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Exam Code: PMP Practice exam 2022 by Killexams.com team
PMP Project Management Professional - PMP (PMBOK 6th Edition)

Analytical skills
 Benefit analysis techniques
 Elements of a project charter
 Estimation tools and techniques
 Strategic management
 Change management planning
 Cost management planning, including project budgeting tools and techniques
 Communications planning
 Contract types and selection criteria
 Estimation tools and techniques
 Human resource planning
 Lean and efficiency principles
 Procurement planning
 Quality management planning
 Requirements gathering techniques (e.g., planning sessions, brainstorming, and focus groups)
 Regulatory and environmental impacts assessment planning
 Risk management planning
 Scope deconstruction (e.g., WBS, Scope backlog) tools and techniques
 Scope management planning
 Stakeholder management planning
 Time management planning, including scheduling tools and techniques
 Workflow diagramming techniques

Continuous improvement processes
 Contract management techniques
 Elements of a statement of work
 Interdependencies among project elements
 Project budgeting tools and techniques
 Quality standard tools
 Vendor management techniques

Performance measurement and tracking techniques (e.g., EV, CPM, PERT, Trend Analysis)
 Process analysis techniques (e.g., LEAN, Kanban, Six Sigma)
 Project control limits (e.g., thresholds, tolerance)
 Project finance principles
 Project monitoring tools and techniques
 Project quality best practices and standards (e.g., ISO, BS, CMMI, IEEE)
 Quality measurement tools (e.g., statistical sampling, control charts, flowcharting, inspection, assessment)
 Risk identification and analysis techniques
 Risk response techniques
 Quality validation and verification techniques

Archiving practices and statutes
 Compliance (statute/organization)
 Contract closure requirements
 Close-out procedures
 Feedback techniques
 Performance measurement techniques (KPI and key success factors)
 Project review techniques
 Transition planning technique

Active listening
 Applicable laws and regulations
 Benefits realization
 Brainstorming techniques
 Business acumen
 Change management techniques
 Coaching, mentoring, training, and motivational techniques
 Communication channels, tools, techniques, and methods
 Configuration management
 Conflict resolution
 Customer satisfaction metrics
 Data gathering techniques
 Decision making
 Delegation techniques
 Diversity and cultural sensitivity
 Emotional intelligence
 Expert judgment technique
 Facilitation
 Generational sensitivity and diversity
 Information management tools, techniques, and methods
 Interpersonal skills
 Knowledge management
 Leadership tools, techniques, and skills
 Lessons learned management techniques
 Meeting management techniques
 Negotiating and influencing techniques and skills Organizational and operational awareness
 Peer-review processes
 Presentation tools and techniques
 Prioritization/time management
 Problem-solving tools and techniques
 Project finance principles
 Quality assurance and control techniques
 Relationship management
 Risk assessment techniques
 Situational awareness
 Stakeholder management techniques
 Team-building techniques
 Virtual/remote team management

Marking
1. Initiating 13%
2. Planning 24%
3. Executing 31%
4. Monitoring and Controlling 25%
5. Closing 7%
Total Number of Scored Questions 175
Total Number of Unscored (Pretest) Questions 25
Total Number of Questions 200

Project Management Professional - PMP (PMBOK 6th Edition)
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Services economy activity saw growth in July, according to the most latest edition of the of the Services ISM Report on Business, which was issued today by the Institute for Supply Management (ISM).

The Services PMI came in at 56.5 (a practicing of 50 or higher signals growth), up 1.4% compared to June, following a slight 0.6% decrease from May to June. The Services PMI showed growth, at a faster rate, for the 26th consecutive month, with services sector growth now remaining intact for 148 of the last 150 months through June, said ISM.

The June Services PMI is 3.5% below the 12-month average of 60.2, with November 2021’s 68.4 and June’s 55.3 marking the high and low readings over that period, respectively. What’s more, the June practicing represents the lowest one since February 2021, which came in at 55.9.

ISM reported that 13 of the services sectors it tracks saw annual gains in July, including: Mining; Real Estate, Rental & Leasing; Public Administration; Management of Companies & Support Services; Construction; Educational Services; Other Services; Utilities; Professional, Scientific & Technical Services; Health Care & Social Assistance; Transportation & Warehousing; Wholesale Trade; and Information. The three industries with July declines were: Agriculture, Forestry, Fishing & Hunting; Retail Trade; and Finance & Insurance.

The report’s equally weighted subindexes that directly factor into the NMI were mixed in July, including:

  • Business activity/production, at 59.9, rose 3.8%, growing, at a faster rate, for the 26th consecutive month, with 13 services sectors reporting growth;
  • New orders, at 59.9, rose 4.3%, growing, at a faster rate, for the 26th consecutive month, with 11 services sectors reporting growth, following two months of contraction, which were preceded by 128 months of growth;
  • Employment, at 49.1, increased 1.7%, contracting, at a slower rate, for the second straight month, which was preceded by seven straight months of growth; and
  • Supplier deliveries, at 57.8 (a practicing above 50 percent indicates slower deliveries), down 4.1 compared to June May and slowing, at a faster rate, for the 38th consecutive month

Comments from ISM member respondents included in the report highlighted various issues being seen in the services sector, including: slowing economic activity and inflation, among others.

A Management of Companies & Support Services respondent said she can feel the economy weakening, with clients making appropriate moves in anticipation of a recession. And a Utilities respondent observed that business is holding steady, adding that some headwinds are definitely ahead on the economic front, while supply chain issues appear to be easing, but are still not great.

Tony Nieves, Chair of the ISM’s Services Business Survey Committee, noted in the report that the slight increase in services sector growth was due to an increase in business activity and new orders.

In a previous interview, Nieves said that declines in the Services PMI, from March through June, serve as a barometer of how much pent-up demand there was from consumers, for services economy activities, out of 2021 and the first half of 2022.

“Things were continually opening up over that period,” he said. “The thing we are experiencing right now is that we are getting a little bit of a decline in consumer confidence, with inflation, issues we are having with materials shortages, some pullback in real estate and rental prices coming down a little bit. Hopefully, fuel prices will come down more, too. But because of the inflation eating into consumer spending…people are spending money on other things. It is not necessarily tangible goods like it was in the past, but more so they are dining out still and spending money on experiences. It is not all gloom and doom.”




Wed, 03 Aug 2022 06:20:00 -0500 text/html https://www.logisticsmgmt.com/article/services_pmi_heads_up_in_july_reports_ism
Killexams : Services PMI® at 56.7%; July 2022 Services ISM® Report On Business®

Business Activity Index at 59.9%; New Orders Index at 59.9%; Employment Index at 49.1%; provider Deliveries Index at 57.8%

TEMPE, Ariz., Aug. 3, 2022 /PRNewswire/ -- Economic activity in the services sector grew in July for the 26th month in a row — with the Services PMI® registering 56.7 percent — say the nation's purchasing and supply executives in the latest Services ISM® Report On Business®.

The report was issued today by Anthony Nieves, CPSM, C.P.M., A.P.P., CFPM, Chair of the Institute for Supply Management® (ISM®) Services Business Survey Committee: "In July, the Services PMI® registered 56.7 percent, 1.4 percentage points higher than June's practicing of 55.3 percent. The Business Activity Index registered 59.9 percent, an increase of 3.8 percentage points compared to the practicing of 56.1 percent in June. The New Orders Index figure of 59.9 percent is 4.3 percentage points higher than the June practicing of 55.6 percent.

"The provider Deliveries Index registered 57.8 percent, 4.1 percentage points lower than the 61.9 percent reported in June. (Supplier Deliveries is the only ISM® Report On Business® index that is inversed; a practicing of above 50 percent indicates slower deliveries, which is typical as the economy improves and customer demand increases.)

"The Prices Index decreased for the third consecutive month in July, down 7.8 percentage points to 72.3 percent. Services businesses continue to struggle to replenish inventories, as the Inventories Index contracted for the second consecutive month; the practicing of 45 percent is down 2.5 percentage points from June's figure of 47.5 percent. The Inventory Sentiment Index (50.1 percent, up 3.9 percentage points from June's practicing of 46.2 percent) moved into expansion territory in July after four consecutive months of contraction."

Nieves continues, "According to the Services PMI®, 13 industries reported growth. The composite index indicated growth for the 26th consecutive month after a two-month contraction in April and May 2020. Growth continues — at a faster rate — for the services sector, which has expanded for all but two of the last 150 months. The slight increase in services sector growth was due to an increase in business activity and new orders. The Employment Index (49.1 percent) contracted for the second consecutive month, and the Backlog of Orders Index decreased 2.2 percentage points, to 58.3 percent. Availability issues with overland trucking, a restricted labor pool, various material shortages and inflation continue to be impediments for the services sector."

INDUSTRY PERFORMANCE
The 13 services industries reporting growth in July — listed in order — are: Mining; Real Estate, Rental & Leasing; Public Administration; Management of Companies & Support Services; Construction; Educational Services; Other Services; Utilities; Professional, Scientific & Technical Services; Health Care & Social Assistance; Transportation & Warehousing; Wholesale Trade; and Information. The three industries reporting a decrease in the month of July are: Agriculture, Forestry, Fishing & Hunting; Retail Trade; and Finance & Insurance.

WHAT RESPONDENTS ARE SAYING

  • "Restaurant sales have softened the past few weeks (due to) post-holiday and seasonality factors, but we're also hearing because of consumer pressures, particularly fuel and food prices. Staffing remains a challenge in some markets. Many of our locations in (Los Angeles County) received news that there could be a return to (indoor) mask mandates." [Accommodation & Food Services]

  • "Interest rates have significantly impacted the homebuilding market. Cancellation rates have increased, as homebuyers can no longer afford the monthly payment. Traffic to our communities is down. Inflation has sidelined many would-be buyers." [Construction]

  • "Strengthening market overall and signs of improvement. Increased prices putting a strain on fixed budgets. There has been a shift from driving down costs to securing continuity of supply. Higher education is growing, with an increase in applicants." [Educational Services]

  • "Business continues to remain below pre-pandemic levels. (Patient) census and visits have increased but seem to have plateaued in the last six-month period." [Health Care & Social Assistance]

  • "Can feel the economy weakening. Clients are making appropriate moves in anticipation of a recession." [Management of Companies & Support Services]

  • "Hiring demand remains robust in most industry sectors. Tech has had a slowdown in hiring and layoffs. It's still a candidate's market, as the number of job openings across all skill levels and positions remains far greater than the number of candidates for those roles." [Professional, Scientific & Technical Services]

  • "Rising costs across the board seems to be the big focus now. Fuel and food are the most common focus but it is across the board, and there is pressure of a job market shortage for qualified workers to increase wages and other benefits." [Public Administration]

  • "(We are) in inventory reduction mode, attempting to match inventory levels to current lower sales trends." [Retail Trade]

  • "Holding steady, but some headwinds are definitely ahead on the economic front. However, supply chain issues appear to be easing, though still not great." [Utilities]

  • "Food service remains strong. Retail is softening as mass is overly concerned about inventory and consumer spending." [Wholesale Trade]

ISM® SERVICES SURVEY RESULTS AT A GLANCE

COMPARISON OF ISM® SERVICES AND ISM® MANUFACTURING SURVEYS

JULY 2022

Index

 Services PMI®

Manufacturing PMI®

Series
Index

Jul

Series
Index

Jun

Percent
Point
Change

 

 

Direction

 

Rate of
Change

 

Trend*

(Months)

Series
Index

Jul

Series
Index

Jun

Percent
Point
Change

Services PMI®

56.7

55.3

+1.4

Growing

Faster

26

52.8

53.0

-0.2

Business Activity/

Production

59.9

56.1

+3.8

Growing

Faster

26

53.5

54.9

-1.4

New Orders

59.9

55.6

+4.3

Growing

Faster

26

48.0

49.2

-1.2

Employment

49.1

47.4

+1.7

Contracting

Slower

2

49.9

47.3

+2.6

Supplier Deliveries

57.8

61.9

-4.1

Slowing

Slower

38

55.2

57.3

-2.1

Inventories

45.0

47.5

-2.5

Contracting

Faster

2

57.3

56.0

+1.3

Prices

72.3

80.1

-7.8

Increasing

Slower

62

60.0

78.5

-18.5

Backlog of Orders

58.3

60.5

-2.2

Growing

Slower

19

51.3

53.2

-1.9

New Export Orders

59.5

57.5

+2.0

Growing

Faster

6

52.6

50.7

+1.9

Imports

48.0

46.3

+1.7

Contracting

Slower

2

54.4

50.7

+3.7

Inventory Sentiment

50.1

46.2

+3.9

Too High

From

Too Low

1

N/A

N/A

N/A

Customers' Inventories

N/A

N/A

N/A

N/A

N/A

N/A

39.5

35.2

+4.3

OVERALL ECONOMY

Growing

Faster

26

Services Sector

Growing

Faster

26

Services ISM® Report On Business® data is seasonally adjusted for the Business Activity, New Orders, Employment and Prices indexes. Manufacturing ISM® Report On Business® data is seasonally adjusted for New Orders, Production, Employment and Inventories indexes.
*Number of months moving in current direction.

COMMODITIES REPORTED UP/DOWN IN PRICE, AND IN SHORT SUPPLY

Commodities Up in Price
Aluminum Products* (8); Chemicals (4); Coated Freesheet; Computer Accessories; Diesel Fuel (20); Eggs; Electrical Components (18); Fuel* (19); Freight Rates; Gasoline (20); Hotel Rates (3); Heating, Ventilation and Air Conditioning (HVAC) Equipment; Labor (20); Labor — Contingent; Medical Supplies; Steel Products (19); Transformers (2); Transportation Costs; Travel (3); and Utilities.

Commodities Down in Price
Aluminum Products*; Copper Wires; Fuel*; Lumber (2); Polyvinyl Chloride (PVC) Conduit; and Steel.

Commodities in Short Supply
Appliances (5); Coated Freesheet; Computer Hardware; Electrical Components (4); Food and Beverages; Labor (12); Masks; Microchips (3); Needles and Syringes (7); Paper Products (5); Resin Based Products; Transformers (3); and Vehicles.

Note: The number of consecutive months the commodity is listed is indicated after each item. *Indicates both up and down in price.

JULY 2022 SERVICES INDEX SUMMARIES

Services PMI®
In July, the Services PMI® registered 56.7 percent, a 1.4-percentage point increase compared to the June practicing of 55.3 percent. The 12-month average is 60.2 percent, reflecting consistently strong growth in the services sector, which has expanded for 26 consecutive months. A practicing above 50 percent indicates the services sector economy is generally expanding; below 50 percent indicates the services sector is generally contracting.

A Services PMI® above 50.1 percent, over time, generally indicates an expansion of the overall economy. Therefore, the July Services PMI® indicates the overall economy has followed the same path as the services sector: expansion for 26 straight months following two months of contraction and a preceding period of 122 months of growth. Nieves says, "The past relationship between the Services PMI® and the overall economy indicates that the Services PMI® for July (56.7 percent) corresponds to a 2.4-percent increase in real gross domestic product (GDP) on an annualized basis."

SERVICES PMI® HISTORY

Month

Services PMI®

Month

Services PMI®

Jul 2022

56.7

Jan 2022

59.9

Jun 2022

55.3

Dec 2021

62.3

May 2022

55.9

Nov 2021

68.4

Apr 2022

57.1

Oct 2021

66.7

Mar 2022

58.3

Sep 2021

62.6

Feb 2022

56.5

Aug 2021

62.2

Average for 12 months – 60.2

High – 68.4

Low – 55.3

Business Activity
ISM®'s Business Activity Index registered 59.9 percent in July, an increase of 3.8 percentage points from the practicing of 56.1 percent in June, indicating growth for the 26th consecutive month. Comments from respondents include: "With a new fiscal year starting on July 1, an uptick in demand of goods and services" and "Seeing more critical material come in, which allowed us to work on more projects."

The 13 industries reporting an increase in business activity for the month of July — listed in order — are: Mining; Real Estate, Rental & Leasing; Educational Services; Public Administration; Management of Companies & Support Services; Utilities; Construction; Other Services; Professional, Scientific & Technical Services; Health Care & Social Assistance; Wholesale Trade; Transportation & Warehousing; and Information. The four industries reporting a decrease in business activity for the month of July are: Agriculture, Forestry, Fishing & Hunting; Accommodation & Food Services; Retail Trade; and Finance & Insurance.

Business Activity

%Higher

%Same

%Lower

Index

Jul 2022

32.9

55.7

11.4

59.9

Jun 2022

27.0

60.5

12.5

56.1

May 2022

27.1

59.6

13.3

54.5

Apr 2022

37.8

55.7

6.5

59.1

New Orders
ISM®'s New Orders Index registered 59.9 percent, up 4.3 percentage points from the June practicing of 55.6 percent. New orders grew for the 26th consecutive month after two months of contraction and a preceding period of 128 months of expansion. Comments from respondents include: "Requests for new business" and "Moderate volume increases over the previous month."

Eleven industries reported growth of new orders in July, in the following order: Real Estate, Rental & Leasing; Mining; Educational Services; Public Administration; Transportation & Warehousing; Other Services; Utilities; Management of Companies & Support Services; Construction; Professional, Scientific & Technical Services; and Health Care & Social Assistance. The five industries reporting a decrease in new orders in July are: Agriculture, Forestry, Fishing & Hunting; Accommodation & Food Services; Retail Trade; Information; and Wholesale Trade.

New Orders

%Higher

%Same

%Lower

Index

Jul 2022

32.8

54.4

12.8

59.9

Jun 2022

28.3

57.7

14.0

55.6

May 2022

31.2

54.7

14.1

57.6

Apr 2022

32.9

55.6

11.5

54.6

Employment
Employment activity in the services sector contracted in July for the fourth time in the last six months. ISM®'s Employment Index registered 49.1 percent, up 1.7 percentage points from the June practicing of 47.4 percent. Comments from respondents include: "Employee turnover, backfills taking longer to locate and onboard" and "Difficulties hiring new candidates as we lose more people who retire or leave the company for new opportunities."

The eight industries reporting an increase in employment in July — listed in order — are: Mining; Construction; Accommodation & Food Services; Other Services; Management of Companies & Support Services; Public Administration; Professional, Scientific & Technical Services; and Wholesale Trade. The seven industries reporting a decrease in employment in July — listed in order — are: Agriculture, Forestry, Fishing & Hunting; Finance & Insurance; Educational Services; Transportation & Warehousing; Real Estate, Rental & Leasing; Utilities; and Health Care & Social Assistance.

Employment

%Higher

%Same

%Lower

Index

Jul 2022

24.2

51.7

24.1

49.1

Jun 2022

20.4

60.1

19.5

47.4

May 2022

26.1

51.2

22.7

50.2

Apr 2022

24.6

52.3

23.1

49.5

Supplier Deliveries
The provider Deliveries Index registered 57.8 percent, down 4.1 percentage points from the 61.9 percent registered in June. A practicing above 50 percent indicates slower deliveries, while a practicing below 50 percent indicates faster deliveries. Comments from respondents include: "Lack of drivers for delivery companies due to labor shortages" and "Global supply issues are causing uncertainty on when and how many products will arrive."

The 14 industries reporting slower deliveries in July — listed in order — are: Mining; Agriculture, Forestry, Fishing & Hunting; Finance & Insurance; Accommodation & Food Services; Educational Services; Construction; Utilities; Health Care & Social Assistance; Management of Companies & Support Services; Real Estate, Rental & Leasing; Public Administration; Professional, Scientific & Technical Services; Transportation & Warehousing; and Information. No industry reported faster deliveries in July.

Supplier Deliveries

%Slower

%Same

%Faster

Index

Jul 2022

25.2

65.2

9.6

57.8

Jun 2022

28.8

66.2

5.0

61.9

May 2022

27.4

67.7

4.9

61.3

Apr 2022

34.0

62.2

3.8

65.1

Inventories
The Inventories Index contracted in July for the second consecutive month after four straight months of growth preceded by an eight-month period of contraction. The practicing of 45 percent was a 2.5-percentage point decrease from the 47.5 percent reported in June. Of the total respondents in July, 41 percent indicated they do not have inventories or do not measure them. Comments from respondents include: "Long lead times have consumed safety stock" and "Inventories are still lower than desired due to supply chain issues."

The seven industries reporting an increase in inventories in July — listed in order — are: Mining; Utilities; Wholesale Trade; Educational Services; Transportation & Warehousing; Public Administration; and Professional, Scientific & Technical Services. The 10 industries reporting a decrease in inventories in July — listed in order — are: Arts, Entertainment & Recreation; Retail Trade; Agriculture, Forestry, Fishing & Hunting; Other Services; Real Estate, Rental & Leasing; Management of Companies & Support Services; Finance & Insurance; Health Care & Social Assistance; Construction; and Information.

Inventories

%Higher

%Same

%Lower

Index

Jul 2022

15.1

59.7

25.2

45.0

Jun 2022

20.2

54.7

25.1

47.5

May 2022

24.7

52.7

22.6

51.0

Apr 2022

22.4

59.7

17.9

52.3

Prices
Prices paid by services organizations for materials and services increased in July for the 62nd consecutive month, with the index registering 72.3 percent, 7.8 percentage points lower than the 80.1 percent recorded in June. This is the first Prices Index practicing below 80 percent since September 2021 and its steepest month-over-month decrease since an 8.7-percentage point drop in May 2017.

Sixteen services industries reported an increase in prices paid during the month of July, in the following order: Mining; Public Administration; Information; Accommodation & Food Services; Agriculture, Forestry, Fishing & Hunting; Educational Services; Finance & Insurance; Management of Companies & Support Services; Professional, Scientific & Technical Services; Real Estate, Rental & Leasing; Transportation & Warehousing; Construction; Health Care & Social Assistance; Other Services; Utilities; and Wholesale Trade. No industry reported a decrease in prices in July.

Prices

%Higher

%Same

%Lower

Index

Jul 2022

54.0

39.7

6.3

72.3

Jun 2022

66.1

32.2

1.7

80.1

May 2022

72.2

26.8

1.0

82.1

Apr 2022

75.4

24.4

0.2

84.6

NOTE: Commodities reported as up in price and down in price are listed in the commodities section of this report.

Backlog of Orders
The ISM® Services Backlog of Orders Index grew in July for the 19th consecutive month. The index registered 58.3 percent, a 2.2-percentage point decrease compared to the June practicing of 60.5 percent. Of the total respondents in July, 40 percent indicated they do not measure backlog of orders. Respondent comments include: "Delays caused by long lead times for components" and "Higher backlog than previous month as suppliers try to keep up with orders and slowing deliveries."

The nine industries reporting an increase in order backlogs in July — listed in order — are: Accommodation & Food Services; Real Estate, Rental & Leasing; Other Services; Public Administration; Utilities; Educational Services; Retail Trade; Professional, Scientific & Technical Services; and Health Care & Social Assistance. The five industries reporting a decrease in order backlogs in July are: Arts, Entertainment & Recreation; Agriculture, Forestry, Fishing & Hunting; Finance & Insurance; Construction; and Wholesale Trade.

Backlog of Orders

%Higher

%Same

%Lower

Index

Jul 2022

31.3

53.9

14.8

58.3

Jun 2022

32.0

57.1

10.9

60.5

May 2022

17.4

69.2

13.4

52.0

Apr 2022

26.4

66.1

7.5

59.4

New Export Orders
Orders and requests for services and other non-manufacturing activities to be provided outside of the U.S. by domestically based companies grew in July for the sixth consecutive month. The New Export Orders Index registered 59.5 percent, a 2-percentage point increase from the 57.5 percent reported in June. Of the total respondents in July, 79 percent indicated they do not perform, or do not separately measure, orders for work outside of the U.S.

The six industries reporting an increase in new export orders in July — listed in order — are: Accommodation & Food Services; Mining; Real Estate, Rental & Leasing; Construction; Utilities; and Educational Services. Six industries reported a decrease in new export orders in July, in the following order: Arts, Entertainment & Recreation; Agriculture, Forestry, Fishing & Hunting; Information; Transportation & Warehousing; Wholesale Trade; and Professional, Scientific & Technical Services. Six industries indicated no change in new export orders in July.

New Export Orders

%Higher

%Same

%Lower

Index

Jul 2022

24.3

70.4

5.3

59.5

Jun 2022

19.9

75.3

4.8

57.5

May 2022

27.1

67.6

5.3

60.9

Apr 2022

22.4

71.4

6.2

58.1

Imports
The Imports Index contracted in July for the second consecutive month, registering 48 percent, up 1.7 percentage points from June's practicing of 46.3 percent. Eighty percent of respondents reported that they do not use, or do not track the use of, imported materials.

The seven industries reporting an increase in imports for the month of July — listed in order — are: Mining; Information; Transportation & Warehousing; Educational Services; Utilities; Wholesale Trade; and Health Care & Social Assistance. The five industries that reported a decrease in imports in July are: Arts, Entertainment & Recreation; Agriculture, Forestry, Fishing & Hunting; Real Estate, Rental & Leasing; Other Services; and Accommodation & Food Services. Six industries reported no change in imports in July.

Imports

%Higher

%Same

%Lower

Index

Jul 2022

8.4

79.0

12.6

48.0

Jun 2022

7.0

78.6

14.4

46.3

May 2022

14.1

77.6

8.3

52.8

Apr 2022

13.6

78.6

7.8

52.9

Inventory Sentiment
The ISM® Services Inventory Sentiment Index grew in July after four previous months of contraction, registering 50.1 percent, a 3.9-percentage point increase from June's figure of 46.2 percent. This practicing indicates that respondents feel their inventories are slightly high when correlated to business activity levels.

The five industries reporting sentiment that their inventories were too high in July are: Retail Trade; Health Care & Social Assistance; Information; Wholesale Trade; and Utilities. The six industries reporting a feeling that their inventories were too low in July — listed in order — are: Accommodation & Food Services; Management of Companies & Support Services; Educational Services; Real Estate, Rental & Leasing; Professional, Scientific & Technical Services; and Construction. Six industries reported no change in July.

Inventory Sentiment

%Too

High

%About Right

%Too

Low

Index

Jul 2022

23.4

53.5

23.1

50.1

Jun 2022

19.4

53.6

27.0

46.2

May 2022

21.7

45.6

32.7

44.5

Apr 2022

21.0

51.4

27.6

46.7

About This Report
DO NOT CONFUSE THIS NATIONAL REPORT with the various regional purchasing reports released across the country. The national report's information reflects the entire U.S., while the regional reports contain primarily regional data from their local vicinities. Also, the information in the regional reports is not used in calculating the results of the national report. The information compiled in this report is for the month of July 2022.

The data presented herein is obtained from a survey of supply executives in the services sector based on information they have collected within their respective organizations. ISM® makes no representation, other than that stated within this release, regarding the individual company data collection procedures. The data should be compared to all other economic data sources when used in decision-making.

Data and Method of Presentation
The Services ISM® Report On Business® (formerly the Non-Manufacturing ISM® Report On Business®) is based on data compiled from purchasing and supply executives nationwide. Membership of the Services Business Survey Committee (formerly Non-Manufacturing Business Survey Committee) is diversified by NAICS, based on each industry's contribution to gross domestic product (GDP). The Services Business Survey Committee responses are divided into the following NAICS code categories: Agriculture, Forestry, Fishing & Hunting; Mining; Utilities; Construction; Wholesale Trade; Retail Trade; Transportation & Warehousing; Information; Finance & Insurance; Real Estate, Rental & Leasing; Professional, Scientific & Technical Services; Management of Companies & Support Services; Educational Services; Health Care & Social Assistance; Arts, Entertainment & Recreation; Accommodation & Food Services; Public Administration; and Other Services (services such as Equipment & Machinery Repairing; Promoting or Administering Religious Activities; Grantmaking; Advocacy; and Providing Dry-Cleaning & Laundry Services, Personal Care Services, Death Care Services, Pet Care Services, Photofinishing Services, Temporary Parking Services, and Dating Services). The data are weighted based on each industry's contribution to GDP. According to the BEA estimates for 2020 GDP (released December 22, 2021), the six largest services sectors are: Real Estate, Rental & Leasing; Government; Professional, Scientific, & Technical Services; Health Care & Social Assistance; Information; and Finance & Insurance. Beginning in February 2020 with January 2020 data, computation of the indexes is accomplished utilizing unrounded numbers.

Survey responses reflect the change, if any, in the current month compared to the previous month. For each of the indicators measured (Business Activity, New Orders, Backlog of Orders, New Export Orders, Inventory Change, Inventory Sentiment, Imports, Prices, Employment and provider Deliveries), this report shows the percentage reporting each response and the diffusion index. Responses represent raw data and are never changed. Data is seasonally adjusted for Business Activity, New Orders, Prices and Employment. All seasonal adjustment factors are subject annually to relatively minor changes when conditions warrant them. The remaining indexes have not indicated significant seasonality.

The Services PMI® is a composite index based on the diffusion indexes for four of the indicators with equal weights: Business Activity (seasonally adjusted), New Orders (seasonally adjusted), Employment (seasonally adjusted) and provider Deliveries. Diffusion indexes have the properties of leading indicators and are convenient summary measures showing the prevailing direction of change and the scope of change. An index practicing above 50 percent indicates that the services economy is generally expanding; below 50 percent indicates that it is generally declining. provider Deliveries is an exception. A provider Deliveries Index above 50 percent indicates slower deliveries and below 50 percent indicates faster deliveries.

A Services PMI® above 50.1 percent, over time, indicates that the overall economy, or gross domestic product (GDP), is generally expanding; below 50.1 percent, it is generally declining. The distance from 50 percent or 50.1 percent is indicative of the strength of the expansion or decline.

The Services ISM® Report On Business® survey is sent out to Services Business Survey Committee respondents the first part of each month. Respondents are asked to ONLY report on U.S. operations for the current month. ISM® receives survey responses throughout most of any given month, with the majority of respondents generally waiting until late in the month to submit responses to provide the most accurate picture of current business activity. ISM® then compiles the report for release on the third business day of the following month.

The industries reporting growth, as indicated in the Services ISM® Report On Business® monthly report, are listed in the order of most growth to least growth. For the industries reporting contraction or decreases, those are listed in the order of the highest level of contraction/decrease to the least level of contraction/decrease.

ISM ROB Content
The Institute for Supply Management® ("ISM") Report On Business® (Manufacturing, Services and Hospital reports) ("ISM ROB") contains information, text, files, images, video, sounds, musical works, works of authorship, applications, and any other materials or content (collectively, "Content") of ISM ("ISM ROB Content"). ISM ROB Content is protected by copyright, trademark, trade secret, and other laws, and as between you and ISM, ISM owns and retains all rights in the ISM ROB Content. ISM hereby grants you a limited, revocable, nonsublicensable license to access and display on your individual device the ISM ROB Content (excluding any software code) solely for your personal, non-commercial use. The ISM ROB Content shall also contain Content of users and other ISM licensors. Except as provided herein or as explicitly allowed in writing by ISM, you shall not copy, download, stream, capture, reproduce, duplicate, archive, upload, modify, translate, publish, broadcast, transmit, retransmit, distribute, perform, display, sell, or otherwise use any ISM ROB Content.

Except as explicitly and expressly permitted by ISM, you are strictly prohibited from creating works or materials (including, but not limited to: tables, charts, data streams, time-series variables, fonts, icons, link buttons, wallpaper, desktop themes, online postcards, montages, mashups and similar videos, greeting cards, and unlicensed merchandise) that derive from or are based on the ISM ROB Content. This prohibition applies regardless of whether the derivative works or materials are sold, bartered, or given away. You shall not either directly or through the use of any device, software, internet site, web-based service, or other means remove, alter, bypass, avoid, interfere with, or circumvent any copyright, trademark, or other proprietary notices marked on the Content or any digital rights management mechanism, device, or other content protection or access control measure associated with the Content including geo-filtering mechanisms. Without prior written authorization from ISM, you shall not build a business utilizing the Content, whether or not for profit.

You shall not create, recreate, distribute, incorporate in other work, or advertise an index of any portion of the Content unless you receive prior written authorization from ISM. Requests for permission to reproduce or distribute ISM ROB Content can be made by contacting in writing at: ISM Research, Institute for Supply Management, 309 W. Elliot Road, Suite 113, Tempe, AZ 85284-1556, or by emailing kcahill@ismworld.org; subject: Content Request.

ISM shall not have any liability, duty, or obligation for or relating to the ISM ROB Content or other information contained herein, any errors, inaccuracies, omissions or delays in providing any ISM ROB Content, or for any actions taken in reliance thereon. In no event shall ISM be liable for any special, incidental, or consequential damages, arising out of the use of the ISM ROB. Report On Business®, Manufacturing PMI®, Services PMI®, and Hospital PMI® are registered trademarks of Institute for Supply Management®. Institute for Supply Management® and ISM® are registered trademarks of Institute for Supply Management, Inc.

About Institute for Supply Management®
Institute for Supply Management® (ISM®) serves supply management professionals in more than 90 countries. Its 50,000 members around the world manage about US$1 trillion in corporate and government supply chain procurement annually. Founded in 1915 as the first supply management institute in the world, ISM is committed to advancing the practice of supply management to drive value and competitive advantage for its members, contributing to a prosperous and sustainable world. ISM leads the profession through the ISM® Report On Business®, its highly regarded certification programs and the ISM® Advance Digital Platform. This report has been issued by the association since 1931, except for a four-year interruption during World War II.

The full text version of the Services ISM® Report On Business® is posted on ISM®'s website at www.ismrob.org on the third business day* of every month after 10:00 a.m. ET.

The next Services ISM® Report On Business® featuring August 2022 data will be released at 10:00 a.m. ET on Tuesday, September 6, 2022.

*Unless the New York Stock Exchange is closed.

Contact:

Kristina Cahill

Report On Business® Analyst

ISM®, ROB/Research Manager

Tempe, Arizona

+1 480.455.5910

Email: kcahill@ismworld.org

Institute for Supply Management logo. (PRNewsFoto/Institute for Supply Management)

Cision

View original content to obtain multimedia:https://www.prnewswire.com/news-releases/services-pmi-at-56-7-july-2022-services-ism-report-on-business-301598327.html

SOURCE Institute for Supply Management

Wed, 03 Aug 2022 02:00:00 -0500 en-US text/html https://finance.yahoo.com/news/services-pmi-56-7-july-140000696.html
Killexams : China manufacturing PMI in contraction again after a short-lived expansion
49.0

Manufacturing PMI for July

Down from 50.2 in June

Worse

China's manufacturing in contraction again

Manufacturing PMI was lower at 49.0 in July from 50.2 in June.

According to the official press release, industries in contraction include textiles, oil, coal processing, ferrous metal smelting and rolling processing. Ferrous metals are popular in building construction. As such, the latest event of uncompleted real estate projects could be at least part of the reason leading to the contraction of manufacturing activites. We believe that the event should delay some real estate projects from starting as demand for new homes has fallen since the event is reported in the media.

But not all industries were in contraction. Infrastructure-related industries were in expansion, including rail, ship and air transport equipment. Automobiles, which is supported by consumption subsidies on electric vehicles (EVs), was also in expansion.

Non-manufacturing PMI still showed a rebound in services

16 industries out of 21 surveyed by the non-manufacturing PMI were in expansion, including airlines, accommodation, catering, environmental protection and public services. This shows a continual recovery of services after lockdowns were lifted in early June. Since then, China has adopted a more flexible approach on Covid testing and quarantines, which also helps the recovery of services. 

We expect these service industries to keep expanding in August as summer holiday travels within China should boost services activities. 

Thu, 24 Oct 2019 13:41:00 -0500 en text/html https://think.ing.com/snaps/china-manufacturing-pmi-in-contraction-again-after-a-short-lived-expansion/
Killexams : How to Estimate a Carpentry Job

E.M. Rawes is a professional writer specializing in business, finance, mathematical and social sciences topics. She completed her studies at the University of Maryland, where she earned her Bachelor of Science. During her time working in workforce management and as a financial analyst, she reinforced her business and financial know-how.

Thu, 19 Jul 2018 22:55:00 -0500 en-US text/html https://smallbusiness.chron.com/estimate-carpentry-job-14409.html
Killexams : Collaboration expedites PMI's placement in foreign countries: BP2MI

It is impossible for the country to run alone and answer the need for enormous job opportunities abroad. Hence, collaboration is important

Badung (ANTARA) - Indonesian Migrant Workers Protection Agency (BP2MI) Head Benny Rhamdani said his side pursued collaboration with parties to accelerate Indonesian migrant workers' (PMI's) placement aboard since it could not rely on just one ministry or agency.

"It is impossible for the country to run alone and answer the need for enormous job opportunities abroad. Hence, collaboration is important," he stated during a press conference after closing the Employment Business Meeting (EBM) in Badung, Bali, Wednesday.

BP2MI held an Employment Business Meeting in Bali on July 25-27, 2022, to connect Indonesian migrant worker placement companies (P3MI) with overseas employment providers, Indonesian representatives abroad, and other relevant parties, Rhamdani stated.

Related news: BP2MI continues to encourage placement of workers in formal sector

At the meeting, the participants explored opportunities for cooperation under the intergovernmental (G to G) and also inter-private (P to P) schemes, as well as exchanged information on placing Indonesian migrant workers through related regulations, he explained.

At the meeting, the BP2MI also convinced overseas employment agencies that the Indonesian migrant workers sent were skilled workers and had met the standards.

"To the employment agency, we had ensured that our migrant workers were qualified. The country would also be serious about placing skilled and professional workers, who have expertise according to the chosen job and have sufficient foreign language skills,” Rhamdani remarked.

Related news: BP2MI, 16 regions to cooperate to protect migrant workers

Hence, he urged overseas employment agencies to not hesitate to hire PMI since BP2MI had guaranteed their expertise and skills.

"Do not doubt their skills and professionalism since the PMIs are our country's dignity. We will not send workers, who do not meet the expectations of employment agencies abroad," he affirmed.

Until mid-2022, Rhamdani remarked that Indonesia had placed around 75 thousand migrant workers in 69 countries, including 481 PMIs to South Korea, under the intergovernmental cooperation (G to G) scheme this week.

With that figure, he is optimistic that by the end of the year, the number of PMIs dispatched abroad can reach hundreds of thousands of workers.

Related news: Government loan helps migrant workers prepare for work: BP2MI

Related news: Taiwan to raise wage for PMIs in domestic sector: BP2MI

Tue, 26 Jul 2022 20:56:00 -0500 text/html https://en.antaranews.com/news/241485/collaboration-expedites-pmis-placement-in-foreign-countries-bp2mi Killexams : Best Wedding Insurance Of August 2022

There are two primary types of wedding insurance coverage: liability and cancellation. Each of these coverage types protects against various wedding mishaps, depending on the insurance company, your location and the policy specifics you choose.

Wedding liability insurance

The liability coverage included on most wedding insurance policies covers things like accidental injuries and property damage that the couple would be held liable for. Suppose the cutest flower girl in the world accidentally trips and knocks over the unity candle display, setting fire to the surroundings. In that case, liability coverage can cover any injuries or damages caused by the fire.

If your wedding insurance includes liquor liability, as most do, then if your maid of honor is tipsy and falls into a candle display, insurance can cover injuries and damages.

Wedding cancellation and postponement

Picture this: The day for the outdoor beach wedding of your dreams is soon to arrive. But unfortunately, so is news of an incoming tropical storm. If there is no inland or indoor backup plan, your dream wedding day can quickly turn into a soggy nightmare.

Wedding cancellation and postponement insurance can reimburse you for prepaid, non-refundable deposits you’d otherwise lose if your wedding has to be canceled or delayed. Or wedding insurance can cover extra expenses if the event can still take place but at some extra cost. For example, if you can move the wedding indoors during severe weather for an extra charge, wedding insurance can pick up that bill.

Problems that are covered include:

  • Extreme weather
  • Vendors who don’t show up or who go out of business
  • Illness or injury of the honorees, their parents, grandparents, children or ceremony officials
  • Venue shut downs
  • Transportation related to the wedding
  • Hotel accommodations related to the wedding
  • Deposits or fees of professional services like florists, musicians, photographers, hairstylists and makeup artists
  • Military deployment

Specific damage

Wedding insurance can also compensate you for:

  • Damage to wedding attire
  • Special jewelry for the wedding
  • Stolen or lost wedding gifts
  • Screw-ups by the wedding photographer, such as ruined negatives
  • Re-staging the wedding for photos if the photographer didn’t show up
Sun, 31 Jul 2022 22:41:00 -0500 Ashlee Tilford en-US text/html https://www.forbes.com/advisor/insurance/best-wedding-insurance/
Killexams : Inflammatory bowel diseases No result found, try new keyword!Enteral feeding therapy for newly diagnosed pediatric Crohn's disease: a double-blind randomized controlled trial with two years follow-up. Myeloperoxidase immunohistochemistry as a measure of ... Thu, 28 Jul 2022 11:06:00 -0500 text/html https://www.medscape.com/viewpublication/10728_122
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