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Killexams : Oracle Fundamentals Study Guide - BingNews https://killexams.com/pass4sure/exam-detail/1Z0-216 Search results Killexams : Oracle Fundamentals Study Guide - BingNews https://killexams.com/pass4sure/exam-detail/1Z0-216 https://killexams.com/exam_list/Oracle Killexams : Recommended Best Trading & Investing Books

Last Updated : October 2008
By Nadeem Walayat

These are my recommended Best Trading & Investing books. Most of these titles are my personal favourites gleaned over a 21 year trading history. The list contains some real gems that over the years I have had the pleasure of re-reading several times over. I have also written short reviews on the real gems to supply you a taste of what's inside.

All of the books are available from Amazon.com.

Commodity Markets

How to Make Profits In Commodities - This is one of the first trading books that I bought and dates back to either late 1987 or earlier 1988. Not only is this one of my first but also one of the best. It teaches the importance of studying the markets in terms of the price action rather than methodology i.e. the plethora of indicators that traders are overwhelmed with today, and whilst it does not say its a swing trading book however what it represents is a model for swing trading. The book was first published in 1942 and my copy dates as 1976, written by the legendary WD Gann, now don't take this as a cue to get sucked into Gann Analysis which is a never ending quest for the holy grail as I treat Gann analysis as both starting and ending in THIS one book ! However I should point out that is not a beginners book, in that it requires dedicated study to get the most out of it which implies a significant commitment of time, much more than say just memorizing a book over a couple of weeks.

Yes, 1942 or the revisions during 1951 mean that the book is not up to date in many aspects, but the fundamentals and building blocks for developing a successful trading strategy are there in how to interpret price action.

As I alluded to earlier the book covers swing analysis and trading rules but does not touch on any of his geometric work i.e. gann angles, master squares etc.. Treat it both as a great study guide that you should come back to on a regular basis over your trading life-time well worth the $50 bucks I paid for it 2 decades ago.

Economics, Real Estate & Emerging Markets
 
Stock Index Futures Trading
Stock Market Investing

Reminiscences of a Stock Operator by Edwin Lefèvre is probably one of the best and well known books on the subject of financial speculation, the book was published as the fictional biography of “Larry Livingston,” but is actually an biography of Jesse Livermore, one of the first famous stock & commodity traders ever. The man started trading after working as a boy in a brokerage house and trading in several of the tiny brokerages called “bucket shops” where small time traders would bet against the house, and eventually went on to become one of the most influential and widely-known traders of his day. He made, lost, and re-made millions at a time.

What you will get from the book are some classic mistakes and the lessons learned from them; some of the best catch phrases in the business; insight into how the markets were manipulated then and probably still are now. One of the most important lessons mentioned in the book is that a trader does not have to be invested in the market all the time.

This is the book from which almost every subsequent general trading book is derived. If you have ever wondered where the trading rule "Never average down" came from, just turn to page 154. Where did the comparison between greed and fear first originate ? Look to page 130.

Many rules to live by that were introduced in LeFevres book are:

-The trend is your friend.
-History repeats itself
-Never average down.
-No stock is too high to buy or too low to sell.
-Let your winners run and cut your losses quickly.

Many aspects of the financial markets are still very much the same as they were in Livermore's day. As he points out, human nature is a constant, an observation that is as true today as it was then. Among the many other insights in this book. The book was originally published in 1923, and remains the most widely read, highly recommended investment book written to date. Generations of investors have found that it has more to teach them about themselves and other investors than years of experience in the market. This is a timeless tale that will enrich the lives and portfolios of today's investors, just as it has generations past.

Technical Analysis & Theories

Technical Analysis of the Financial Markets - This was the first technical analysis book I bought in the late 1980's which was purchased with a view to using it as a study book towards working towards the diploma in technical analysis issued by the Society of Technical Analysts in the UK. The book covers virtual every aspect of technical analysis and trading tactics and seeks to be the definitive guide from the basics to the advanced. I rate this as a great book for beginners as you really do need to touch on all aspects of analysis as a basic primer to help determine which direction your going to go after having read the book and for instance you see the answer to trading success lies in Japanese candlesticks which you may not have understood until you happened on the section in this book.

Therefore its a must read for especially beginners, which helps to determine which direction to go in next.

The Best Trendline Methods of Alan Andrews - Since I am basically a trendlines, support and resistance and swings trader, books that focus on these areas of TA usual get my attention. This is a relatively recent book on trendlines, specifically focusing on the work of Andrews “Pitchforks”, as well as covering research by Mikula, for me this book basically reinforces what I already had learned from the charts over the last 15 years or so up until I came across the book but also did supply me some new insights as I had more or less scrapped pitchforks from my own trading a good 8 years earlier in my own version of the great purge when I preceded to scrap much of the TA I had learned from my trading methodology.

The book is well written, short and sweet just the way I like it so that a trader can get on with practicing what is being preached rather than working through a load of waffle. - I recommend this book to all level of traders from beginners to advanced.

Happy reading, trading and investing !

Nadeem Walayat.
Editor, The Market Oracle

 

Tue, 29 Nov 2016 02:21:00 -0600 text/html https://marketoracle.co.uk/recommended_books.htm
Killexams : Oracle Power Share Chat No result found, try new keyword!London South East prides itself on its community spirit, and in order to keep the chat section problem free, we ask all members to follow these simple rules. In these rules, we refer to ourselves ... Tue, 26 Jul 2022 18:34:00 -0500 en-US text/html https://www.lse.co.uk/ShareChat.asp?ShareTicker=ORCP&thread=9AF705D6-00FB-4204-BC43-1E28D479913A Killexams : Master of Science in Computer Science for Non-Majors

Recognizing the high demand for training in computer science, Brandeis created an innovative master’s program for majors in the sciences and humanities who wish to transition to the thriving computer industry. This means you’ll be learning alongside smart, motivated students who are not afraid of change.

The two-year, 12-course program provides training in the fundamentals of computing, as well as in “hot” areas such as big data. While the curriculum is demanding, the flexibility afforded by the wide range of electives means you can tailor your program to your own personal learning goals.

As a student of the master’s in computer science for non-majors, you’ll have access to the department’s dedicated, research-driven computer science faculty, to the thriving high-tech cities of Boston and Cambridge, and to a growing network of alumni who have found careers in the high-tech, high-demand, high-salary fields in both academia and industry.

Why Brandeis?

The graduate programs in computer science are relatively small, allowing for individualized attention even as students receive the rigorous interdisciplinary training that is a hallmark of Brandeis. Brandeis is home to a number of computer science research labs, in addition to individual faculty labs. The proximity to Boston and Cambridge, with their thriving technology scene (which includes Google, Microsoft, Oracle and Amazon), is a further advantage, offering research, internship and career opportunities.

Careers and Alumni

Our alumni have secured positions at well-known companies such as Google, Microsoft, Dell EMC, Akamai Technologies, Uber and BBN Technologies. Software developer, professor, design engineer and robotics programmer are among the many professions that computer science students may pursue with a graduate degree.

Brandeis’ proximity to Cambridge and Route 128 allows students to pursue internships that are distinct to their interests, and a strong alumni network enables students to connect with professionals at leading technology corporations. The graduate school's Center for Career and Professional Development offers an array of resources, including CV/resume help, job search and networking.

Curriculum

Students complete 12 courses: three core courses and nine electives in areas such as distributed computing, big data, machine learning, and computational linguistics. Faculty mentors assist students with selecting courses related to students' interests.

A full list of the computer science courses offered this year can be found on the Schedule of Classes. For information on all computer science courses and elective courses in related disciplines, including the full description and frequency of offering for each course, please see the University Bulletin.

Financial Aid and Scholarships

We are proud to offer substantial scholarships for students in this program. Scholarships are awarded at the time of admission. No separate application is required. Our financial aid, scholarships, and other funding opportunities help make the costs of a graduate education affordable.

Sat, 08 Dec 2018 07:03:00 -0600 en text/html https://www.brandeis.edu/computer-science/graduate/12-course-masters.html
Killexams : Yes, People Lie on Their Resumes
  • A 2020 survey found that a majority of job applicants have misrepresented themselves on their resumes, but another study found very different results.
  • Lying on your resume can put your career in peril, even if you’re a prominent CEO.
  • Always follow resume best practices that can make you stand out without falsehoods.
  • This article is for business owners, hiring managers and job seekers who are interested in resume trends and best practices.

Although we may not want to admit it, we’ve all lied at some point, whether it was a white lie that got you out of a previous engagement or a massive falsehood that’s been sticking around for years. But it’s considered common sense not to lie on a resume, right? Well, not according to some studies.

2020 study: 78% of job seekers lie on their resume

In 2020, the reference-check firm Checkster surveyed 400 job seekers and 400 hiring managers. According to the findings, 78% of job seekers misrepresented – or at least thought about misrepresenting – themselves on job applications and resumes. 

The extent to which job seekers lie on their resumes

Among the job seekers Checkster surveyed, 45.7% said the extent of their lying was moderate, and 3.3% said it was extreme. Only 16.1% of respondents didn’t lie at all. Another 28.5% of respondents said they lied “a lot” on their resumes but not quite to the “extreme” extent of other respondents. The remaining 6.3% of respondents said there were almost no lies on their resumes.

The lies job seekers told on their resumes

Here are some common resume lies Checkster asked respondents about and the percentage of survey participants who admitted to telling them or thinking about doing so.

Resume lie Percentage of respondents who confessed
Proficiency in in-demand career skills you don’t actually have 60%
Working at a certain company for a falsely increased number of years to exclude another company from your employment history 50.25%
For recent college graduates, inflating your GPA by at least half a point 49%
Using the title of “director” in place of “manager” or an equivalent term 41%
Listing a degree from a prestigious university when you still need a few more credits to officially obtain the degree 40%
Listing a degree from a more prestigious university than your actual school 39%
Listing a degree from a prestigious university after taking just one online class 39%
Including false achievements 33%

Other common lies included listing a false address or saying they chose to leave a job when they were actually fired. Inflated salaries and descriptions of work in a certain role or on a certain project were also common.

How hiring managers respond to resume lies

Interestingly, 29.4% of the surveyed hiring managers told Checkster they would still hire someone who misrepresented themselves if there was a good explanation. Another 3.3% would hire the candidate no matter what, with only 34.4% citing lying as an automatic disqualification. 

If no other candidate were available, 13.6% of hiring managers would hire someone who misrepresented themselves. Among HR staff, 14% would hire that person with the hiring manager’s permission. [If a company discovers a worker lied, they could rescind the job offer or fire the employee.]

How certain resume lies affect hiring manager decisions

When candidates lied about their GPAs, 22% of the hiring managers surveyed still hired them. The equivalent figure was 12% for fake job titles. For falsified professional references, hiring managers said they would never hire the applicant 63% of the time. The equivalent figure for untrue achievements was 60%.

Key TakeawayKey takeaway: Based on the 2020 study, the majority of job applicants lie on their resumes, but not as many hiring managers are fully opposed to this behavior as you might expect.

2019 study: 10% of employees lie on their resume

In contrast to the whopping 78% of people who said they lie on their resume or considered doing so in the Checkster survey, another study – conducted by Blind, an anonymous workplace social media platform, in 2019 – found different results. The company asked participants whether they had “embellished or lied on [their] LinkedIn or resume” when searching for a job. Approximately 90% of the respondents said they’d never lied to get a job, while the remaining 10% said they had. However, that study differed from the Checkster survey in that it didn’t count “thinking about misrepresenting” as lying.

The lies used on resumes

Some of the more common lies found on resumes in the 2019 study were about academic degrees, age, technical abilities and criminal records. The survey found that, in addition to falsifying resume information, some respondents weren’t above lying about their “salaries, references and complete work history” during job interviews

Where resume liars get hired

Along with asking respondents whether they had ever lied on their resume or LinkedIn profile, Blind’s survey wanted to know where these individuals worked. After collating the data, the organization discovered that 17 major businesses, including Apple and Cisco, were represented among the respondents.

According to the survey, the company with the most respondents who admitted to lying was European software corporation SAP, with 12.5% of the surveyed employees admitting to lying, followed by Amazon (11.57%), Cisco (10.78%), PayPal (10.58%) and eBay (9.93%). Other major companies that had a relatively high rate of falsehoods among respondents were Microsoft (9.84%) and Oracle (9.19%).

Most job applicants are honest

Blind’s study took a hard look at employees who lied, but it also found comforting data for businesses that prioritize ethics. Along with 9 in 10 respondents saying they had never lied on a resume, 13 of the 17 companies represented had a truth rating higher than 90% – meaning the vast majority of their employees did not misrepresent themselves on their resumes.

The company with the highest percentage of truthful respondents was Salesforce, with 97.17% denying ever having lied on a resume. Other companies with the most truthful employees based on resume honesty were Tableau (96.30%), Intuit (96.26%), LinkedIn (95.54%), Apple (94.83%), Adobe (93.14%), Facebook (92.68%) and Google (92.57%).

Key TakeawayKey takeaway: Even though some job applicants, even at large companies, lie on their resumes, the 2019 study suggests that the vast majority do not.

The consequences of lying on your resume

Though the Checkster study found that some companies would still hire a candidate who lied on their resume, getting caught lying often leads to the unemployment line. This notion is true at all levels of a team. Even prominent executives have lied on their resumes – including a former Yahoo CEO, a former RadioShack CEO and a celebrity chef – and most faced career difficulties as a result.

Applicants who lie on their resumes have more to lose than their desired job. Consider damage to your reputation, for example. If word gets out that you’re a dishonest person, you won’t be very attractive to other companies and could have trouble getting hired in the future. Some false resume information could even put you in legal jeopardy, especially if you’ve lied when applying for federal or state jobs or careers that require specific licenses. 

Did you know?Did you know?: The best time to look for a job is in January and February, whereas the summer and holiday seasons are considered the worst.

How to avoid lying on your resume

The easiest way to avoid lying on your resume is to just not do it. Beyond that, though, writing a great resume that’s brief and direct is always a safer bet than misrepresenting yourself. Here are some other best practices to get you hired.

  • Create your own resume design, rather than using a template, so you stand out from the pack. 
  • Qualify all of your achievements with metrics, and show off your skills. 
  • Use industry buzzwords (but not cliches) to indicate you know what you’re talking about and to get past electronic filters. 
  • Take a chance with unconventional, creative job applications so your resume isn’t overlooked.
  • Sign up for LinkedIn alternatives so your resume is seen by more people.

When you follow these tips, your honest, ethical resume might land on the right desk before you know it. Looking for more guidance? Check out everything you need to know about job searching in the digital age.

Andrew Martins contributed to the writing and research in this article. 

Mon, 04 Jul 2022 12:00:00 -0500 en text/html https://www.businessnewsdaily.com/12003-employee-lies-on-resume.html
Killexams : Internet of Things MSc

Afghanistan
We normally consider the following qualifications for entry to our postgraduate taught programmes: Master Degree from a recognised institution.

UK 1st class degree: 90%; or GPA 3.7 out of 4.0
UK 2:1 degree: 80%; or GPA 3.0 out of 4.0
UK 2:2 degree: 70%; or GPA 2.4 out of 4.0

Albania
We normally consider the following qualifications for entry to our postgraduate taught programmes: Bachelor Degree from a recognised institution.

UK 1st class degree: 9.5 out of 10
UK 2:1 degree: 8 out of 10
UK 2:2 degree: 7 out of 10

Algeria
We normally consider the following qualifications for entry to our postgraduate taught programmes: Licence; Diplome de [subject area]; Diplome d'Etudes Superieures; Diplome de Docteur end Pharmacie; or Diplome de Docteur en Medecine from a recognised institution.

UK 1st class degree: 16 out of 20
UK 2:1 degree: 14 out of 20
UK 2:2 degree: 12 out of 20

Angola
We normally consider the following qualifications for entry to our postgraduate taught programmes: Grau de Licenciado/a (minimum 4 years) from selected institutions.

UK 1st class degree: 17 out of 20
UK 2:1 degree: 15 out of 20
UK 2:2 degree: 13 out of 20

Argentina
We normally consider the following qualifications for entry to our postgraduate taught programmes: Titulo/ Grado de Licenciado/ Titulo de [subject area] (minimum 4 years) from a recognised institution.

UK 1st class degree: 9 out of 10
UK 2:1 degree: 7.5 out of 10
UK 2:2 degree: 6.5 out of 10

Armenia
We normally consider the following qualifications for entry to our postgraduate taught programmes: Bachelor Degree or Specialist Diploma from a recognised institution.

UK 1st class degree: 87 out of 100
UK 2:1 degree: 75 out of 100
UK 2:2 degree: 61 out of 100

Australia
We normally consider the following qualifications for entry to our postgraduate taught programmes: Bachelor Degree (minimum 3 years) or Bachelor Honours degree from a recognised institution.

UK 1st class degree: High Distinction; or First Class with Honours
UK 2:1 degree: Distinction; or Upper Second Class with Honours
UK 2:2 degree: Credit; or Lower Second Class with Honours

Austria
We normally consider the following qualifications for entry to our postgraduate taught programmes: Bachelor Degree from a recognised institution.

UK 1st class degree: 1.5 out of 5.0
UK 2:1 degree: 2.5 out of 5.0
UK 2:2 degree: 3.5 out of 5.0

The above relates to grading scale where 1 is the highest and 5 is the lowest.

Azerbaijan
We normally consider the following qualifications for entry to our postgraduate taught programmes: Bachelor Degree or Specialist Diploma from a recognised institution.

UK 1st class degree: 90%; or GPA 4.7 out of 5
UK 2:1 degree: 80%; or GPA 4 out of 5
UK 2:2 degree: 70%; or GPA 3.5 out of 5

Bahamas
We normally consider the following qualifications for entry to our postgraduate taught programmes: Bachelor Degree (minimum 3 years) from the University of West Indies.

UK 1st class degree: First Class Honours
UK 2:1 degree: Upper Second Class Honours
UK 2:2 degree: Lower Second Class Honours

Bahrain
We normally consider the following qualifications for entry to our postgraduate taught programmes: Bachelor Degree from a recognised institution.

UK 1st class degree: GPA 3.7 out of 4.0; or 90 out of 100
UK 2:1 degree: GPA 3.0 out of 4.0; or 80 out of 100
UK 2:2 degree: GPA 2.3 out of 4.0; or 74 out of 100

Bangladesh
We normally consider the following qualifications for entry to our postgraduate taught programmes: Bachelor Degree (minimum 4 years) from selected institutions.

UK 1st class degree: GPA 3.2 to 3.7 out of 4.0
UK 2:1 degree: GPA 3.0 to 3.3 out of 4.0
UK 2:2 degree: GPA 2.3 to 2.7 out of 4.0

Offer conditions will vary depending on the institution you are applying from.  For some institutions/degrees we will ask for different grades to above, so this is only a guide. 

Barbados
We normally consider the following qualifications for entry to our postgraduate taught programmes: Bachelor Degree from the University of West Indies, Cave Hill or Barbados Community College.

UK 1st class degree: First Class Honours*; or GPA 3.7 out of 4.0**
UK 2:1 degree: Upper Second Class Honours*; or GPA 3.0 out of 4.0**
UK 2:2 degree: Lower Second Class Honours*; or GPA 2.4 out of 4.0**

*relates to: the University of West Indies, Cave Hill.

**relates to: Barbados Community College.

Belarus
We normally consider the following qualifications for entry to our postgraduate taught programmes: Bachelor Degree or Specialist Diploma (minimum 4 years) from a recognised institution.

UK 1st class degree: 9 out of 10; or 4.7 out of 5
UK 2:1 degree: 7 out of 10; or 4 out of 5
UK 2:2 degree: 5 out of 10; or 3.5 out of 5

Belgium
We normally consider the following qualifications for entry to our postgraduate taught programmes: Bachelor Degree (180 ECTS credits) from a recognised institution.

UK 1st class degree: 80% or 16/20*; or 78%**
UK 2:1 degree: 70% or 14/20*; or 72%**
UK 2:2 degree: 60% or 12/20*; or 65%**

*Flanders (Dutch-speaking)/ Wallonia (French-speaking)
**German-speaking

Belize
We normally consider the following qualifications for entry to our postgraduate taught programmes: Bachelor Degree (minimum 3 years) from the University of West Indies.

UK 1st class degree: First Class Honours
UK 2:1 degree: Upper Second Class Honours
UK 2:2 degree: Lower Second Class Honours

Benin
We normally consider the following qualifications for entry to our postgraduate taught programmes: Maitrise or Masters from a recognised institution.

UK 1st class degree: 16 out of 20
UK 2:1 degree: 14 out of 20
UK 2:2 degree: 12 out of 20

Bolivia
We normally consider the following qualifications for entry to our postgraduate taught programmes: Titulo de Bachiller Universitario or Licenciado / Titulo de [subject area] (minimum 4 years) from a recognised institution.

UK 1st class degree: 85%* or 80%**
UK 2:1 degree: 75%* or 70%**
UK 2:2 degree: 65%* or 60%**

*relates to: Titulo de Bachiller Universitario

**relates to: Licenciado / Titulo de [subject area] 

Bosnia and Herzegovina
We normally consider the following qualifications for entry to our postgraduate taught programmes: Bachelor Degree (minimum 3 years) from a recognised institution.

UK 1st class degree: 9.5 out of 10
UK 2:1 degree: 8.5 out of 10
UK 2:2 degree: 7.5 out of 10

Botswana
We normally consider the following qualifications for entry to our postgraduate taught programmes: Bachelor Degree (minimum 5 years) or Master Degree from the University of Botswana.

UK 1st class degree: 80%
UK 2:1 degree: 70%
UK 2:2 degree: 60%

Brazil
We normally consider the following qualifications for entry to our postgraduate taught programmes: Título de Bacharel / Título de [subject area] or Título de Licenciado/a (minimum 4 years) from a recognised institution.

UK 1st class degree: 8.25 out of 10
UK 2:1 degree: 7.5 out of 10
UK 2:2 degree: 6.5 out of 10

The above grades assumes that the grading scale has a pass mark of 5.

Brunei
We normally consider the following qualifications for entry to our postgraduate taught programmes: Bachelor Honours degree from a recognised institution.

UK 1st class degree: First Class Honours
UK 2:1 degree: Upper Second Class Honours
UK 2:2 degree: Lower Second Class Honours

Bulgaria
We normally consider the following qualifications for entry to our postgraduate taught programmes: Bachelor Degree from a recognised institution.

UK 1st class degree: 5.75 out of 6.0
UK 2:1 degree: 4.75 out of 6.0
UK 2:2 degree: 4.0 out of 6.0

Burundi
We normally consider the following qualifications for entry to our postgraduate taught programmes: Diplome d'Etudes Approfondies from a recognised institution.

UK 1st class degree: 85%; or 16 out of 20
UK 2:1 degree: 75%; or 14 out of 20
UK 2:2 degree: 60%; or 12 out of 20

Cambodia
We normally consider the following qualifications for entry to our postgraduate taught programmes: Masters Degree from a recognised institution.

UK 1st class degree: 80%; or GPA 3.5 out of 4.0
UK 2:1 degree: 70%; or GPA 3.0 out of 4.0
UK 2:2 degree: 60%; or GPA 2.35 out of 4.0

Cameroon
We normally consider the following qualifications for entry to our postgraduate taught programmes: Bachelor Degree; Licence; Diplome d'Etudes Superieures de Commerce; Diplome d'Ingenieur de Conception/ Travaux; Doctorat en Medecine/ Pharmacie; or Maitrise or Master 1 from selected institutions.

UK 1st class degree: 16 out of 20; or GPA 3.6 out of 4.0
UK 2:1 degree: 14 out of 20; or GPA 3.0 out of 4.0
UK 2:2 degree: 12 out of 20; or GPA 2.5 out of 4.0

Canada
We normally consider the following qualifications for entry to our postgraduate taught programmes: Bachelor Degree or Bachelor Honours Degree from a recognised institution.

UK 1st class degree: GPA 3.6 out of 4.0
UK 2:1 degree: GPA 3.2 out of 4.0
UK 2:2 degree: GPA 2.5 out of 4.0

China
We normally consider the following qualifications for entry to our postgraduate taught programmes: Bachelor Degree (minimum 4 years) from selected institutions.

UK 1st class degree: 85 to 95%
UK 2:1 degree: 75 to 85%
UK 2:2 degree: 70 to 80%

Offer conditions will vary depending on the institution you are applying from.  Generally, we do not accept applications from students studying at Affiliate Colleges.

Colombia
We normally consider the following qualifications for entry to our postgraduate taught programmes: Licenciado en [subject area] or Titulo de [subject area] (minimum 4 years) from a recognised institution.

UK 1st class degree: 4.60 out of 5.00
UK 2:1 degree: 4.00 out of 5.00
UK 2:2 degree: 3.50 out of 5.00

Congo, Dem. Rep. of
We normally consider the following qualifications for entry to our postgraduate taught programmes: Diplome d'Etudes Approfondies or Diplome d'Etudes Speciales from a recognised institution.

UK 1st class degree: 16 out of 20; or 90%
UK 2:1 degree: 14 out of 20; or 80%
UK 2:2 degree: 12 out of 20; or 70%

Congo, Rep. of
We normally consider the following qualifications for entry to our postgraduate taught programmes: Diplome d'Etudes Superieures or Maitrise from a recognised institution.

UK 1st class degree: 16 out of 20
UK 2:1 degree: 14 out of 20
UK 2:2 degree: 12 out of 20

Costa Rica
We normally consider the following qualifications for entry to our postgraduate taught programmes: Bachiller or Licenciado from a recognised institution.

UK 1st class degree: 9 out of 10
UK 2:1 degree: 8 out of 10
UK 2:2 degree: 7.5 out of 10

Croatia
We normally consider the following qualifications for entry to our postgraduate taught programmes: Bachelor Degree or Advanced Diploma of Higher Education Level VII/1 (Diploma - Visoko obrazovanje) from a recognised institution.

UK 1st class degree: 4.5 out of 5
UK 2:1 degree: 4 out of 5
UK 2:2 degree: 3 out of 5

Cuba
We normally consider the following qualifications for entry to our postgraduate taught programmes: Titulo de Licenciado/ Arquitecto/ Doctor/ Ingeniero from a recognised institution.

UK 1st class degree: 4.7 out of 5
UK 2:1 degree: 4 out of 5
UK 2:2 degree: 3.5 out of 5

Cyprus
We normally consider the following qualifications for entry to our postgraduate taught programmes: Bachelor Degree from a recognised institution.

UK 1st class degree: 8 out of 10; or GPA 3.7 out of 4.0
UK 2:1 degree: 7.0 out of 10; or GPA 3.0 out of 4.0
UK 2:2 degree: 6.0 out of 10; or GPA 2.5 out of 4.0

Czech Republic
We normally consider the following qualifications for entry to our postgraduate taught programmes: Bachelor Degree (180 ECTS credits) from a recognised institution.

UK 1st class degree: 1.2 out of 4
UK 2:1 degree: 1.5 out of 4
UK 2:2 degree: 2.5 out of 4

The above relates to grading scale where 1 is the highest and 4 is the lowest.

Denmark
We normally consider the following qualifications for entry to our postgraduate taught programmes: Bachelor degree from a recognised institution.

UK 1st class degree: 12 out of 12 (2007 onwards); or 11 out of 13 (before 2007)
UK 2:1 degree: 7 out of 12 (2007 onwards); or 8 out of 13 (before 2007)
UK 2:2 degree: 4 out of 12 (2007 onwards); or 7 out of 13 (before 2007)

Dominican Republic
We normally consider the following qualifications for entry to our postgraduate taught programmes: Licenciado/ Titulo de [subject area] (minimum 4 years) from a recognised institution.

UK 1st class degree: 95/100
UK 2:1 degree: 85/100
UK 2:2 degree: 78/100

Ecuador
We normally consider the following qualifications for entry to our postgraduate taught programmes: Titulo de Licenciado / Titulo de [subject area] (minimum 4 years) from a recognised institution.

UK 1st class degree: 90%; or 9/10; or 19/20; or GPA 3.7 out of 4.0
UK 2:1 degree: 80%; or 8/10; or 18/20; or GPA 3.0 out of 4.0
UK 2:2 degree: 70%; or 7/10; or 14/20; or GPA 2.4 out of 4.0

Egypt
We normally consider the following qualifications for entry to our postgraduate taught programmes: Bachelor Degree from selected institutions.

UK 1st class degree: 85%; or GPA 3.7 out of 4
UK 2:1 degree: 75%; or GPA 3.0 out of 4
UK 2:2 degree: 65%; or GPA 2.5 out of 4

El Salvador
We normally consider the following qualifications for entry to our postgraduate taught programmes: Licenciado/ Titulo de [subject area] (minimum 5 years) from a recognised institution.

UK 1st class degree: 8.5 out of 10
UK 2:1 degree: 7.5 out of 10
UK 2:2 degree: 6.5 out of 10

Eritrea
We normally consider the following qualifications for entry to our postgraduate taught programmes: Masters Degree from a recognised institution.

UK 1st class degree: GPA 3.7 out of 4.0
UK 2:1 degree: GPA 3.0 out of 4.0
UK 2:2 degree: GPA 2.4 out of 4.0

Estonia
We normally consider the following qualifications for entry to our postgraduate taught programmes: Bachelor Degree; University Specialist's Diploma; or Professional Higher Education Diploma from a recognised institution.

UK 1st class degree: 4.5 out of 5
UK 2:1 degree: 3.5 out of 5
UK 2:2 degree: 2 out of 5

The above grades assumes that 1 is the pass mark. 

Eswatini
We normally consider the following qualifications for entry to our postgraduate taught programmes: Masters Degree from a recognised institution.

UK 1st class degree: 80%
UK 2:1 degree: 70%
UK 2:2 degree: 60%

Ethiopia
We normally consider the following qualifications for entry to our postgraduate taught programmes: Masters Degree from a recognised institution.

UK 1st class degree: GPA 3.7 out of 4.0
UK 2:1 degree: GPA 3.0 out of 4.0
UK 2:2 degree: GPA 2.5 out of 4.0

Fiji
We normally consider the following qualifications for entry to our postgraduate taught programmes: Bachelor Degree (minimum 3 years) from one of the following institutions: Fiji National University, the University of Fiji, or the University of South Pacific, Fiji.

UK 1st class degree: GPA 4.0 out of 5.0*; or overall grade A with High Distinction pass**; or GPA 4.0 out of 4.5***
UK 2:1 degree: GPA 3.33 out of 5.0*; or overall grade B with Credit pass**; or GPA 3.5 out of 4.5***
UK 2:2 degree: GPA 2.33 out of 5.0*; or overall grade S (Satisfactory)**; or GPA 2.5 out of 4.5***

*relates to Fiji National University

**relate to the University of Fiji

***relates to the University of South Pacific, Fiji

Finland
We normally consider the following qualifications for entry to our postgraduate taught programmes: Bachelor Degree/ Kandidaatti/ Kandidat (minimum 180 ECTS credits) from a recognised institution; or Bachelor degree (Ammattikorkeakoulututkinto/ Yrkeshögskoleexamen) from a recognised University of Applied Sciences.

UK 1st class degree: 4.5 out of 5; or 2.8 out of 3
UK 2:1 degree: 3.5 out of 5; or 2 out of 3
UK 2:2 degree: 2.5 out of 5; or 1.4 out of 3

France
We normally consider the following qualifications for entry to our postgraduate taught programmes: Licence; Grade de Licence; Diplome d'Ingenieur; or Maitrise from a recognised institution.

UK 1st class degree: 14 out of 20
UK 2:1 degree: 12 out of 20
UK 2:2 degree: 11 out of 20

Gambia
We normally consider the following qualifications for entry to our postgraduate taught programmes: Masters Degree from a recognised institution.

UK 1st class degree: 80%; or GPA 4.0 out of 4.3
UK 2:1 degree: 67%; or GPA 3.3 out of 4.3
UK 2:2 degree: 60%; or GPA 2.7 out of 4.3

Georgia
We normally consider the following qualifications for entry to our postgraduate taught programmes: Bachelor Degree or Specialist Diploma (minimum 4 years) from a recognised institution.

UK 1st class degree: 91 out of 100; or 4.7 out of 5
UK 2:1 degree: 81 out of 100; or 4 out of 5
UK 2:2 degree: 71 out of 100; or 3.5 out of 5

Germany
We normally consider the following qualifications for entry to our postgraduate taught programmes: Bachelor Degree (180 ECTS credits) from a recognised institution.

UK 1st class degree: 1.5 out of 5.0
UK 2:1 degree: 2.5 out of 5.0
UK 2:2 degree: 3.5 out of 5.0

The above relates to grading scale where 1 is the highest and 5 is the lowest.

Ghana
We normally consider the following qualifications for entry to our postgraduate taught programmes: Bachelor Degree from a recognised institution.

UK 1st class degree: First Class
UK 2:1 degree: Second Class (Upper Division)
UK 2:2 degree: Second Class (Lower Division)

Greece
We normally consider the following qualifications for entry to our postgraduate taught programmes: Degrees from recognised selected institutions in the University sector or Degrees (awarded after 2003) from recognised Technological Educational Institutes.

UK 1st class degree: 8 out of 10*; or 9 out of 10**
UK 2:1 degree: 7 out of 10*; or 7.5 out of 10**
UK 2:2 degree: 6 out of 10*; or 6.8 out of 10**

*Relates to degrees from the University Sector.
**Relates to degrees from Technological Educational Institutes.

Grenada
We normally consider the following qualifications for entry to our postgraduate taught programmes: Bachelor Degree (minimum 3 years) from the University of West Indies.

UK 1st class degree: First Class Honours
UK 2:1 degree: Upper Second Class Honours
UK 2:2 degree: Lower Second Class Honours

Guatemala
We normally consider the following qualifications for entry to our postgraduate taught programmes: Licenciado / Titulo de [subject area] (minimum 4 years) from a recognised institution.

UK 1st class degree: 90%
UK 2:1 degree: 80%
UK 2:2 degree: 70%

The above grades assumes that the pass mark is 61% or less.

Guinea
We normally consider the following qualifications for entry to our postgraduate taught programmes: Master; Maitrise; Diplome d'Etudes Superieures; or Diplome d'Etudes Approfondies from a recognised institution.

UK 1st class degree: 16 out of 20
UK 2:1 degree: 14 out of 20
UK 2:2 degree: 12 out of 20

Guyana
We normally consider the following qualifications for entry to our postgraduate taught programmes: Graduate Diploma (Postgraduate) or Masters degree from a recognised institution.

UK 1st class degree: GPA 3.7 out of 4.0
UK 2:1 degree: GPA 3.0 out of 4.0
UK 2:2 degree: GPA 2.4 out of 4.0

Honduras
We normally consider the following qualifications for entry to our postgraduate taught programmes: Titulo de Licenciado/a / Grado Academico de Licenciatura (minimum 4 years) from a recognised institution.

UK 1st class degree: 90%; or 4.7 out of 5; or GPA 3.7 out of 4.0
UK 2:1 degree: 80%; or 4.0 out of 5; or GPA 3.0 out of 4.0
UK 2:2 degree: 70%; or 3.5 out of 5; or GPA 2.4 out of 4.0

Hong Kong
We normally consider the following qualifications for entry to our postgraduate taught programmes: Bachelor Honours Degree from selected institutions.

UK 1st class degree: First Class Honours
UK 2:1 degree: Upper Second Class Honours
UK 2:2 degree: Lower Second Class Honours

Hungary
We normally consider the following qualifications for entry to our postgraduate taught programmes: Bachelor degree (Alapfokozat) or University Diploma (Egyetemi Oklevel) from a recognised institution.

UK 1st class degree: 4.75 out of 5
UK 2:1 degree: 4 out of 5
UK 2:2 degree: 3.5 out of 5

Iceland
We normally consider the following qualifications for entry to our postgraduate taught programmes: Bachelor degree (Baccalaureus or Bakkalarprof) from a recognised institution.

UK 1st class degree: 8.25 out of 10
UK 2:1 degree: 7.25 out of 10
UK 2:2 degree: 6.5 out of 10

India
We normally consider the following qualifications for entry to our postgraduate taught programmes: Bachelor Degree (minimum 3 years) from selected institutions.

UK 1st class degree: 70% to 80%
UK 2:1 degree: 60% to 70%
UK 2:2 degree: 50% to 60%

Offer conditions will vary depending on the institution you are applying from.  For some institutions/degrees we will ask for different grades to above, so this is only a guide.  

For India, offers may be made on the GPA scale.

We do not consider the Bachelor of Vocation (B. Voc.) for Masters entry.

Indonesia
We normally consider the following qualifications for entry to our postgraduate taught programmes: Sarjna I (S1) Bachelor Degree or Diploma IV (D4) (minimum 4 years) from selected degree programmes and institutions.

UK 1st class degree: GPA 3.6 to 3.8 out of 4.0
UK 2:1 degree: GPA 3.0 to 3.2 out of 4.0
UK 2:2 degree: GPA 2.67 to 2.8 out of 4.0

Offer conditions will vary depending on the institution you are applying from and the degree that you study.

Iran
We normally consider the following qualifications for entry to our postgraduate taught programmes: Bachelor Degree from a recognised institution.

UK 1st class degree: 17.5 to 18.5 out of 20
UK 2:1 degree: 15 to 16 out of 20
UK 2:2 degree: 13.5 to 14 out of 20

Offer conditions will vary depending on the institution you are applying from.  

Iraq
We normally consider the following qualifications for entry to our postgraduate taught programmes: Bachelor Degree (minimum 4 years) from a recognised institution.

UK 1st class degree: 85 out of 100
UK 2:1 degree: 75 out of 100
UK 2:2 degree: 60 out of 100

Ireland
We normally consider the following qualifications for entry to our postgraduate taught programmes: Honours Bachelor Degree from a recognised institution.

UK 1st class degree: First Class Honours
UK 2:1 degree: Second Class Honours Grade I
UK 2:2 degree: Second Class Honours Grade II

Israel
We normally consider the following qualifications for entry to our postgraduate taught programmes: Bachelor Degree from a recognised institution.

UK 1st class degree: 90%
UK 2:1 degree: 80%
UK 2:2 degree: 65%

Italy
We normally consider the following qualifications for entry to our postgraduate taught programmes: Laurea (180 ECTS credits) from a recognised institution.

UK 1st class degree: 110 out of 110
UK 2:1 degree: 105 out of 110
UK 2:2 degree: 94 out of 110

Cote D’ivoire (Ivory Coast)
We normally consider the following qualifications for entry to our postgraduate taught programmes: Diplome d'Ingenieur; Doctorat en Medicine; Maitrise; Master; Diplome d'Etudes Approfondies; or Diplome d'Etudes Superieures Specialisees from selected institutions.

UK 1st class degree: 16 out of 20
UK 2:1 degree: 14 out of 20
UK 2:2 degree: 12 out of 20

Jamaica
We normally consider the following qualifications for entry to our postgraduate taught programmes: Bachelor Degree (minimum 3 years) from the University of West Indies (UWI) or a recognised institution.

UK 1st class degree: GPA 3.7 out of 4.0; or First Class Honours from the UWI
UK 2:1 degree: GPA 3.0 out of 4.0; or Upper Second Class Honours from the UWI
UK 2:2 degree: GPA 2.4 out of 4.0; or Lower Second Class Honours from the UWI

Japan
We normally consider the following qualifications for entry to our postgraduate taught programmes: Bachelor Degree from selected institutions.

UK 1st class degree: S overall* or A overall**; or 90%; or GPA 3.70 out of 4.00
UK 2:1 degree: A overall* or B overall**; or 80%; or GPA 3.00 out of 4.00
UK 2:2 degree: B overall* or C overall**; or 70%; or GPA 2.3 out of 4.00

*Overall mark is from the grading scale: S, A, B, C (S is highest mark)
**Overall mark is from the grading scale: A, B, C, D (A is highest mark)

Jordan
We normally consider the following qualifications for entry to our postgraduate taught programmes: Bachelor Degree from a recognised institution.

UK 1st class degree: 85%; or GPA of 3.7 out of 4.0
UK 2:1 degree: 75%; or GPA of 3.0 out of 4.0
UK 2:2 degree: 70%; or GPA of 2.5 out of 4.0

Kazakhstan
We normally consider the following qualifications for entry to our postgraduate taught programmes: Bachelor Degree or Specialist Diploma from a recognised institution.

UK 1st class degree: 3.8 out of 4.0/4.33; or 4.7 out of 5
UK 2:1 degree: 3.33 out of 4.0/4.33; or 4.0 out of 5
UK 2:2 degree: 2.67 out of 4.0/4.33; or 3.5 out of 5

Kenya
We normally consider the following qualifications for entry to our postgraduate taught programmes: Bachelor Degree (minimum 4 years) from a recognised institution.

UK 1st class degree: First Class Honours; or GPA 3.6 out of 4.0
UK 2:1 degree: Second Class Honours Upper Division; or GPA 3.0 out of 4.0
UK 2:2 degree: Second Class Honours Lower Division; or GPA 2.4 out of 4.0

Kosovo
We normally consider the following qualifications for entry to our postgraduate taught programmes: Bachelor Degree from a recognised institution.

UK 1st class degree: 9.5 out of 10
UK 2:1 degree: 8.5 out of 10
UK 2:2 degree: 7.5 out of 10

Kuwait
We normally consider the following qualifications for entry to our postgraduate taught programmes: Bachelor Degree from a recognised institution.

UK 1st class degree: GPA 3.67 out of 4.0
UK 2:1 degree: GPA 3.0 out of 4.0
UK 2:2 degree: GPA 2.67 out of 4.0

Kyrgyzstan
We normally consider the following qualifications for entry to our postgraduate taught programmes: Bachelor Degree or Specialist Diploma (minimum 4 years) from a recognised institution.

UK 1st class degree: 4.7 out of 5; or GPA 3.7 out of 4
UK 2:1 degree: 4.0 out of 5; or GPA 3.0 out of 4
UK 2:2 degree: 3.5 out of 5; or GPA 2.4 out of 4

Laos
We normally consider the following qualifications for entry to our postgraduate taught programmes: Masters Degree from a recognised institution.

UK 1st class degree: GPA 3.7 out of 4.0
UK 2:1 degree: GPA 3.0 out of 4.0
UK 2:2 degree: GPA 2.4 out of 4.0

Latvia
We normally consider the following qualifications for entry to our postgraduate taught programmes: Bachelor Degree (awarded after 2002) from a recognised institution.

UK 1st class degree: 9.5 out of 10
UK 2:1 degree: 7.5 out of 10
UK 2:2 degree: 6 out of 10

Lebanon
We normally consider the following qualifications for entry to our postgraduate taught programmes: Bachelor Degree; Licence; or Maitrise from a recognised institution.

UK 1st class degree: 90% or Grade A; or GPA 3.7 out of 4.0; or 16 out of 20 (French system)
UK 2:1 degree: 80% or Grade B; or GPA 3.0 out of 4.0; or 13 out of 20 (French system)
UK 2:2 degree: 70% or Grade C; or GPA 2.5 out of 4.0; or 12 out of 20 (French system)

Lesotho
We normally consider the following qualifications for entry to our postgraduate taught programmes: Bachelor Honours Degree (minimum 5 years total HE study); Masters Degree or Postgraduate Diploma from selected institutions.

UK 1st class degree: 80%
UK 2:1 degree: 70%
UK 2:2 degree: 60%

Liberia
We normally consider the following qualifications for entry to our postgraduate taught programmes: Masters Degree from a recognised institution.

UK 1st class degree: 90% or GPA 3.7 out of 4.0
UK 2:1 degree: 80% or GPA 3.0 out of 4.0
UK 2:2 degree: 70% or GPA 2.4 out of 4.0

Libya
We normally consider the following qualifications for entry to our postgraduate taught programmes: Bachelor Degree from selected institutions.

UK 1st class degree: 85%; or 3.7 out of 4.0 GPA
UK 2:1 degree: 75%; or 3.0 out of 4.0 GPA
UK 2:2 degree: 65%; or 2.6 out of 4.0 GPA

Liechtenstein
We normally consider the following qualifications for entry to our postgraduate taught programmes: Bachelor Degree (180 ECTS credits) from a recognised institution.

UK 1st class degree: 5.6 out of 6.0
UK 2:1 degree: 5.0 out of 6.0
UK 2:2 degree: 4.4 out of 6.0

Lithuania
We normally consider the following qualifications for entry to our postgraduate taught programmes: Bachelor Degree (minimum 180 ECTS credits) from a recognised institution.

UK 1st class degree: 9.5 out of 10
UK 2:1 degree: 8 out of 10
UK 2:2 degree: 7 out of 10

Luxembourg
We normally consider the following qualifications for entry to our postgraduate taught programmes: Bachelor Degree from a recognised institution.

UK 1st class degree: 16 out of 20
UK 2:1 degree: 14 out of 20
UK 2:2 degree: 12 out of 20

Macau
We normally consider the following qualifications for entry to our postgraduate taught programmes: Bachelor Degree (Licenciatura) (minimum 4 years) from a recognised institution.

UK 1st class degree: GPA 3.7 out of 4.0
UK 2:1 degree: GPA 3.0 out of 4.0
UK 2:2 degree: GPA 2.5 out of 4.0

Macedonia
We normally consider the following qualifications for entry to our postgraduate taught programmes: Diploma of Completed Higher Education - Level VII/1 or Bachelor Degree from a recognised institution.

UK 1st class degree: 9.5 out of 10
UK 2:1 degree: 8.5 out of 10
UK 2:2 degree: 7 out of 10

Madagascar
We normally consider the following qualifications for entry to our postgraduate taught programmes: Maîtrise; Diplome d'Ingenieur; Diplôme d'Etat de Docteur en Médecine; Diplôme d’Etat de Docteur en Chirurgie Dentaire; Diplôme d'Études Approfondies; Diplôme de Magistère (Première Partie) – also known as Master 1; or Diplôme de Master – also known as Master 2 from a recognised institution.

UK 1st class degree: 16 out of 20
UK 2:1 degree: 14 out of 20
UK 2:2 degree: 12 out of 20

Malawi
We normally consider the following qualifications for entry to our postgraduate taught programmes: Masters Degree from selected institutions.

UK 1st class degree: 80% or GPA 3.7 out of 4.0
UK 2:1 degree: 70% or GPA 3.0 out of 4.0
UK 2:2 degree: 60% or GPA 2.4 out of 4.0

Malaysia
We normally consider the following qualifications for entry to our postgraduate taught programmes: Bachelor Degree from a recognised institution.

UK 1st class degree: Class 1; or 3.7 out of 4.0 CGPA
UK 2:1 degree: Class 2 division 1; or 3.0 out of 4.0 CGPA
UK 2:2 degree: Class 2 division 2; or 2.6 out of 4.0 CGPA

Maldives
We normally consider the following qualifications for entry to our postgraduate taught programmes: Bachelor Degree (awarded from 2000) from the Maldives National University.

UK 1st class degree: GPA 3.7 out of 4.0
UK 2:1 degree: GPA 3.0 out of 4.0
UK 2:2 degree: GPA 2.5 out of 4.0

Malta
We normally consider the following qualifications for entry to our postgraduate taught programmes: Bachelor Degree or Bachelor Honours Degree from a recognised institution.

UK 1st class degree: First Class Honours; or Category I
UK 2:1 degree: Upper Second Class Honours; or Category IIA
UK 2:2 degree: Lower Second Class Honours; or Category IIB

Mauritius
We normally consider the following qualifications for entry to our postgraduate taught programmes: Bachelor Degree from a recognised institution.

UK 1st class degree: Class I; or 70%
UK 2:1 degree: Class II division I; or 60%
UK 2:2 degree: Class II division II; or 50%

Offer conditions will vary depending on the grading scale used by your institution.

Mexico
We normally consider the following qualifications for entry to our postgraduate taught programmes: Titulo de Licenciado/ Titulo (Profesional) de [subject area] from a recognised institution.

UK 1st class degree: 9.0 to 9.5 out of 10
UK 2:1 degree: 8.0 to 8.5 out of 10
UK 2:2 degree: 7.0 to 7.5 out of 10

Offer conditions will vary depending on the grading scale your institution uses.

Moldova
We normally consider the following qualifications for entry to our postgraduate taught programmes: Bachelor Degree (Diploma de Licenta) from a recognised institution.

UK 1st class degree: 9.5 out of 10
UK 2:1 degree: 8 out of 10
UK 2:2 degree: 6.5 out of 10

Monaco
We normally consider the following qualifications for entry to our postgraduate taught programmes: Bachelor Degree from a recognised institution.

UK 1st class degree: GPA 3.7 out of 4.0
UK 2:1 degree: GPA 3.0 out of 4.0
UK 2:2 degree: GPA 2.5 out of 4.0

Mongolia
We normally consider the following qualifications for entry to our postgraduate taught programmes: Bachelor Degree (minimum 4 years) from selected institutions.

UK 1st class degree: GPA 3.6 out of 4.0; or 90%; or grade A
UK 2:1 degree: GPA 3.2 out of 4.0; or 80%; or grade B
UK 2:2 degree: GPA 2.8 out of 4.0; or 70%; or grade C

Montenegro
We normally consider the following qualifications for entry to our postgraduate taught programmes: Diploma of Completed Academic Undergraduate Studies; Diploma of Professional Undergraduate Studies; or Advanced Diploma of Higher Education from a recognised institution.

UK 1st class degree: 9.5 out of 10
UK 2:1 degree: 8.5 out of 10
UK 2:2 degree: 7 out of 10

Morocco
We normally consider the following qualifications for entry to our postgraduate taught programmes: Diplome d'Ecoles Nationales de Commerce et de Gestion; Diplome de Docteur Veterinaire; Doctorat en Medecine; Docteur en Medecine Dentaire; Licence; Diplome d'Inegeniuer d'Etat; Diplome de Doctorat en Pharmacie; or Maitrise from a recognised institution.

UK 1st class degree: 16 out of 20
UK 2:1 degree: 13 out of 20
UK 2:2 degree: 11 out of 20

Mozambique
We normally consider the following qualifications for entry to our postgraduate taught programmes: Grau de Licenciado (minimum 4 years) or Grau de Mestre from from a recognised institution.

UK 1st class degree: 16 out of 20
UK 2:1 degree: 14 out of 20
UK 2:2 degree: 12 out of 20

Myanmar
We normally consider the following qualifications for entry to our postgraduate taught programmes: Masters Degree from a recognised institution.

UK 1st class degree: 80% or GPA of 4.7 out of 5.0
UK 2:1 degree: 70% or GPA of 4.0 out of 5.0
UK 2:2 degree: 60% or GPA of 3.5 out of 5.0

Namibia
We normally consider the following qualifications for entry to our postgraduate taught programmes: Bachelor Honours Degree or Professional Bachelor Degree (NQF level 8 qualifications) - these to be awarded after 2008 from a recognised institution.

UK 1st class degree: 80%
UK 2:1 degree: 70%
UK 2:2 degree: 60%

Nepal
We normally consider the following qualifications for entry to our postgraduate taught programmes: Bachelor Degree (minimum 4 years) from selected institutions.

UK 1st class degree: 80%; or GPA 3.7 out of 4.0
UK 2:1 degree: 65%; or GPA 3.0 out of 4.0
UK 2:2 degree: 55%; or GPA of 2.4 out of 4.0

Bachelor in Nursing Science are not considered equivalent to UK Bachelor degrees.

Netherlands
We normally consider the following qualifications for entry to our postgraduate taught programmes: Bachelor Degree from a recognised institution.

UK 1st class degree: 8 out of 10
UK 2:1 degree: 7 out of 10
UK 2:2 degree: 6 out of 10

New Zealand
We normally consider the following qualifications for entry to our postgraduate taught programmes: Bachelor Degree (minimum 3 years) or Bachelor Honours Degree from a recognised institution.

UK 1st class degree: A-*; or First Class Honours**
UK 2:1 degree: B*; or Second Class (Division 1) Honours**
UK 2:2 degree: C+*; or Second Class (Division 2) Honours**

*from a Bachelor degree
**from a Bachelor Honours degree

Nigeria
We normally consider the following qualifications for entry to our postgraduate taught programmes: Bachelor Degree from selected institutions.

UK 1st class degree: GPA 4.50 out of 5.00; or GPA 6.0 out of 7.0
UK 2:1 degree: GPA 3.50 out of 5.00; or GPA 4.6 out of 7.0
UK 2:2 degree: GPA 2.80 out of 5.00; or GPA 3.0 out of 7.0

Norway
We normally consider the following qualifications for entry to our postgraduate taught programmes: Bachelor Degree (180 ECTS credits) from a recognised institution.

UK 1st class degree: Overall B grade with at least 75 ECTS (of 180 ECTS min overall) at grade A or above.
UK 2:1 degree: Overall B grade
UK 2:2 degree: Overall C grade

Oman
We normally consider the following qualifications for entry to our postgraduate taught programmes: Bachelor Degree from a recognised institution.

UK 1st class degree: GPA 3.7 out of 4.0
UK 2:1 degree: GPA 3.0 out of 4.0
UK 2:2 degree: GPA 2.5 out of 4.0

Pakistan
We normally consider the following qualifications for entry to our postgraduate taught programmes: Bachelor Degree (minimum 4 years) from selected institutions.

UK 1st class degree: GPA 3.0 to 3.8 out of 4.0
UK 2:1 degree: GPA 2.6 to 3.6 out of 4.0
UK 2:2 degree: GPA 2.0 to 3.0 out of 4.0

Offer conditions will vary depending on the institution you are applying from.  For some institutions/degrees we will ask for different grades to above, so this is only a guide. 

Palestine, State of
We normally consider the following qualifications for entry to our postgraduate taught programmes: Bachelor Degree from a recognised institution.

UK 1st class degree: 90% or GPA 3.7 out of 4.0
UK 2:1 degree: 80% or GPA 3.0 out of 4.0
UK 2:2 degree: 70% or GPA 2.4 out of 4.0

Panama
We normally consider the following qualifications for entry to our postgraduate taught programmes: Licenciado / Titulo de [subject area] (minimum 4 years) from a recognised institution.

UK 1st class degree: 91%
UK 2:1 degree: 81%
UK 2:2 degree: 71%

Papua New Guinea
We normally consider the following qualifications for entry to our postgraduate taught programmes: Bachelor Honours Degree from a recognised institution.

UK 1st class degree: Class I
UK 2:1 degree: Class II, division A
UK 2:2 degree: Class II, division B

Paraguay
We normally consider the following qualifications for entry to our postgraduate taught programmes: Titulo de Licenciado / Titulo de [professional title] (minimum 4 years) from a recognised institution.

UK 1st class degree: 4.7 out of 5
UK 2:1 degree: 4 out of 5
UK 2:2 degree: 3.5 out fo 5

Peru
We normally consider the following qualifications for entry to our postgraduate taught programmes: Grado Academico de Bachiller or Titulo de Licenciado/ Titulo (Professional) de [subject area] from a recognised institution.

UK 1st class degree: 17 out of 20
UK 2:1 degree: 14 out of 20
UK 2:2 degree: 12 out of 20

Philippines
We normally consider the following qualifications for entry to our postgraduate taught programmes: Bachelor Degree from selected institutions or Juris Doctor; Bachelor of Laws; Doctor of Medicine; Doctor of Dentistry/ Optometry/ Veterinary Medicine; or Masters Degree from recognised institutions.

UK 1st class degree: 3.6 out of 4.0; or 94%; or 1.25 out of 5
UK 2:1 degree: 3.0 out of 4.0; or 86%; or 1.75 out of 5
UK 2:2 degree: 2.5 out of 4.0; or 80%; or 2.5 out of 5

The above 'out of 5' scale assumes 1 is highest mark and 3 is the pass mark.

Poland
We normally consider the following qualifications for entry to our postgraduate taught programmes: Licencjat or Inzynier (minimum 3 years) - these must be awarded after 2001 from a recognised institution.

UK 1st class degree: 4.8 out of 5.0
UK 2:1 degree: 4.5 out of 5.0
UK 2:2 degree: 3.8 out of 5.0

The above grades are based on the 2 to 5 scale, where 3 is the pass mark and 5 is the highest mark.

Portugal
We normally consider the following qualifications for entry to our postgraduate taught programmes: Licenciado (minimum 180 ECTS credits) or Diploma de Estudos Superiores Especializados (DESE) from a recognised institution.

UK 1st class degree: 16 out of 20
UK 2:1 degree: 14 out of 20
UK 2:2 degree: 12 out of 20

Puerto Rico
We normally consider the following qualifications for entry to our postgraduate taught programmes: Bachelor Degree (minimum 3 years) from a recognised institution.

UK 1st class degree: 90/100 or GPA 3.7 out of 4.0
UK 2:1 degree: 80/100 or GPA 3.0 out of 4.0
UK 2:2 degree: 70/100 or GPA 2.4 out of 4.0

Qatar
We normally consider the following qualifications for entry to our postgraduate taught programmes: Bachelor Degree from a recognised institution.

UK 1st class degree: GPA 3.7 out of 4.0; or GPA 4.4 out of 5.0
UK 2:1 degree: GPA 3.0 out of 4.0; or GPA 3.6 out of 5.0
UK 2:2 degree: GPA 2.4 out of 4.0; or GPA 2.8 out of 5.0

Romania
We normally consider the following qualifications for entry to our postgraduate taught programmes: Bachelor Degree (minimum 180 ECTS credits) from a recognised institution.

UK 1st class degree: 9.75 out of 10
UK 2:1 degree: 8.0 out of 10
UK 2:2 degree: 7.0 out of 10

Russia
We normally consider the following qualifications for entry to our postgraduate taught programmes: Bachelor Degree or Specialist Diploma from a recognised institution.

UK 1st class degree: 4.7 out of 5
UK 2:1 degree: 4.0 out of 5
UK 2:2 degree: 3.5 out of 5

Rwanda
We normally consider the following qualifications for entry to our postgraduate taught programmes: Bachelor Honours Degree (minimum 4 years) from a recognised institution.

UK 1st class degree: 85%; or 17 out of 20
UK 2:1 degree: 70%; or 15 out of 20
UK 2:2 degree: 60%; or 13 out of 20

Saudi Arabia
We normally consider the following qualifications for entry to our postgraduate taught programmes: Bachelor Degree from a recognised institution.

UK 1st class degree: GPA 4.75 out of 5.0; or GPA 3.75 out of 4.0
UK 2:1 degree: GPA 3.75 out of 5.0; or GPA 3.0 out of 4.0
UK 2:2 degree: GPA 3.0 out of 5.0; or GPA 2.4 out of 4.0

Senegal
We normally consider the following qualifications for entry to our postgraduate taught programmes: Maîtrise; Master II; Diplôme d'Études Approfondies (DEA); Diplôme d'Études Supérieures Specialisées (DESS); Diplôme d'État de Docteur en Médecine; Diplôme d'Ingénieur; Diplôme de Docteur en Chirurgie Dentaire; or Diplôme de Pharmacien from a recognised institution.

UK 1st class degree: 16/20
UK 2:1 degree: 14/20
UK 2:2 degree: 12/20

Serbia
We normally consider the following qualifications for entry to our postgraduate taught programmes: Bachelor Degree or Advanced Diploma of Higher Education from a recognised institution.

UK 1st class degree: 9 out of 10
UK 2:1 degree: 8 out of 10
UK 2:2 degree: 7 out of 10

Sierra Leone
We normally consider the following qualifications for entry to our postgraduate taught programmes: Bachelor Degree (Honours) or a Masters degree from a recognised institution.

UK 1st class degree: First Class honours; or GPA 4.7 out of 5; or GPA 3.75 out of 4
UK 2:1 degree: Upper Second Class honours; or GPA 4 out of 5; or GPA 3.25 out of 4
UK 2:2 degree: Lower Second Class Honours; or GPA 3.4 out of 5; or GPA 2.75 out of 4

Singapore
We normally consider the following qualifications for entry to our postgraduate taught programmes: Bachelor Degree (minimum 3 years) or Bachelor Honours degree from selected institutions.

UK 1st class degree: GPA 4.3 out of 5.0; or GPA 3.6 out of 4.0
UK 2:1 degree: GPA 3.8 out of 5.0; or GPA 3.0 out of 4.0
UK 2:2 degree: GPA 3.3 out of 5.0; or GPA 2.5 out of 4.0

Slovakia
We normally consider the following qualifications for entry to our postgraduate taught programmes: Bachelor Degree (180 ECTS credits) (minimum 3 years) from a recognised institution.

UK 1st class degree: 93%; or 1 overall (on 1 to 4 scale, where 1 is highest mark)
UK 2:1 degree: 86%; or 1.5 overall (on 1 to 4 scale, where 1 is highest mark)
UK 2:2 degree: 72%; or 2.5 overall (on 1 to 4 scale, where 1 is highest mark)

Slovenia
We normally consider the following qualifications for entry to our postgraduate taught programmes: Univerzitetni Diplomant (180 ECTS credits) (minimum 3 years) from a recognised institution.

UK 1st class degree: 9.5 out of 10
UK 2:1 degree: 8 out of 10
UK 2:2 degree: 7 out of 10

Somalia
Bachelor degrees from Somalia are not considered for direct entry to our postgraduate taught programmes. Holders of Bachelor degrees from Somali National University can be considered for our Pre-Masters programmes on a case by case basis.

South Africa
We normally consider the following qualifications for entry to our postgraduate taught programmes: NQF Level 8 qualifications such as Bachelor Honours degrees or Professional Bachelor degrees from a recognised institution.

UK 1st class degree: 75%
UK 2:1 degree: 70%
UK 2:2 degree: 60%

South Korea
We normally consider the following qualifications for entry to our postgraduate taught programmes: Bachelor Degree (minimum 4 years) from a recognised institution.

UK 1st class degree: GPA 4.2 out of 4.5; or GPA 4.0 out of 4.3; or GPA 3.7 out of 4.0
UK 2:1 degree: GPA 3.5 out of 4.5; or GPA 3.3 out of 4.3; or GPA 3.2 out of 4.0
UK 2:2 degree: GPA 3.0 out of 4.5; or GPA 2.8 out of 4.3; or GPA 2.5 out of 4.0

Spain
We normally consider the following qualifications for entry to our postgraduate taught programmes: Titulo Universitario Oficial de Graduado en [subject area] (Grado) or Titulo Universitario Oficial de Licenciado en [subject area] (Licenciatura) from a recognised institution.

UK 1st class degree: 8.0 out of 10; or 2.5 out of 4.0
UK 2:1 degree: 7.0 out of 10; or 2.0 out of 4.0
UK 2:2 degree: 6.0 out of 10; or 1.5 out of 4.0

Sri Lanka
We normally consider the following qualifications for entry to our postgraduate taught programmes: Bachelor Degree (Special or Honours) or Bachelor Degree (Professional) (minimum 4 years) from a recognised institution.

UK 1st class degree: GPA 3.5 out of 4.0
UK 2:1 degree: GPA 3.0 out of 4.0
UK 2:2 degree: GPA 2.4 out of 4.0

Sudan
We normally consider the following qualifications for entry to our postgraduate taught programmes: Bachelor Honours degree from a recognised institution or Bachelor degree in one of the following Professional subjects: Architecture; Dentistry; Engineering; Medicine/Surgery from a recognised institution.

UK 1st class degree: 80%
UK 2:1 degree: 65%
UK 2:2 degree: 60%

Sweden
We normally consider the following qualifications for entry to our postgraduate taught programmes: Bachelor Degree (Kandidatexamen) or Professional Bachelor Degree (Yrkesexamenfrom) (180 ECTS credits) from a recognised institution.

UK 1st class degree: Overall B grade with at least 75 ECTS at grade A or above (180 ECTS minimum overall); or at least 65% of credits graded at VG overall
UK 2:1 degree: Overall B grade (180 ECTS minimum overall); or at least 50% of credits graded at VG overall
UK 2:2 degree: Overall C grade (180 ECTS minimum overall); or at least 20% of credits graded at VG overall.

Switzerland
We normally consider the following qualifications for entry to our postgraduate taught programmes: Bachelor degree (180 ECTS credits) from a recognised institution.

UK 1st class degree: 5.5 out of 6; or 9 out of 10
UK 2:1 degree: 5 out of 6; or 8 out of 10
UK 2:2 degree: 4.25 out of 6; or 7 out of 10

Syria
We normally consider the following qualifications for entry to our postgraduate taught programmes: Bachelor Degree from a recognised institution.

UK 1st class degree: 85%
UK 2:1 degree: 75%
UK 2:2 degree: 65%

Taiwan
We normally consider the following qualifications for entry to our postgraduate taught programmes: Bachelor Degree from selected institutions.

UK 1st class degree: 85 to 90%
UK 2:1 degree: 70 to 75%
UK 2:2 degree: 65 to 70%

Offer conditions will vary depending on the institution you are applying from.  

Tajikistan
We normally consider the following qualifications for entry to our postgraduate taught programmes: Specialist Diploma or Masters Degree from a recognised institution.

UK 1st class degree: 4.7 out of 5
UK 2:1 degree: 4.0 out of 5
UK 2:2 degree: 3.5 out of 5

Tanzania
We normally consider the following qualifications for entry to our postgraduate taught programmes: Bachelor Degree from a recognised institution.

UK 1st class degree: GPA 4.4 out of 5.0
UK 2:1 degree: GPA 3.5 out of 5.0
UK 2:2 degree: GPA 2.7 out of 5.0

Thailand
We normally consider the following qualifications for entry to our postgraduate taught programmes: Bachelor Degree from a recognised institution.

UK 1st class degree: GPA 3.40 to 3.60 out of 4.00
UK 2:1 degree: GPA 3.00 to 3.20 out of 4.00
UK 2:2 degree: GPA 2.40 to 2.60 out of 4.00

Offer conditions will vary depending on the institution you are applying from.

Trinidad and Tobago
We normally consider the following qualifications for entry to our postgraduate taught programmes: Bachelor Degree (minimum 3 years) from a recognised institution.

UK 1st class degree: GPA 3.7 out of 4.0; or First Class Honours from the University of West Indies
UK 2:1 degree: GPA 3.0 out of 4.0; or Upper Second Class Honours from the University of West Indies
UK 2:2 degree: GPA 2.4 out of 4.0; or Lower Second Class Honours from the University of West Indies

Tunisia
We normally consider the following qualifications for entry to our postgraduate taught programmes: Licence; Diplome National d'Architecture; Maitrise; Diplome National d'Ingeniuer; or Doctorat en Medecine / Veterinaire from a recognised institution.

UK 1st class degree: 16 out of 20
UK 2:1 degree: 13 out of 20
UK 2:2 degree: 11 out of 20

Turkey
We normally consider the following qualifications for entry to our postgraduate taught programmes: Bachelor Degree from a recognised institution.

UK 1st class degree: GPA 3.40 to 3.60 out of 4.00
UK 2:1 degree: GPA 2.80 to 3.00 out of 4.00
UK 2:2 degree: GPA 2.30 to 2.50 out of 4.00

Offer conditions will vary depending on the institution you are applying from.

Turkish Republic of Northern Cyprus
We normally consider the following qualifications for entry to our postgraduate taught programmes: Bachelor Degree from a recognised institution.

UK 1st class degree: GPA 3.60 out of 4.00
UK 2:1 degree: GPA 3.00 out of 4.00
UK 2:2 degree: GPA 2.50 out of 4.00

Turkmenistan
We normally consider the following qualifications for entry to our postgraduate taught programmes: Bachelor Degree or Diploma of Higher Education (awarded after 2007) from a recognised institution.

UK 1st class degree: 4.7 out of 5
UK 2:1 degree: 4.0 out of 5
UK 2:2 degree: 3.5 out of 5

Turks and Caicos Islands
We normally consider the following qualifications for entry to our postgraduate taught programmes: Bachelor Degree (accredited by the Council of Community Colleges of Jamaica) from a recognised institution.

UK 1st class degree: GPA 3.7 out of 4.0; or 80%
UK 2:1 degree: GPA 3.3 out of 4.0; or 75%
UK 2:2 degree: GPA 2.7 out of 4.0; or 65%

Uganda
We normally consider the following qualifications for entry to our postgraduate taught programmes: Bachelor Degree (minimum 3 years) from a recognised institution.

UK 1st class degree: GPA 4.4 out of 5.0
UK 2:1 degree: GPA 4.0 out of 5.0
UK 2:2 degree: GPA 3.0 out of 5.0

Ukraine
We normally consider the following qualifications for entry to our postgraduate taught programmes: Bachelor Degree or Specialist Diploma from a recognised institution.

UK 1st class degree: 10 out of 12; or 4.7 out of 5
UK 2:1 degree: 8 out of 12; or 4.0 out of 5
UK 2:2 degree: 6 out of 12; or 3.5 out of 5

United Arab Emirates
We normally consider the following qualifications for entry to our postgraduate taught programmes: Bachelor Degree from a recognised institution.

UK 1st class degree: GPA 3.7 out of 4.0
UK 2:1 degree: GPA 3.0 out of 4.0
UK 2:2 degree: GPA 2.5 out of 4.0

United States of America
We normally consider the following qualifications for entry to our postgraduate taught programmes: Bachelor Degree from a recognised institution.

UK 1st class degree: GPA 3.7 out of 4.0
UK 2:1 degree: GPA 3.2 out of 4.0
UK 2:2 degree: GPA 2.5 out of 4.0

Uruguay
We normally consider the following qualifications for entry to our postgraduate taught programmes: Titulo de Licenciado/ Titulo de [subject area] (minimum 4 years) from a recognised institution.

UK 1st class degree: 10 to 11 out of 12
UK 2:1 degree: 7 to 9 out of 12
UK 2:2 degree: 6 to 7 out of 12

Offer conditions will vary depending on the institution you are applying from.

Uzbekistan
We normally consider the following qualifications for entry to our postgraduate taught programmes: Bachelor Degree (minimum 4 years) or Specialist Diploma from a recognised institution.

UK 1st class degree: 90%; or 4.7 out of 5
UK 2:1 degree: 80%; or 4.0 out of 5
UK 2:2 degree: 71%; or 3.5 out of 5

Venezuela
We normally consider the following qualifications for entry to our postgraduate taught programmes: Titulo de Licenciado/ Titulo de [subject area] from a recognised institution.

UK 1st class degree: 81%
UK 2:1 degree: 71%
UK 2:2 degree: 61%

Non-percentage grading scales, for example scales out of 20, 10, 9 or 5, will have different requirements. 

Vietnam
We normally consider the following qualifications for entry to our postgraduate taught programmes: Bachelor Degree from a recognised institution.

UK 1st class degree: 8.0 out of 10; or GPA 3.7 out of 4
UK 2:1 degree: 7.0 out of 10; or GPA 3.0 out of 4
UK 2:2 degree: 5.7 out of 10; or GPA 2.4 out of 4

Yemen
We normally consider the following qualifications for entry to our postgraduate taught programmes: Masters (Majister) degree from a recognised institution.

UK 1st class degree: 90%
UK 2:1 degree: 80%
UK 2:2 degree: 65%

Bachelor Degrees from Lebanese International University (in Yemen) can be considered for entry to postgraduate taught programmes - please see Lebanon for guidance on grade requirements for this.

Zambia
We normally consider the following qualifications for entry to our postgraduate taught programmes: Masters Degree from a recognised institution.

UK 1st class degree: 75%; or GPA 3.7 out of 4.0
UK 2:1 degree: 65%; or GPA 3.0 out of 4.0
UK 2:2 degree: 55%; or GPA 2.4 out of 4.0

Zimbabwe
We normally consider the following qualifications for entry to our postgraduate taught programmes: Bachelor Degree (minimum 4 years) or Bachelor Honours degree from a recognised institution.

UK 1st class degree: 75%
UK 2:1 degree: 65%
UK 2:2 degree: 60%

Sat, 02 Nov 2019 21:23:00 -0500 en text/html https://www.qmul.ac.uk/postgraduate/taught/coursefinder/courses/internet-of-things-data-msc/
Killexams : The Guide to Finding a Favorable Restaurant Site

Picking a restaurant site isn’t what it used to be. According to Buxton, a leading customer analytics and predictive analytics platform, the process is more than just simple demographics and a hunch based off experience. It describes the work as a “blend of art and science.”

The company released a report, “Restaurant Site Selection: Minimizing Losses, Maximizing Success” that could assist operators by putting them on the path toward the right market and trade areas and making a solid investment.

1. Identifying the Market

Buxton states the first step in site selection is usually identifying the market. This initial objective can be done in one of two ways.

The first method is to analyze big-picture factors such as population growth, employment rates, real estate activity, and consumer spending. The other method is what Buxton refers to as a “bottom-up” approach where you first identify potential trade areas within a region that meet the necessary requirements and then move back up to the market level. The advantage to this approach, Buxton states, is that it helps streamline steps later in the process. But it does require technology that can run algorithms on every possible combination of trade areas to find the best groupings.

The company lists four key questions when considering potential markets: which markets have the right types of consumers, where is the best balance of competition, where is the best place to build multiple locations, and can your existing supply chain support the market?

When it comes to the consumers, Buxton adds that looking at psychographics, rather than basic demographics, can provide a better idea of the potential base. For example, such things as purchasing behaviors, media preferences, and lifestyle characteristics provide more specificity and a more accurate assessment of potential customers.

Buxton says that it’s OK to have competitors in a market, but it’s crucial to make sure there is enough demand. In addition, it is important to keep in mind that markets that can support multiple units allow for economics of scale and to not place units in a market too far away from the supply chain structure or else there may be struggles to keep it profitable.

2. Identifying Trade Areas

After finding the most suitable market, Buxton says the next move should be finding the best trade areas. When looking at trade areas, it’s imperative to remember that consumers care more about how long it takes to reach a destination as opposed to how close it is, according to the company. Therefore, Buxton notes that “identifying trade areas based on drive times yields the most accurate view.”

Buxton writes that you should focus on trade areas that meet criteria such as:

Positive performance estimates

This one is simple—ensuring the area will produce enough sales to meet your goals.

Customer mix and concentration

Buxton states that you want to find a trade area that is close to your customer profile. Under this criterion, the company writes, “Given the restaurant industry’s expansion into new dayparts and delivery channels, it’s also important to understand who your customers are for the dayparts and channels that drive your success to ensure the correct customer mix for each location.”

Acceptable competition and helpful co-tenants

In some cases, restaurants benefit from being close to other restaurants, which is also known as the “restaurant row effect.” There are other times where a co-tenant could boost business. You must take into account whether these factors would help or hurt your particular restaurant.

High traffic counts

This criterion is also self-explanatory—you want an area where a large number of consumers congregate.

Minimal cannibalization or trade area overlap

If you’ve settled on an existing market, Buxton says that you need to understand how your new location will affect your other sites and whether that potential effect is acceptable.

Buxton also advises that if you are entering a far-away market, then “pick your best trade area to concentrate on first. A successful first location provides both the brand recognition and cash flow needed to fuel additional locations.” If the market is closer, then “consider approaching the market gradually to build brand recognition organically.”

3. Identifying the Optimal Site

After establishing the best market and trade areas, the final step is to find the actual site. Per Buxton, after using quantitative data to validate the market and trade area, qualitative data becomes a key driver at this stage.

Some characteristics to look out for include: quality of site and visibility, parking availability and access to mass transit, ease of ingress/egress, presence of left-turn signal, space for a drive-thru lane, if necessary, appropriate real estate, and costs to operate at the site.

4. Site Selection Models

The last portion of Buxton’s report dives into the pros and cons of using site selection models.

The company states that the advantages to using models are estimation of performance potential, confirmation of information from brokers, and understanding what is required to be successful in a trade area.

The disadvantages to site selection models are the limits of what can be quantified, such as measuring foot traffic, and they can’t truly replace what Buxton states are the “fundamentals of good site selection.” Buxton’s example of this is “A model might supply a high score to a site located next to a highway—based on the assumption that the highway will provide both good accessibility and visibility—but if the closest available site next to the highway actually has poor visibility or accessibility, then it likely will not live up to the full potential indicated by the model.”

Mon, 06 Jan 2020 07:30:00 -0600 en text/html https://www.qsrmagazine.com/business-advice/guide-finding-favorable-restaurant-site
Killexams : Gareth Rushgrove on Kubernetes as a Platform, Applications, and Security

In this podcast, Daniel Bryant sat down with Gareth Rushgrove, Director of Product Management at Snyk. subjects covered included Kubernetes as a platform, application abstractions, continuous delivery, and implementing good security practices in the cloud native space.

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Can you introduce yourself?

  • 01:00 I'm director of product at Snyk; we do security tooling for developers covering open-source components and containers.

Are there core capabilities of a platform based on Kubernetes?

  • 01:45 One of the things with Kubernetes that surprises a lot of people is that it is both a low-level abstraction and a higher-level abstraction.
  • 02:00 If you are thinking of Kubernetes as your future application platform, and it turns out that Kubernetes has got low-level building blocks, then you have to build something on top of it.
  • 02:10 On the other hand, if you are coming at it from a migration path of a bunch of VMs, the Kubernetes API is incredibly high level.
  • 02:30 It depends on where you are coming from.
  • 02:35 If you buy into the idea that you're building a platform on top of it, what is missing in the Kubernetes API is the application.
  • 02:45 You've got Services, you've got Deployments (which adds an abstraction layer over replication sets and pods) - but how do you organise teams, source code, CI around?
  • 03:10 Kubernetes doesn't have that built in, but there has been moves in that direction for a while.

What's the state of Kubernetes tooling?

  • 03:30 There's a lot of opportunity; that was what attracted me to Kubernetes 4-5 years ago.
  • 03:35 The first talk I did at KubeCon was called "Kubernetes and the potential for higher level tools" - and I still fundamentally believe that will happen.
  • 03:45 We haven't moved towards it as quickly as I thought we might, and to a certain degree that's also down to wide-scale adoption.
  • 04:00 It's not just the high level high context people who were interested in Kubernetes because of its API surface; lots of people have been using Kubernetes to get work done.
  • 04:10 Because that potential was there, you do see some of those tools; some have come and gone, some were too early.
  • 04:20 Most people haven't needed the high level tools yet, and that's led to a certain degree of fragmentation.
  • 04:30 I think what's happened was a lot of people jumped on to Kubernetes too early, before the tooling existed, and built their own tools.
  • 04:40 Kubernetes was API-first, and lots of people built their own tooling, which was relatively straightforward to do; you'll see some of that consolidating over time.
  • 04:50 KubeCon is a great proxy for that; in Barcelona, something like 80% of attendees were new to the event, and in San Diego, something like 70% were new to the platform.
  • 05:05 It's easy to forget that most people are new to Kubernetes.
  • 05:10 In that context, if you come to the platform and find the array of tools bewildering, that can be a problem.
  • 05:15 I created a spreadsheet a while back, partly as a narrative of what tools were built on top.
  • 05:30 I don't think too many tools have been created; the ones that see large-scale adoption will win, rather than the ones with the most interesting functionality.

What's your thoughts between pure open source and CNCF as well as vendors?

  • 06:00 I think they can be quite individual and come from a different point of view.
  • 06:05 Some of it comes from what you think of open source, and whether you think open source is important.
  • 06:10 I came back from FOSDEM a few weeks ago, and there were lots of conversations about what open source is.
  • 06:20 When I got into open source, it was about the freedoms for me; we've had conversations about licences and maybe open source has become synonymous with free, but we're coming back to licenses again.
  • 06:40 I think you'll have people coming from different points of view.
  • 06:45 I believe open source is important.
  • 06:50 I don't like the idea of a world where all the open source software that becomes popular and sticky is spat out of large corporate organisations.
  • 07:00 It adds value to the ecosystem; but I like it where there's a mix.
  • 07:05 I've learnt that building big software takes a lot of people, and gathering that amount of people together for free take a long time and is hard.
  • 07:15 Doing it commercially is easier; it doesn't mean it's easy.
  • 07:20 I like the mix that you can go out on your own and create software, or with a small group of people.
  • 07:25 You can see open source projects coming from start-ups, which might succeed or fail, and from end users.
  • 07:40 The interplay is interesting, and I think that relationship is all about the end-user first.
  • 07:50 If you don't focus on the end user first, you're not going to succeed.
  • 07:55 If you build something for yourself, you are the end user - it's really easy.
  • 08:00 If you're building for someone else, whether it's for a startup or a giant corporation, if you're not putting the end user first then over time it won't work out.
  • 08:10 If you have a lot of money, you can get somewhere quite quickly, and you can squash things, but on balance it might not work out.
  • 08:15 Foundations have a different role to play, and work differently - CNCF is central to quite a lot of things in the cloud native space.
  • 08:30 People like the idea that the foundation is making lots of decisions, but actually what's happening is it's lots of people in lots of projects that are making decisions.
  • 08:35 The CNCF provides a place where lots of the technology people can talk, even though they might be from competing companies.
  • 08:45 That's the benefit of the foundation.
  • 08:50 The other aspect is it has driven awareness of cloud native applications and infrastructure, and that shift across lots of companies (including small ones) is a benefit to everyone.
  • 09:10 Large companies, which might not listen to individual users, can be associated with a group to move towards automation and devops - all of those things, we can agree on under one banner.
  • 09:45 When we get down to the specifics of how to offer a specific thing, we can offer competing solutions.
  • 09:50 That's the key benefit of a foundation; people may look down on marketing, but actually it turns out it's really powerful when done well.
  • 10:00 The foundation is also a place where people who are employed by fiercely competing companies can talk about things together, even though they work for different companies.
  • 10:10 Technically it just needs a common project, but the foundation provides things and opportunities that wouldn't exist otherwise.

What is the role of standards in this?

  • 10:30 Standards get a bad reputation, and people run away - I don't think that's going to change.
  • 10:40 I would like to see more work done around standardisation.
  • 10:45 What we're seeing is people trying to build de-facto standards.
  • 10:50 Where that works, it works really well; the projects around the cloud native space are generally to do with containers; securing them, managing them, building them, using them as an abstraction.
  • 11:15 That fundamentally happened down to a widely adopted implementation in Docker, but the smart move in standardising the low-level bits with the OCI, the runtime image formats, etc.
  • 11:40 The number of companies with container registries expands every few months, and the reason why it's not a problem for users is because they're all fundamentally based on the distribution spec.
  • 11:50 It turns out that they aren't 100% compatible; there's always things that people will do either on purpose or not on purpose, but for the most part they are transferrable between registries and runtimes.
  • 12:10 Google cloud run enables you to run containers here or there, hypo was doing that before perhaps ahead of its time; and all of these were based on standards.
  • 12:15 You don't want too many standards, and you don't want to create standards first and then hit people over the head with them.
  • 12:25 I do think specification standards we can all agree on common undifferentiated things is a good space.
  • 12:30 The serverless working group around Kubernetes around the cloud event spec have been doing things there.
  • 12:45 They've been finding areas in which they can agree, and writing those down as lightweight standardisation processes.
  • 12:55 I was recently involved in the Cloud Native Application Bundles (CNAB) spec at the beginning, with Microsoft, Docker, Pivotal etc. about the higher level packaging.
  • 13:05 A lot of that doesn't have to be end-user facing, either; there's a lot of people who are using Docker without knowing about OCI - but they get the benefits of that.
  • 13:20 There are a lot of people wondering how they might use it, but instead, should be wondering which products to use that might use it.
  • 13:25 Most people don't need or want to care how it does it; they care about the products solving the end user problem, which is the way it should be.

What are your thoughts on the good and bad of buildpacks?

  • 14:05 Software packaging and container builds are important.
  • 14:10 One of the things Docker brought it at the right time and right place was to move software packaging from a specialised part of the IT department to self-service.
  • 14:40 Docker packaging shifted really rapidly to developer teams doing packaging all the time.
  • 14:50 There are tradeoffs about how that happened; ultimately with docker build as the tool and the OCI specification as the result.
  • 14:55 One of the things you can't argue about is how widely adopted and simple it was to make that transition.
  • 15:05 IF you talk to the Debian packaging people, they'll list off a whole set of things that are wrong with the Docker files, and they have a point.
  • 15:15 There are several million Docker files on GitHub - it really helped to democratise packaging.
  • 15:30 There are tradeoffs; so the question is, can we have other types of build tools?
  • 15:40 Jib is a specialised tool from Google for the Java ecosystem.
  • 15:50 If you can remove a lot of the general purpose nature abstraction; as long as you fit into this gap, and the tool will take care of the rest of the complexity for you.
  • 16:10 I think buildpacks have ultimately been of interest for those that have already been using CloudFoundry.
  • 16:15 As a direct end-user tool, I think it has some downsides; where I see much more interest in buildpacks is being built in to something they are already using.
  • 16:25 Buildpacks aren't the end user interface; they're an implementation detail - so I really like the recent Spring integration.
  • 16:40 If it gets built into the latest Spring projects, it will automatically build your Spring project into a container using buildpacks.
  • 16:50 You don't need lots of things being able to do that; you just need something that has encapsulated all of those problems.
  • 17:00 There's other build work going on as well; the evolution of 'docker build' into a library called buildkit; lots of software is now using buildkit to do builds without needing docker.
  • 17:15 That's then plugged back into docker as the next generation of the build process.
  • 17:20 There's still some integration required for Windows containers, but there's already a lot of improvements about syntax and extending the Dockerfile syntax.
  • 17:30 For me, the Dockerfile is a great blunt tool for getting to the 80% goal very quickly with a low barrier to entry.
  • 17:40 I think we'll see tools that take a different approach; single tools around specific ecosystems like buildpacks which generate an OCI image.

What do you think a best practice CI/CD pipeline looks like for Kubernetes?

  • 18:10 I think the reality is that it is based on your organisation context.
  • 18:15 There are multiple projects in the CNCF and the CDF from projects and end-users to large vendor-backed projects.
  • 18:30 What it means is that there's a richness to the tooling, but everything is moving really quickly
  • 18:35 It's probably also why I would wager that Jenkins is the tool that everyone's using for doing their builds.
  • 18:45 Everyone's using it, and can make it do what they want.
  • 18:50 In a greenfield environment with a lot of Kubernetes experts, the answer is going to be different from that from one in which there are SaaS solutions.
  • 19:05 I'm interested in Tekton [https://github.com/tektoncd/pipeline] (a project stewarded by the CDF), built by Google, RedHat, and other folks.
  • 19:25 What it's doing is providing the elements for software build on top of Kubernetes.
  • 19:30 What it adds to Kubernetes is pipelines, tasks, as constructs in the same way you'd have deployments, pods and services.
  • 19:40 For me, that's serving an interesting problem; at that point, you could have interoperable tools on top which are using those details.
  • 19:55 I think that might be how we get to genuinely better tooling.
  • 20:00 There are other tools available; Argo and ArgoFlux is taking a slightly different approach.
  • 20:10 I would love to see other things built on top of Tekton, because the interoperable bit appeals to my nature.
  • 20:15 The Kubernetes-native objects is a useful API abstraction.
  • 20:20 It's a powerful abstraction, but there's a high barrier to entry.
  • 20:35 Viewing these as as end-user tools is probably the wrong level.
  • 20:40 Viewing the tools that use these things is probably the correct way of doing it.
  • 20:45 If people feel that Kubernetes is complex - but there are a lot of people who are using Kubernetes without attending KubeCon - they're not using them and they don't find it complicated.
  • 21:05 The moment you add custom resource definitions and operators, the complexity goes through the roof.
  • 21:10 I feel that they're an implementation detail of what can be done, but not an end user visible thing.

What do you think are the biggest security challenges with Kubernetes?

  • 21:40 Security problems are always socio-technological; they're always a mixture of both people and technology.
  • 21:45 It's nearly impossible to say which one is more important, because it will depend on the actual problem at the time.
  • 21:55 We talked about previously, about the shift of software packaging to something that developers own (and associated problems).
  • 22:10 We are seeing it move from a smaller number of people who bear all the responsibility and assume all the load and act as a gate to good or bad is breaking down.
  • 22:20 Security is something that is shifting towards being a developer problem.
  • 22:25 That isn't to say - in the same way as software packages - that there aren't expert people who know how to do the high-end bits.
  • 22:30 Security definitely needs security experts - with the shift to devops, the sys admins didn't disappear, they became SREs.
  • 22:50 You have seen the value and appreciation of SREs grow over time - security is going to go through the same existential crisis.
  • 23:00 The security people are going to become the new security experts, and instead of playing whack-a-mole with thousands of things and focus on the high-risk, high-security problems.
  • 23:15 Kubernetes is happening in the space where there's a lot of things shifting; packaging, operations, configuration, security etc. is being pushed down to developers.
  • 23:25 So what are the security tools and problems that are fundamentally application security problems, but they spill over into historically what would have been IT and infrastructure space.
  • 23:40 The line of IT owning databases and load balancers and the devs owning the applications is breaking down; the developers are bringing their own databases and owning more of the data.
  • 24:00 It's in that context that all of this is happening; developers need help to understand what is happening, but security needs new tools and to understand the evolving space.
  • 24:15 The fundamentals, like ephemeral API driven infrastructure, is the new normal, and it's not sufficient to (say) to get a list of all of the IP addresses?
  • 24:30 The problem is that the spreadsheet will be out of data before it's even used, so is it useful?
  • 24:35 So it moves the discussion to security fundamentals - one of the main things is to go back to basics, and do a thread modelling exercise.
  • 24:55 You'll then discover the problems as you go through that process.
  • 25:10 There's a CNCF SIG about security, and there were a security days at KubeCon which was about a cross-section of end users.
  • 25:30 The work that's going through that community between all stakeholders and security people is important.

If I'm new to the security space, are there any quick wins?

  • 26:10 One is understanding that Kubernetes' defaults aren't that secure.
  • 26:15 That's something the Kubernetes project acknowledges, and it isn't as much a mistake as much as hindsight of massive success.
  • 26:20 If you understand the defaults, like things are running by default as privileged or with writable file systems; if you can avoid those, you can remove a lot of attack vectors.
  • 26:40 Another is that a pod can use as much as it wants to on a node, and the other things get thrown off; you end up with risks around resource starvation.
  • 27:00 Adding limits can mitigate some of those problems.
  • 27:05 You need to address the secure defaults on a per-application basis.
  • 27:15 The biggest problem aside from people deploying Kubernetes control planes to the internet (don't do that!) is the security of the application itself.
  • 27:30 People might not attack Kubernetes, but if the applications have SQL injection problems or cross-site scripting problems, the most secure Kubernetes platform won't help you.
  • 27:55 You don't win by protecting the data or compute if you don't also protect the application you put onto the platform.
  • 28:00 Ultimately thinking about the security of the applications and vulnerabilities they may have are the best places to start.
  • 28:20 It doesn't require you to buy into a lot of tooling to make it happen.
  • 28:30 If you are in a large organisation, and have intrusion detection systems or business intelligence solutions you can get your data in to, you should use those.
  • 28:35 You still need a level of expertise to use the data and find the signals.
  • 28:45 There are things on the developer side that you can scale out faster to cut down the signal in order to help.
  • 28:55 Bang for buck, secure your applications and understand that Kubernetes isn't secure by default are the two main ones.
  • 29:00 Ian Coldwater did a talk on "Think like an attacker
  • 29:15 Ian also did a talk from Duffy Cooley from VMWare on the problems of a security point of view of Kubernetes defaults 

What is the best way for people to follow you on-line?

. From this page you also have access to our recorded show notes. They all have clickable links that will take you directly to that part of the audio.

Sat, 06 Feb 2021 14:16:00 -0600 en text/html https://www.infoq.com/podcasts/kubernetes-applications-security/
Killexams : Information Systems

MSc PG Certificate PG Diploma

2022 start September 

Information School, Faculty of Social Sciences

Aimed at graduates from any discipline, this course will teach you to design and implement information systems and effective project management techniques alongside practical computing skills, including computer programming. The MSc and PG Diploma awards are CILIP accredited.

Course description

By the end of the course, you'll have an in-depth understanding of information systems within an organisational context, emphasising issues related to information, people, information technologies and the business environment. You'll have gained practical skills related to the design and analysis of information systems. Your knowledge and skills will be highly valued in industry, commerce and academia.

We have world-leading research groups in areas such as database systems, information retrieval, speech recognition, information extraction and information management. This means you'll not only gain knowledge of the well-established fundamentals, but also the most current and advanced theories and techniques.

The course focuses on core subjects in information systems including information systems modelling, project management and the impact of information systems on organisations and society. These are complemented by practical skills in computer programming and the study of professional issues in computing.

You can then tailor the course to your own interests by choosing from more specialised subjects including those with a more technical focus such as database design and human-computer interaction, or subjects that focus on how information management can be used to benefit organisations through digital business and business intelligence.

If you have two or more years' relevant work experience in the information sector and wish to study for a higher degree, you may be interested in our Professional Enhancement programme. The programme is designed for people already in work who want to further their careers, and allows greater freedom in module choice in recognition of your existing expertise.

Accreditation

CILIP accredited for the MSc and PG Diploma awards

Modules

A selection of modules are available each year - some examples are below. There may be changes before you start your course. From May of the year of entry, formal programme regulations will be available in our Programme Regulations Finder.

You’ll need 180 credits to get a masters degree, with 75 credits from core modules, 45 credits from optional modules and a dissertation (including dissertation preparation) worth 60 credits.

Core modules:

Professional Issues

This module aims to promote an awareness of the wider social, legal and ethical issues of computing. It describes the relationship between technological change, society and the law, emphasising the powerful role that computers and computer professionals play in a technological society. It also introduces the legal areas which are specific and relevant to the discipline of computing (e.g., intellectual property, liability for defective software, computer misuse, etc) and aims to provide an understanding of ethical concepts that are important to computer professionals, and experience of considering ethical dilemmas.

15 credits
Information Systems Modelling

To consider the role of information modelling within the organisation and provide an appreciation of the rigorous methods that are needed to analyse, design, develop and maintain computer-based information systems. The course is intended to provide an introduction to information modelling techniques. Students gain experience in applying the wide range of systems analysis methods. Students cover subjects including: soft systems analysis; structured systems analysis methodologies; business process modelling; data flow modelling and object-oriented approaches (e.g. RUP/UML).

15 credits
Information Systems in Organisations

This module integrates subjects of organisation, management, and information systems, with an aim to offer the students an integrated set of concepts and tools for understanding information systems in organisations. During this module students will explore basic management and organisational theories and examine the impact of information systems on organisations. This course introduces key concepts which will be explored further in other modules on the information Management and Information Systems programmes.

15 credits
Information Systems Project Management

This module aims to provide a broad understanding of the fundamentals of project management as they apply to the development of Information Systems (IS). The module uses a flexible approach combining face-to-face seminars with web-based learning material. The module will begin with an overview of the principles involved in IS project management; followed by a discussion of IS development methodologies and their different characteristics and specialisms. The rest of the module will discuss the requirements for various project control activities, including estimating development resources, risk management, guidelines for system quality assurance, and various project control techniques that have been developed in recent years. The module will culminate with a review of human resource management issues.

15 credits
Information Systems and the Information Society

The module develops students' critical understanding of the impact of information and communication technologies (ICTs) on social change in 'the Information Society'. Work will revolve around three key themes: the digital divide, community and digital rights.

15 credits
Research Methods and Dissertation Preparation

This module assists students in the identification of, and preparation of a dissertation proposal. Students will: learn about: on-going research in the School; identify and prepare a dissertation proposal; carry out a preliminary literature search in the area of the dissertation research topic; and be introduced to the use of social research methods and statistics for information management.

15 credits
Dissertation

This module enables students to carry out an extended piece of work on an Information School approved topic, so that they can explore an area of specialist interest to them in greater depth. Students will be supported through tutorials with a project supervisor, will apply research methods appropriate to their topic, and implement their work-plan to produce an individual project report. Students will already have identified a suitable subject and designed a project plan in the pre-requisite unit Research Methods and Dissertation Preparation.

45 credits

Optional modules - one from:

Foundations of Object Oriented Programming

This module introduces the foundations of object-oriented programming using the language Java. The emphasis of the module is on software engineering principles, and concepts underpinning object-oriented design and development are introduced from the outset. By the end of the module, you will be able to design, implement and test moderately complex Java programs.

15 credits
Introduction to Programming

This module introduces students with little or no programming experience to the general purpose programming language Python. Python is popular and easy to learn for developing a wide range of information systems applications. The skills and understandings required to program in Python are valued by organisations and transfer to most other programming languages.

15 credits

Optional modules - two from:

Digital Business

The module addresses both theoretical and practical aspects of digital business. The module will cover the latest business trends and business models adopted by ecommerce companies so that students are able to recognise and relate to the current practice in business.  The module aims to equip the students with theoretical and business knowledge and entrepreneurial skills to understand and manage new ways of doing business in the digital economy.

15 credits
Researching Social Media

The module will examine the key theoretical frameworks and methods used in social media studies. Students will explore the following questions: 1) What can be learnt about society by studying social media? 2) How should researchers construct ethical stances for researching sites such as Facebook and Twitter? 3) What are the traditional and digital research methods and tools that can be applied to conduct research on social media? 4) What are the strengths and weaknesses of these methods?

15 credits
Information Governance and Ethics

This module explores a) the emergence of information and data as an economic resource; b) the governance challenges and ethical issues arising from organizations' systematic capture, processing, and use of information and data for organizational goals, e.g. value, risk, accountability, ownership, privacy etc; c) governance, ethical, legal and other frameworks relevant to the capture, processing and use of information and data within organizational and networked contexts; and d) technologies and techniques used in the governing and governance of information and data. Case examples from a number of domains, e.g. business, government, health, law, and social media illustrate the subjects investigated.

15 credits
Business Intelligence

We will cover the principles and practices of gathering and synthesizing business intelligence from the external environment, including organisations,  competitive intelligence operations, environmental scanning activities, market intelligence, and strategic intelligence using open source information. A  secondary focus for the module is the role of BI software in organizations to collect and analyse internal information. This module aims to provide students with an understanding of the ways in which business people use information and of how information is used to support strategic decision- making. Students will learn how to carry out effective searches using both free and fee-based resources, and will study key issues concerning the value, cost and availability of information. The module will concentrate primarily on external information resources but also covers the ways in which information internal to   an organisation can be used strategically to enhance competitive advantage. Students will learn through a combination of lectures and practical exercises, and  will have opportunities to develop expertise in using business-focused electronic information services.

15 credits
ICTs, Innovation and Change

This module aims at examining and exploring how organizations and human activity systems cope with change due to the new implementation or updating of Information Systems and Information and Communication Technologies (ICTs). This change occurs in complex social environments and has cultural, political, structural and ethical impacts that need to be carefully managed. The module will examine and explore how both managers and Information Systems practitioners can be better prepared for the unpredictability, unintended outcomes and possible harmful consequences of change caused by the introduction or update of Information Systems and ICTs. Therefore, the module aims at providing an understanding of both approaches and techniques for the management of this change.

15 credits
Database Design

Effective data management is key to any organisation, particularly with the increasing availability of large and heterogeneous datasets (e.g. transactional, multimedia and geo-spatial data). A database is an organised collection of data, typically describing the activities of one or more organisations and a core component of modern information systems. A Database Management System (DBMS) is software designed to assist in maintaining and utilising large collections of data and becoming a necessity for all organisations. This module provides an introduction to the area of databases and database management, relational database design and a flavour of some advanced subjects in current database research that deal with different kinds of data often found within an organisational context. Lectures are structured into three main areas:¿An introduction to databases¿The process of designing relational databases¿Advanced subjects (e.g. data warehouses and non-relational databases)The course includes a series of online tasks with supporting 'drop in¿ laboratories aimed at providing you with the skills required to implement a database in Oracle and extract information using the Structured Query Language (SQL).

15 credits
User-Centred Design and Human-Computer Interaction

Interface design and usability are central to the experience of interacting with computers. The module introduces usability principles and the design process for interactive systems exploring four major themes. Firstly, user psychology and cognitive principles underlying interface design. Secondly, user interface architectures, modes of interaction, metaphors, navigational structures. Thirdly, the user interface design process including task analysis, modelling constructs and prototyping techniques. Fourthly, the evaluation of user interfaces covering concepts of usability, goals and types of evaluation. The module focus is on the underlying principles of HCI and user-centred design approach with practical sessions to demonstrate these principles.

15 credits

Other courses:

Postgraduate Certificate requires a total of 60 credits
Postgraduate Diploma requires a total of 120 credits

The content of our courses is reviewed annually to make sure it's up-to-date and relevant. Individual modules are occasionally updated or withdrawn. This is in response to discoveries through our world-leading research; funding changes; professional accreditation requirements; student or employer feedback; outcomes of reviews; and variations in staff or student numbers. In the event of any change we'll consult and inform students in good time and take reasonable steps to minimise disruption. We are no longer offering unrestricted module choice. If your course included unrestricted modules, your department will provide a list of modules from their own and other subject areas that you can choose from.

Open days

An open day gives you the best opportunity to hear first-hand from our current students and staff about our courses. You'll find out what makes us special.

Upcoming open days and campus tours

Duration

  • 1 year full-time
  • 2 years part-time
  • 3 years part-time

Teaching

A variety of teaching methods are used, combining lectures from academic staff and professional practitioners with seminars, tutorials, small-group work and computer laboratory sessions. There is strong emphasis on problem-solving and individual aspects of learning, with the expectation that you will engage in independent study, memorizing and research in support of your coursework.

Teaching consists of two 15-week semesters, after which you will write your dissertation.

Assessment

Assessments vary depending on the modules you choose but may include essays, report writing, oral presentations, in-class tests and group projects.

There is also a dissertation of 10–15,000 words, which provides the opportunity, under one-to-one supervision, to focus in depth on a subject of your choice. You may choose to carry out your dissertation with an external organisation, for instance if you are a Professional Enhancement student, your project could be directly related to your own work situation. In the past, students who have carried out such dissertations have welcomed the opportunity to tackle real-life problems.

Your career

After completing the course, you'll be equipped to pursue a variety of roles across a wide range of industries. Our students have found work as business or data analysts, IT business consultants, information systems managers and in enterprise architecture.

Department

The University of Sheffield Information School is ranked number one in the world for library and information management in the QS World University Rankings by subject 2021. These rankings are based upon academic reputation, employer reputation and research impact.

The school has been at the forefront of developments in the information field for more than fifty years. The subject is characterised by its distinctive, interdisciplinary focus on the interactions between people, information and digital technologies. It has the ultimate goal of enhancing information access, and the management, sharing and use of information, to benefit society.

When you come to study with us you'll be an integral part of our research culture. The school is your home and we pride ourselves on the friendliness and helpfulness of our staff.

We offer an outstanding academic education through a wide range of taught postgraduate degrees which embed the principles of research-led teaching.

When you join any of our degree programmes you'll develop a critical understanding of current issues in library and information management. You'll benefit from being taught by staff who are undertaking leading-edge research and who have many links with industry.

As part of our mission to provide world-quality university education in information, we aim to inspire and help you pursue your highest ambitions for your academic and professional careers.

Entry requirements

Main course

You’ll need at least a 2:1 in any subject. Relevant work experience is an advantage but we’ll supply consideration to candidates without experience.

Professional Enhancement

This is a different route to the main course. It's aimed at those who already have relevant work experience.

To apply for this course you need either:

  • an undergraduate degree in any subject discipline and at least 2 years' relevant work experience.
  • an undergraduate degree in any subject together with an acceptable relevant professional qualification and at least 2 years' relevant work experience.
  • an undergraduate degree in any subject area, and at least 5 years' relevant work experience.

If you do not have an undergraduate degree but have other qualifications and substantial relevant work experience you may be considered for entry onto the Postgraduate Certificate or Diploma courses.

Overall IELTS score of 6.5, with a minimum of 6.0 in each component.

Pathway programme for international students

If you're an international student who does not meet the entry requirements for this course, you have the opportunity to apply for a pre-masters programme in Business, Social Sciences and Humanities at the University of Sheffield International College. This course is designed to develop your English language and academic skills. Upon successful completion, you can progress to degree level study at the University of Sheffield.

If you have any questions about entry requirements, please contact the department.

Apply

You can apply for postgraduate study using our Postgraduate Online Application Form. It's a quick and easy process.

Applications close on Friday 5 August 2022 at 5pm.

Apply now

Any supervisors and research areas listed are indicative and may change before the start of the course.

Our student protection plan

Recognition of professional qualifications: from 1 January 2021, in order to have any UK professional qualifications recognised for work in an EU country across a number of regulated and other professions you need to apply to the host country for recognition. Read information from the UK government and the EU Regulated Professions Database.

Thu, 01 Oct 2020 03:20:00 -0500 en text/html https://www.sheffield.ac.uk/postgraduate/taught/courses/2022/information-systems-msc-pg-certificate-pg-diploma
Killexams : NV5 Global, Inc.'s (NASDAQ:NVEE) Stock On An Uptrend: Could Fundamentals Be Driving The Momentum?

NV5 Global (NASDAQ:NVEE) has had a great run on the share market with its stock up by a significant 17% over the last month. As most would know, fundamentals are what usually guide market price movements over the long-term, so we decided to look at the company's key financial indicators today to determine if they have any role to play in the recent price movement. In this article, we decided to focus on NV5 Global's ROE.

Return on Equity or ROE is a test of how effectively a company is growing its value and managing investors’ money. In other words, it is a profitability ratio which measures the rate of return on the capital provided by the company's shareholders.

View our latest analysis for NV5 Global

How Is ROE Calculated?

Return on equity can be calculated by using the formula:

Return on Equity = Net Profit (from continuing operations) ÷ Shareholders' Equity

So, based on the above formula, the ROE for NV5 Global is:

7.9% = US$50m ÷ US$640m (Based on the trailing twelve months to April 2022).

The 'return' refers to a company's earnings over the last year. So, this means that for every $1 of its shareholder's investments, the company generates a profit of $0.08.

What Has ROE Got To Do With Earnings Growth?

We have already established that ROE serves as an efficient profit-generating gauge for a company's future earnings. Depending on how much of these profits the company reinvests or "retains", and how effectively it does so, we are then able to assess a company’s earnings growth potential. Assuming everything else remains unchanged, the higher the ROE and profit retention, the higher the growth rate of a company compared to companies that don't necessarily bear these characteristics.

NV5 Global's Earnings Growth And 7.9% ROE

At first glance, NV5 Global's ROE doesn't look very promising. However, its ROE is similar to the industry average of 9.4%, so we won't completely dismiss the company. On the other hand, NV5 Global reported a moderate 15% net income growth over the past five years. Given the slightly low ROE, it is likely that there could be some other aspects that are driving this growth. For example, it is possible that the company's management has made some good strategic decisions, or that the company has a low payout ratio.

Next, on comparing NV5 Global's net income growth with the industry, we found that the company's reported growth is similar to the industry average growth rate of 13% in the same period.

past-earnings-growth

Earnings growth is an important metric to consider when valuing a stock. The investor should try to establish if the expected growth or decline in earnings, whichever the case may be, is priced in. Doing so will help them establish if the stock's future looks promising or ominous. Has the market priced in the future outlook for NVEE? You can find out in our latest intrinsic value infographic research report.

Is NV5 Global Efficiently Re-investing Its Profits?

NV5 Global doesn't pay any dividend, meaning that all of its profits are being reinvested in the business, which explains the fair bit of earnings growth the company has seen.

Summary

On the whole, we do feel that NV5 Global has some positive attributes. With a high rate of reinvestment, albeit at a low ROE, the company has managed to see a considerable growth in its earnings. We also studied the latest analyst forecasts and found that the company's earnings growth is expected be similar to its current growth rate. To know more about the latest analysts predictions for the company, check out this visualization of analyst forecasts for the company.

Have feedback on this article? Concerned about the content? Get in touch with us directly. Alternatively, email editorial-team (at) simplywallst.com.

This article by Simply Wall St is general in nature. We provide commentary based on historical data and analyst forecasts only using an unbiased methodology and our articles are not intended to be financial advice. It does not constitute a recommendation to buy or sell any stock, and does not take account of your objectives, or your financial situation. We aim to bring you long-term focused analysis driven by fundamental data. Note that our analysis may not factor in the latest price-sensitive company announcements or qualitative material. Simply Wall St has no position in any stocks mentioned.

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Wed, 20 Jul 2022 03:10:00 -0500 en-US text/html https://finance.yahoo.com/news/nv5-global-inc-nasdaq-nvee-111549293.html
Killexams : Disclosure Management Market Size, Share Remuneration To Surge At 9.1% CAGR Through 2028 Industry Report

(MENAFN- Ameliorate Digital Consultancy)

The Disclosure Management market size study sources invaluable data from credible sources to determine the critical factors contributing to or hampering the industry progression in the forthcoming years. It evaluates the historical and present business scenario to predict the growth rate, revenue, share, and other important parameters of the market and its segments over the study duration.

Disclosure Management market size revenue share is predicted to increase at a CAGR of 9.1% over the course of the upcoming five years, consequently pulling the overall market value up to $ 1007.9 million by 2028, from $ 549.2 million in 2021.

Request a demo Report of Disclosure Management Market at:

The research seeks to guide firms in developing effective contingency plans to address existing and foreseeable challenges by offering a complete picture of this vertical. It does so by dividing this domain into various sub-markets, followed by their individual assessment. The document further extends through a detailed competitive landscape analysis.

Key inclusions in the Disclosure Management market report:

  • Market size, sales volume, revenue, along with the growth rate
  • Production capacity of the leading geographies
  • Predominant trends in the industry
  • Business expansion opportunities
  • Positives & negatives of direct and indirect sales channels
  • Archive of leading distributors, traders, and dealers

Disclosure Management market segments covered in the report:

Regional bifurcation: North America, Europe, Asia-Pacific, South America, Middle East & Africa, South East Asia.

  • Assessment of industry at regional and country-level
  • Industry share captured, sales accrued, and returns generated by each region
  • Approximations for growth rate and revenue of every geography over the forecast period

Product types: Software, Services, Managed Services, Professional Services, Consulting Services and Support and Maintenance Services

  • Market share estimates with respect to sales and revenue accumulated by each product segment
  • Pricing patterns of each product type

Applications spectrum: Small and Medium-sized Enterprises (SMEs) and Large Enterprises

  • Sales volume and revenue of every application segment over the analysis timeframe
  • Pricing of each product type in terms of their application scope

Competitive dashboard: Oracle, SAp, Certent, Iris Business Services, WorkivA, Corefiling, Datatracks, Lucanet, Ocr Services, TrintecH, AnaquA and Synthesis Technology

  • Fundamentals of the mentioned companies
  • Manufacturing facilities of the leading organizations
  • Product and service offerings of the leading firms
  • Data germane to each company's revenue, gross margins, sales, price, and market share
  • Insightful data for industry newcomers
  • Expert guidance on expanding business
  • Conclusive data on marketing methods, market concentration ratio, and other critical business-related facets

Following are the List of Chapter Covered in the report:

  • Global Disclosure Management Market Overview
  • Global Disclosure Management Market Economic Impact on Industry
  • Global Disclosure Management Market Competition by Manufacturers
  • Market Analysis by Application
  • Marketing Strategy Analysis, Distributors/Traders
  • Market Effect Factors Analysis
  • Global Disclosure Management Market Forecast

For More Details on this report:

About Us:

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If you are looking for research reports on global or regional markets, competitive information, emerging markets, and trends or just looking to stay on top of the curve then Market Study Report. is the platform that can help you in achieving any of these objectives.

MENAFN03082022004660010643ID1104639093


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