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Exam Code: H13-821_V2.0-ENU Practice exam 2022 by Killexams.com team
HCIP-Cloud Service Solutions Architect V2.0
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Killexams : HUAWEI HCIP-Cloud resources - BingNews https://killexams.com/pass4sure/exam-detail/H13-821_V2.0-ENU Search results Killexams : HUAWEI HCIP-Cloud resources - BingNews https://killexams.com/pass4sure/exam-detail/H13-821_V2.0-ENU https://killexams.com/exam_list/HUAWEI Killexams : Accelerating Carrier Cloud Transformation with Huawei’s Suite of Scenario-Based Cloud Solutions

Huawei, a leading global provider of information and communications technology (ICT) infrastructure and smart devices, unveiled its first suite of global scenario-based cloud solutions at the Carrier Cloud Transformation Summit as part of its Win-Win Huawei Innovation Week, which took place last week virtually. The launch comes at a juncture of extensive investments in the cloud space by carriers, as gaps in IT capabilities continue to weigh heavily on their digital transformation ambitions.

The carrier-cloud advantage

In his keynote address, Chen Xuejun, Director of Huawei Carrier IT Marketing & Solution Sales Department iterated that for carriers to be able to ride the new growth curve driven by technologies such as cloud computing, big data, AI and edge computing, they must strengthen their cloud capabilities to expand existing offerings and spur new innovations.

Carriers’ focus on the cloud is precipitated largely by their burgeoning IT workloads. The rise of computing-intensive, low-latency applications and services require a new level of scalability and agility delivered via high performance clouds and cloud-native technologies.

Chen Xuejun, presenting on Huawei Cloud at the Win-Win Huawei Innovation Week

Ramping up monetization, innovation and efficiency 

Addressing these needs, Huawei’s suite of cloud solutions takes a three-pronged approach with the aim of monetizing carrier networks, speeding up innovation and optimizing operations. The first of the solutions, cloud-network collaboration solutions, enables carriers to boost their traditional connectivity services with IT offerings such as cloud, security and analytics. Tapping into Huawei Cloud, carriers are able to beef up their B2B offerings and create new upsell opportunities while capitalizing on their existing network assets, leading to greater monetization. Chen Xuejun explained how a Chinese carrier leveraged cloud, network and security services to expand the coverage of traditional solutions with integrated ICT for a multiplier boost in value.   

The second solution leverages Huawei’s advanced cloud platform to accelerate service innovation. Here, carriers can utilize Huawei’s agile development methods and its expertise in innovating telecom applications and network services to speed up time-to-market. The cloud platform grants ready access to highly-customized tools such as CloudNative Application developing platform to enable new add-ons, features and whole applications to be rapidly developed, tested and perfected. Chen Xuejun shared an example of an African carrier who saw the rollout time for its mobile wallet application being reduced from months to just weeks. This was achieved by tapping into the cloud platform’s efficiencies, resource scalability and expanded capabilities enabled through a rich ecosystem.

Responding to carriers’ needs in the 5G era, Huawei’s third solution - the pre-optimized cloud solution - is aimed at driving operational efficiency. The solution equips carriers with deep insights which are delivered through collaborative data analysis using Huawei’s distributed data lake solution. According to Chen Xuejun, the pre-optimized cloud solution is aimed at bolstering the growth of carriers’ conventional services. An Asian carrier which had a take-up rate of only 10% on its 5G services had used the insights drawn from a collaborative analysis of its BSS and OSS data using Huawei’s advanced customer experience management solution, SmartCare. This powered a range of real-time contextual targeting efforts, improving the carrier’s 5G conversion rate by 180%.

Digital China

During the event, Li Gang, CTO at Digital China, a leading cloud-based digital service provider, shared how Huawei Cloud has been instrumental in the development of its suite of cloud offerings spanning managed hosting services, consulting, migration, big data, robotic process automation, disaster recovery, operations and management (O&M) and security.

The cloud capacity and cost optimization powered by Huawei Cloud enabled Digital China to undertake large scale transformation projects across various sectors. Notable projects include a large-scale application migration from the private cloud to Huawei’s distributed cloud for a high-tech conglomerate; deployment of a multi-cloud management platform that involved multiple technology stacks; and an end-to-end migration project spanning host, database and container clusters. Other projects include the development of a PaaS container platform based on heterogeneous computing.

Diving into the details of an insurance industry case study, Li Gang explained how regulatory requirements, business bottlenecks and demand from the younger user base pushed an insurance company to enhance its cloud computing and big data capabilities, being two critical areas for risk control and claim assessment. The transformation entailed a Hadoop-based migration and the migration of big data analytics to Huawei Cloud and the implementation of a one-stop O&M. 

Ensuring cloud success

With more than 120 carrier cloud collaborations under its belt, Huawei emphasizes the importance of ensuring that a carrier’s chosen pathway to the cloud takes into consideration its value proposition, strengths, market nature, service portfolio as well as its stage of application and cloud maturity. In this aspect, Chen Xuejun believes that deep industry expertise, long standing experience in ICT and a strong local presence brought by deployment partners can go a long way in ensuring a carrier’s success on this challenging, albeit highly rewarding journey.  

Learn more:

Huawei Debuts Versatile Cloud Solutions to Turbocharge New Growth for Carriers

Huawei’s Solutions on Building Intelligent Infrastructure to Support Carriers’ Digital Transformation

Wed, 27 Jul 2022 13:14:00 -0500 en text/html https://www.thefastmode.com/expert-opinion/26541-accelerating-carrier-cloud-transformation-with-huawei-s-suite-of-scenario-based-cloud-solutions
Killexams : PH Huawei Ads Summit: Introducing new marketing resource to leverage on

The first-ever Philippine HUAWEI Ads Summit held in Manila was an afternoon of influential discussions on digital marketing by industry leaders such as AdSpark Inc., Dentsu Philippines, and Wavemaker Philippines. The afternoon session introduced capabilities within the HUAWEI ecosystem and its new self-serve ads platform – HUAWEI Ads – as well as insightful case studies and panel discussions led by digital industry leaders.

In his welcoming speech, Mr. Tan Donghui, the Vice President and Chief Strategy and Business Development Officer at Huawei Consumer Cloud Business, affirmed HUAWEI’s commitment to empower its partners’ growth through its all-scenario mobile offerings. With HUAWEI Ads, the tech-powerhouse promises to continue broadening its capabilities and provide solutions that would unlock growth opportunities in digital marketing.

Left to right, Jazper Tiongson, Event Host; Skyson Tey, Head of Huawei APAC Business Development; Malcolm Wong, Vice President of Product Strategy & Product Management, Huawei APAC Region; Rei Xiao, Director of Huawei APAC Device Ecosystem Development & Operations; Mr.Tan Donghui, Vice President and Chief Strategy and Business Development Officer at Huawei Consumer Cloud Business; Peter Peng, Country Head of Huawei Philippines Consumer Business; Ken Liang, Director of Huawei Philippines Device Ecosystem Development & Operations; Karen Tseng, Head of Global Business Development, Huawei.

Panel discussion by industry leaders empower digital marketers to thrive in a data-led world

“One of the event’s highlights was the panel discussion involving experienced advertising and

tech leaders sharing their insights on subjects such as Data-led Marketing in 2022How First-Party Data could be leveraged, and the Pros & Cons of a walled garden ecosystem. The panel included Malcolm Wong, Vice President of Product Strategy & Product Management, Huawei APAC Region, Karen Tseng, Head of Global Business Development, Huawei, Gretchen Largoza, President & CEO of Adspark Inc, James Dalusong, Head of Programmatic at Dentsu Philippines, and Sherry Magno, Deputy Head of Precision at Wavemaker Philippines.

Enter HUAWEI Ads — The leverage for advertisers within Huawei’s Mobile User Ecosystem

In the summit, the company showcased the capabilities of HUAWEI Ads on how it could help advertising partners achieve specific business goals. In the age of digital transformation, mobile ads have become the new vital touchpoint between competitive brands and their target audiences, making HUAWEI Ads an effective marketing resource that boasts 730 million global users within the world’s third largest mobile ecosystem.

The HUAWEI Ads 1+8+N Strategy

HUAWEI Ads’ effectiveness is made possible with HUAWEI’s all-scenario “1+8+N” strategy. Simply put, this strategy forms an all-scenario hardware ecosystem with three layers: ‘1’ stands for the smartphone as the center of it all; ‘8’ stands for the 8 categories of Huawei-developed products such as speakers, tablets, PCs, and watches as auxiliary entrances; ‘n’ stands for the abundant IoT ecosystem devices; ‘+’ sign stands for what connects these layers such as HUAWEI Share and HUAWEI HiLink. The all-connected ecosystem sets the building blocks for the upcoming connected future that Huawei has heavily contributed to with its 1+8+n ecosystem concept and Seamless AI Life Strategy, bringing more smart devices to homes and offices. Together, they provide the fundamental advantage for more cohesive data, precise reach, and intelligent ad distribution across devices and apps.

Chums Live provided excellent case studies on how Huawei Ads helped improved their ad campaig

Existing partners were also instrumental in providing successful case studies using HUAWEI Ads to reach their business objectives. Randy Tejada, Country Director for Intertext and Chat Comms Inc provided an insightful take as well on how the service helped them increase revenue by 73% by targeting the most valuable users possible, with a 4% contribution to overall revenue that makes HUAWEI Ads their best marketing collaborator of 2021.

To build on the event’s success, HUAWEI Ads will continue to collaborate with advertisers who are in need of efficient solutions that leverages on first-party data and for those who would want to tap into new audiences within HUAWEI’s ecosystem. Overall, the event introduced HUAWEI Ads as a strategic and cost-efficient resource that digital marketers could utilize in order to reach new audiences at the right moment with the proper advertisement.

HUAWEI Ads has organized a series of Ad Summits within Asia, in collaboration with industry leaders from Singapore, Thailand, and Hong Kong. The next station for HUAWEI Ads will be held in Malaysia.

Advertisers who wish to gain first-hand insights and knowledge, or would like to learn more about HUAWEI Ads services can register their interests at HuaweiAdsAPAC@huawei.com.

For more information about HUAWEI Ads, please visit: https://ads.huawei.com/.

To stay updated on the latest promos and devices, visit Huawei Philippines’ official pages on FacebookTwitter, and Instagram!

Sun, 31 Jul 2022 18:21:00 -0500 en-US text/html https://manilastandard.net/tech/314248294/ph-huawei-ads-summit-introducing-new-marketing-resource-to-leverage-on.html
Killexams : Why Indonesia Has Embraced Huawei

China is neither liked nor trusted in Indonesia. Yet Chinese tech firms—particularly Huawei and ZTE—have become trusted cybersecurity partners for the country. They provide the tech and the training for much of the workforce and the government officials charged with Indonesia’s cybersecurity. These Chinese tech successes in Indonesia offer sobering lessons for the United States, its allies, and its partners—not just in Indonesia, with a population of more than 270 million, but in the broader Indo-Pacific as well.

Unless policymakers in Washington take some pages from the Huawei and ZTE playbook, these Chinese tech titans will not face any serious competition as they maneuver to train vast swaths of the 21st century’s digital workforce. After all, the United States and its allies and partners have for years been in the business of walling themselves off from the perceived security vulnerabilities of dependence on Chinese technology.

Starting in the early 2010s, staunch U.S. allies such as Australia began limiting Huawei’s involvement in critical information communications technology infrastructure. This eventually culminated in strong restrictions—and sometimes outright exclusions—for Huawei and its peers such as ZTE.

China is neither liked nor trusted in Indonesia. Yet Chinese tech firms—particularly Huawei and ZTE—have become trusted cybersecurity partners for the country. They provide the tech and the training for much of the workforce and the government officials charged with Indonesia’s cybersecurity. These Chinese tech successes in Indonesia offer sobering lessons for the United States, its allies, and its partners—not just in Indonesia, with a population of more than 270 million, but in the broader Indo-Pacific as well.

Unless policymakers in Washington take some pages from the Huawei and ZTE playbook, these Chinese tech titans will not face any serious competition as they maneuver to train vast swaths of the 21st century’s digital workforce. After all, the United States and its allies and partners have for years been in the business of walling themselves off from the perceived security vulnerabilities of dependence on Chinese technology.

Starting in the early 2010s, staunch U.S. allies such as Australia began limiting Huawei’s involvement in critical information communications technology infrastructure. This eventually culminated in strong restrictions—and sometimes outright exclusions—for Huawei and its peers such as ZTE.

But for much of the developing world, the story could not be more different.

With a few notable exceptions including Vietnam and India, the developing world still welcomes Chinese tech companies as providers of sorely needed communications infrastructure and training. Huawei and ZTE have experienced among their warmest embraces in Indonesia. First entering the Indonesian market in the late 1990s and early 2000s, these companies have emerged as integral suppliers both of Indonesia’s essential communications infrastructure and the training that will empower the workforce of the country’s booming digital economy. Huawei, for example, already has by a wide margin the largest share of Indonesia’s telecom carrier equipment market.

As with many other developing countries, the relatively low price point of Huawei and ZTE kits is a big part of the appeal. By some estimates, Chinese communications infrastructure is as much as 30 percent cheaper than its competitors’.

Yet in setting out to document how senior Indonesian government officials approach the risks of technological reliance on Chinese companies for our new report, Localization and China’s Tech Success in Indonesia, we found that the reasons for the expansive role of China’s tech companies are more complex and numerous than price point. As our interviews with a wide range of Indonesian officials and experts made plain, Chinese tech companies are seen as partners to both realize Indonesia’s big digital economy goals and navigate its daunting cybersecurity challenges.

Although the digital economy is central to the Indonesian government’s plans for catapulting the country into the top 10 global economies by 2030, the country also faces a massive skills shortage in the field of information communications technology, with the World Bank projecting that it will need 9 million additional such workers by 2030.

Meanwhile, Indonesia is among the countries most vulnerable to cyberattacks globally. According to Indonesia’s National Cyber and Crypto Agency, the country experienced 1.4 billion cyberattacks or web traffic anomalies in 2021. In 2017, when the number of cyberattacks was closer to 200 million, they were estimated to have cost the country $34.2 billion.

Despite deep suspicion of Chinese tech companies among rich liberal democracies, Huawei and ZTE have presented themselves as the solution to Indonesia’s twin challenges of an impending tech skills shortfall and pervasive cyberattacks.

In 2020, Huawei pledged to train 100,000 Indonesians in essential digital skills, including cloud computing and 5G. Despite the ambitiousness of the move, Huawei is backing its pledges with resources.

We found that Huawei is partnering with local Indonesian universities to offer free short courses and certifications in app development and other key skills. One Indonesian academic we spoke to shared emails showing that Huawei is expanding its outreach by seeking to partner with more local universities and education providers.

Huawei is offering training to the Indonesian government as well, with the company reportedly having trained 7,000 officials since 2019. Indonesia has long been a victim of China’s sophisticated cyber-espionage. Despite this, Indonesia sees the training offered by Chinese tech companies as a solution to many of the country’s most severe cybersecurity challenges.

For Indonesia, the threat of state-based cyber-espionage is far down the list of security concerns when compared to cybercrime committed by nonstate actors, misinformation, and disinformation. In addition to financial losses for Indonesian companies and identity theft and fraud for ordinary Indonesians, these threats endanger the country’s social and political stability.

With Chinese tech companies offering the training, technology, and security practices to reduce vulnerabilities to cybercrime committed by nonstate actors and the skills and technology needed to manage the information domain, the Indonesian government sees firms like Huawei as partners. As a testament to this, the country’s National Cyber and Crypto Agency signed a memorandum of understanding with Huawei on cybersecurity capacity building in 2019. This agreement was then upgraded to a three-party agreement with a leading Indonesian technology institute in 2021.

For the United States or Australia, the notion that a cybersecurity agency would sign such an agreement with Huawei might seem absurd—especially considering that the Chinese government can compel Chinese companies to assist with its intelligence efforts.

But for Indonesia, these concerns about state security are trumped by the training and technology benefits that companies like Huawei provide. As one senior Indonesian government official said to us: “If we’re constantly afraid, our development will stagnate.”

If the United States and its allies and partners want to compete with China in developing countries such as Indonesia, then, much like Huawei, they need to get themselves in the business of offering tangible benefits that respond to real needs.

The U.S. government should partner with its leading tech companies to offer free or at least highly subsidized technical training programs in Indonesia and elsewhere in the Indo-Pacific. As well as subjecting the offerings from Chinese companies to some healthy competition, such initiatives would be welcomed by key U.S. allies and partners.

Countries such as Japan, Australia, and India are similarly concerned about the rise of Chinese tech companies across the Indo-Pacific and would strongly support such a U.S. initiative. Moreover, these countries could bolster such a U.S.-led effort by providing additional know-how, funding, and technology. Such a so-called minilateral initiative could also potentially be rolled into exiting Quad efforts to provide more public goods in the Indo-Pacific.

Rhetoric from the United States and like-minded countries about the rules-based international order and a free and open Indo-Pacific isn’t bad. But it won’t persuade developing countries to turn down tangible benefits like technology and training. To shift decision-making in Jakarta and elsewhere, Washington will need to step up with technology and training offers that provide a more appealing value proposition.

None of this is to say that strategic competition with China is the only reason for offering tech training programs in Indonesia and other developing countries in the Indo-Pacific.

Helping to upskill future generations of tech workers in the region is an unambiguously good thing. Many Indo-Pacific countries and their young populations will need these skills to realize their development goals in the global economy’s digital future.

But as well as the clear development rationale for providing these kinds of opportunities, there is a compelling realpolitik reason. Without training funded and supported by the United States and its allies and partners, Huawei and other Chinese tech companies will only increase their already strong influence over Indonesia’s—and the broader region’s—technology landscape.

The United States and its allies and partners have been missing in action on tech training in Indonesia and other key developing economies in the Indo-Pacific. It is time for them to get back in the game.

Thu, 28 Jul 2022 00:10:00 -0500 en-US text/html https://foreignpolicy.com/2022/07/28/indonesia-china-huawei-tech-cybersecurity/?tpcc=onboarding_trending
Killexams : Huawei partners firm, targets tech solutions No result found, try new keyword!A technology company, Soft Alliance, has expressed its commitment to providing tech solutions and enhancing growth of the Information and Technology sector in Nigeria.This, it said, informed its ... Sun, 31 Jul 2022 12:00:00 -0500 en text/html https://www.msn.com/en-xl/africa/other/huawei-partners-firm-targets-tech-solutions/ar-AA10aEYA
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