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Exam Code: ANCC-MSN Practice test 2022 by Killexams.com team
ANCC-MSN ANCC (RN-BC) Medical-Surgical Nursing

Exam ID : ANCC-MSN
Exam Title : Medical-Surgical Nursing Board Certification Examination
Questions : 125 (25 unscored)

The ANCC Medical-Surgical Nursing board certification examination is a competency based examination that provides a valid and reliable assessment of the entry-level clinical knowledge and skills of registered nurses in the medical-surgical specialty after initial RN licensure. Once you complete eligibility requirements to take the certification examination and successfully pass the exam, you are awarded the credential: Registered Nurse-Board Certified (RN-BC). This credential is valid for 5 years. You can continue to use this credential by maintaining your license to practice and meeting the renewal requirements in place at the time of your certification renewal. The Accreditation Board for Specialty Nursing Certification accredits this ANCC certification.

There are 150 questions on this examination. Of these, 125 are scored questions and 25 are pretest questions that are not scored. Pretest questions are used to determine how well these questions will perform before they are used on the scored portion of the examination. The pretest questions cannot be distinguished from those that will be scored, so it is important for a candidate to answer all questions. A candidate's score, however, is based solely on the 125 scored questions. Performance on pretest questions does not affect a candidate's score.

Category Content Domain Number of Questions Percentage
I Assessment and Diagnosis 52 42%
II Planning, Implementation, and Evaluation 58 46%
III Professional Role 15 12%
TOTAL 125 100%

I Assessment and Diagnosis
A. Skill
1. Health history collection
2. Physical assessment (e.g., disease process, review of systems, activities of daily living)
3. Psychosocial assessment (e.g., developmental stages, suicide risk, abuse, substance use disorders)
4. Cognitive assessment (e.g., neuro status, developmental age, impairment)
5. Diagnostic and laboratory testing (e.g., patient preparation, response to abnormal values, medication considerations)
6. Nursing diagnosis identification and prioritization
B. Knowledge
1. Fluids and electrolytes (e.g., imbalances, disease-related, blood products)
II Planning, Implementation, and Evaluation
A. Skill
1. Nursing care planning (e.g., interventions, modifications, outcomes)
2. Postoperative complication prevention and management (e.g., bleeding, infection, emboli)
3. Patient teaching (i.e., learning preferences, barriers, and confirmation)
B. Knowledge
1. Education subjects (e.g., self-management, acute and chronic conditions, population specific)
2. Patient safety measures (e.g., screening tools, infection prevention, restraints, medical equipment)
3. Non-pharmacologic treatments (e.g., complementary and alternative medicine, diversional activities)
4. Medication interactions and adverse effects (e.g., pain management, polypharmacy, drug-drug, food-drug)
5. Health and wellness promotion (e.g., screenings, vaccinations, healthy lifestyle modifications)
III Professional Role
A. Skill
1. Therapeutic communication (e.g., patient- and family-centered care, cultural competence)
B. Knowledge
1. Nursing ethics (e.g., evidence-based practice, advocacy)

ANCC (RN-BC) Medical-Surgical Nursing
Medical Medical-Surgical mission
Killexams : Medical Medical-Surgical mission - BingNews https://killexams.com/pass4sure/exam-detail/ANCC-MSN Search results Killexams : Medical Medical-Surgical mission - BingNews https://killexams.com/pass4sure/exam-detail/ANCC-MSN https://killexams.com/exam_list/Medical Killexams : An Experimental Surgical Robot Is Headed to The International Space Station

The MIRA surgical robot's hand. (Craig Chandler/UNL)

In the near future, NASA and other space agencies will send astronauts beyond Low Earth Orbit (LEO) for the first time in over fifty years.

But unlike the Apollo Era, these missions will consist of astronauts spending extended periods on the Moon and traveling to and from Mars (with a few months of surface operations in between).

Beyond that, there's also the planned commercialization of LEO and cis-Lunar space, meaning millions of people could live aboard space habitats and surface settlements well beyond Earth. 

This presents many challenges, which include the possibility that the sick and injured won't have licensed medical practitioners to perform potentially life-saving surgery.

To address this, Professor Shane Farritor and his colleagues at the University of Nebraska-Lincoln's (UNL) Nebraska Innovation Campus (NIC) have developed the Miniaturized In-vivo Robotic Assistant (MIRA).

In 2024, this portable miniaturized robotic-assisted surgery (RAS) platform will be flown to the International Space Station (ISS) for a test mission to evaluate its ability to perform medical procedures in space.

Farritor is the David and Nancy Lederer Professor of Engineering at the University of Nebraska who studied robotics at MIT. As part of his studies, he worked with the NASA Kennedy Space Center, Goddard Space Flight Center, and Jet Propulsion Laboratory in support of NASA's Mars Exploration Rover (MER) program.

This consisted of assisting in designing and assembling the Curiosity and Perseverance rovers, defining their motion planning, and inventing a process where the rover's Sun detectors are used to determine its direction of travel.

In 2006, he and Dmitry Oleynikov – a former University of Nebraska Medical Center (UNMC) professor of surgery – founded Virtual Incision, a startup company based at the NIC.

In April 2022, Farritor was named the inaugural winner of the Faculty IP Innovation and Commercialization Award – issued by the University of Nebraska for intellectual property.

For nearly 20 years, Farritor, Oleynikov, and their colleagues have been developing the MIRA robotic surgical suite, which has attracted over US$100 million in venture capital.

Recently, NASA awarded Virtual Incision a $100,000 grant through the US Department of Energy's (DoE) Established Program to Stimulate Competitive Research (EPSCoR) to help engineers and roboticists at the NIC prepare it for its test aboard the ISS.

Compared to conventional robotic surgical suites, MIRA offers two advantages. First, its instruments can be inserted through small incisions, allowing doctors to perform minimally-invasive operations (such as abdominal surgery and colon resections).

Second, the technology could allow for telemedicine, where surgeons can perform operations remotely and provide services to locations far from a medical facility. On Earth, this technology already allows doctors to assist people in faraway locations where services are not readily available.

However, the MIRA technology has the added benefit of performing operations autonomously, meaning that astronauts serving on the Moon and Mars could receive medical care without the need for a human surgeon.

Said John Murphy, CEO of Virtual Incision, in a latest company press release:

"The Virtual Incision MIRA platform was designed to deliver the power of a mainframe robotic-assisted surgery device in a miniaturized size, with the goal of making RAS accessible in any operating room on the planet.

"Working with NASA aboard the space station will test how MIRA can make surgery accessible in even the most faraway places."

During the next year, Farritor will work with engineering graduate student Rachael Wagner to prep MIRA for operations aboard the ISS. Wagner began working with Farritor as an undergraduate student and took a position with Virtual Incision in 2018 after completing her bachelor's degree in mechanical engineering.

This will consist of writing software, configuring MIRA to fit inside an experiment locker, and testing the device to ensure it is rugged enough to survive being launched aboard a rocket and will function as needed in space.

In August 2021, MIRA successfully performed its first remote surgery as part of a clinical study under an Investigational Device Exemption (IDE) from the US Food and Drug Administration (FDA).

The procedure – performed by Dr. Michael A. Jobst at the Bryan Medical Center in Lincoln, Nebraska – consisted of a right hemicolectomy (where one-half of the colon is removed) and was accomplished with a single incision within the naval.

Said Dr. Jobst: "The MIRA platform is a true breakthrough platform for general surgery, and it is extremely gratifying to be the first surgeon in the world to use the system.

"The procedure went smoothly, and the patient is recovering well. I'm excited to play a part in taking the first steps toward increasing access to robotically assisted surgery, which has clear benefits for patients."

In another experiment, former astronaut Clayton Anderson (a retired NASA astronaut) operated MIRA from the Johnson Space Center, directing it to perform surgery-like tasks in an operating room at the University of Nebraska Medical Center – located 1450 kilometers (900 miles) away.

During its upcoming test aboard the ISS, MIRA will operate autonomously without the help of a controller. For the sake of this test, the robot will cut tautly stretched rubber bands (simulating skin) and push metal rings along a wire (simulating delicate operations).

"These simulations are very important because of all the data we will collect during the tests," said Wagner in a Nebraska News release.

This test will be the most autonomous operation of the robot so far, which is intended to conserve space station communications bandwidth and minimize the time astronauts spend with the experiment.

However, the goal of this mission is not to demonstrate the robot's autonomy (which is still limited) but to fine-tune the robot's operation in zero gravity. These experiments will help validate the technology for future long-duration missions in and beyond LEO.

As Farritor said: "NASA has ambitious plans for long-duration space travel, and it's important to test the capabilities of technology that may be beneficial during missions measured in months and years.

"MIRA continues to push the boundaries of what's possible in RAS, and we are pleased with its performance so far during clinical trials. We're excited to take it a step further and help identify what could be possible in the future as space travel is becoming more of a reality for mankind."

As humans travel farther and farther from Earth, they will need to be as self-sufficient as possible. On the Moon, Mars, and other locations in deep space, resupply missions are impractical, as is flying doctors or patients to and from these locations.

This means that in addition to being able to grow their own food, utilize local resources to meet their needs (ISRU), rely on bioregenerative life support systems, and generate electricity locally, they will need to provide essential services like medical care and surgery.

This article was originally published by Universe Today. Read the original article

Mon, 08 Aug 2022 18:07:00 -0500 en-gb text/html https://www.sciencealert.com/a-remote-surgical-robot-is-going-to-the-international-space-station
Killexams : Remote Surgical Robot Could Join Astronauts on Future Mars Missions

No matter how mentally and physically prepared they are, future astronauts bound for deep space can't escape their mortal restrictions. At some point during their long and isolated journeys, these pioneers might need medical care. But that's tough. In space, there are no hospitals.

Enter MIRA.

On Tuesday, scientists from the University of Nebraska-Lincoln said their invention of a small surgical robot -- called the miniaturized in vivo robotic assistant, or MIRA -- will board the International Space Station for zero-gravity testing in 2024. Ultimately, the team's hope is for MIRA to accompany astronauts as they fly toward Mars and zoom through the untouched outer reaches of space.

"As people go further and deeper into space, they might need to do surgery someday. We're working toward that goal," Shane Farritor said in a statement. Farritor is a professor of engineering at the University of Nebraska-Lincoln and co-founder of Virtual Incision, the company behind MIRA.

The 2-pound bot basically looks like a white rod with a duo of small armlike attachments on one end. These attachments are each adorned with two metal instruments. It's the product of nearly 20 years of development -- Virtual Incision has attained more than $100 million in venture capital investment since its genesis in 2006. To add to that, NASA recently awarded the University of Nebraska-Lincoln $100,000 to get the device ready for the 2024 journey. 

International Space Station

A view of the International Space Station, where MIRA will hopefully live in a few years.

NASA/Roscosmos

Already, according to a press release on the robotic surgeon, MIRA has helped with important procedures. Doctors have successfully used the instrument to perform minimally invasive colon resections, for instance, which involve removing part or all of a patient's colon.

If MIRA works well in space, a surgeon aboard the ISS could take advantage of the tech to help astronauts in need of medical assistance, without posing major risks to their bodies. MIRA could be especially important given the lack of personnel, time and tools on spacecraft.

Beyond that, the team says its technology could also allow ground-based surgeons to remotely work on a space-borne astronaut patient. As proof of principle, NASA astronaut Clayton Anderson took the robot's controls while situated at the Johnson Space Center in Houston and guided MIRA to perform surgerylike tasks in an operating room 900 miles away, at the University of Nebraska Medical Center. It worked.

This remote-control aspect of MIRA may also aid in surgeries closer to home one day -- an example the team gives is injured soldiers in the field who need advanced procedures calling for specialists stationed elsewhere. In fact, with that in mind, the US Army has also provided some funding for the MIRA project.

A black patient bed to which MIRA is attached and hovering above. Above MIRA, there are two surgical round light fixtures.

This is what MIRA attached to a patient bed might look like. 

Virtual Incision

Come 2024, we'll have a better idea of how MIRA fares in intense situations. 

If MIRA can survive the aggressive jostling that accompanies rocket launches, it'll reach the ISS and promptly be fit inside a space station experiment locker. Per the team, it'll probably be a year before astronauts conducting science experiments can put it into action. Then, once it's turned on, the robotic contraption will pretty much operate autonomously, Farritor said.

"The astronaut flips a switch, the process starts and the robot does its work by itself," he said. "Two hours later, the astronaut switches it off and it's done."

Recently, extraterrestrial surgery has become more talked about, given space agencies' goal of sending humans to other planets and coming up with new forms of transportation to access deep space. In April, NASA even "holoported" flight surgeon Dr. Josef Schmid onto the ISS as part of its endeavor to advance remote, cosmic medicine. Combined with MIRA, that mechanism suggests that one day life might truly be imitating Star Trek when it comes to health care.

Wed, 03 Aug 2022 03:23:00 -0500 See full bio en text/html https://www.cnet.com/science/space/remote-surgical-robot-could-join-astronauts-on-future-mars-missions/
Killexams : NASA grant will see Virtual Incision’s surgical robot go to space
Virtual Incision MIRA Platform
[Image from Virtual Incision]
Virtual Incision announced today that its MIRA platform will be used in a technology demonstration aboard the International Space Station (ISS).

Lincoln, Nebraska-based Virtual Incision received a grant from the National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA) to use the miniaturized robotic-associated surgery (RAS) platform on the 2024 technology demonstration mission.

MIRA includes a small, self-contained surgical device inserted through a single midline umbilical incision in the patient’s abdomen, allowing for complex, multi-quadrant abdominal surgeries utilizing existing minimally invasive tools and techniques that are familiar to surgeons.

The platform received IDE approval in October 2020, followed by approval for an IDE supplement in April. In November 2021, Virtual Incision completed a $46 million Series C financing round to support the robotic surgery platform.

It weighs approximately 2 pounds and fits within the tight spaces and mass requirements of a long-duration space mission. Once aboard the ISS, MIRA will operate inside a microwave-oven-sized experiment locker and perform activities that simulate those used in surgery, such as cutting simulated tissue and manipulating small objects.

“The Virtual Incision MIRA platform was designed to deliver the power of a mainframe robotic-assisted surgery device in a miniaturized size, with the goal of making RAS accessible in any operating room on the planet,” John Murphy, CEO of Virtual Incision, said in a news release. “Working with NASA aboard the space station will test how MIRA can make surgery accessible in even the most faraway places.”

NASA awarded its grant to the University of Nebraska-Lincoln through the Established Program to Stimulate Competitive Research (EPSCoR) at the University of Nebraska Omaha.

“NASA has ambitious plans for long-duration space travel, and it’s important to test the capabilities of technology that may be beneficial during missions measured in months and years,” said Shane Farritor, co-founder and CTO at Virtual Incision. “MIRA continues to push the boundaries of what’s possible in RAS, and we are pleased with its performance so far during clinical trials. We’re excited to take it a step further and help identify what could be possible in the future as space travel is becoming more of a reality for mankind.”

Tue, 02 Aug 2022 08:15:00 -0500 Sean Whooley en-US text/html https://www.massdevice.com/nasa-virtual-incision-mira-surgical-robot-space/
Killexams : Vicarious Surgical completes Beta 2 system design

Vicarious Surgical logo

Vicarious Surgical (NYSE:RBOT) continues to progress in the development of its Beta 2 robotic surgery platform, though supply chain disruption poses risks for the company’s timeline.

That appeared to be the big message out of the Waltham, Massachusetts–based surgical robotics company’s Q2 earnings report yesterday evening.

Vicarious Surgical’s technology uses proprietary human-like surgical robots combined with 3D visualization to transport surgeons inside the patient to perform minimally invasive surgery. CEO Adam Sachs noted during the company’s earnings call that updates to the previous Beta 1 system are focusing on ergonomic changes for surgeon comfort — and improved 3D visualization, sensing and motion capabilities. The idea is to enable the surgeon to move freely within the abdominal cavity with the system, he said.

“With significant and very positive feedback on the initial Beta 2 ergonomic prototypes, we have completed the Beta 2 design, and we are beginning the integration phase of the build,” Sachs said during the call, transcribed by Seeking Alpha. “This is our next step towards bringing our robotics platform to market and ultimately demonstrating its capabilities through a cadaveric eventual hernia procedure in a hospital setting, which we plan to share greater details around later this year.”

A month ago, Vicarious Surgical signed collaborative Center of Excellence agreements with Nashville, Tennessee–based HCA Healthcare and its 182 hospitals across 20 U.S. states and the United Kingdom — as well as University Hospitals Ventures, the innovation and commercialization arm of University Hospitals (UH) in northern Ohio.

Sachs said the agreements go much deeper than mere post-market surgeon training; they represent collaboration throughout the extensive development, clinical, verification, validation and launch phases of Vicarious Surgical’s robotic system.

Despite the strides the company is making, Sachs acknowledged that Vicarious Surgical has experienced limited semiconductor supply and shortages of chips and other hardware in latest months. “If these challenges continue, they can present a risk to our timeline.”

He added: “We continue to evaluate the details of our supply chain for opportunities to build internal redundancies and multi-source key components and enhance our product design to address constrained supply chain risk.”

For the quarter ended June 30, 2022, Vicarious Surgical saw an adjusted net loss of $19.1 million, or 16¢ per share. It was two pennies behind the 14¢ loss predicted by The Street. The company’s cash burn rate in Q2 was $15.7 million — with a projected full-year cash burn of $65 million to $75 million. The plan is to have roughly $100 million in cash and cash equivalents on hand by the end of the year.

BTIG analyst Ryan Zimmerman kept his Buy rating on Vicarious Surgical stock, even as he called out supply chain challenges as an unnecessary distraction: “We await RBOTs next clinical milestones, which include a potential demo of the system later this year at one of their Centers of Excellence.”

Investors reacted by sending RBOT shares down more than 8% to $4.06 apiece in after-hours trading. The following morning (Aug. 9), however, shares were up 2.1% at $4.53 apeice.

Tue, 09 Aug 2022 01:52:00 -0500 Chris Newmarker en-US text/html https://www.massdevice.com/vicarious-surgical-completes-beta2-design/
Killexams : Miniature surgical robot gets ready for a 2024 test mission aboard the ISS

A miniaturized robot invented by Nebraska’s Shane Farritor is on scheduled to blast off into space to showcase its skills.

NASA recently awarded the University of Nebraska-Lincoln $100,000 through the Established Program to Stimulate Competitive Research (EPSCoR) to ready the surgical robot for a 2024 test mission aboard the International Space Station.

NASA has been a long-term supporter of this research and, as a culmination of that effort, our robot will have a chance to fly on the International Space Station.”

Shane Farritor, professor of engineering, University of Nebraska-Lincoln

Farritor is co-founder of Virtual Incision, a startup company based on Nebraska Innovation Campus. For nearly 20 years, he and his colleagues have been developing the tiny surgical robot known as MIRA, short for “miniaturized in vivo robotic assistant.” The company has attracted more than $100 million in venture capital investment since its founding in 2006.

During the next year, Farritor and engineering graduate student Rachael Wagner will write software, configure MIRA to fit inside a space station experiment locker and exhaustively test the device to make sure it’s robust enough to survive launch and its systems will perform as anticipated in space. Then, they will wait a year or so for the robot to get its turn aboard the station.

Wagner, who is from Lincoln, began working with Farritor as an undergraduate student and took a position with Virtual Incision after completing her bachelor’s degree in mechanical engineering in 2018. A second graduate student may join the team later in 2022.

MIRA has two key advantages. First, it can be inserted through a small incision, enabling doctors to perform abdominal surgery in a minimally invasive manner. In previous tests, surgeons have successfully used the device to perform colon resections.

Secondly, the technology could allow surgeons to work remotely — perhaps someday repairing an astronaut’s ruptured appendix on a mission to Mars or removing shrapnel from a soldier injured by an IED thousands of miles distant.

In a previous experiment, retired NASA astronaut Clayton Anderson took the robot’s controls while at the Johnson Space Center in Houston, directing MIRA to perform surgery-like tasks in an operating room 900 miles away at the University of Nebraska Medical Center in Omaha.

During its upcoming trip aboard the space station, MIRA will work autonomously, without the guiding hand of a doctor or an astronaut. Inside a microwave oven-sized experiment locker, it will cut tautly stretched rubber bands and push metal rings along a wire, gestures that simulate those used in surgery.

“These simulations are very important because of all the data we will collect during the tests,” Wagner said.

It will be the most autonomous operation of the robot so far. Although Farritor anticipates MIRA will function on its own in 50 to 100 years, this mission’s goal is not autonomy, but to fine-tune the robot’s operation in zero gravity.

The device is being programmed to work autonomously to conserve space station communications bandwidth and to minimize the amount of time astronauts spend with the experiment.

“The astronaut flips a switch, the process starts and the robot does its work by itself,” Farritor said. “Two hours later, the astronaut switches it off and it’s done.”

Farritor, who is David and Nancy Lederer Professor of Engineering, serves as chief technology officer of Virtual Incision, founded with Dmitry Oleynikov, a former University of Nebraska Medical Center professor of surgery. In April 2022, Farritor was named the inaugural winner of the University of Nebraska system’s intellectual property award, the Faculty IP Innovation and Commercialization Award.

Both NASA and the U.S. Army have provided funding for Farritor’s robotics research.

“As people go further and deeper into space, they might need to do surgery someday,” Farritor said. “We’re working toward that goal.”

Tue, 02 Aug 2022 09:23:00 -0500 en text/html https://www.news-medical.net/news/20220802/Miniature-surgical-robot-gets-ready-for-a-2024-test-mission-aboard-the-ISS.aspx
Killexams : McKesson Medical-Surgical Supports National Health Center Week 2022

RICHMOND, Va.--(BUSINESS WIRE)--Aug 4, 2022--

McKesson Medical-Surgical, an affiliate of the McKesson Corporation, will participate as a silver sponsor of the National Association of Community Health Center (NACHC) National Health Center Week 2022 (NHCW) on Aug. 7-13. The theme of NHCW 2022 is “Community Health Centers: The Chemistry for Strong Communities.”

As a strong supporter of the nation’s community health centers, McKesson Medical-Surgical is a proud sponsor of seven events across the United States. McKesson Medical-Surgical will donate $1,000 per event and coordinate with these centers to support their local events. In addition, McKesson Medical-Surgical will contribute 175 kits of giveaway items for community health centers to distribute within their health care centers to patients and consumers, including lip balm, adhesive bandages and holders, hand sanitizer, toothpaste, tissues and other personal products.

The seven McKesson Medical-Surgical sponsored Community Health Center events for NHCW 2022 include Community Health Association of Spokane, Cumberland Family Medical Centers, East Boston Neighborhood Health Center, Eisner Health, Sun River Health, Tampa Family Health Centers and Terry Reilly Health Centers.

“Community Health Centers have been integral in the fight against the Coronavirus (COVID-19) throughout the pandemic by providing essential, accessible and equitable health care for our nation’s most vulnerable patients. In addition, nearly 30 million health center patients depend on a committed network of clinicians, providers and staff delivering comprehensive, effective primary care throughout underserved communities. Our NHCW sponsorships recognize the critical work being done by these organizations and their steadfast dedication to eliminate barriers to healthcare,” said Ryan Klosky, director of Community Health Center Development, McKesson Medical-Surgical.

About McKesson Medical-Surgical

McKesson Medical-Surgical Inc. is an affiliate of the McKesson Corporation. McKesson Corporation is a global leader in healthcare supply chain management solutions, retail pharmacy, community oncology and specialty care, and healthcare information solutions. McKesson has been named the “Most Admired Company” in the healthcare wholesaler category by FORTUNE, a “Best Place to Work” by the Human Rights Campaign Foundation, and a top military-friendly company by Military Friendly. McKesson Medical-Surgical works with health systems, physician offices, extended care providers, in-home patients, labs, payers and others across the spectrum of care to build healthier organizations that deliver better care to patients in every setting. McKesson Medical-Surgical supports its customers in their operational, financial, and clinical performance with solutions that include pharmaceutical and medical-surgical supply management, healthcare information technology, and business and clinical services. For more information, visit mms.mckesson.com.

About National Health Center Week 2022

National Health Center Week (NHCW) has been celebrated for more than 30 years to recognize the services and contributions of America’s health centers. While there are countless reasons to celebrate health centers, among the most important and unique is their long success in providing access to affordable, high-quality, cost-effective healthcare to medically vulnerable and underserved people in the United States. This NHCW honors those who lost their lives during the (ongoing) COVID-19 pandemic including front line providers, staff and patients. To learn more about NHCW visit www.healthcenterweek.org and follow the #NHCW22 hashtag on Twitter. To learn about the Community Health Center success story, visit www.nachc.org.

About National Association of Community Health Centers

The National Association of Community Health Centers (NACHC) was founded in 1971 to promote efficient, high quality, comprehensive health care that is accessible, culturally and linguistically competent, community directed, and patient centered for all. NACHC also works closely with chartered State and Regional Primary Care Associations (PCAs) to fulfill their shared health care mission and support the growth and development of community-based health center programs.

View source version on businesswire.com:https://www.businesswire.com/news/home/20220804006027/en/

Teri Mitchell, 804-414-4698,Teri.Mitchell@mckesson.com

KEYWORD: VIRGINIA UNITED STATES NORTH AMERICA

INDUSTRY KEYWORD: MEDICAL SUPPLIES MEDICAL DEVICES HEALTH HOSPITALS SURGERY COVID-19

SOURCE: McKesson Medical-Surgical

Copyright Business Wire 2022.

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Thu, 04 Aug 2022 09:20:00 -0500 en text/html https://apnews.com/press-release/business-wire/covid-health-united-states-mckesson-corp-72284eb5acf24c64a55854663c619b19
Killexams : UB surgical resident, recipient of 2022 Citizen Honors Award, leading medical mission in Ukraine

Last Friday, the Congressional Medal of Honor Society announced that it was awarding to UB surgical resident Aaron Epstein the prestigious 2022 Citizen Honors Award for Service.

The national award, administered by the same organization that bestows the prestigious Congressional Medal of Honor, is considered the second-highest civilian award in the U.S. It recognizes those who distinguish themselves by their service or an act of heroism. The organization cited “Epstein’s commitment to providing medical relief to communities in conflict zones, austere environments and disaster areas around the world.”

But Epstein wasn’t in the U.S. to share the good news with colleagues, family and friends. Instead, he was at an undisclosed location in Ukraine, leading the Global Surgical and Medical Support Group (GSMSG) he launched in 2014 that quickly mobilizes American surgeons and surgical residents — many of them veterans — on missions to war zones and areas of great need.

Beginning with the ongoing crisis with ISIS, Epstein created the GSMSG to provide high-quality care to victims in Iraq in 2015. He started the group while still a medical student at Georgetown University, and has made numerous trips leading teams to the Middle East and other conflict zones around the globe.

GSMSG has now expanded to more than 1,000 U.S.-licensed medical experts who cover every medical and surgical subspecialty, as well as U.S. Special Operations veterans. In 2020, Epstein was selected to receive the American College of Surgeons/Pfizer Resident Volunteerism Award.

As this CNN video explains, the group is teaching Ukrainians as young as high school age — and many with absolutely no medical background whatsoever — how to provide medical assistance on the battlefield. The training is focused on the kinds of injuries that are typically seen on the battlefield, such as penetrating wounds, which even medical personnel do not typically see in peacetime.

Epstein is in his fourth year as a surgical resident in the Department of Surgery in the Jacobs School of Medicine and Biomedical Sciences at UB.

“Aaron Epstein is one of those unique individuals whose supreme dedication to the cause of humanitarian care serves as an exemplar to us all,” says Steven D. Schwaitzberg, SUNY Distinguished Service Professor and department chair, himself a veteran of the Gulf War.

“He is unselfish and willing to go to some of the most difficult places on earth to help those who need medical and surgical care. There is no doubt he will continue to have a remarkable career.”

Allison Brashear, vice president for health sciences and dean of the Jacobs School, noted: “Dr. Epstein’s passion for delivering critical care to communities in crisis around the world, and leading others to do the same, is an inspiration to everyone at the Jacobs School and the entire UB community.”

Epstein’s return date to the U.S. is not yet known.

Fri, 01 Apr 2022 06:06:00 -0500 en text/html https://www.buffalo.edu/pss/news-home/gen_news.host.html/content/shared/university/news/ub-reporter-articles/stories/2022/04/epstein-citizen-honors-award.detail.html
Killexams : FRESH START SURGICAL GIFTS PARTNERS WITH SANFORD HEALTH TO EXPAND SERVICES AND FURTHER THEIR MISSION OF TRANSFORMING THE LIVES OF CHILDREN

SAN DIEGO, June 27, 2022 /PRNewswire/ -- Fresh Start Surgical Gifts has partnered with Sanford Health to expand their services and further their mission to transform the lives of children and teens forever. Fresh Start recently hosted free informational sessions on services offered in Sioux Falls on June 1 and 2.

Fresh Start Surgical Gifts and Sanford Health partner to further the mission of transforming the lives of children.

San Diego-based Fresh Start Surgical Gifts transforms the lives of disadvantaged infants, children and teens who have physical and cosmetic deformities through their gift of reconstructive surgery and related treatments at absolutely no cost to patients or their families. World-renowned surgeons donate their time and expertise to these children to offer them a fresh start on life through much-needed medical care.

Many insurance companies do not offer coverage for certain procedures that they consider to be cosmetic, which places a large burden on the families of children who need these types of surgeries and treatments.

"We're so excited to be able to expand the services of Fresh Start through this amazing partnership with Sanford Health. We look forward to reaching many more children and families who are in need of reconstructive surgery and related treatments to Excellerate their lives," says Michelle Pius, Chief Development Officer of Fresh Start Surgical Gifts.

Both Sanford Health and Fresh Start had each other on their radars. Sanford Health, the largest rural health system in the US and home of the only children's hospital in South Dakota, has been in talks with Fresh Start for the last two years, brainstorming ways to make screenings available and accessible for as many children as possible. The goal is to continue this program to help more families across the US and expand into other states and even countries through these partnerships.

"The partnership with Fresh Start has already made a positive impact in our community. During the informational screening sessions we connected families locally and internationally, through our World Clinic, to the Fresh Start team," Jessica Aguilar, the system executive director of women's, children's, and cancer care at Sanford Health. "It is our mission to advance health care for children, and this partnership reaches children who may not be able to receive care due to financial hardships or lack of insurance."

Every child receives the highest quality medical care, and the families never see a bill for the services provided. Each donation is put to the highest use and each dollar enables Fresh Start to provide $5 in medical care. 100% of contributions go directly to medical programs. For media inquiries, please contact PR@teaminnovision.com.

About Fresh Start

Fresh Start Surgical Gifts transforms the lives of disadvantaged infants, children and teens who have physical and cosmetic deformities through their gift of reconstructive surgery. Providing reconstructive, plastic and neurosurgeries for children across the U.S., Fresh Start's commitment to children extends far beyond medical care. The organization ensures their children will leave feeling more empowered than before. To learn more, visit FreshStart.org.

About Sanford Health

Sanford Health, the largest rural health system in the US, is dedicated to transforming the health care experience and providing access to world-class health care in America's heartland. Headquartered in Sioux Falls, South Dakota, the organization serves more than one million patients and 220,000 health plan members across 250,000 square miles. The integrated health system has 47 medical centers, 2,800 Sanford physicians and advanced practice providers, 170 clinical investigators and research scientists, more than 200 Good Samaritan Society senior care locations and world clinics in 8 countries around the globe. Learn more at sanfordhealth.org.

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SOURCE Fresh Start Surgical Gifts

Mon, 27 Jun 2022 02:37:00 -0500 en-US text/html https://fox8.com/business/press-releases/cision/20220627LA00182/fresh-start-surgical-gifts-partners-with-sanford-health-to-expand-services-and-further-their-mission-of-transforming-the-lives-of-children/
Killexams : UCSF Health-UCSF Medical Center No result found, try new keyword!UCSF Health-UCSF Medical Center in San Francisco, CA is ranked No. 12 on the Best Hospitals Honor Roll. It is nationally ranked in 14 adult and 10 pediatric specialties and rated high performing ... Mon, 09 May 2022 07:59:00 -0500 text/html https://health.usnews.com/best-hospitals/area/ca/ucsf-medical-center-6930043 Killexams : PervasID to Present Solution for Tracking Medical Equipment and Surgical Instruments at Electronic and Biomedical Engineering Expo 2022

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