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Exam Code: EX0-112 Practice exam 2022 by Killexams.com team
Business Information Management Foundation (BIMF)
Exin Information health
Killexams : Exin Information health - BingNews https://killexams.com/pass4sure/exam-detail/EX0-112 Search results Killexams : Exin Information health - BingNews https://killexams.com/pass4sure/exam-detail/EX0-112 https://killexams.com/exam_list/Exin Killexams : Hawaii Health Information Exchange expands electronic resources for health care providers No result found, try new keyword!The new educational video series will help Medicaid providers integrate information sharing into their health care practices. Thu, 04 Aug 2022 11:30:00 -0500 text/html https://www.bizjournals.com/pacific/news/2022/08/04/hawaii-health-information-exchange-expands-service.html Killexams : NOAA, Federal Partners Create Heat Health Data Portal; Gina McCarthy Quoted

The National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration collaborated with 10 other federal agencies to build a website that contains science-based information on the health risks of extreme heat as part of a government effort to raise awareness among the public and decision-makers.

Heat.gov, which is hosted on a cloud-based Esri geospatial platform, is among the priority projects of President Biden’s National Climate Task Force and its Interagency Working Group on Extreme Heat, NOAA said Tuesday.

The site offers the public access to a collection of tools such as the Heat and Health Tracker from the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention and the Heat Safety Tool from the Occupational Safety and Health Administration and the National Institute for Occupational Safety and Health.

“Heat.gov is an exciting new and accessible website designed to help everyone become engaged with their community, their state-level government, and federal partners, to take actions that can reduce the deadly health impacts of extreme heat,” National Climate Adviser Gina McCarthy said.

NOAA said extreme heat is the top weather-related cause of death in the U.S., killing more people than hurricanes, flooding, tornadoes or extreme cold.

Wed, 27 Jul 2022 08:56:00 -0500 Naomi Cooper en-US text/html https://executivegov.com/2022/07/biden-admin-announces-new-heat-health-information-website/
Killexams : WHO declares monkeypox a public health emergency of international concern

The decision was announced Saturday morning after WHO convened its second emergency committee on the issue on Thursday.

"I have decided that the global monkeypox outbreak represents a public health emergency of international concern," WHO Director-General Tedros Adhanom Ghebreyesus announced on Saturday morning.

Tedros said while the committee was unable to reach a consensus, he came to the decision after considering the five elements required on deciding whether an outbreak constitutes a public health emergency of international concern.

He added that while he was declaring monkeypox a public health emergency of international concern, "For the moment this is an outbreak that's concentrated among men who have sex with men, especially those who have multiple partners, that means that this is an outbreak that can be stopped with the right strategies in the right right groups."

WHO initially stopped short of declaring the monkeypox outbreak a public health emergency of international concern after its first emergency committee meeting on June 23. At the time, Tedros said the emergency committee advised that at the moment, "the event does not constitute a Public Health Emergency of International Concern" but acknowledged the "evolving health threat" that WHO would be following extremely closely.

WHO defines a public health emergency of international concern, or PHEIC, as "an extraordinary event" that constitutes a "public health risk to other States through the international spread of disease" and "to potentially require a coordinated international response."

The organization's emergency committee on monkeypox first met in late June, when its members reported serious concerns about the scale and speed of the virus outbreak but said it didn't constitute a PHEIC. Tedros reconvened the committee in order to provide the latest information, he has said.

The PHEIC designation comes from the International Health Regulations created in 2005, and it represents an international agreement to help the prevent and respond to public health risks that have the potential to spread around the globe.

The US Centers for Disease Control and Prevention describes the regulations as "a legally binding agreement of 196 countries to build the capability to detect and report potential public health emergencies worldwide. IHR require that all countries have the ability to detect, assess, report, and respond to public health events."

There are two ongoing public health emergencies: polio, which began in 2014, and Covid-19, starting in 2020.

Four other PHEICs have been declared since the regulations were put into place: H1N1 influenza from 2009 to 2010; Ebola from 2014 to 2016 and from 2019 to 2020; and the Zika virus in 2016.

Currently, the US is reporting over 2,800 probable or confirmed monkeypox cases in 44 states, DC and Puerto Rico, according to data from the US Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. Globally, there are over 16,500 cases reported in 74 countries.

Monkeypox is a much less severe cousin of the now-eradicated smallpox virus. It is endemic to parts of West and Central Africa and is usually contracted from a rodent or small mammal.

The monkeypox virus can spread through contact with body fluids, sores or items such as clothing and bedding contaminated with the virus. It can also spread from person to person through respiratory droplets, typically in a close setting, according to the CDC.

Anyone who has had contact with someone with a monkeypox-like rash, or who has had contact with someone who has a probable or confirmed case of monkeypox, is at high risk for infection. A large number of cases this year have been in men who have sex with men, and public health officials are focusing their prevention efforts in this group.

Fri, 22 Jul 2022 22:57:00 -0500 text/html https://www.cnn.com/2022/07/23/health/monkeypox-who-intl/index.html
Killexams : Monkeypox Declared Public Health Emergency by Biden Administration

Men waiting in line for a monkeypox vaccine.

As case counts increase and criticism grows over the administration’s handling of the monkeypox outbreak, the Biden administration on Thursday declared it a public health emergency.

The designation signals that the disease now poses a significant threat to Americans, and the government is increasing its implementation of measures to contain it.

More than a week after the World Health Organization declared a global health emergency over the MPV outbreak, the U.S. federal government has been authorized to use funds to develop and evaluate vaccines, obtain emergency funding, and hire additional workers to fight it.

“We’re prepared to take our response to the next level in addressing this virus, and we urge every American to take monkeypox seriously,” Health and Human Services Secretary Xavier Becerra said in announcing the declaration during a call with reporters Thursday afternoon.

President Joe Biden and Becerra have been under intense pressure from activists and public health experts to move more aggressively to combat the outbreak.

Earlier this week, Biden named Dr. Demetre Daskalakis, a veteran emergency response official and a respected infectious disease specialist who has overseen HIV/AIDS prevention efforts by the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, to help coordinate the MPV response from the White House — a sign that the administration is stepping up its efforts. Biden selected FEMA's Robert Fenton as coordinator and Daskalakis as deputy coordinator.

The CDC reports that there have been more than 6,600 confirmed MPV cases in the U.S.

Supplies of the monkeypox vaccine, called Jynneos, have been severely constrained, and the administration has been criticized for moving too slowly to expand the number of doses. Declaring the emergency would not ease that shortage, but the administration may take steps to allow quicker access to tecovirimat, the drug recommended for treating the disease.

Additionally, the Food and Drug Administration Commissioner Robert Califf announced Thursday that the agency was considering allowing Bavarian Nordic’s Jynneos, the only monkeypox vaccine licensed in the U.S., to be administered subcutaneously in two doses one-fifth the size of its licensed dose. Currently, the vaccine is licensed as a two-dose product, given 28 days apart by intramuscular injection.

As a result, five times more people could be vaccinated with existing supplies than with the licensed dosage, making a single-dose vial available for five uses.

“We believe this could be a promising approach,” Califf said.

In general, federal agencies like the CDC cannot compel states to share data on vaccinations or cases of the disease. However, declaring an emergency allows them more access to health care providers and state information.

Daskalakis said that the administration is reaching out to community-based organizations that don’t serve only major cities to reach people at risk for MPV infection.

He said that through “having engagement, especially in the LGBTQ space with LGBTQ centers, many of which serve rural areas,” the administration seeks to provide MPV outreach to members of at-risk communities wherever they are.

The majority of MPV cases have been among men who have sex with men, according to the WHO. However, anyone can catch the virus.

In the age of social media targeting messages on those platforms has been shown to penetrate and get notifications through to rural communities, Daskalakis added.

CDC director Dr. Rochelle Walensky added that communication with LGBTQ+ stakeholders has been crucial.

“Our partners in the LGBTQ community...have just been essential to get the message out,” she said.

Becerra addressed the concerns of people who live in rural America and are also thinking about MPV.

“We have, from the beginning, made sure that we have kept in mind all communities, including communities that may not be in the most densely populated portions of the country or aren't reporting as high a number of cases,” Becerra said concerning the administration’s actions beyond major cities.

“We try to make sure we get to those areas of the country where there are high numbers of cases, but we don’t want to leave people out. And so we have made sure that we have allocated vaccines throughout the country through all jurisdictions,” Becerra added.

 For more information on monkeypox, please visit the CDC's website here. 

Thu, 04 Aug 2022 06:23:00 -0500 en-US text/html https://finance.yahoo.com/news/monkeypox-declared-public-health-emergency-182334039.html
Killexams : World Health Organization declares monkeypox a global emergency

LONDON (AP) — The World Health Organization said the expanding monkeypox outbreak in more than 70 countries is an “extraordinary” situation that now qualifies as a global emergency, a declaration Saturday that could spur further investment in treating the once-rare disease and worsen the scramble for scarce vaccines.

Although monkeypox has been established in parts of central and west Africa for decades, it was not known to spark large outbreaks beyond the continent or to spread widely among people until May, when authorities detected dozens of epidemics in Europe, North America and elsewhere.

Declaring a global emergency means the monkeypox outbreak is an “extraordinary event” that could spill over into more countries and requires a coordinated global response. WHO previously declared emergencies for public health crises such as the COVID-19 pandemic, the 2014 West African Ebola outbreak, the Zika virus in Latin America in 2016 and the ongoing effort to eradicate polio.

The emergency declaration mostly serves as a plea to draw more global resources and attention to an outbreak. Past announcements had mixed impact, given that the U.N. health agency is largely powerless in getting countries to act.

Last month, WHO’s expert committee said the worldwide monkeypox outbreak did not yet amount to an international emergency, but the panel convened this week to reevaluate the situation.

According to the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, more than 16,000 cases of monkeypox have been reported in 74 countries since about May. To date, monkeypox deaths have only been reported in Africa, where a more dangerous version of the virus is spreading, mainly in Nigeria and Congo.

In Africa, monkeypox mainly spreads to people from infected wild animals like rodents, in limited outbreaks that typically have not crossed borders. In Europe, North America and elsewhere, however, monkeypox is spreading among people with no links to animals or recent travel to Africa.

WHO’s top monkeypox expert, Dr. Rosamund Lewis, said this week that 99% of all the monkeypox cases beyond Africa were in men and that of those, 98% involved men who have sex with men. Experts suspect the monkeypox outbreaks in Europe and North America were spread via sex at two raves in Belgium and Spain.

Michael Head, a senior research fellow in global health at Southampton University, said it was surprising WHO hadn’t already declared monkeypox a global emergency, explaining that the conditions were arguably met weeks ago.

Some experts have questioned whether such a declaration would help, arguing the disease isn’t severe enough to warrant the attention and that rich countries battling monkeypox already have the funds to do so; most people recover without needing medical attention, although the lesions may be painful.

“I think it would be better to be proactive and overreact to the problem instead of waiting to react when it’s too late,” Head said. He added that WHO’s emergency declaration could help donors like the World Bank make funds available to stop the outbreaks both in the West and in Africa, where animals are the likely natural reservoir of monkeypox.

In the U.S., some experts have speculated whether monkeypox might be on the verge of becoming an entrenched sexually transmitted disease in the country, like gonorrhea, herpes and HIV.

“The bottom line is we’ve seen a shift in the epidemiology of monkeypox where there’s now widespread, unexpected transmission,” said Dr. Albert Ko, a professor of public health and epidemiology at Yale University. “There are some genetic mutations in the virus that suggest why that may be happening, but we do need a globally-coordinated response to get it under control,” he said.

Ko called for testing to be immediately scaled up rapidly, saying that similar to the early days of COVID-19, that there were significant gaps in surveillance.

“The cases we are seeing are just the tip of the iceberg,” he said. “The window has probably closed for us to quickly stop the outbreaks in Europe and the U.S., but it’s not too late to stop monkeypox from causing huge damage to poorer countries without the resources to handle it.”

In the U.S., some experts have speculated that monkeypox might become entrenched there as the latest sexually transmitted disease, with officials estimating that 1.5 million men are at high risk of being infected.

Dr. Placide Mbala, a virologist who directs the global health department at Congo’s Institute of National Biomedical Research, said he hoped any global efforts to stop monkeypox would be equitable. Although countries including Britain, Canada, Germany and the U.S. have ordered millions of vaccine doses, none have gone to Africa.

“The solution needs to be global,” Mbala said, adding that any vaccines sent to Africa would be used to target those at highest risk, like hunters in rural areas.

“Vaccination in the West might help stop the outbreak there, but there will still be cases in Africa,” he said. “Unless the problem is solved here, the risk to the rest of the world will remain.”

Sat, 23 Jul 2022 02:23:00 -0500 en-US text/html https://kdvr.com/news/nationalworld-news/world-health-organization-declares-monkeypox-a-global-emergency/
Killexams : Eisenhower Health’s Chief Medical Officer answers questions about monkeypox BE PART OF THE CONVERSATION

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Tue, 02 Aug 2022 16:29:00 -0500 By Jesus Reyes en-US text/html https://kesq.com/news/cv-questions-answered/2022/08/02/eisenhower-healths-chief-medical-officer-answers-questions-about-monkeypox/
Killexams : ELLM Alumni Association Management Committee

Michelle Montero Lemoine, Chair (Class 2019)
Michelle is an experienced lawyer in financing operations, capital markets, investment funds, derivative instruments and alternative investments. She has completed Level 1 of the international certification for alternative investments analyst, Chartered Alternative Investment Analyst (CAIA), and holds an Executive LL.M of London School of Economics and Political Science (LSE). She is currently senior structuring professional in the London office of a Swiss private markets asset manager. Before, she was senior associate in Lazo & De Romaña Abogados (2017-2019) and legal advisor of the investment process in several private pension funds in Peru (2012-2017). She was also co-director of the diversity committee of the American Chamber of Commerce in Peru and member of the mentoring committee of Women in the Profession (WIP).

Josh Newton, Vice Chair (Class 2021)
Josh is a lawyer and partner at Best & Krieger LLP in Bend, Oregon, United States. Josh’s practice concentrates on complex dispute resolution with an emphasis on natural resource and environmental disputes and indigenous rights. He focuses on issues affecting the lands, waters, and culture of the western United States. Josh received his LLM degree from London School of Economics and Political Science in 2021.

Omar Salem, General Secretary (Class 2021)
Omar Salem is a Managing Associate at Linklaters specialising in financial regulation and public advocacy. He provides advice on complex regulatory matters, transactions and investigations, as well as on legal aspects of reputation management. His clients include banks, brokers, asset managers, private equity houses, payment service providers, funds, trading and clearing platforms, mortgage lenders and consumer credit providers. Prior to his legal career, Omar worked at the Young Foundation, where he carried out research on responding to the financial crisis and co-founded the UpRising Leadership Programme, which works to develop young leaders from diverse backgrounds. Omar also worked in Parliament as senior researcher to Emily Thornberry MP, who is currently the Shadow Secretary of State for Trade. Omar has an LLB from the University of Law and a BA (Hons) in Philosophy, Politics and Economics from St. Hugh’s College, University of Oxford. Omar tweets at @FinRegLawyer and his LinkedIn profile is here.

Carmen Martorano, Membership Secretary (Class 2021)
Carmen is an Italian qualified lawyer admitted to the Italian Bar in 2016, a Registered European Lawyer in England and Wales since 2018 and a Registered Foreign Lawyer since 2021. She is experienced in commercial and regulatory laws related to Life Sciences industries (among others, pharmaceutical, medical devices, cosmetics, chemicals, food& beverage laws and regulations, e-health). Before moving into the Life sciences industry, she has worked for lending companies as CEO, member of the board and legal counsel  and for investment funds as legal counsel. On 2018, she attended courses in Private Equity and Project Finance at London Business School. She held lectures at Luiss Guido Carly University and published articles related to the digital innovation and regulations. 

Committee Members

Patricia Brister, Committee Member (Class 2020)
Trish Brister has been a member of the Canadian Bar Association and the Law Society of Alberta since 1988, practicing in the areas of construction, services, energy, general corporate/commercial and commercial real estate law.  She has done a significant amount of transactional work in acquisitions and divestitures in addition to training a broad range of front line workers, directors and executives in contract risk management.  Her past work experience includes private practice in a multi-national law firm as well as acting as in-house counsel for multi-national energy and construction companies.
    Trish is a Graduate of the London School of Economics (LL.M 2020), the University of Victoria (LL.B  1987) and McGill University (B.Comm 1983 with Distinction) and holds certifications from the Institute of Corporate Directors (ICD.D 2018) and the Family Enterprise Exchange (FEA 2018).
    Trish is active in the not-for-profit sector, having held board positions recently while working on governance and risk management committees.  She is currently involved in mental health research focused on entrepreneurs.

Olga Bezhentseva, Committee Member (Class 2022 – expected)

Verônica Barros, Committee Member (Class 2020)
Verônica is an attorney with an LL.M in Regulating Innovation, Communication and Technology from the London School of Economics and Political Science (LSE), and has completed an Executive Program in Digital Law at INSPER/SP.  After some years working as city attorney and as a lawyer at the Brazilian Bank for Economic and Social Development (BNDES), she came back to the private sector to work with consultancy in the areas of digital and personal data protection law, public policies and information security. She holds an EXIN certification in data protection, and is a sitting member of the Science, Technology, and Innovation Commission and of Privacy and Data Protection Commission, both of the Brazilian Bar Association - São Paulo Chapter (OAB/SP).

Advisory Members

Dimos Adamos

Pietro Del Bufalo, General Secretary (Class 2019)
Pietro is an Italian qualified lawyer, admitted to the bar of Rome in 2005. He has worked for the Italian association of fund managers (Assogestioni) from 2001 to 2005 and for the law firm Lovells (now Hogan Lovells) from 2005 to 2010. His professional practice focused on financial regulation and compliance matters, specifically for investment and pension funds, and asset managers. In 2010 he moved to the Principality of Monaco to work as legal counsel for a single family office.

Pinar Basdan Cetinel (Class 2017) 
Pınar is a qualified lawyer in Turkey and currently the Chief Legal Officer at one of the country's investment banks, Nurolbank. Prior to Nurolbank, Pınar worked as partner in one of the leading law firms active in banking & finance and corporate matters. She is a graduate of Master of Laws from the LSE, 2017 and she holds a Bachelor of Laws from Galatasaray University, 2005. Pınar's broad legal practice includes corporate law, contract law, banking law and capital markets matters.  She has been involved in highlight structured finance transactions (including first local covered-bonds and asset-guaranteed bonds programs in Turkey in 2011). Pınar's past work experience also includes foreign associate role at Mayer Brown LLP, in 2008. She is a member of Istanbul Bar and she volunteers for Spina Bifida Association in Turkey and animal rights.  

Dr Marizah Minhat (Class 2018) 
Marizah is an Associate Professor in Finance and Economics at the University of Bradford, UK. She graduated with LL.M (Financial Law and Regulation) from the LSE. She holds an MSc in Banking and Finance and a PhD from the University of Stirling, and a Bachelor of Commerce (Honours) from Lincoln University, New Zealand. As a professionally qualified accountant, she is a Fellow of Association of Chartered Certified Accountants (ACCA), member of Malaysian Institute of Accountants (MIA), Chartered Accountants Australia & New Zealand (CA ANZ), and Institute of Chartered Accountants in England and Wales (ICAEW). She is also a committee member of ICAEW Scotland and Tech Sub-Group Lead. Marizah has served in various roles within higher education institutions in the UK with stints in Hong Kong and Singapore. Prior to her academic career, she gained corporate experience in energy industry during her years with a Malaysia’s publicly listed government-linked company, as well as a stint in retail financial industry. She has published in Finance, Economics and Human Rights journals, and wider media. 

Giuseppe Pinelli 

Sat, 03 Mar 2018 06:25:00 -0600 en-GB text/html https://www.lse.ac.uk/law/study/ellm/ellm-alumni-association
Killexams : HHS Still Mulling Whether Monkeypox Is a Public Health Emergency

WASHINGTON -- HHS is not yet declaring the monkeypox outbreak in the U.S. to be a public health emergency, but they are taking more steps to fight it, including increasing vaccine stockpiles and making more monkeypox tests available.

"We continue to monitor the response throughout the country on monkeypox," HHS Secretary Xavier Becerra said Thursday morning on a call with reporters. "And we will weigh any decision on declaring a public health emergency based on the response received throughout the country. The bottom line is, we need to be able to stay ahead of this and end this outbreak."

When pressed further, he added, "You can't end it if you're falling behind. That's why we have procured more than a million vaccines already, even though there have only been less than 5,000 cases," and why the administration also has made many more tests available than are currently being used, he said.

Becerra also announced that the administration is making available an additional 786,000 doses of the Bavarian Nordic monkeypox vaccine, adding to the 338,000 doses already distributed. Dawn O'Connell, JD, administrator for strategic preparedness and response at HHS, noted that the agency will open ordering for additional vaccines on Friday, and will switch over to a more centralized ordering system starting on Monday.

"At the start of the outbreak, HHS had purchased an additional 5.5 million doses of the JYNNEOS vaccine on top of the over 1 million we already [had]," she said. "We are continuing to work with our provider to identify opportunities to further expand and accelerate availability of this critical vaccine. When including doses already distributed, the federal government will have secured more than 6.9 million vaccine doses by the end of 2023."

In addition to the more than 1 million doses already distributed, "we also have 15.1 million doses in bulk drug substances that our manufacturers are holding in storage for us," O'Connell said. "We intended that to be [part of] our program for smallpox preparedness, but we have immediately begun putting all of those doses ... into our monkeypox response."

"Right now, we have ordered 5.5 million doses to be fill-finished over the course of the next several months," she continued. Along with the more than 1 million doses already distributed, "that equals that 6.9 million total that I mentioned, but that also leaves 11.1 million doses we could fill-finish pending additional funding." Any doses not used for monkeypox response will be put toward the smallpox preparedness program, "so we will use all the vaccines one way or the other," O'Connell added.

Capt. Jennifer McQuiston, DVM, MS, deputy director of the High Consequence Pathogens and Pathology division at the CDC, gave the latest case numbers: as of July 27, about 20,000 cases of monkeypox had been reported globally, including more than 4,600 cases in the U.S. spread across 48 states and territories. The median age of the U.S. cases is 35, with an age range of 17 to 76, not counting the two cases reported in children, McQuiston said. Nearly all of the cases were in patients assigned male gender at birth, and the vast majority were men who have sex with men. In terms of racial/ethnic characteristics, 37% of patients were white, 31% were Hispanic/Latino, 27% were Black, and 4% were Asian.

The four most common symptoms reported were rash (reported in 99% of cases), malaise, fever, and swollen lymph nodes; chills and muscle pain were also reported, she said. "The CDC strongly encourages all providers to be on high alert for patients presenting with monkeypox symptoms, and to test any patients where monkeypox is suspected."

The Biden administration is also working to educate providers about the illness. "Just a couple of days ago, the CDC held a call with some 10,000 clinicians to provide them whatever information they needed and answer any questions they had," said Becerra. In addition, "every week, CDC holds a call with relevant jurisdictions and healthcare officials with state and local governments, and on a daily basis, CDC is in touch with clinicians, officials, and community members ... that might be impacted as well."

As for the funding for dealing with monkeypox, Becerra said his agency has "communicated to Congress what we're looking for in terms of resources and authorities to be able to move forward, to stay ahead of monkeypox and end this outbreak ... We will continue to provide whatever information and technical assistance they request of us."

  • Joyce Frieden oversees MedPage Today’s Washington coverage, including stories about Congress, the White House, the Supreme Court, healthcare trade associations, and federal agencies. She has 35 years of experience covering health policy. Follow

Thu, 28 Jul 2022 07:04:00 -0500 en text/html https://www.medpagetoday.com/infectiousdisease/generalinfectiousdisease/99952
Killexams : UN health agency declares monkeypox a global emergency
<p>FILE - This 1997 image provided by the CDC during an investigation into an outbreak of monkeypox, which took place in the Democratic Republic of the Congo (DRC), formerly Zaire, and depicts the dorsal surfaces of the hands of a monkeypox case patient, who was displaying the appearance of the characteristic rash during its recuperative stage. </p>

CDC via AP, File

FILE - This 1997 image provided by the CDC during an investigation into an outbreak of monkeypox, which took place in the Democratic Republic of the Congo (DRC), formerly Zaire, and depicts the dorsal surfaces of the hands of a monkeypox case patient, who was displaying the appearance of the characteristic rash during its recuperative stage. 

LONDON (AP) — The World Health Organization said the expanding monkeypox outbreak in more than 70 countries is an “extraordinary” situation that now qualifies as a global emergency, a declaration Saturday that could spur further investment in treating the once-rare disease and worsen the scramble for scarce vaccines.

Although monkeypox has been established in parts of central and west Africa for decades, it was not known to spark large outbreaks beyond the continent or to spread widely among people until May, when authorities detected dozens of epidemics in Europe, North America and elsewhere.

Declaring a global emergency means the monkeypox outbreak is an “extraordinary event” that could spill over into more countries and requires a coordinated global response. WHO previously declared emergencies for public health crises such as the COVID-19 pandemic, the 2014 West African Ebola outbreak, the Zika virus in Latin America in 2016 and the ongoing effort to eradicate polio.

The emergency declaration mostly serves as a plea to draw more global resources and attention to an outbreak. Past announcements had mixed impact, given that the U.N. health agency is largely powerless in getting countries to act.

Last month, WHO’s expert committee said the worldwide monkeypox outbreak did not yet amount to an international emergency, but the panel convened this week to reevaluate the situation.

According to the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, more than 16,000 cases of monkeypox have been reported in 74 countries since about May. To date, monkeypox deaths have only been reported in Africa, where a more dangerous version of the virus is spreading, mainly in Nigeria and Congo.

In Africa, monkeypox mainly spreads to people from infected wild animals like rodents, in limited outbreaks that typically have not crossed borders. In Europe, North America and elsewhere, however, monkeypox is spreading among people with no links to animals or recent travel to Africa.

WHO’s top monkeypox expert, Dr. Rosamund Lewis, said this week that 99% of all the monkeypox cases beyond Africa were in men and that of those, 98% involved men who have sex with men. Experts suspect the monkeypox outbreaks in Europe and North America were spread via sex at two raves in Belgium and Spain.


THE MONKEYPOX EMERGENCY


Michael Head, a senior research fellow in global health at Southampton University, said it was surprising WHO hadn’t already declared monkeypox a global emergency, explaining that the conditions were arguably met weeks ago.

Some experts have questioned whether such a declaration would help, arguing the disease isn’t severe enough to warrant the attention and that rich countries battling monkeypox already have the funds to do so; most people recover without needing medical attention, although the lesions may be painful.

“I think it would be better to be proactive and overreact to the problem instead of waiting to react when it’s too late,” Head said. He added that WHO’s emergency declaration could help donors like the World Bank make funds available to stop the outbreaks both in the West and in Africa, where animals are the likely natural reservoir of monkeypox.

In the U.S., some experts have speculated whether monkeypox might be on the verge of becoming an entrenched sexually transmitted disease in the country, like gonorrhea, herpes and HIV.

“The bottom line is we’ve seen a shift in the epidemiology of monkeypox where there’s now widespread, unexpected transmission,” said Dr. Albert Ko, a professor of public health and epidemiology at Yale University. “There are some genetic mutations in the virus that suggest why that may be happening, but we do need a globally-coordinated response to get it under control,” he said.

Ko called for testing to be immediately scaled up rapidly, saying that similar to the early days of COVID-19, that there were significant gaps in surveillance.

“The cases we are seeing are just the tip of the iceberg,” he said. “The window has probably closed for us to quickly stop the outbreaks in Europe and the U.S., but it’s not too late to stop monkeypox from causing huge damage to poorer countries without the resources to handle it.”

In the U.S., some experts have speculated that monkeypox might become entrenched there as the latest sexually transmitted disease, with officials estimating that 1.5 million men are at high risk of being infected.

Dr. Placide Mbala, a virologist who directs the global health department at Congo’s Institute of National Biomedical Research, said he hoped any global efforts to stop monkeypox would be equitable. Although countries including Britain, Canada, Germany and the U.S. have ordered millions of vaccine doses, none have gone to Africa.

“The solution needs to be global,” Mbala said, adding that any vaccines sent to Africa would be used to target those at highest risk, like hunters in rural areas.

“Vaccination in the West might help stop the outbreak there, but there will still be cases in Africa,” he said. “Unless the problem is solved here, the risk to the rest of the world will remain.”

Tue, 26 Jul 2022 10:20:00 -0500 en-US text/html https://www.yaktrinews.com/i/un-health-agency-declares-monkeypox-a-global-emergency/
Killexams : Mymee Acquires Breakthrough Health, Leading Digital Health Platform for Multiple Sclerosis

Acquisition Includes #1 Ranked MS App in Google and Apple App Stores, Emilyn

NEW YORK, July 27, 2022 /PRNewswire/ -- Mymee, a leading provider of specialized care and support for people with significant symptoms associated with autoimmune disease and long COVID, has acquired Berlin-based Breakthrough Health, the creator of the #1 mobile app Emilyn for people with multiple sclerosis (MS). With the acquisition, Mymee gains deeper expertise in the unique needs of MS patients and brings on Breakthrough Health’s experienced leadership to help scale Mymee’s personalized health platform and research.

MS affects an estimated 2.8 million people worldwide, with women four times more likely than men to develop the disease. In the US alone, MS and rheumatological autoimmune diseases like lupus, Sjögren’s syndrome and rheumatoid arthritis are estimated to affect 10 million people, with women suffering at a rate of between 9 to 1 and 3 to 1. Separately, the American Academy of Physical Medicine estimates that over 25 million people in the US may now have long COVID.

Mymee is dedicated to changing the future of precision research and care for complex autoimmune diseases. For the past decade, the company has invested in ′ n-of-1 ′ clinical research, focusing on individual case studies, to develop a personalized support program for people who struggle with persistent, unpredictable symptoms, including fatigue, brain fog and pain. Mymee enrolled its first patients with long COVID in July 2020 and became a preferred partner to Mount Sinai Hospital’s Post COVID Care Clinic. In June 2022, Mymee received the Platinum Award for most innovative Precision Medicine solution from Juniper Research.

Mymee leverages self-evidence, or patient-reported data, to help people identify personal disease triggers, reduce symptoms and Boost overall quality of life. Through its research, Mymee has uncovered 95 triggers correlated to more than 150 patient-reported symptoms in complex cases of autoimmune diseases such as lupus, RA, MS, Sjögren’s, mixed autoimmune diagnosis and long COVID. In these cases, patients experienced debilitating symptoms despite immunosuppressants, personal nutritionists or functional medicine.

“Helping those with highly variable autoimmune diseases involves both disease-specific experience and a personalized ‘n-of-1’ approach that accounts for the detailed nuances of each person’s case,” said Mymee founder Mette Dyhrberg. “The addition of Breakthrough Health’s innovation and mission-driven product, technology and growth leadership empowers us to scale and continuously Boost our personalization capabilities and strengthens our support for individuals living with MS as well as those with long COVID who share some symptoms associated with neurological autoimmune diseases.”

Breakthrough Health’s founding team, Bazil Azmil, Stefano Palazzo and Rachel Reichel, will join the Mymee leadership team as Head of Growth, CTO and VP of Product, respectively, effective immediately. In 2021, Breakthrough Health won the MS Challenge from EIT Health for most innovative MS startup and partner for MS patient support. Prior to founding Breakthrough Health, the team held key positions at ResearchGate, the world’s largest professional network for scientists and researchers during years of high growth.

“What we have found in supporting Emilyn’s MS community over the past four years was that most members were managing significant symptoms between neurologist visits but were without the power to predict or prevent them,” said Bazil Azmil, co-founder and former CEO at Breakthrough Health. “Our determination to find a solution led us to Mymee with their rigorous systems-based approach to connecting the dots between autoimmune symptoms and triggers and their focus on addressing the ‘n-of-1.’”

About Mymee

Mymee is a leader in precision care and nutrition for individuals still struggling with significant, unpredictable symptoms associated with long COVID and autoimmune diseases like multiple sclerosis, lupus, Sjögren’s syndrome and rheumatoid arthritis.

Scientific publications indicate that any number of environmental triggers may worsen autoimmune symptoms. Unlike Celiac disease, where the known trigger is gluten, diseases like MS, lupus, Sjögren’s syndrome, RA and long COVID have multiple triggers that vary by individual. What is healthy for one person could harm another.

Mymee makes it possible for individuals to identify specific trigger-symptom correlations that are unique to their case so they can predict, lower and manage symptoms. Mymee combines technology, research and highly specialized long COVID and autoimmune disease coaches to guide health improvements backed by data and aligned to individual needs and preferences. Mymee’s ‘n-of-1’ research matched over 150 unique symptoms to over 90 unique triggers and clinically tested over 50 types of interventions. Mymee also offers support through Emilyn, the #1 ranked app for individuals suffering from MS.

In 2022, Mymee joined NYCHBL’s Digital Health 100 as a women’s health company to watch and one of the most innovative health startups in New York. Mymee received the Platinum Award in the category of Precision Medicine from Juniper Research. Additionally, Mymee was nominated for the 2021 Annual Galien Foundation Awards and received an honorable mention in Fast Company’s World Changing Ideas Awards.

For more information or to learn more about Mymee’s clinical validation visit www.mymee.com

CONTACT: Ashley Beenen, 231.878.0888, ashley@stanton-company.com

View original content: https://www.prnewswire.com/news-releases/mymee-acquires-breakthrough-health-leading-digital-health-platform-for-multiple-sclerosis-301593842.html

SOURCE Mymee

Wed, 27 Jul 2022 01:39:00 -0500 en text/html https://apnews.com/press-release/pr-newswire/technology-health-multiple-sclerosis-98af9ed0a4b435d9821eb8d90864bbf7
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