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Exam Code: DANB Practice exam 2022 by Killexams.com team
DANB Dental Assisting National Board

DANBs exam outlines list the courses covered on each exam. You can use these outlines to help create your study plan. obtain free outlines by clicking on the links below.

Note: DANBs exams do not correspond directly to any specific textbook or dental assisting program. Instead, they are based on an analysis of the duties commonly performed in genuine dental assisting practice, which is called a content validation study. This study serves as the basis for what DANB calls the exam outline.

National Entry Level Dental Assistant (NELDA) certification
• Anatomy, Morphology and Physiology (AMP)
• Infection Control (ICE)
• Radiation Health and Safety (RHS)

Certified Dental Assistant (CDA) certification
• General Chairside Assisting (GC)
• Radiation Health and Safety (RHS)
• Infection Control (ICE)

Certified Orthodontic Assistant (COA) certification
• Orthodontic Assisting (OA)
• Infection Control (ICE)

Certified Preventive Functions Dental Assistant (CPFDA) certification
• Coronal Polishing (CP)
• Sealants (SE)
• Topical Fluoride (TF)

Certified Restorative Functions Dental Assistant (CRFDA) certification
• Impressions (IM)
• Sealants (SE)
• Temporaries (TMP)
• Restorative Functions (RF)

All DANB exam Outlines
• Anatomy, Morphology and Physiology (AMP)
• Coronal Polishing (CP)
• General Chairside Assisting (GC)
• Infection Control (ICE)
• Impressions (IM)
• Orthodontic Assisting (OA)
• Restorative Functions (RF)
• Radiation Health and Safety (RHS)
• Sealants (SE)
• Topical Fluoride (TF)
• Temporaries (TMP)

Dental Assisting National Board
Medical Assisting learner
Killexams : Medical Assisting learner - BingNews https://killexams.com/pass4sure/exam-detail/DANB Search results Killexams : Medical Assisting learner - BingNews https://killexams.com/pass4sure/exam-detail/DANB https://killexams.com/exam_list/Medical Killexams : CareerStep Launches Training Program to Meet Growing Demand for Medical Lab Assistants

Workforce training pioneer's flexible, skills-focused approach helps working learners earn credentials for in-demand allied health roles

BOSTON, Aug. 2, 2022 /PRNewswire/ -- Penn Foster-Carrus, whose jobtech platform is used by major employers nationwide to identify, recruit, and train workers for middle-skill careers, today announced the launch of a new training program for the fast-growing medical laboratory assistant role. Available through CareerStep, the new course prepares learners to sit for two industry-recognized and employer-preferred certification exams: the American Medical Technologists (AMT) Certified Medical Laboratory Assistant (CMLA) exam and the National Healthcare Association (NHA) Certified Phlebotomist Technician (CPT) exam.

Penn Foster (PRNewsfoto/Penn Foster)

The Bureau of Labor Statistics estimates that the demand for clinical lab-related skills will continue to accelerate in the next 8 years, as the volume of laboratory tests increases to meet both population growth and the development of new types of medical diagnostics. Penn Foster-Carrus' portfolio of healthcare training programs already includes in-demand fields like Phlebotomy, Medical Assistant, and Hemodialysis Technician; the addition of the Medical Laboratory Assistant program will enable more working learners to access affordable, job-aligned training programs that help them take the next step in their careers. Thanks to the unique design of the program's externship course, learners who complete and pass the certification exams will be fully certified for the role, with no other additional requirements needed.

"Middle-skill roles like medical lab assistant are critical to the country's labor market, and play a vital role in ensuring quality of care amidst a rapidly changing healthcare landscape," said Misty Frost, CEO of Penn Foster-Carrus. "This is not just about meeting the most immediate talent needs of hospital systems and healthcare providers, but also building a skilled workforce that is better-prepared to navigate a complex and dynamic labor market in the years to come."

Penn Foster and Carrus, which combined in 2021, now provide training in middle-skill fields like allied health, design, and skilled trades for more than 450,000 learners each year.

About Penn Foster
Penn Foster is bridging the gap between education and economic opportunity to build the workforce of tomorrow. We partner with employers to design and deliver digital and blended learning programs that attract, upskill, and retain workers in America's fastest-growing fields and professions. With more than 40,000 graduates each year, Penn Foster helps individuals discover pathways to opportunity through accredited diploma, certificate and degree programs that matter in the world of work. For more information, visit https://www.partners.pennfoster.edu.

About Carrus
Carrus delivers quality, trusted healthcare learning content, continuing education, and certification management to new learners, healthcare professionals, and institutions through an integrated technology platform that provides the most seamless healthcare learning experience possible. In 25+ years, Carrus—through its CareerStep and CareerCert divisions—has trained over 150,000 learners for new careers, partnered with more than 150 colleges and universities nationwide, and educated more than 100,000 healthcare professionals

Cision

View original content to obtain multimedia:https://www.prnewswire.com/news-releases/careerstep-launches-training-program-to-meet-growing-demand-for-medical-lab-assistants-301597177.html

SOURCE Penn Foster

Tue, 02 Aug 2022 01:00:00 -0500 en-US text/html https://finance.yahoo.com/news/careerstep-launches-training-program-meet-130000292.html
Killexams : Teachers help hospitalized kids heal and thrive through learning

oklahoman.com cannot provide a good user experience to your browser. To use this site and continue to benefit from our journalism and site features, please upgrade to the latest version of Chrome, Edge, Firefox or Safari.

Sun, 07 Aug 2022 22:01:00 -0500 en-US text/html https://www.oklahoman.com/story/sponsor-story/the-childrens-center-rehabilitation-hospital/2022/08/08/teachers-help-hospitalized-kids-heal-and-thrive-through-learning/65391951007/
Killexams : Long Beach health care simulation program gives high schoolers early look at medical industry

In the future, one of these teens could save your life.

And as a group, they could help bolster the health care workforce.

More than a dozen Long Beach high school students recently finished a 2 1/2-week summer learning session at a local hospital. The session is part of LBUSD’s High School Healthcare Pathway Simulation Program, which is offered three times a year and is designed to provide the teens early experiences working in a hospital environment and hands-on training with medical professionals.

The program, which began in 2014, is part of a partnership between the Long Beach Unified School District and MemorialCare Long Beach Medical Center, to provide work-based learning experiences for students who want to pursue a career in health care.

It is one of the few known programs of its kind in the United States.

And its mission is to provide high school students with a health care-focused learning environment – geared toward a specific profession they may be interested in – that they may not otherwise have until moving into higher education, said pathway facilitator Alison McCloskey, clinical supervisor for the neurodiagnostic lab at Long Beach Medical Center.

The program, by giving students an early look at various medical professions, will also benefit the health care profession over the long-term, during a time when there is a worker shortage.

The program’s data tracker shows that 97% of students who have participated in the program go on to further their education and career in health care, McCloskey said. And the program’s participants represent the city’s diversity, potentially boosting the diversity of health care professionals in the future as well.

“It is always beneficial to start introducing students to the healthcare field early,” Carolyn Caldwell, president at Dignity Health–St. Mary Medical Center, said in a statement. “Early introduction has led to many individuals starting in non-clinical roles and continuing their professional development by becoming nurses, pharmacists or physicians.”

  • Alison McCloskey, clinical supervisor for the neurodiagnostic lab at Long...

    Alison McCloskey, clinical supervisor for the neurodiagnostic lab at Long Beach MemorialCare and the Long Beach Unified High School Healthcare Pathway Simulation Program facilitator conducting a communication exercise for students at the MemoricalCare Long Beach Medical Center’s Simulation Lab on Wednesday, July 27. (Photo by Christina Merino, Press-Telegram/SCNG)

  • Alison McCloskey, clinical supervisor for the neurodiagnostic lab at Long...

    Alison McCloskey, clinical supervisor for the neurodiagnostic lab at Long Beach MemorialCare and the Long Beach Unified High School Healthcare Pathway Simulation Program facilitator conducting a communication exercise for students at the MemoricalCare Long Beach Medical Center’s Simulation Lab on Wednesday, July 27. (Photo by Christina Merino, Press-Telegram/SCNG)

  • Two students with a MemorialCare physical therapist during skills day...

    Two students with a MemorialCare physical therapist during skills day at the MemoricalCare Long Beach Medical Center’s Simulation Lab on Wednesday, July 27. (Photo by Christina Merino, Press-Telegram/SCNG)

  • Calvin Im-Sor and Bailey Snow with a MemorialCare registered nurse...

    Calvin Im-Sor and Bailey Snow with a MemorialCare registered nurse practicing wound care on skills day at the MemoricalCare Long Beach Medical Center’s Simulation Lab on Wednesday, July 27. (Photo by Christina Merino, Press-Telegram/SCNG)

  • The Long Beach Unified High School Healthcare Pathway Simulation Program...

    The Long Beach Unified High School Healthcare Pathway Simulation Program offers an opportunity for students to practice real skills on manikins as different professions in the healthcare field. (Photo by Christina Merino, Press-Telegram/SCNG)

  • Three students with the MemorialCare social worker on skills day...

    Three students with the MemorialCare social worker on skills day where students learn about different careers in the hospital at the MemoricalCare Long Beach Medical Center’s Simulation Lab on Wednesday, July 27. (Photo by Christina Merino, Press-Telegram/SCNG)

  • Three students with the MemoricalCare occupational therapist on skills day...

    Three students with the MemoricalCare occupational therapist on skills day at the MemoricalCare Long Beach Medical Center’s Simulation Lab on Wednesday, July 27. (Photo by Christina Merino, Press-Telegram/SCNG)

  • Bailey Snow (left) and Calvin Im-Sor with a MemorialCare physical...

    Bailey Snow (left) and Calvin Im-Sor with a MemorialCare physical therapist during skills day at the MemoricalCare Long Beach Medical Center’s Simulation Lab on Wednesday, July 27. (Photo by Christina Merino, Press-Telegram/SCNG)

  • Three students with the MemoricalCare occupational therapist on skills day...

    Three students with the MemoricalCare occupational therapist on skills day at the MemoricalCare Long Beach Medical Center’s Simulation Lab on Wednesday, July 27. (Photo by Christina Merino, Press-Telegram/SCNG)

  • Alison McCloskey, clinical supervisor for the neurodiagnostic lab at Long...

    Alison McCloskey, clinical supervisor for the neurodiagnostic lab at Long Beach MemorialCare and the Long Beach Unified High School Healthcare Pathway Simulation Program facilitator conducting a communication exercise for students at the MemoricalCare Long Beach Medical Center’s Simulation Lab on Wednesday, July 27. (Photo by Christina Merino, Press-Telegram/SCNG)

  • Three students including Diego Alvarado (on right) with a MemorialCare...

    Three students including Diego Alvarado (on right) with a MemorialCare registered nurse practicing wound care on skills day at the MemoricalCare Long Beach Medical Center’s Simulation Lab on Wednesday, July 27. (Photo by Christina Merino, Press-Telegram/SCNG)

  • Two students with the MemorialCare respiratory therapist learn about intubation...

    Two students with the MemorialCare respiratory therapist learn about intubation on skills day for the Long Beach Unified High School Healthcare Pathway Simulation Program at the MemoricalCare Long Beach Medical Center’s Simulation Lab on Wednesday, July 27. (Photo by Christina Merino, Press-Telegram/SCNG)

  • Nosogastric Intubation model for the Long Beach Unified High School...

    Nosogastric Intubation model for the Long Beach Unified High School Healthcare Pathway Simulation Program at the MemoricalCare Long Beach Medical Center’s Simulation Lab on Wednesday, July 27. (Photo by Christina Merino, Press-Telegram/SCNG)

  • Two students with the MemorialCare respiratory therapist learn about intubation...

    Two students with the MemorialCare respiratory therapist learn about intubation on skills day for the Long Beach Unified High School Healthcare Pathway Simulation Program at the MemoricalCare Long Beach Medical Center’s Simulation Lab on Wednesday, July 27. (Photo by Christina Merino, Press-Telegram/SCNG)

  • Alison McCloskey, clinical supervisor for the neurodiagnostic lab at Long...

    Alison McCloskey, clinical supervisor for the neurodiagnostic lab at Long Beach MemorialCare and the Long Beach Unified High School Healthcare Pathway Simulation Program facilitator conducting a communication exercise for students at the MemoricalCare Long Beach Medical Center’s Simulation Lab on Wednesday, July 27. (Photo by Christina Merino, Press-Telegram/SCNG)

The pathway accepts applications for fall, spring and summer sessions.

Students go through a selection process during which they must answer questions and provide their GPA. Two LBUSD school teachers and two hospital facilitators (one being McCloskey) review the applications and hand select candidates. This gives someone with a lower GPA an opportunity if they answer the questions in depth.

Once students are selected, they begin their hands-on training at Long Beach Medical, which includes being able to meet with and learn from professionals, such as a respiratory therapist who can teach them about intubation.

Students also meet with a registered nurse to learn how to put in a foley catheter. They are given a “Stop the Bleed” demonstration with the hospital trauma team and learn skills on how to recognize a stroke and do CPR, McCloskey said.

One of the other benefits students get when joining the program is lasting relationships with professionals in the field they wish to pursue, McCloskey said. She said she is proud that the pathway program provides a community for students to reach out and ask for help even after they have left.

The 14 students in the exact summer program, which ended Wednesday, Aug. 3, were able to experience a wide range of health care disciplines.

Senior Bryanna Garcia, for example, is part of the biomedical program at Wilson High and wants to have a career in the health care field because of her experience living with her grandparents; her grandmother has been  hospitalized in the past.

“Before this program, I wanted to go into kinesiology to become a physical therapist,” Garcia said. “But now that they put me into the situation where I was a registered nurse, I liked how it was and the charge that I had to take and being a leader in the field that I was in was great.”

Learning more about the role of a RN and different areas in the hospital that she can work in is one of the things that she hoped to benefit from during the program, Garica said.

Diego Alvarado, another Wilson High senior, found out about the program through a teacher and decided to apply for the hands-on experience. Alvarado wants to go to medical school, hopefully Johns Hopkins University, and pursue a career as a surgeon.

One of Alvarado’s favorite parts about being in the pathway program, he said, was interacting with the instructional-volunteer MemorialCare staff who talked and demonstrated their work to the students.

“Seeing different mentors come in, like the trauma nurse that came in, that was really interesting and cool,” he said. “I think that this program is really special and it gives you a lot of insight of what you can be experiencing as a health care professional.”

During skills days, the students learned  more about different career paths and put into practice what they learned from each one.

“Providing young people with early exposure to health care careers is one way to ensure that they understand the wide variety of professional opportunities that are available to them,” said Margie Harrier, a registered nurse, senior vice president and area manager of Kaiser Permanente South Bay Medical Center.

Many of these health care careers are opening up after the coronavirus pandemic.

Despite the resilience of health care workers, many became burnt out, leading people to quit or go into early retirement.

Nearly one in five health care workers quit their jobs during the pandemic, according to a survey conducted by intelligence company Morning Consult in September.

“I think now more than ever, it’s so important that we have this new, upcoming group of people who are really motivated in healthcare,” McCloskey said in a statement. “I’m so happy that the pandemic didn’t scare them all away; they seem more motivated.”

The high school students going into these careers are also becoming more diverse, which will end up benefiting the health care field as well, hospital executives said.

“Several studies have shown that patients feel comfortable when their caregivers are a reflection of themselves,” Caldwell said. “There is a feeling of trust and a potential feeling that the caregiver will have a better understanding of them personally.”

Diversity in health care could also Improve health equity among some groups of patients, such as Black women, who continue to experience higher mortality rates relative to other U.S. women. The maternal mortality rate among Black women, for example, is three to four times higher than the general population, according to a 2021 study published in the Journal of Women’s Health.

When asked about diversity in the health care field, students at the program said their backgrounds could benefit their work as professionals in the future.

Growing up in a low-income area of Long Beach, Calvin Im-Sor, a senior at Lakewood High School, said the health care field would allow him to help other people that can relate to his past experiences.

“I feel like (the health care field is) going to be more diverse because a bunch of low-income students are getting the opportunity to learn and grow as a future or nurse in training,” Im-Sor said. “So, a bunch of people who have never thought about learning about doing nursing are open to the opportunity to learn with this program.”

Calvin Im-Sor (left) and Bailey Snow with a MemorialCare physical therapist during skills day at the MemoricalCare Long Beach Medical Center's Simulation Lab on Wednesday, July 27. (Photo by Christina Merino, Press-Telegram/SCNG)
Calvin Im-Sor (left) and Bailey Snow with a MemorialCare physical therapist during skills day at the MemoricalCare Long Beach Medical Center’s Simulation Lab on Wednesday, July 27. (Photo by Christina Merino, Press-Telegram/SCNG)

At Long Beach Medical Center, McCloskey said, those who seek medical care and the staff that help them are both diverse.

“For me, I see that in my classroom, just like I see it already in the hospital,” she said. “I definitely think that the more diverse we are, the more we support the community.”

Other health care providers are also working to create a more diverse environment to Improve patient experiences.

“To meet the health care needs of the future, our communities need diverse health care workers with the right experiences, skills, cultural diversity, and linguistic capabilities,” Harrier, with Kaiser Permanente, said. “Health care workforce development programs increase access to education, exposure to skill development and job experiences, and employment opportunities.”

As such, the LBUSD-MemorialCare program isn’t the only one that seems poised to increase diversity in the health care industry.

In 2020, CommonSpirit Health – Dignity’s parent company – partnered with Charles R. Drew University of Medicine and Science, one of the nation’s four historically Black medical schools, to both respond to a national nursing shortage but also diversify the workforce’s ranks.

“As our country becomes more diverse,” Caldwell said, “it is important that the workforce mirrors the community.

The program, she added, will “increase medical education opportunities for more Black, Indigenous and people of color.”

Partnerships like these and the Long Beach Unified High School Healthcare Pathway Simulation Program have concrete goals: to Improve the health care field in the long-term– by cultivating and preparing students to be medical professionals in the future.

A past student of the LBUSD program, for example, is in medical school. Another is at UCI studying to be a pharmacist. Several others have completed the MemorialCare patient care assistant program, and two are currently interns for clinical lab scientists at Long Beach Medical Center, McCloskey said.

McCloskey said she hopes to expand the program to other school districts and other campuses in Long Beach.

“I just want people to know that the program is here and that it’s successful,” McCloskey said, “and if people are interested in creating a program with MemorialCare, I think MemorialCare is open to helping our youth.”

Mon, 08 Aug 2022 09:01:00 -0500 Christina Merino en-US text/html https://www.presstelegram.com/2022/08/08/long-beach-health-care-simulation-program-gives-high-schoolers-early-look-at-medical-industry/
Killexams : Somerset Scrub Club introduces students to healthcare careers No result found, try new keyword!Twenty students started their first of a three-day experience in Skowhegan exploring healthcare career options through the Somerset Scrub Club. Mon, 08 Aug 2022 10:27:45 -0500 en-us text/html https://www.msn.com/en-us/money/careersandeducation/somerset-scrub-club-introduces-students-to-healthcare-careers/ar-AA10sa9O Killexams : High School Internship leads to opportunities for aspiring medical student

Among the staff of a local doctor's office is a teenager Studying for college. What started as an internship at Arlington Dermatology has led to an even bigger opportunity for one exact high school graduate.

Angelica Groszek always knew she wanted a career in the medical field. While attending Buffalo Grove High School, she took classes in the District 214 Health Science career pathway, including anatomy and medical terminology. She also earned state certification as a Certified Nursing Assistant. These programs helped prepare her when she started an internship with Arlington Dermatology in January.

"I feel like I have a head start because of how many medical terms I use here, and even interacting with patients. I even impressed some of the workers here," said Groszek. "Being here and seeing everything, it reiterated my passion for medicine."

As an intern, Groszek started at the front desk making appointments and learning about insurance. Her CNA certification allowed her to get more experience on the floor by rooming patients, helping them sign forms and assisting with light and laser treatments.

Upon graduation in May, Arlington Dermatology paid for her training to become a certified dermatology technician. They even offered her a job to keep coming back during college breaks.

"They really took a chance on me, a girl right out of high school who's interested in medicine and didn't have a lot of experience," said Groszek. "Now my scope of practice is bigger. I'm so thankful for them investing in me. They trained me, they let me shadow a doctor and be in the rooms. You're not going to find that anywhere else."

The partnership between District 214 and Arlington Dermatology started last year. To the administrators at the practice, Groszek was a standout.

"Angelica was an extremely fast learner from day one. She caught on immediately on what to do and how to do it. She also has a natural politeness in her. Patients clicked with her immediately," said Ursula Cholewa, the Clinical Research Director at Arlington Dermatology. "Within a couple of weeks we knew we wanted to invest in her professional training because we knew it would benefit her and us."

Arlington Dermatology prides itself on not only being a community practice, but also promoting education and research.

"Good education should start early. We have young students from high school, colleges and medical schools working alongside our staff. We teach them practical dermatology but also show them true compassion and care for our patients. Teaching by example is what we believe in," said Cholewa.

"Just seeing how all the staff treats patients with care and respect - they're my role models. I'm grateful to have the opportunity to keep coming back," said Groszek.

Groszek plans to study biology at the University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign starting this fall.

Work-based learning is an element of every District 214 career pathway. The opportunities that the district's Industry Partners provide are available to all students, regardless of chosen field. Learn more about internships and apprenticeships in the Center for Career Discovery section of District 214's website.

Fri, 29 Jul 2022 01:43:00 -0500 en-US text/html https://www.dailyherald.com/submitted/20220728/high-school-internship-leads-to-opportunities-for-aspiring-medical-student
Killexams : VR learners more empathetic and inclusive, study finds

Virtual reality and the metaverse can nurture a more empathetic and inclusive community of learners, with VR learners feeling almost four times more emotionally connected to content, a study by PwC has found.

Wed, 27 Jul 2022 03:07:00 -0500 en text/html https://thepienews.com/news/vr-learners-more-empathetic-and-inclusive-survey-finds/
Killexams : World's first standalone computer vision and machine learning tool for surgical wound infections debuts in Rwanda

In science fiction, medics can wave a high-tech sensor at a patient and diagnose whatever ails them with a flash of light and a symphony of beeps and buzzes. Now, a new AI-enabled diagnostic tool is helping to make that space-age dream a reality on Earth. The new tool, which facilitates postsurgical follow-up care at home for women recovering from caesarean sections in rural Rwanda, is the result of a multinational, multifaceted collaboration between researchers, clinicians, and community health workers from Harvard Medical School, MIT, Partners In Health, and Rwandan telemedicine tech firm Insightiv.

While more than 800 women around the world die each day from complications of pregnancy and childbirth, in Rwanda has fallen sharply in exact decades. One reason for the rapid decline in maternal deaths is improved access to comprehensive obstetric care, including an increase in surgical capacity, which allows greater access to C-sections for women in need.

Yet, the growing use of C-sections has been accompanied by an increase in postpartum surgical complications, such as infections of the surgical wound. While Rwanda has a robust community health system that provides routine follow-up care for nonsurgical deliveries in new mothers' homes, community health workers are not trained to provide post-cesarean care, so women who gave birth via C-section must travel to clinics and hospitals for their postpartum care. The idea for a -aided arose when the team's early research showed that more than 10 percent of women giving birth in Rwanda develop postoperative surgical-site infection, with greatest risk for those who live further from a hospital, and that traveling to a clinic or hospital for routine surgical follow-up was physically and financially burdensome for many of these new mothers.

The latest version of the still-developing tool is a smartphone app that guides community health workers through general well-being assessments and includes an image-based surgical-site infection diagnostic guide based on a machine learning algorithm. The tool can render an accurate diagnosis nine out of 10 times, on average, a higher accuracy than that of trained diagnosticians reviewing the images remotely.

While an earlier version of the tool relied on an internet connection to access a remote server to perform the computer vision calculations, the latest edition of the tool is being designed to perform all the work locally, on the community health workers' handheld smartphones, and is believed to be the first reported instance of onboard computer vision and machine learning for surgical wound analysis.

The project was named first-place winner of the National Institutes of Health Technology Accelerator Challenge for Maternal Health on July 28. The challenge was designed to spur and reward the development of prototypes of low-cost, point-of-care diagnostic tools for conditions associated with maternal and infant mortality and complications of pregnancy and childbirth, according to the NIH.

Bethany Hedt-Gauthier, associate professor of global health and in the Blavatnik Institute at HMS and the captain of the challenge project team, said that she and colleagues are planning to invest the $500,000 cash prize into further research and development of the project. They and the other winning teams will discuss their work at a webinar on Aug. 4 .

The other leaders of the team include Robert Riviello, HMS associate professor of surgery at Brigham and Women's Hospital and associate professor of global health and social medicine, Adeline Boatin, HMS assistant professor of obstetrics, gynecology and reproductive biology at Massachusetts General Hospital, Laban Bikorimana, Vincent Cubaka, Fred Kateera, and Anne Niyigena from Partners In Health in Rwanda, Audace Nakeshimana from Insightiv AI, and Rich Fletcher, director of the Mobile Technology Group in the MIT Mechanical Engineering Department.

Identifying problems, developing solutions

"For me, global health work should be focused on solving specific problems defined in collaboration with the clinicians who are delivering care, the patients we are trying to care for, and the communities we seek to serve, with a focus on improving health equity," said Hedt-Gauthier.

The team's initial assessments of C-section outcomes in Rwanda included some surprising findings, such as high surgical-site infection rates. Several factors contribute to surgical-site infections, including access to safe sanitation, particularly during the dry season. A exact study found that most women who deliver via C-section in Rwanda return for follow-up care; however, the team's research also found that more than 77 percent of women who needed to go to clinic for follow-up suffered catastrophic financial losses due to the cost of treatment, transportation, and lost work, even with Rwanda's robust universal health insurance.

Engaging community health workers to support women during recovery could offer a safe and more preferred alternative. "We've learned so much from this project," Riviello said. "One of the key lessons is how important it is to keep the big picture in mind. It's not just the that matters, it's the whole hospital, the patient's home life, the challenges of getting to and from the clinic and the hospital over great distances."

Step by step

"Solving maternal health problems in an underserved community is an exceptionally complex challenge," Boatin said. "You have to understand the clinical situation within its social context. When you add the additional level of complexity of training health care workers to provide a new service at the same time as you're trying to build a new piece of technology, you need to bring together patients and clinicians, social scientists and technologists in a partnership where everyone's voice can be heard."

"Once you get the conversations started, you have to keep them going as you work toward a solution, step by step," Boatin added.

In this case, that meant careful development, testing, and evaluation of a series of tools aimed at enabling community health workers to determine whether women who had C-sections needed to travel to the clinic for a possible infection or other problem. The buildup to the current tool started with a simple in-person or telephone questionnaire, then telemedicine enabled surgical-site analysis using cell phones to text images from the field to a diagnostician at a clinic or hospital, and eventually culminating in multiple versions of computer vision and machine learning tools.

"Before we began this work, gaps in postpartum care and their impact on outcomes for mothers who delivered by caesarean section were largely unknown," said Fred Kateera, chief medical officer for Partners In Health in Rwanda and a lecturer at the University of Global Health Equity. "Fast forward just a few years, and we're not only providing strong evidence for the feasibility of community-based use of technologies to provide follow-up care for new mothers in their own homes, we're using data from this comprehensive suite of studies to inform local development of the CDC's WASH programming, to Improve our antibiotic stewardship, and to mitigate catastrophic expenditures for patients and their caregivers," Kateera noted.

"We're delighted to take a moment to celebrate the achievements, but we're also excited to dig back in and see how much further we can go with this crucial implementation science," he said.

The group is now working to incorporate computer vision diagnostics for anemia—another common complication of C-section—and exploring whether might be more accurate and more generalizable to other populations than color photography since thermal imaging is less reliant on skin tone, which can vary and can confound the computer vision algorithm.

Hedt-Gauthier said that she was excited that the work is being acknowledged and emphasized the importance of the multidisciplinary, multiperspective approach that the team took.

"Our team includes technologists, clinicians, researchers, and implementers," Hedt-Gauthier said. "Working towards a solution that is both innovative and feasible, acceptable to patients and health care staff, and integrates within existing systems requires this varying expertise."

Digital health has been alternately touted as a near-magical solution to global health problems or denigrated as yet another idea from privileged communities that instead of bringing greater equity can exacerbate existing disparities.

"The end goal of digital global health shouldn't be to develop a cool tool that doesn't work in low-resource settings, or to publish a paper in a journal for other researchers to read. It should be to help the people who need it most live healthier lives," Hedt-Gauthier said. "The only way to get there is by working together, building deep collaborations, and keeping a relentless focus on the goals of equity and solving problems for patients in need."



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Killexams : Experts use tools from artificial intelligence to rapidly identify substances that cause overdose deaths

An automated process based on computer algorithms that can read text from medical examiners' death certificates can substantially speed up data collection of overdose deaths – which in turn can ensure a more rapid public health response time than the system currently used, new UCLA research finds.

The analysis, to be published Aug. 8 in the peer-reviewed JAMA Network Open, used tools from artificial intelligence to rapidly identify substances that caused overdose deaths.

The overdose crisis in America is the number one cause of death in young adults, but we don't know the genuine number of overdose deaths until months after the fact. We also don't know the number of overdoses in our communities, as rapidly released data is only available at the state level, at best. We need systems that get this data out fast and at a local level so public health can respond. Machine learning and natural language processing can help bridge this gap."

Dr David Goodman-Meza, Study Lead Author and Assistant Professor, Medicine, Division of Infectious Diseases, David Geffen School of Medicine, University of California - Los Angeles Health Sciences

As it now stands, overdose data recording involves several steps, beginning with medical examiners and coroners, who determine a cause of death and record suspected drug overdoses on death certificates, including the drugs that caused the death. The certificates, which include unstructured text, are then sent to local jurisdictions or the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) which code them according to the International Statistical Classification of Diseases and Related Health Problems, Tenth Edition (ICD-10). This coding process is time consuming as it may be done manually. As a result, there is a substantial lag time between the date of death and the reporting of those deaths, which slows the release of surveillance data. This in turn slows the public health response.

Further complicating matters is that under this system, different drugs with different uses and effects are aggregated under the same code – for instance buprenorphine, a partial opioid used to treat opioid use disorder, and the synthetic opioid fentanyl are listed under the same ICD-10 code.

For this study, the researchers used "natural language processing" (NLP) and machine learning to analyze nearly 35,500 death records for all of 2020 from Connecticut and from 9 U.S. counties: Cook (Illinois); Jefferson (Alabama); Johnson, Denton, Tarrant and Parker (Texas), Milwaukee (Wisconsin), and Los Angeles and San Diego. They examined how combining NLP, which uses computer algorithms to understand text, and machine learning can automate the deciphering of large amounts of data with precision and accuracy.

They found that of the 8,738 overdose deaths recorded that year the most common specific substances were fentanyl (4758, 54%), alcohol (2866, 33%), cocaine (2247, 26%), methamphetamine (1876, 21%), heroin (1613, 18%), prescription opioids (1197, 14%), and any benzodiazepine (1076, 12%). Of these, only the classification for benzodiazepines was suboptimal under this method and the others were perfect or near perfect.

Most recently the CDC released preliminary overdose data that was no sooner than four months after the deaths, Goodman-Meza said.

"If these algorithms are embedded within medical examiner's offices, the time could be reduced to as early as toxicology testing is completed, which could be about three weeks after the death," he said.

The rest of the overdose deaths were due to other substances such as amphetamines, antidepressants, antipsychotics, antihistamines, anticonvulsants, barbiturates, muscle relaxants, and hallucinogensThe researchers note some limitations to the study, the main one being that the system was not tested on less common substances such as anticonvulsants or other designer drugs, so it is unknown if it would work for these. Also, given that the models need to be trained to rely on a large volume of data to make predictions, the system may be unable to detect emerging trends.

But rapid and accurate data are needed to develop and implement interventions to curb overdoses, the researchers write, and "NLP tools such as these should be integrated in data surveillance workflows to increase rapid dissemination of data to the public, researchers, and policy makers."

Study co-authors in addition to Goodman-Meza are Chelsea Shover, Dr. Jesus Medina, Dr. Amber Tang, Steven Shoptaw, and Alex Bui of UCLA.

Source:

Journal reference:

Goodman-Meza, D., et al. (2022) Development and Validation of Machine Models Using Natural Language Processing to Classify Substances Involved in Overdose Deaths. JAMA Network Open. doi.org/10.1001/jamanetworkopen.2022.25593.

Mon, 08 Aug 2022 17:04:00 -0500 en text/html https://www.news-medical.net/news/20220809/Experts-use-tools-from-artificial-intelligence-to-rapidly-identify-substances-that-cause-overdose-deaths.aspx
Killexams : Study: AI Tools More Rapidly Identify Substances Causing Overdose Deaths No result found, try new keyword!An automated process based on computer algorithms that can read text from medical examiners' death certificates can substantially speed up data collection of overdose deaths -- which in turn can ... Mon, 08 Aug 2022 10:40:27 -0500 en-us text/html https://www.msn.com/en-us/health/medical/study-ai-tools-more-rapidly-identify-substances-causing-overdose-deaths/ar-AA10rWS6 Killexams : AI can revolutionise medical research, but a cautious approach is needed

One week social-media users are generating and sharing amusing images using AI, the next we hear AI can predict the structure of over 200 million proteins.

Topics
Artificial Intelligence in health

PRI ESPL INT .MELBOURNE TGA1 AI-MEDICAL RESEARCH AI promises to revolutionise medical research, but a cautious approach is needed By Reece Hooker, Assistant Producer, 360info Asia-Pacific Melbourne, Aug 1 (360info) One week social-media users are generating and sharing amusing images using AI, the next we hear AI can predict the structure of over 200 million proteins. AI is particularly well placed to revolutionise medical research. The technology helps in two vital ways: it optimises research, and it can make discoveries that humans have not. AI is unshackled from the limitations that come with human researchers: it can trawl deep datasets exponentially faster, never needs to take a break, and never succumbs to illness or fatigue. Taiwanese computer scientist, businessman and author Kai-Fu Lee recently spoke about his optimism for the future of AI. We've surprised ourselves with how well machine learning algorithms work. It makes us focus on the things that AI cannot do, and it will probably either lead to a greater understanding of the human mystique of how we think or it will lead to more breakthroughs, leading to superintelligence It took 40 years, but I think we're basically there. None of this means the rise of the machines is imminent. Despite its advances, AI is still encumbered by technical limitations. AI pioneer Yosua Bengio said in 2021 that deep learning was not anywhere close today to the level of intelligence of a two-year-old child. A study by Pugliese et al. (2021) finds that more and more medical research is mentioning "machine learning". But maybe we have algorithms that are equivalent to lower animals, for perception. And we're gradually climbing this ladder in terms of tools that allow an entity to explore its environment, he said. Much more work needs to be done to perfect the technology, and there is no foreseeable date by which humans will be superfluous to the world of medical research. There is also the matter of ethics in AI, in which legislators will have to parse a minefield of questions about issues ranging from data collection to intellectual property and beyond. In the meantime, leading minds continue to use machine learning and AI to innovate and expand the horizon of what's possible in medical research. REALITY CHECK Between 2000 and 2019, the research community became much more interested in AI: the global output of AI research grew from 52,000 journal publications and conference papers in 2000 to roughly 403,000 in 2019. AI is projected to contribute US$15.7 trillion to the 2030 global economy. Nine in 10 of the 100 healthcare executives surveyed in 2020 said their hospital had an AI and automation strategy in place. BIG IDEAS "The goal and expectation is that in fully integrating AI into research about disease development, many unknowns will become known. What causes diseases to spread, worsen and change, and additional early signs or symptoms that research has yet to uncover, should reveal themselves with the new frontiers made possible by automated AI," Hiroaki Kitano, Okinawa Institute of Science and Technology. "The use of AI in making medical decisions is still new and many barriers need to be overcome before it is used widely in clinical practice. For it to reach its full capacity, wider research and more rigorous approaches are needed to grapple with the ethical issues it raises. This is an ideal time for medical professionals, stakeholders and governments, as well as individuals and their families, to work together and seek a balance between the benefits and risks of the new technologies," Alexander Merkin, Auckland University of Technology. (360info) VM 08011017 NNNN

(Only the headline and picture of this report may have been reworked by the Business Standard staff; the rest of the content is auto-generated from a syndicated feed.)

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First Published: Mon, August 01 2022. 12:10 IST

Sun, 31 Jul 2022 18:40:00 -0500 en text/html https://www.business-standard.com/article/technology/ai-can-revolutionise-medical-research-but-a-cautious-approach-is-needed-122080100234_1.html
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