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Exam Code: 9A0-381 Practice test 2022 by Killexams.com team
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Killexams : Adobe Practitioner study - BingNews https://killexams.com/pass4sure/exam-detail/9A0-381 Search results Killexams : Adobe Practitioner study - BingNews https://killexams.com/pass4sure/exam-detail/9A0-381 https://killexams.com/exam_list/Adobe Killexams : Adobe Study: 86% Of Aussies Reject Labels Such As Millennial Or Gen Z

Adobe has revealed new research revealing the growing importance of brands understanding customers at a personal level – and interacting with them as individuals, in real-time. 

Rejecting age-based stereotypes, the majority (86 per cent) of consumers in APAC want to be treated as an individual with unique interests and preferences, with one in two consumers (57 per cent) saying they feel negatively towards brands that interact with them based on broad assumptions and labels, including age-based stereotypes such as “Millennial” and “Gen-Z”.

Adobe’s research shows the emergence of a new consumer who is not defined by age, refuses to be stereotyped, and expects to be understood as the unique person they are today. Brands seeking to meet consumer’s new expectations must ensure they are equipped with the latest customer data platform technologies, creating a complete single view of every customer capable of delivering personalised experiences in real-time.

Across Asia Pacific, customers are calling on brands to demonstrate that they know them, show them, and will help them in the moments that matter – not once, but all the time,” said Duncan Egan, vice president of marketing, Adobe Asia Pacific and Japan. “To meet that standard, brands need to unlock preferences in real-time through customer data and use it to deliver relevant interactions and content at the right moment. Scaling that across up to millions of customers is the next step.”

Time to get personal

The survey of 5000 APAC consumers (2000 Australians, 2000 Indians and 1000 Singaporeans) reveals three times as many APAC consumers feel closer to people who share their passions and interests (62 per cent) than those of a similar demographic (19 per cent). The vast majority (86 per cent) of consumers want to be seen and treated as individuals based on their unique interests and preferences. Australians felt more strongly about this, with half (49 per cent) rejecting the stereotypes of their generation and 91 per cent wanting to be seen and treated as an individual.

Change is constant

Adobe found that consumer preferences and tastes are constantly evolving, reinforcing the need for brands to move away from simple groupings based on age or other fixed demographic factors. Consumers’ collective experience over exact years and months has only added to that rate of change. Most consumers across Asia Pacific see themselves and their peer group differently from how they were pre-pandemic, and 79 per cent have adjusted their preferences and tastes even further in the past three months. The average person takes on a new interest or hobby six times a year, rising to ten times a year for people under the age of 25.

Brands’ ability to keep pace is also a significant expectation for Australian consumers. When asked, 62 per cent of Australians said they have changed their favourite brands as their tastes and financial situation has changed. Real-time visibility and delivering experiences in line with emerging preferences is vital to keeping even the most loyal customers on side. 

Individuality is key

Today’s consumers have high expectations for the brands they engage with – they expect brands to see them as unique people, keep up with their changing habits and interests, and respect their privacy preferences. Almost half of Australians (46 per cent) now expect businesses to have a clear understanding of who they are as individuals, and only contact them with information relevant to what they are interested in at any given moment. More than one in two Australian consumers (59 per cent) think negatively of brands that use broad assumptions and stereotypes to engage them.

Over two-thirds of consumers (66 per cent) say they expect personalised experiences from brands they share data with, with more than half (50 per cent) wanting real-time offers relevant to them. However, 25 per cent of Australians say brands are not doing this well or are inconsistent in their efforts to keep up with their personal preferences. Regular efforts to engage consumers with bespoke offers related to their current interests is of the highest importance – more than three times as many people want frequent, thoughtful gestures (61 per cent) over bigger one-off moments (14 per cent).

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Wed, 12 Oct 2022 23:16:00 -0500 en-US text/html https://www.bandt.com.au/adobe-study-86-of-aussies-reject-labels-such-as-millennial-or-gen-z/
Killexams : Adobe Marks This Year’s National Disability Employment Awareness Month By ‘Redefining How The Disability Community Is Perceived’

Like Halloween, October is National Disability Employment Awareness Month (NDEAM), and San Jose-based software maker Adobe is again marking the occasion. In a blog post published on Wednesday, the company’s accessibility boss Andrew Kirkpatrick details what Adobe is doing throughout the month to amplify disabled workers and what he calls “[celebrating] intersectional identities.”

“Throughout the month, Adobe is excited to host several engaging events and spotlight stories from our employees to continue our efforts in raising awareness on the significant role people with disabilities play in the workforce and our communities,” he wrote in the post. “It is Adobe’s conviction that everyone deserves respect and equal treatment, regardless of any personal traits that make up who we are. We believe when people feel appreciated and included, they can be more creative, innovative, and successful. We call this vision Adobe for All.”

The centerpiece of Adobe’s NDEAM celebration this year is what the company describes as “We the 15%.” Kirkpatrick explains the number is a reference to the 1.2 billion people worldwide, or 15% of the global population, who live with some sort of disability. Additionally, the company hopes to inspire all employees to own and take pride in their own unique identities—not only disability, but the intersectionality therein around race, sexuality, gender identity, and more. The ultimate goal for Adobe, Kirkpatrick said, is to continue fostering an inclusive and empathetic corporate culture in which people feel free to “break free from stigmas,” thereby ensuring everyone feels a strong sense of belonging.

Adobe is encouraging participation with a slew of activities, including:

  • A fireside chat with an as-yet-unnamed guest speaker who will, according to Kirkpatrick, “share insights on how authentic representation across communities is pivotal in fostering an innovative and vibrant creative experience for everyone.”
  • In observance of World Mental Health Day on Monday, October 10, the Access at Adobe employee network has organized a number of activities in an effort to mobilize awareness of mental health. Activities include fundraising and other regional events.
  • In addition to NDEAM, October also is ADHD Awareness Month. The company will host a story from customer success executive Catherine Wynne, who will share about being recently diagnosed with ADHD and how it helped her more fully understand who she is as a person.

“Annually in October [during NDEAM], we take the time to recognize contributions from the disability community in the workplace and throughout society more broadly,” said director of product equity Timothy Bardlavens in a statement included the post. “I’m looking forward to the events this year and continuing to collaborate across Adobe, and in historically underinvested and marginalized communities, to envision a future focused on making product decisions that consider the full spectrum of human difference.”

Kirkpatrick also noted in the announcement how Adobe continues to push hard on disability inclusion in the workplace. To wit, the company was recognized by Disability:IN in their Disability Inclusion Index as a Best Place to Work for Disability Inclusion for 2022. Elsewhere, Kirkpatrick mentions Adobe continues to be involved with disability employment organization The Valuable 500.

Wed, 05 Oct 2022 04:29:00 -0500 Steven Aquino en text/html https://www.forbes.com/sites/stevenaquino/2022/10/05/adobe-marks-this-years-national-disability-employment-awareness-month-by-redefining-how-the-disability-community-is-perceived/
Killexams : Adobe "Future of Creativity" Study: Emoji Aid Inclusivity; Empower Creative Self-Expression

  • New study reveals emoji spark cultural conversations, benefit mental health
  • U.S. emoji users say emoji create connections across language barriers (92%), make expression easier (91%), foster empathy (88%), and should continue to strive for more inclusive representation (83%)
  • 😂(#1), 👍(#2), ❤️(#3), 🤣(#4), 😢(#5) are U.S. emoji users' top five favorite emoji
  • New emoji-themed templates in Adobe Express and designing with emoji in Photoshop and Illustrator, empowers creators to express themselves

Adobe ADBE released itsU.S. Emoji Trend Report, part of Adobe's “Future of Creativity” Study,=1rem looking at the vital role and impact of emoji in digital communication. The report finds that 91% of U.S. emoji users agree emoji make it easier to express themselves and 71% agree inclusive emoji can help spark positive conversations about cultural and social issues. The majority of U.S. emoji users agree we should strive for more inclusive emoji representation (83%), which is in line with the release of Unicode 15.0, which will introduce new emoji including the maracas, flute, khanda, hair pick, pink heart and folding hand fan.

“Emoji have become a favorite form of creative self-expression for people everywhere,” said Kamile Demir, computer scientist at Adobe and Adobe representative on the Unicode Emoji Subcommittee.�“As a member of the Unicode Consortium, we recognize the potential for emoji to promote inclusivity, spark cultural conversations and even positively impact mental health.”

Among the report's additional findings: emoji don't always mean what users think they do and are always changing; emoji have become a hallmark of American dating culture; and emoji use at work improves efficiency, boosts creativity and builds stronger relationships. There is a gulf in how users view emoji across different states.

=16px“As a visual form of communication, emoji help fill the emotional gaps when representing ourselves online and help us communicate our personal identities, thoughts and feelings in ways words often cannot,” said Paul D. Hunt, typeface designer and font developer at Adobe. “With new emoji-themed templates in Adobe Express and support for emoji in Photoshop and IIlustrator creators can express themselves across language barriers and cultures.”

The report explored when, why and how Americans are using emoji to advance self-expression and identity; diversity, equity and inclusion; dating and relationships; workplace communications and more. This fun, fast and friendly form of digital communication has transformed the way Americans express themselves and continues to push the boundaries on how U.S. emoji users bridge conversations across age, race, culture and beyond.

Emoji users' favorite emoji help them express joy, approval, love and sadness.


  • 😂(#1), 👍(#2), ❤️(#3), 🤣(#4), 😢(#5) are U.S. emoji users' top five favorite emoji, and U.S. emoji users' least favorite emoji are 💩(#1), 😠(#2), 😳(#3).
  • 🤣😂(#1), 🥰😘(#2), 😘❤️(#3) are U.S. emoji users' top three favorite emoji pairings.

Emoji empower self-expression, make conversations fun and boost mental health.


  • 60% of U.S. emoji users agree that using emoji in their communications has improved their mental health.
  • 91% of U.S. emoji users agree that emoji make it easier for them to express themselves.
  • 73% of U.S. emoji users think people who use emoji are friendlier, funnier and cooler than those who don't.

Emoji foster more empathy, understanding and connection.


  • 92% of U.S. emoji users agree that emoji can communicate across language barriers.
  • A majority of U.S. emoji users (88%) report they are more likely to feel empathetic toward someone if they use an emoji.
  • 71% of U.S. emoji users agree that emoji are an important communication tool for creating unity, respect and understanding of one another.

Emoji users continue to want more inclusive and representative emoji.


  • 83% of U.S. emoji users agree that emoji should continue to strive for more inclusive representation of users.
  • 75% of U.S. emoji users agree inclusive emoji can help raise awareness of diverse groups of people.
  • 71% of U.S. emoji users agree inclusive emoji can help spark positive conversations about important cultural and societal issues.

Emoji don't always mean what you think they do and are always changing.


  • 🤠(#1), 🍒(#2), 🙃(#3) are U.S. emoji users' most misunderstood emoji.
  • Half of U.S. emoji users use emoji differently than their intended meaning (50%).
  • Gen Z'ers are significantly more likely to agree they use emoji differently than intended meanings (74% Gen Z vs. 65% Millennial, 48% Gen X, 24% Boomer).

Emoji are the new love language and can make or break relationships.


  • The top three make it or break it emoji when it comes to flirting or dating:

    1. 😘(#1), 🥰(#2), 😍(#3) make you more likable.
    2. 💩(#1), 😠(#2), 🍆(#3) make you less likable.
  • 72% of U.S. emoji users use emoji in conversations with someone they're interested in flirting with or dating.
  • Two out of five Gen Z'ers (38%) would not pursue a serious or long-term relationship with someone who did not use emoji.

Emoji use at work improves efficiency, boosts creativity and builds stronger relationships.


  • 71% of U.S. emoji users say they use emoji at work, and 53% of U.S. emoji users report that they've increased their emoji use at work in the last 12 months.
  • Using emoji at work helps U.S. emoji users quickly share ideas (79%), makes team decision-making more efficient (62%) and reduces the need for meetings and calls (47%).
  • 58% of U.S. emoji users agree that emoji usage at work boosts their creativity and 68% agree emoji helps build better relationships with new hires.

Emoji use will evolve and expand in new and interesting ways in the future.


  • More than half of U.S. emoji users are willing to purchase an item using an emoji (57%) – with Gen Z'ers being the most willing (71%), followed by Millennials (67%).
  • The top three products U.S. emoji users are willing to purchase with an emoji include takeout meals (#1), clothing (#2) and streaming services (#3).
  • The majority of U.S. emoji users are open to creative emoji use, from confirming event attendance (68%) to sending and receiving payments (45%).

Emoji use differs state by state.

Adobe took a closer look at emoji users in California, Florida, Illinois, New York and Texas and found some surprising differences in how their emoji use differs when compared to U.S. emoji users at large:�


  • Texas emoji users use more emoji when flirting or dating than U.S. emoji users (67% of TX vs. 59% of U.S.).
  • New York emoji users think people who use emoji are friendlier, funnier and cooler than those who don't (77% of NY vs. 73% of U.S.).
  • Florida emoji users agree inclusive emoji can help raise awareness of diverse groups of people (79% of FL vs. 75% of U.S.).
  • Using emoji at work helps California emoji users quickly share ideas (79% of CA vs. 79% of U.S.), makes team decision-making more efficient (70% of CA vs. 62% of U.S.) and reduces the need for meetings and calls (55% of CA vs. 47% of U.S.).
  • Illinois emoji users share emoji most often with their friends compared to the family or significant others (84% of IL vs. 80% of U.S.).

Adobe offers the most comprehensive portfolio of products and services across every creative category—including imaging, photography, design, video and 3D and immersive—unleashing creativity for all. Tools like Adobe Express, Fonts, Photoshop and Frame.io empower millions of creators around the world to express themselves every day.�

The Future of Creativity: 2022 U.S. Emoji Trend Report can be found in full here.

About the “Future of Creativity”: 2022 U.S. Emoji Trend Report

Adobe's Future of Creativity: 2022 U.S. Emoji Trend Report aims to understand the role and impact of emoji in digital communication. The report examines the importance of emoji across a variety of areas such as self-expression and identity; diversity, equity and inclusion; dating and relationships; workplace communications and more. It is part of Adobe's Future of Creativity research series, which explores how creativity is changing around the world.

Methodology

Adobe's Future of Creativity: 2022 U.S. Emoji Trend Report was conducted in March – April 2022 with 5,000 frequent emoji users across the U.S. and an oversample of 500 frequent emoji users per state in five states, including California, Florida, Illinois, New York and Texas. The survey was conducted to understand the role and impact of emoji in digital communication. The demo is a representative recruit of the U.S. with a �1.4% margin of error at the 95% confidence level.

About Adobe

Adobe is changing the world through digital experiences. For more information, visit www.adobe.com.

� 2022 Adobe. All rights reserved. Adobe and the Adobe logo are either registered trademarks or trademarks of Adobe in the United States and/or other countries. All other trademarks are the property of their respective owners.

— WebWireID294231 —


© 2022 Benzinga.com. Benzinga does not provide investment advice. All rights reserved.

Wed, 14 Sep 2022 11:55:00 -0500 text/html https://www.benzinga.com/pressreleases/22/09/w28864264/adobe-future-of-creativity-study-emoji-aid-inclusivity-empower-creative-self-expression
Killexams : Best alternatives to Adobe Premiere Pro in 2022

Finding the best alternatives to Adobe Premiere Pro opens up a wealth of post-production video editors that bring the same Hollywood-grade polish to your films that you’ll find in Adobe’s feature-rich software. 

As an industry-standard tool, it's one of the best video editing software tools on the market. Adobe Premiere Pro packs all the tools and features professionals demand. It even offers seamless integration with Adobe After Effects for total control in post.