceed Prime Day sales, Amazon still likely saw more sales on Tuesday and Wednesday than it would on a typical day, said Juozas Kaziukenas, founder of research firm Marketplace Pulse.

"I think it did fine for what Amazon was trying to do, which was to reduce the amount of products they have in their warehouses," Kaziukenas said.

Amazon, Walmart, Target and many other major retailers are grappling with a glut of inventory after long-delayed orders of items that were hot sellers during the pandemic arrived, only to be passed over by shoppers whose habits have since shifted. Companies are now opting to kick off holiday sales sooner than ever with the hope that it will help clear out unwanted inventory.

Those challenges may have pushed more brands to run promotions during the sale. For example, Peloton, which has wrestled with excess inventory, was one of the top-selling items.

Amazon may also be looking to juice sales as it confronts slowing revenue growth and what's likely to be a lackluster holiday shopping season. Online spending throughout the holiday season is expected to grow 2.5%, according to Adobe, marking the slowest growth since the firm began tracking the figure in 2015.

Discount events such as the Prime Early Access sale are a relatively low cost way to goose sales, Kaziukenas said.

"The only cost is the discount, which is either coming from sellers or brands," he said. "In terms of putting up the actual event, it's a cheap thing for them to do. They could do it every month if they wanted to."

WATCH: Amazon gets in front of holiday shopping with second Prime Day of the year

Amazon gets in front of holiday shopping with second Prime Day of the year

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Sat, 15 Oct 2022 02:40:00 -0500 en text/html https://www.cnbc.com/2022/10/14/amazon-shoppers-shrug-off-second-prime-day-sale.html
Killexams : Here’s what type of data Amazon devices are collecting about you

The Washington Post Technology Columnist Geoffrey Fowler joins Yahoo Finance Live to discuss Amazon’s digital surveillance network and what type of data Amazon is collecting about consumers.

Video transcript

- All right. Well, while you might soon be able to be unboxing some of these new shiny Amazon devices, the online retail giant's slew of smart home devices are collecting a treasure trove of data from its millions of customers. So what does Amazon know about you? And what's it doing with that information? Well, joining us now to discuss this is "Washington Post" technology columnist Geoff Fowler. Good to have you on the show. Obviously, even when we were looking at the data, 12% of the purchases made there for Amazon Prime on these smart devices. I've got a Ring. I've got an Echo. What information do these devices collect for Amazon?

GEOFF FOWLER: Well, are you ready to get a little creeped out? Because I spent the last couple of weeks just trying to tally it all up. I'm a tech columnist. And I have many of these products in my own home or I've used them over the years. So I just tried to add it all up. And I made a little list to share with you. Just the top level here is Amazon-- if you get their dream home, if you buy all their gadgets, they'll gather data about you when you're talking, when you're sleeping, when you walk by them, when you show your face, when you cough, when you snore, when you come home or leave home, when you turn on the lights, when you turn up the heat, when you play music, when you watch TV.

I mean, I could keep going and going and going with this list. The point is Amazon has pushed much further than any other big tech company not only to make devices for the smart home, but also to make sure that they're collecting data out of them that they can use for their own purposes.

- I have to point out Jeff Bezos happens to own the "Washington Post." So it's listening to you right now, maybe the boss is. After knowing all this, do you still have an Amazon smart device plugged in your home? And what was the most concerning form of data that it is recording?

GEOFF FOWLER: Yeah. So I think the one that is the most popular in America is the Echo Speaker. It's, in fact, one of the best-selling speakers of all time. I do have some in my house. I'm a little bit unusual because I'm the tech guy for the "Washington Post." So my job is to have all of the things. So I also have the Apple one and I have the Google one. In terms of what is the most disturbing kind of information, for me, it's the stuff where Amazon just doesn't even deliver you a choice for them to collect all this data and to keep it.

For example, their ring doorbells and security cameras, they used to tell people that, oh, you're totally in control of what happens with that data. But we've now learned that there are about a dozen cases so far this year where Amazon has just hand it over that footage to police without the permission of their owners. So I think stuff like that is really the areas where Americans are going to get kind of upset here.

- So, Jeff, two things. Is this something that people can opt out of if they're not comfortable with that? And also, from what I understand, Amazon doesn't sell the data. So then what are they actually doing with it?

GEOFF FOWLER: Yeah. So two really good points. This is sort of what Amazon always likes to say. It's actually lines that they borrowed from Facebook before. Facebook also doesn't sell our data, yet they seem to have found plenty of use for it. And Facebook also offers you lots of little opt-out buttons. The truth is the defaults matter. And the defaults for many of Amazon's services just collect a lot more data. They just know that you're not going to bother to go in and change the setting that tells them not to keep recordings of stuff that goes on in your house, for example.

So, yes, you can do it. And, in fact, we made a guide at the "Washington Post" as our privacy reset guide where we'll walk you through a bunch of the settings you can adjust for Amazon to get them to collect less data. But most people really just aren't going to take the time. And that's kind of the problem.

- And now they've got this $140 Halo Rise, which tracks your breathing during your sleep. God knows what else. To what end? What do you think Amazon is trying to accomplish here?

GEOFF FOWLER: Amazon is-- it understands that data is power. It's the oil of our economy. And with all of this data about our lives, they can do a lot of stuff. I mean, many of their more accurate acquisitions, in fact, and products have involved our bodies. They're trying to buy One Medical. They bought PillPack, the pharmacy company.

Products like the Halo, and they also have a Halo Tracker, are gathering data about their body. One of their visions is to become kind of the eye doctor and to be able to do that, to be able to provide useful information to people, they just need to know a lot about our bodies. So we are giving it to them. And in some cases, we're paying them to let them gather data about us that they can then analyze and try to use and sell back to us later.

- Makes me feel even worse. We've talked about Echo and Ring. But even things like like smart blinds. For people who are sort of drawing comparisons with things like Skynet and sort of wondering where does this go from here, where does this-- in terms of AI and robotics. You've got your Roomba being now nosy as it's vacuuming your house. How should consumers take this? What should they take away from this report?

GEOFF FOWLER: Yeah. I think a couple of things. First of all, everybody's going to have to make their own decisions about what they're comfortable with a company knowing about them, and also what they're comfortable with one of the largest corporations in human history knowing about them. Amazon should get some pressure back from us for those of us who think that it's collecting too much and storing too much. And they should be hearing this. So I hope they're listening to our conversation here today because I think a lot of their customers feel this way.

The other thing is they don't have to design their products this way. We're often kind of given false choices as tech consumers that, well, either they're going to take all our data or we won't get to live in the future. And it's just not true. They don't have to design their products. And in fact, some of their competitors have not. If you look at the way that Apple, for example, handles a lot of smart home devices and data, they work very hard to make sure that they're not storing it, that they're not keeping it. So I think it's really just about us as consumers pushing back and saying, hey, we have some rights here too, Amazon.

- Of course, everybody wants your data, including Meta, who rolled out this new VR headset. $1,500. You got to try this thing out. Your thoughts on it. And your thoughts on the metaverse, where we are right now.

GEOFF FOWLER: Yeah. Well, since we were just talking about privacy, I'll tell you the one eyebrow-raising thing about this new headset is that it contains a whole bunch of cameras now on the inside that are looking at your eyes, your eyebrows, your cheeks, your mouth, you name it. And it's kind of a lot of information to know about our bodies. And I was really not satisfied with Meta's answer about how they were going to keep that data private.

So they say they're going to process it on the device. But they're still letting apps have access to it. So the question is, are we in a near future where, let's say, you're watching Netflix and Netflix could gather data about when you laugh at certain points in the show or when you're crying because that's the kind of thing that this technology would enable.

On the metaverse more broadly, it's been seven years since the first Facebook Oculus product came out, the Rift. I reviewed that at the time. And when I was sitting down looking through the six demos that Meta gave me of the new Quest Pro, I was kind of struck by we haven't really gotten very far. I think the term I used in my review for the post was it's the meh-taverse. It just doesn't really push the boundary that far yet. It's never felt further away, the idea that the metaverse is a place where lots of us in our normal everyday lives and our jobs and being creative are going to use this thing. It feels like they've really got a long ways to go.

- A long, long way to go. "Washington Post" tech columnist Geoff Fowler. Great to have you, man. I appreciate it.

GEOFF FOWLER: You bet.

Thu, 13 Oct 2022 09:00:00 -0500 en-SG text/html https://sg.finance.yahoo.com/video/type-data-amazon-devices-collecting-204727028.html
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