Download 9L0-623 examcollection with 9L0-623 VCE

killexams.com exam prep cram serves all of you that you have to pass 9L0-623 exam. That includes 9L0-623 examcollection that you can easily make your study guide and VCE exam simulator that you will use to practice and memorize the 9L0-623 cram. Our Apple 9L0-623 free pdf questions that are precisely same as actual exam.

Exam Code: 9L0-623 Practice test 2022 by Killexams.com team
Mac OS X Deployment 10.6
Apple Deployment Free PDF
Killexams : Apple Deployment Free PDF - BingNews https://killexams.com/pass4sure/exam-detail/9L0-623 Search results Killexams : Apple Deployment Free PDF - BingNews https://killexams.com/pass4sure/exam-detail/9L0-623 https://killexams.com/exam_list/Apple Killexams : The Impact of Apple's HEVC Adoption: A Survey-Based Report

Sponsored By: Harmonic

Early 2018 is a particularly dynamic time for codec development and deployment, and many streaming publishers are wondering whether to stand pat with H.264 or to start to experiment with VP9, HEVC, or even AV1. When Apple added HEVC to HLS in mid-2017, HEVC seemed like the frontrunner. Then, in January 2018, Apple joined the Alliance for Open Media, seemingly backing the AV1 codec, which is scheduled to be released in early 2018.

Which codecs will advance in 2018 and beyond, and which will fall by the wayside? To a great degree, this depends upon which codecs are deployed by streaming producers and when. A new report from Unisphere Research and Streaming Media magazine, and sponsored by Harmonic, reveals these intentions.

The new report, entitled The Impact of Apple’s HEVC Adoption: A Survey-Based Report, asks how quickly the over 600 respondents anticipate supporting HEVC in HLS, as well as their plans for VP9 and AV1. It also delves into the concerns each publisher has about each format, such as unknown royalty costs (HEVC) or uncertain performance parameters (AV1). Anyone seeking a snapshot of how codec deployments will play out over the next 12-18 months should download this free report.

Tue, 08 Sep 2020 22:05:00 -0500 text/html https://www.streamingmedia.com/Research/7694-The-Impact-of-Apples-HEVC-Adoption-A-Survey-Based-Report.htm
Killexams : Best Mac VPN for 2022

While Apple devices are known for their robust security, Mac users should still consider a virtual private network a key tool to protecting their browsing privacy. Why? Because MacOS can't stop your internet service provider from tracking your browsing habits. Nor can it prevent your information from being compromised by sites that collect your IP address. That's where our guide to the best Mac VPN comes in.

When determining the best Mac VPN for our readers, we evaluate a number of things that are specific to being a Mac user: First, while not every Mac device is faster than a PC and Windows product, we want to see a VPN service with a connection speed that complements MacOS machines' rapid reputation. Further, if you've been using MacOS, you're used to a clean, intuitive user interface with a minimal learning curve and a well-organized set of digital tools -- that's why a VPN's usability weighs into our consideration. 

We also know that for many MacOS users, a broad resistance to app-borne viruses and malware is a major reason for choosing that ecosystem over Windows devices. To that end, we scrutinize a VPN's anti-tracker capacity and its general compatibility with Apple's progressively heightened privacy policies. 

Drawn from our directory of the best VPN services, these are our top recommendations for the best Mac VPN. Keep checking back here often since we regularly update this list as new VPN contenders emerge for the top spot.

ExpressVPN

Despite battling major upheavals through the end of 2021, ExpressVPN clenched our Editor's Choice Award for best VPN in 2022. One of the two largest providers globally, the VPN titan has been in business since 2009 and once again aggressively raised the industry bar for service transparency this year. 

In the past year, ExpressVPN increased its independent third-party audit count, published details about its TrustedServer deployment process, joined the i2Coalition to call for improved VPN industry ethics, and released an open source Lightway encryption protocol.

After a set-back in 2020, ExpressVPN is again currently in first place as the fastest VPN we've tested. While most VPNs will cause you to lose half or more of your normal internet speeds, ExpressVPN caused us to lose just 2% of speeds in our 2022 speed tests. It also unblocks Netflix and other streaming services more reliably than most other VPNs, and seamlessly surpasses geo-blocking for access to international gaming servers and torrenting sites. 

All of our top-rated VPN's have wide compatibility across platforms and operating systems, but ExpressVPN's collection of setup guides, detailed FAQs and troubleshooting articles provide it a clear advantage for users. So does its 24/7 customer support, and its no-questions-asked, 30-day money back guarantee.  

While you can get a better month-to-dollar bargain with ExpressVPN's two-year subscription, we don't recommend anyone purchase any two-year VPN subscriptions at this time due to overall market volatility. ExpressVPN's best plan offers five simultaneous connections for $80 a year (which includes three extra months, for a limited-time deal totalling 15 months of service). You can also opt for a $13 per-month plan, or pay $60 for six months. Read our ExpressVPN review.

Read our ExpressVPN review.

Surfshark
  • Number of servers: 3,200-plus
  • Number of VPN server locations: 65
  • Country/jurisdiction: British Virgin Islands
  • $4 a month (69% discount) for the yearly plan

While Surfshark's network is smaller than some, the VPN service makes up for it in features. And by currently achieving the fastest speeds in our most accurate VPN tests. Surfshark and NordVPN announced a merger in February, but each VPN runs its own separate network.

The biggest win Surfshark offers is its unlimited device support. If you want to run your entire home or office on Surfshark's VPN, you don't have to worry about how many devices you have on or connected. It also offers antimalware, ad-blocking and tracker-blocking as part of its VPN software.

Surfshark received generally Excellent Marks when its Chrome and Firefox extensions were audited for privacy by German security firm Cure 53 (PDF link of full report) -- though that audit was commissioned by Surfshark.

The VPN provider has a solid range of app support, running on Mac, Windows, iOS, Android, FireTV and routers. Additional devices such as game consoles can be configured for Surfshark via DNS settings. We particularly like the feature that allows you to whitelist certain apps and websites to automatically bypass the VPN. For some business uses, this can be critically important. 

Surfshark also offers three special modes designed for those who want to get around restrictions and more carefully hide their online footsteps. Camouflage Mode masks your VPN activity so your ISP doesn't know you're using a VPN. Multihop jumps your internet connection through multiple countries to hide your trail. Finally, NoBorders Mode "allows [you] to successfully use Surfshark in restrictive regions." 

Just be careful: Doing any of these three things could be illegal in your country and could result in severe penalties. During our testing, we saw no DNS or IP address leaks and had no trouble accessing Netflix. 

Like an increasing number of other VPNs, Surfshark offers several different introductory pricing packages that are cheaper the longer your contract, but that get more expensive after the first term of your subscription plan. One of your options is to lock in 26 months of service for about $60 -- which Surfshark frames as "24 months +2 Free" for $2.30 a month. It's a decent intro deal, but the plan then recurs at $60 annually. For the standard yearly subscription plan, you'll pay about $48 initially for the first year of service, then $60 per year for any additional years of service. 

Surfshark's regular monthly plan offers no discounts and is available for $13 a month. If you're not satisfied with the service, Surfshark offers a 30-day money-back guarantee.

Read our Surfshark VPN review.

NordVPN
  • Number of IP addresses: 5,400-plus
  • Number of VPN server locations: 83
  • Country/jurisdiction: Panama
  • 60 countries
  • $5 a month for the yearly plan

NordVPN is one of the most recognized brands in the VPN field. It offers Mac VPN users a generous simultaneous connection count, with six simultaneous connections through its network, where nearly all other providers offer five or fewer. The VPN provider also offers a dedicated IP option, for those looking for a different level of VPN connection. NordVPN offers a kill switch feature, and the ability to VPN into Tor. We detected no privacy leaks during our tests, and found its speeds to be reliably fast. 

NordVPN's pricing structure is similar to that of its sister company Surfshark, but more expensive. A two-year plan carries an introductory price of about $96, but that price increases to a little under $100 annually for each subsequent year of service. If you opt for the yearly plan, you'll pay $60 for the first year of service, then just shy of $100 per year for any additional years. NordVPN's monthly plan is a dollar cheaper than Surfshark's, though, at $12 a month. And like most other VPN services, NordVPN offers a full 30-day money-back ensure in case you're not satisfied with the service. 

While NordVPN has lived on this list for a long time, we moved it to the penalty box in October 2019 to re-evaluate our recommendation after a report emerged that one of its rented servers was accessed without authorization in 2018. Nord's actions following the discovery included -- eventually -- multiple security audits, a bug bounty program and heavier investments in server security. 

While we'd have preferred that Nord had self-disclosed the issue much earlier, the fact that the breach was limited in nature and involved no user-identifying information served to further verify that NordVPN keeps no logs of VPN user activity. As a result, Nord remains on this list of the best Mac VPN as a recommended vendor. It operates on Mac, Windows, Android, iOS and Linux. 

Read our NordVPN review.

What's the best Mac VPN right now?

ExpressVPN is the current CNET Editors' Choice for best overall VPN. We evaluate VPNs based on their overall performance in three main categories: speed, security features and price. Express isn't the cheapest, but it's among the fastest, and so far, is the most secure. At lower costs, Surfshark is a close second among our picks, thanks to its impressive performance and unlimited device support. NordVPN, our third choice, is a die-hard heavy-hitter. It costs more than Surfshark but less than Express, has an enormous network that's constantly getting faster and more secure, and is easily the most reliable service we've tested. 

Use a mobile-friendly VPN to avoid slower speeds and ensure greater data privacy for your whole device. Mobile VPNs generally have a smaller memory footprint, and require less processing power than desktop VPNs, so they run faster and save more battery. Our top three VPNs listed above all have excellent, easy-to-use mobile VPN app options for their services. Some VPNs will only work with one type of platform -- like Apple or Android -- and some are universally compatible. To find the right mobile VPN for you, check out our mobile-specific VPN guides below. We routinely update them with our retesting information so check back often. 

What's the best free VPN service?

None of them. Seriously. While there are plenty of excellent free security and privacy apps online, VPNs, sadly, aren't among them. Safe VPNs cost companies a lot of money to operate and keep secure, and free ones are almost always malware-laden data snoops. But there's good news: The burgeoning VPN market is hyper-competitive right now, so prices for even the best VPNs regularly drop to less than $5 a month. In fact, the least expensive paid VPN option we've seen so far ranks in our top three VPNs overall for security and speed. Check out our quick list of budget-savvy VPNs to find one in your price range.

What's the most secure VPN for Mac?

Each of the three VPNs we highlight on this page offer the same level of AES 256-bit encryption. You'll be able to secure your connection via the same encryption standards whether you're using ExpressVPN, Surfshark or NordVPN. Each has also been independently audited for security, and each one operates a RAM-only server infrastructure, which helps reduce the possibility of data being stored on a VPN server. Our DNS leak tests of all three providers revealed no leaks of any sort, and each one's kill switch worked flawlessly. 

Can you get in trouble for using a VPN?

You can potentially get in legal trouble for using a VPN if you're in a country like China or Iran that bans or outlaws VPN use altogether. Otherwise, in the vast majority of regions around the world, you don't have to worry about getting into any legal trouble just for using a VPN. Just remember that if you're doing something illegal online, it's still illegal whether you're using a VPN or not. And if you're in a country where VPN use is illegal or restricted in any way, it's imperative that you connect to an obfuscated server so your VPN traffic is disguised as ordinary HTTPS traffic. This hides the fact that you're using a VPN in the first place. 

What does my ISP see when I'm connected to my VPN?

Your ISP will see that you're connected to a VPN and it will see the IP address of the VPN server you're connected to, along with the amount of data you're transmitting. It will also see timestamps of when you connected to the VPN. Other than that, it won't see your browsing history or the websites you visit since your internet traffic is encrypted and rendered unreadable when you connect to a VPN.

Sun, 17 Jul 2022 07:22:00 -0500 en text/html https://www.cnet.com/tech/services-and-software/best-mac-vpn/
Killexams : ManageEngine Vulnerability Manager Plus No result found, try new keyword!One way you can shield yourself from all sorts of web-based security threats is to equip Zoho’s web risk-driven security scanner called ManageEngine Vulnerability Manager Plus – well, that was quite a ... Thu, 04 Aug 2022 01:04:16 -0500 en-us text/html https://www.msn.com/en-us/news/technology/manageengine-vulnerability-manager-plus/ar-AA10iEnE Killexams : Chinese Mac apps found abusing App Store

An investigation into seven different apps on the Mac App Store, including the number one PDF reader in the U.S., has found that all of them are orchestrated by the same Chinese developer using fake reviews and command-and-control exploits to try and target users. 

Research from Privacy1st (Alex Kleber) published this week has revealed that 7 different Apple developer accounts (so far) are all linked to the same Chinese developer and are using abusive practices to make money. 

Stephen Warwick has written about Apple for five years at iMore and previously elsewhere. He covers all of iMore's latest breaking news regarding all of Apple's products and services, both hardware and software. Stephen has interviewed industry experts in a range of fields including finance, litigation, security, and more. He also specializes in curating and reviewing audio hardware and has experience beyond journalism in sound engineering, production, and design.

Before becoming a writer Stephen studied Ancient History at University and also worked at Apple for more than two years. Stephen is also a host on the iMore show, a weekly podcast recorded live that discusses the latest in breaking Apple news, as well as featuring fun trivia about all things Apple.

Wed, 03 Aug 2022 07:42:00 -0500 Stephen Warwick en text/html https://www.imore.com/apps/mac-apps/chinese-mac-apps-found-abusing-app-store
Killexams : Best iPhone VPN of 2022

Apple is known for the powerful security of its mobile devices, but iPhone users still need a solid virtual private network if they want to keep their browsing private, avoid ad tracking and get past streaming service geoblocks. Not every VPN is going to pair well with iOS' distinct controls, but Apple-focused VPN apps are only growing more popular among leading providers. 

The most accurate trend reports available have shown that the market for mobile VPNs has surged in the past few years -- beginning between 2019 and 2020 when, according to a report from research firm Top10VPN, more than 480 million people downloaded a mobile VPN. That's a whopping 54% increase from the previous year. And while 84% of those downloads were free VPN services, we'd strongly advise you to steer clear from any free VPNs, as they almost always involve unforeseen risks on top of being limited in their usefulness. Instead, it's best to stick to tried-and-true paid VPNs whenever possible. Of course, if you're opting for a paid service, you'll want to make sure you're getting your money's worth. 

The best VPN services are more reliable than ever before and have excellent apps that are optimized for mobile devices, so we've created a list specifically for you and your iPhone.

This list is essentially a subset of our main best VPN list, but specifically focuses on VPN clients for anyone looking for mobile browsing protection for their iPhone or other iOS device. If and when a service is ranked higher here than on our main VPN list, it's because the mobile app experience was superior. (You can check out our picks for the best Android VPNs, too.) Keep in mind that this is an evolving list: We're actively working on more research and hands-on testing, so check back regularly as we expect this list to change throughout the year. Here are the top VPN apps for iPhone that we've tested so far this year. 

Surfshark
  • Intuitive app interface, with plenty of power under the hood
  • Number of servers: 3,200-plus
  • Number of VPN server locations: 95
  • Country/jurisdiction: British Virgin Islands

Despite its customizability and powerful performance as a VPN, Surfshark's iOS VPN app (and Android app) offers an interface that is surprisingly intuitive for first-time users. Its four-tab design elegantly conceals a host of privacy tools and connection options, highlighting a single-click connection button on the app's landing screen. 

Quickly access one of Surfshark's multihop connection options -- one of its most promising features, which jumps your connection through multiple countries to hide your trail -- through its main location-selection screen, with no need to rummage through the app's VPN settings. Surfshark also gets bonus points for making its customer support options readily available, including its help ticket feature and user guide library. 

Surfshark's network has expanded significantly, now offering servers in 95 countries -- making its network one of the largest in the industry. Though Surfshark and NordVPN announced a merger in February, each VPN provider runs its own separate network of servers. 

One of Surfshark's big draws is its unlimited device support. If you want to run your entire home or office on Surfshark's VPN, you don't have to worry about how many devices you have on or connected. The VPN provider has a solid range of app support, running on Mac, Windows, iOS, Android, FireTV and routers. Additional devices such as game consoles can be configured for Surfshark via DNS settings. 

Surfshark received generally Excellent Marks when its Chrome and Firefox extensions were audited for privacy by German security firm Cure 53 (PDF link of full report) -- though that audit was commissioned by Surfshark.

We particularly like the feature that allows you to whitelist certain apps and websites to automatically bypass the VPN. For some business uses, this can be critically important. Surfshark also offers antimalware, ad-blocking and tracker-blocking as part of its software.

Along with multihop, Surfshark also offers two more special modes designed for those who want to get around restrictions and more carefully hide their online footsteps. Camouflage Mode masks your VPN activity so your ISP doesn't know you're using a VPN. And NoBorders Mode "allows [you] to successfully use Surfshark in restrictive regions." 

Just be careful. Doing any of those three things could be illegal in your country and could result in severe penalties. During our testing, we didn't see a DNS leak or IP address leak, and had no trouble accessing Netflix. 

Like many other VPNs, Surfshark offers several promotional pricing packages designed to pull you in with attractive first-term prices before hiking costs after that term closes. 

With Surfshark, one of your options is to lock in 26 months of service for about $60 -- which Surfshark frames as "24 months +2 Free" for $2.30 a month. It's a decent intro deal, but the plan then recurs at $60 annually. We also don't recommend contracts of more than a year with any provider because of the VPN industry's rapidly shifting landscape. 

For the standard yearly subscription plan, you'll pay about $48 initially for the first year of service, then $60 per year for any additional years of service. Surfshark's regular monthly plan offers no discounts and is available for $13 a month. If you're not satisfied with the service, Surfshark offers a 30-day money-back guarantee. Read our Surfshark VPN review

Read our Surfshark VPN review.

Screenshot by David Gewirtz/CNET

Despite battling major upheavals through the end of 2021, ExpressVPN clenched our Editors' Choice Award for best VPN in 2022. One of the two largest providers globally, the VPN titan has been in business since 2009 and once again aggressively raised the industry bar for service transparency this year. 

In the past year, ExpressVPN increased its independent third-party audit count, published details about its TrustedServer deployment process, joined the i2Coalition to call for improved VPN industry ethics, and released an open source Lightway encryption protocol.

After a setback in 2020, ExpressVPN is again currently in first place as the fastest VPN we've tested. While most VPNs will cause you to lose half or more of your normal internet speeds, ExpressVPN caused us to lose just 2% of speeds in our 2022 speed tests. It also unblocks Netflix and other streaming services more reliably than most other VPNs, and seamlessly surpasses geo-blocking for access to international gaming servers and torrenting sites. 

Lightway's flexible nature allows it to take on both TCP and UDP connections, seamlessly balancing speed and stability. It's a brilliant choice for iOS devices, since it's so responsive to varying connection types and strengths. 

All of our top-rated VPNs have wide compatibility across platforms and operating systems, but ExpressVPN's collection of setup guides, detailed FAQs and troubleshooting articles provide it a clear advantage for users. So does its 24/7 customer support, and its no-questions-asked, 30-day money back guarantee.  

While you can get a better month-to-dollar bargain with ExpressVPN's two-year subscription, we don't recommend anyone purchase any two-year VPN subscriptions at this time due to overall market volatility. ExpressVPN's best plan offers five simultaneous connections for $80 a year (which includes three extra months, for a limited-time deal totaling 15 months of service). You can also opt for a $13 per-month plan, or pay $60 for six months. Read our ExpressVPN review.

Read our ExpressVPN review.

NordVPN
  • An easy to use, reliable VPN application
  • Number of servers: 5,500-plus servers
  • Number of VPN server locations: 58
  • Country/jurisdiction: Panama

NordVPN is one of the most recognized brands in the VPN field. Part of that brand recognition is based on its intuitive design. The NordVPN iOS app is just as easy to interact with as its desktop client, with a similar design. It poses no learning curve if you're new to the app and looking to move from desktop to a mobile iOS device like an iPhone or iPad.

Just as the desktop client does, Nord's iPhone app opens to a familiar blue-scale landing screen map where an iPhone user can opt to either select a country or connect to the fastest server automatically. Nord gets bonus points for its split-tunneling feature, which allows you to select other apps that you don't want to run through your encrypted VPN connection.

Nord offers a generous simultaneous connection count, with six connections allowed through its network -- nearly all other providers offer five or fewer. NordVPN also offers a dedicated IP option, for those looking for a different level of VPN connection. NordVPN offers a kill switch feature, and the ability to VPN into Tor. We detected no privacy leaks during our tests, and found its speeds to be reliably fast. 

NordVPN's pricing structure is similar to that of its sister company Surfshark, but more expensive. The company's one-year subscription plan costs $5 a month ($60 billed at once) for the first year of service. The yearly plan then renews at $100 per year for any subsequent years of service. NordVPN also offers an option for a 2-year plan for $79 for the first two years. However, the 2-year plan then renews annually at the same $100 rate as the yearly plan. It's a good introductory deal, but we don't recommend signing on with a VPN provider for longer than a year at a time given the rapidly changing nature of the industry. While the introductory rates NordVPN offers for its longer-term plans are relatively cheap, the provider's month-to-month price of $12 is at the high end of the spectrum. But NordVPN does offer a full 30-day refund policy. 

While NordVPN has lived on our top VPNs list for a long time, we moved it to the penalty box in October 2019 to reevaluate our recommendation after a report emerged that one of its rented servers was accessed without authorization in 2018. Nord's actions following the discovery included -- eventually -- multiple security audits, a bug bounty program and heavier investments in server security. 

While we'd have preferred that Nord self-disclosed the issue much earlier, the fact that the breach was limited in nature and involved no user-identifying information served to further verify that NordVPN keeps no logs of its VPN user activity. As a result, Nord remains on our list as a recommended VPN service provider. 

Read our NordVPN review.

Screenshot by David Gewirtz/CNET
  • Most customizable VPN app 
  • Number of servers: 2,000-plus
  • Number of VPN server locations: 75-plus
  • Country/jurisdiction: US

A big win for IPVanish is its fun, configurable interface, which makes it an ideal client for those who are interested in learning how to understand what a VPN does under the hood. With its iOS app, IPVanish manages to pack the same extensive suite of digital knobs and dials into a smaller screen to impressive effect. 

If you're looking for the ability to do some precision-tuning to your VPN connection, IPVanish is a solid bet. From generating visual graphs of your internet activity to a bevy of switches controlling split-tunneling, LAN connection allowance and more -- IPVanish is an iOS app for the methodical tech tweaker who enjoys having exact control over their mobile traffic. 

While IPVanish isn't the fastest VPN, the 58% speed loss we measured in our most accurate speed tests is about on par with most VPN providers. However, we noticed that IPVanish's Quick Connect feature doesn't always connect you to the best available server, so you may need to optimize your speeds by connecting manually to a server showing a lighter load. In IPVanish's iOS app, you can check the current load of each server by tapping on Locations and tapping the number next to each city.

IPVanish's monthly plan costs $11 per month, but you can get a discount on its yearly plan now for $40 for the first year. However, that yearly plan jumps to $90 for any subsequent years of service. You can also opt for a quarterly plan that costs just over $13 for the first three months, then $30 for each three-month period thereafter. The provider offers a 30-day money-back guarantee, but only if you purchase the yearly plan -- which could be a disappointment to anyone who purchased a monthly or quarterly subscription and decided they didn't like the service. That said, the company gets kudos for allowing unlimited simultaneous connections. We also liked its connection kill switch feature, a must for anyone serious about protecting their privacy while surfing. Read our IPVanish review.

Read our IPVanish review.

What's the best iPhone VPN right now?

Thanks to its impressive performance and unlimited device support, Surfshark is our current top pick for the best iPhone VPN. ExpressVPN is a close second among our picks and offers a simple and effective iPhone VPN app. It isn't the cheapest, but it's among the fastest of all the VPN options. NordVPN, our third choice, is a die-hard heavy-hitter. It costs more than Surfshark but less than Express, has a network of servers that's constantly getting faster and more secure, and is easily the most reliable service we've tested. 

Use a mobile-friendly VPN to avoid slower speeds and ensure greater data privacy for your whole device. Mobile VPNs generally have a smaller memory footprint, and require less processing power than desktop VPNs, so they run faster and save more battery. Our top three VPNs listed above all have excellent, easy-to-use mobile app options for their services. Some VPNs will only work with one type of platform -- like Apple or Android -- and some are universally compatible. To find the right mobile VPN for you, check out our other mobile-specific VPN guides below. We routinely update them with our retesting information so check back often. 

What's the best free VPN?

We don't recommend opting for a free VPN because they can be risky to use. Free VPNs usually make money by selling user data, and some have even been found to be riddled with malware -- which is the exact opposite of what you want from a VPN. On top of that, free VPNs are often slow, impose restrictive usage and data limits, offer a minimal selection of servers and are generally less secure than paid VPNs. Most won't work with streaming services, either. Check out CNET's list of the best cheap VPNs if you want to find a premium, budget-friendly VPN.    

Can you get in trouble for using a VPN?

You normally don't have to worry about getting into any legal trouble just for using a VPN -- unless you're in a country like China or Iran where VPN use is banned or illegal. In most parts of the world, using a VPN is perfectly legal. If you're in a country where VPN use is restricted in any way, you'll need to connect to an obfuscated server. Doing so will disguise your VPN traffic as regular HTTPS internet traffic, so authorities won't know you're using a VPN in the first place. 

What does my ISP/mobile carrier see when I'm connected to my VPN?

Your internet service provider or mobile carrier (depending on whether you're connected to Wi-Fi or using mobile data) will see that you're connected to a VPN, but it will not be able to see any of your internet activity like the websites you visit or browsing history since your traffic is encrypted. It will also see things like the IP address of the VPN server you're connected to, the timestamps of when you're connected and the amount of data you've transmitted. If you want to hide your VPN usage from your ISP or mobile carrier, you can connect to an obfuscated server, if offered by your VPN. 

More VPN advice

Sun, 20 May 2018 16:16:00 -0500 en text/html https://www.cnet.com/tech/services-and-software/best-iphone-vpn/
Killexams : How Apple's Files app is getting better in iOS 16 & iPadOS 16

AppleInsider is supported by its audience and may earn commission as an Amazon Associate and affiliate partner on qualifying purchases. These affiliate partnerships do not influence our editorial content.

Updates to the Files app in iOS 16 and iPadOS 16 bring it closer to the macOS Finder. Here's what's new.

The Files app brings basic file management functionality to iPhone and iPad. While it isn't as robust as Finder on Mac, it can accomplish most of what a user would need for managing files.

Files started as a way to see everything stored in iCloud Drive, then expanded into third-party cloud services like Dropbox, and finally ended up with local and network storage options. Now, the feature set has expanded again with a few much-needed updates to navigation and file control in iOS 16 and iPadOS 16.

Files app updates

Most of the changes made to the Files app focus on making interaction paradigms similar to macOS for better ecosystem parity. These new updates make it easier to locate, manipulate, and organize files.

Save, open, and transfer functions

The "Save to Files" function has been improved with a new modal window. Any time a user is saving something to the Files app, the entire app UI appears with options to select the save location, add a tag, and rename the file.

Saving, moving, and opening files get better user controls

Opening files using third-party apps get a similar UI when the developer properly targets the Files app as a storage location. The modal window shows all the navigation UI for finding a file, including the new navigation options described below.

When moving a file to a different storage location, like from one cloud service to another or to an external SSD, a file transfer progress bar appears.

View options and navigation

Apple has enhanced the List view with better controls over organization. The file or folder is shown on the left, as usual, with the modification date and file size on the right with column titles in blue.

Navigating through folders and manipulating files gets easier with more controls

Tap on a column title to organize the list by that data point, and tap it again to reverse the order. Grouping by file type, date, size, or who shared it offers more organization options.

The navigation toolbar also got a small but welcome change. Instead of showing the parent folder or previous folder in the top left, the Files app now shows forward and back arrows next to the name of the current folder.

Tapping on the name of the folder opens a navigation view of accurate folders and offers a few control options like rename, copy, and move.

Organize files and folders using groups and listing options

Within the view menu, selecting "View Options" shows the "Group By" options for any given view mode, plus a "Show All Extensions" button we'll discuss below.

When interacting with a file, a handful of new interactions are available depending on the file type and context. These are hidden under the "right click" or press and hold menu.

Using "Get Info" on folders will now reveal the size of the folder's contents. Previously, this wouldn't show any data for size. Also, the "where" section shows the file structure leading to the selected file or folder.

Files app menus have new options for altering files

When selecting certain file types, new quick actions will appear in the menu. For example, image quick actions include rotating the image, converting to PDF, or removing the background.

When "Remove Background is selected, a new PNG image is saved with the object within the same folder.

The Columns layout offers a hybrid view of information and action buttons normally found when an image or file is selected in the file selection menu. The hamburger button reveals additional file actions similar to the ones listed before.

Also, some actions can be performed with multiple files selected. For example, select several image files to have them all added to a PDF file which is saved separately.

Other batch operations include changing file extensions, removing backgrounds from all selected images, or creating a new folder with the selected items. However, the Files app cannot batch rename files.

File extensions

File extensions tell you what kind of file you're dealing with, like an image file could be JPEG, PNG, or HEIF. Users can now convert an image freely between these extension types using the "Convert Image" action in the quick actions menu.

Change file extensions in the iOS 16 Files app

For more advanced users, use the "Show All Extensions" toggle in the layout menu to see the file extension after the file name. With this enabled, simply rename a file and change the extension shown after the period to actually change the file type.

Take caution when performing file changes in this manner. Some file containers have more information like location, tags, or notes, which won't appear in a new file type.

Understanding the Files app

The iPhone and iPad are fundamentally different computing platforms from Mac, so users shouldn't expect Files to have feature parity with Finder. One of the most significant differences between the two is system file access.

On Mac, users can dive into hidden file structures and alter program files for installed applications or even system files integral to normal operating system operation. On iPad and iPhone, the only thing users have access to is user-generated files.

Apple hasn't opened that up at all, and users shouldn't expect that philosophy to change anytime soon. Instead, Files updates focus on quality-of-life improvements that make file management easier.

Tue, 02 Aug 2022 04:04:00 -0500 en text/html https://appleinsider.com/articles/22/08/02/how-apples-files-app-is-getting-better-in-ios-16-ipados-16
Killexams : MacOS Bug Could Let Malicious Code Break Out of Application Sandbox

Microsoft has revealed a now-fixed flaw in Apple's macOS that allowed specific kinds of code to bypass the operating system's App Sandbox restrictions on third-party applications, potentially allowing attackers to escalate device privileges and install additional malicious payloads.

Microsoft shares credit for the find (CVE-2022-26706) with researcher Arsenii Kostromin, the company said in its announcement, adding that Apple patched the vulnerability in its May 16 security update.

The team at Microsoft discovered the bug while researching malicious macros in Microsoft Office for macOS, they explained in a recent blog post.

"Our research shows that even the built-in, baseline security features in macOS could still be bypassed, potentially compromising system and user data," the team wrote. "Therefore, collaboration between vulnerability researchers, software vendors, and the larger security community remains crucial to helping secure the overall user experience. This includes responsibly disclosing vulnerabilities to vendors."

Keep up with the latest cybersecurity threats, newly-discovered vulnerabilities, data breach information, and emerging trends. Delivered daily or weekly right to your email inbox.

Wed, 13 Jul 2022 09:54:00 -0500 en text/html https://www.darkreading.com/application-security/macos-bug-let-malicious-code-break-out-of-app-sandbox
Killexams : Four transformative changes SEPTA can make to be more rider-friendly

Today, the Southeastern Pennsylvania Transportation Authority (SEPTA) is dreaming bigger than it has in the last 40 years. With a full trolley overhaul in the works, station upgrades, rail extensions and a once-in-a-lifetime, clean-slate reimagining of the bus network — Southeast PA is poised to make a transit comeback of global significance. It’s about time.

But at moments like these, it’s easy to forget about the more immediate ways we can Strengthen rider experience, not years into the future, but now. Here are four transformative plans that SEPTA won’t need a federal grant to implement. In fact, they could deploy these mass transit hacks in the next year.

Modernize communication with riders

On the internet, there’s one data feed that provides third-party apps like Transit App, Google Maps and Apple Maps with routes, schedules, and notifications from SEPTA. It’s the most effective way of getting crucial information to riders. But in SEPTA’s case, it’s equally great at distributing wrong information. For example, on the 106 (which runs the length of the Main Line), SEPTA had the following advisories posted.

Here’s a link to the archived page (click on the page’s “advisory” tab), because after this op-ed is published, I’m hoping these notifications will get taken down. I say this because every single sentence posted here is false. First, the Villanova stop was not moved East, it was moved West. (The move has since been made permanent.) The Eastbound stop at Ithan Ave was reinstated in 2020. The stop at Lancaster Ave. and Valley Rd. has also been working fine for the last two years at least. This same alert was also cross-posted to the 105, despite the 105 not serving Valley Rd. since 2016.

This is just my own bus route, and there are similar, extremely out-of-date advisories posted across the whole system. Even worse, important information about planned track work and road work is often posted late, or never. And when it is, it’s awfully hard to access.

Imagine you’re a transit authority. You have to reduce service on a rail line for construction, and you want to get the word out. The first thing you would do is delete the canceled train departures from the affected stops on your data feed, then you would post a concise notification explaining the change. But, in nearly all cases (such as, during the July 4th fireworks this year), SEPTA prefers to leave the wrong schedule data up to confuse riders and post the real schedule in a PDF, linked in a webpage that can only be accessed via the website or in a tweet posted to the line’s Twitter account.

This slipshod and apathetic approach to communication breeds distrust among riders with ruthless efficiency amid the greatest ridership crisis in history. Winning back patrons means providing information channels users can actually trust. The good news is that some transit authorities have already done it.

On a trip to Boston, I had to take a ride on the MBTA’s “D Branch.” Unfortunately, the line had been shut down that day for track work. But instead of leaving a misleading data feed, MBTA removed all departures on the D Branch from third-party apps. Then, it programmed in a new route for the shuttle bus, complete with a schedule and stop locations. This allowed Google Maps to tell me exactly where to stand, no PDFs required. I got where I was going barely 10 minutes late, and if I hadn’t seen the notification, I might not have even known anything was wrong.

When there’s a bus detour, MBTA reprograms the digital route to reflect the change. When individual stops are affected, notifications are targeted to those locations. MBTA has also partnered with Transit App to Strengthen the reliability of real-time tracking (something SEPTA could also take note of) and show live crowd levels on vehicles. When I returned to Southeast PA, the contrast was stark.

Thankfully, SEPTA seems to be inching in the right direction. It created digital routes for the substitute buses of the 101 and 102. And earlier this month, during track work on the Southwest Connection, SEPTA updated the digital schedules to reflect schedule changes on the Wilmington/Newark, Media/Elwyn, and Airport lines. So even though the notification fails to mention that the Wilmington/Newark and Airport Lines will board from the lower platforms, it’s an encouraging step forward for SEPTA. I can’t wait to see more.

Skirt the Schuylkill Expressway

It’s no secret that the bus routes running the Schuylkill Expressway are among SEPTA’s most unreliable. The 124 and 125, after traveling this erratic artery of single occupancy vehicles for 14 miles, routinely see delays in excess of 30 minutes. There’s no way schedule padding can fix that. But the real crime is that in the latest Bus Revolution drafts, SEPTA plans to double down on this traffic travesty by maintaining or even adding express service to the highway. There is a better way.

After reaching Gulph Mills, the 125 and 124 could skip the highway, instead traveling 2.6 miles over to Conshohoken, on the Manayunk/Norristown Line. Riders could then make a timed traffic-free transfer to Center City by rail. Just like the 124 and 125, the train stops at Wissahickon. And soon, Conshohocken will be wheelchair accessible.

There are only two snags. First is frequency. By alternating, the twin routes maintain a half-hourly mid-day frequency. So in order for this plan to work, the frequency would need to be doubled on the current hourly Manayunk/Norristown. It sounds expensive, but it’s important to remember that truncating the buses eliminates at least 70 vehicle hours per weekday, covering the cost of increased rail frequency.

The Delaware Valley Planning Commission came to the same conclusion when it studied this same idea back in 2009. Consolidating resources to a single, more frequent service will also build ridership along the rail line, something non-stop highway travel can’t do. A potential political barrier is that converting the 124 and 125 to rail-feeders could upset the delicate balance of service allocation between counties. All the more reason to make the switch next year as part of Bus Revolution.

As for the increased fare for travelers? That can be fixed too.

Revamp railroad revenues

SEPTA has long been criticized for the oddly high fares charged on regional rail trips between inner zones and center city. Regional rail trips within Philly often cost more than $1 per mile. But running on a tight budget, SEPTA is wary of potential shortfalls in fare revenue, so it continues the current fare structure. In doing so, SEPTA’s leaders have made an implicit assumption that, while high prices may deter ridership, they make up for it by milking more money from remaining passengers. Is this really true?

Nowhere does SEPTA adopt this fare philosophy more than with trips from Center City to the airport. Escalating to $6.50 (Zone 4) in only 8 miles, the pricing scheme is designed to exploit out-of-towners and people who don’t want to pay for airport parking (but can’t find a friend to drop them off). It’s a shakedown, so you’d assume the Airport Line is raking it in, right? Wrong.

Pre-pandemic, the Airport Line recovered only 15% of its operating cost in fares, the lowest among the 13 lines, which averaged 38%. If SEPTA’s goal was to make money, no other line did worse. This same effect is part of the reason why, despite their dense surroundings, outer city stations like North Broad and Angora are among the lowest ridership stops in the system. This is the natural result when fares are the highest where people are the poorest.

Pricing out a majority of potential riders was always a losing strategy, but in a world where more white-collar work now takes place online, it’s suicidal. To its credit, SEPTA knows and acknowledges the problem. But, has been slow to adapt, planning to lower Zone 1 fares by just 25¢. They’ve recently implied that Regional Rail fares will have to be changed as part of Reimagining Regional Rail, a long-term overhaul of infrastructure and service patterns.

While it is true that Regional Rail can’t be priced as low as PATCO until it runs like PATCO (no conductors or low platforms), SEPTA has more room for immediate change than it lets on. The key to that reform is, well, Key.

Before SEPTA Key was implemented on Regional Rail in 2020, it was critical to have a fare structure that conductors could keep track of. Comprehension is the reason intermediate (not through Center City) trips are $3.75, regardless of trip length. It’s why peak prices remain in effect mid-day. It’s the reason there are even zones at all.

In fiscal year 2023, SEPTA should take advantage of the hundreds of millions invested in SEPTA Key, and adopt a new system with fares based on the number of zones traveled, regardless of which zones. Here’s my proposal for how to do that.

Current fares (with SEPTA Key)

Notes:

  • No transfers between Regional Rail and other modes.
  • Airport line does not get an off-peak discount.

Suggested new fares (With SEPTA Key)

Notes:

  • Fares increase $1 at rush hour (6:00-9:30 a.m. & 4:00-6:30 p.m.) only in the peak direction of travel (excluding Airport Line)
  • When transferring from rail to bus/metro routes, the bus/metro section is free.
  • When transferring from bus/metro to rail, the Regional Rail fare is discounted $2 (essentially refunding the bus/metro fare).
  • New Jersey trips are $1 extra. (New Jersey does not subsidize the Trenton or West Trenton lines.)

While not perfect, this new system I’m proposing solves a few major problems while preserving fare revenue. It lowers fares more in the inner zones, where high prices are most destructive to ridership. It spares reverse commuters, who are on average poorer, from peak pricing. It brings zone pricing to intermediate trips, instead of the current flat $3.75. And it breaks down the price barrier between Regional Rail and other modes by providing the same transfer discount the rest of the system currently enjoys.

So yes, for the most part, this is a fare cut. However, I’m specifically targeting the fare cut to the types of trips that are now artificially uncommon, thanks to high prices. It’s for this reason that I think a fare restructuring like this would not reduce revenues. In fact, revenues may increase. If SEPTA wants a short-term compromise between the realists and the idealists, it’s my hope that they’ll take a look at this proposal.

Get creative with accessibility

Like other legacy transit systems, SEPTA is working to upgrade stations to Americans with Disabilities Act (ADA) compliance, one by one. Every station that’s overhauled is rebuilt with ramps, elevators, or high platforms to make it wheelchair accessible. But, it’s slow going. SEPTA’s current strategy is to bundle accessibility upgrades with full station reconstructions, pushing full accessibility well into the 2030s.

In response, some have suggested that SEPTA do accessibility upgrades first as separate projects. That would mean doubling the number of construction projects, increasing costs and route disruptions. Thankfully, there’s a technique SEPTA can use to reach accessibility fast and economically.

Across the world, when passenger railroads rebuild stations, many install temporary high-level platforms to maintain accessibility. For the Third Track project, Long Island Railroad has constructed temporary platforms out of steel scaffolding. At Paoli station, Amtrak built high-level scaffold platforms before the concrete ones were finished.

SEPTA can do the same, fast-forwarding to near full accessibility across the Regional Rail network. Many stations could receive full-length scaffold platforms. Where a full platform won’t fit, SEPTA can install mini-high platforms to provide level boarding at the front door. Even at stations requiring clearance for freight trains, SEPTA could equip the mini platforms with bridgeplates to span the gap. But of course, platforms aren’t the only obstacle.

On the Norristown High Speed Line, all 22 stations have high platforms, but thanks to stairs, only six are wheelchair accessible. At many stations, SEPTA could construct temporary scaffold overpasses, or in many cases, connect scaffold ramps to an existing road crossing.

The toughest stations are along the Broad Street Line, where low ceilings and tight corridors leave no room for ramps.  None are more pressing than City Hall Station. Arguably SEPTA’s most important transfer point, making this three-dimensional labyrinth ADA compliant is going to be a logistical nightmare.

Instead of forcing Philadelphia’s disabled community to wait it out, SEPTA should investigate installing stairlifts. For only a few thousand dollars, there are models available that can easily fit on the 40-inch wide staircases leading down to the BSL platforms. They could be user-operated, or if SEPTA (understandably) doesn’t trust the general public, staff operated. Vandalism is a risk, but no more than for SEPTA Key validators.

Of course, SEPTA should keep plowing ahead with station reconstructions and elevator installations. But, for SEPTA’s disabled riders, there is enormous value in having a scaffold platform now while they wait for the concrete one. To anyone who says we can’t keep ugly scaffolding up for years on end, try telling that to New York City.

SEPTA can make these changes

Across the world, transit leaders are used to getting grilled for problems they have little control over. SEPTA receives a steady stream of complaints about bus stops maintained by municipalities, service levels controlled by state funding, delays caused by cars, and anything that happens on their property. I imagine it’s exhausting.

But, the four examples outlined here are of the rare variety where there really is no signal to wait for. These problems, and their solutions, are completely internal to SEPTA. If we wanted, we could make nearly every station accessible, modernize our regional rail fares, get buses off I-76 and finally bring SEPTA’s rider communication into the 21st century. We could do it this year, and we wouldn’t need permission or help from anyone.

Alex is a member of 5th Square studying urban planning at Rutgers, and a graduate of WHYY’s Summer Journalists Program.

Wed, 27 Jul 2022 19:35:00 -0500 en-US text/html https://whyy.org/articles/septa-more-rider-friendly/
Killexams : Walmart intends to ditch Microsoft, favors 100,000 Macs over Windows PCs

Over the past few days, a couple of major companies have left Microsoft in favor of Apple products. First, Delta Air Lines announced that it would be deploying iOS devices for its flight crew soon, though Microsoft insisted that this transition was only taking place because of smaller standardized bag sizes. A couple of days later, General Electric unexpectedly revealed that it would be rolling out Apple devices to its workforce.

The bad news for Microsoft hasn't quite stopped yet, as according to AppleInsider, Walmart intends to deploy approximately 100,000 Macs instead of Windows PCs. This announcement was made at the Jamf Nation User Conference, which is the world's largest Apple-focused IT event.

According to Walmart's Technical Expert, Miles Leacey, Windows PCs generate 60% of all support issues, in comparison to a much lower 40% on Macs. Furthermore, Leacy noted that Macs would result in an ''everyday low cost'', due to less expensive licensing fees, a higher percentage of users being satisfied with the product, and more. These calculations do take into account the fact that Windows PCs generally have a much lower upfront cost.

Walmart has noted significantly low support costs for its current Mac user base as well, which consists of about 7,000 users. Therefore, following Apple's offer, the multinational retailing corporation is considering rolling out around 100,000 Macs the next year as part of an employee choice program.

No implementation dates have been outlined as of yet, but Walmart noted that it is currently in the process of researching a program that could potentially result in Mac becoming the default choice for new employees, given the Total Cost of Ownership savings.

Sat, 02 Jul 2022 05:00:00 -0500 Hamza Jawad en text/html https://www.neowin.net/news/walmart-intends-to-ditch-microsoft-favors-100000-macs-over-windows-pcs/
Killexams : Microsoft Weekly: Windows 11 updates, Teams in the store, and One Outlook0 0
Microsoft Weekly logo with Outlook icon at first place on a podium and a Windows 11 logo with an upd

We are at the end of the week again, which means that it is time to recap all the accurate news items related to Microsoft. This week, we have lots of news related to Windows 10 and Windows 11 updates, some related to the Microsoft Store, and then a pinch of details about Outlook to wrap it all up. To find out more, read our weekly digest for May 14 - May 20.

Updates for Windows 10 and Windows 11

Windows logo dark on orange background

The highlight of this section is that Microsoft has announced that Windows 11 is now ready for broad deployment. This basically means that the OS is now available for all eligible users to update to and is no longer being rolled out in a staggered manner.

Insider channels for Windows 11 received some updates this week too. Build 25120 was released to the Dev Channel with the main features being a search widget - that does not respect your browser preferences - on the desktop and support for ARM64 PCs. This was followed up by build 25120.1010 (KB5015039) in the same channel but that was just a servicing update with nothing new being added. If you're on the Dev Channel, you'll also notice updated dialog boxes for Windows Shut Down and WinRE.

Meanwhile, Release Preview users were treated to build 22000.706 with Windows Spotlight on the desktop, an improved Family Safety verification experience, and a bunch of bug fixes.

On the other hand, if you're experiencing BSODs on the generally available version of Windows 11, that may be due to faulty drivers that are necessary for third-party anti-virus solutions, claims Sophos. Microsoft is yet to corroborate the cybersecurity company's findings.

But coming over to some Windows update shenanigans now too. Earlier this week, the U.S. Cybersecurity and Infrastructure Security Agency (CISA) discouraged federal bodies from installing the latest Patch Tuesday updates on Domain Controllers. This is because the May update caused authorization failures. This forced Microsoft to roll out an out-of-band (OOB) update to fix the problem. Meanwhile, if you are an IT admin testing Windows Server vNext, there is a new build labeled 25120 (the same as the latest Windows 11 Dev Channel release), but as usual, there's no changelog.

Windows Server wasn't the only SKU to receive an OOB update, though. Microsoft released the same for the client (and server) version of Windows 10 to mitigate a problem that caused Microsoft Store app installs to fail on select Intel and AMD CPUs. Find out more details here.

Microsoft Teams in the store

The Microsoft Teams and Microsoft Store logos with a heart emoji

Microsoft Teams finally made its debut in the Microsoft Store this week. The Windows 10 version works as expected, in the sense that it allows you to utilize Teams with personal, work, or school accounts. However, since Windows 11 already has integrations with the Teams Chat app for personal accounts, the Microsoft Store version only allows signing in from a work or school account. This is a bit annoying, to be honest.

However, some other customers are not so happy with their favorite apps being moved to the Microsoft Store. There has been significant backlash from IT admins following the announcement of Quick Assist's migration. For those unaware, this is Microsoft's in-house remote assistance app.

But if you're on Windows 11 and use Windows Subsystem for Android (WSA) downloaded from the Microsoft Store, you'll be happy to know that the implementation received a major update this week. This brought in support for Android 12.1, advanced networking configurations, an improved Settings app, and enhancement to Windows integration, among many other things.

And if you are a developer who publishes Edge extensions to Microsoft's storefront, you should know that you now have the ability to respond directly to customer reviews through the Microsoft Partner Center.

One Outlook

Screenshots of the new One Outlook app

Following a bunch of leaks in the past few months, Microsoft finally made its One Outlook (codenamed Project Monarch) app available for testing. It is currently available for Office Insiders in the Beta Channel Version 2205 (Build 15225.20000) on Windows. The redesigned app doesn't have feature parity with the existing version but it does offer some new capabilities. These include integration with Microsoft Loop components, a board view for Calendar, a clearer RSVP mechanism, and a To Do list. In the same vein, Microsoft is also working on a capability that will allow Outlook for Mac users to "react" to emails.

While we are on the subject of features and apps that have not been generally released yet, you might also want to know about an upcoming app called "Designer". Details are scarce right now but it appears to be a standalone app that borrows functionalities from the component of the same name in PowerPoint. We'll likely hear more on this front soon.

And if the lengthy context menus in Edge are bothering you, fret not, as Microsoft is on the case. The company says that it is already planning around addressing some UI and UX changes in the Canary channel, and these will likely make their way to the Stable channel once they have been thoroughly tested. Other areas Microsoft is working on include better ways to close tabs, respecting the default PDF viewer, and enhancements to tools managing audio and video autoplay.

Git gud

Xbox Game Pass May wave 2 lineup of games

We will kick off our gaming section with news about the second wave of titles hitting Xbox Game Pass this month. The latest selection include Jurassic World Evolution 2, Her Story, Sniper Elite 5, Skate, Cricket 22, and more. Touch controls have also been added to some games but there are others that are leaving the service too. Catch up on all the details here.

Meanwhile, Games with Gold subscribers can now claim The Inner World – The Last Wind Monk for Xbox One and Viva Piñata Party Animals for Xbox 360. The former can be claimed for free until June 15 while the latter is up for grabs until May 31.

And if you're looking to grow your Xbox backlog at a discount, look no further than our latest Deals with Gold article. The highlights this time around are primarily for the Assassin's Creed and Call of Duty franchises.

But if you don't have money to spare for gaming at the moment and would still like to try out some new games, you'll be happy to know that PGA Tour 2K21, State of Decay 2: Juggernaut Edition, and SnowRunner free to play via Xbox Live Gold and Xbox Game Pass Ultimate this weekend.

Finally, Microsoft Flight Simulator World Update IX has newly modeled cities for further upgrading those Italy and Malta, handcrafted airports, new activities for simmers, and more.

Dev Channel

The Surface Duo 2 with the Spotify app

Under the spotlight

A Windows 11 22H2 sign with a stock Windows 11 wallpaper in the background

This week, News Reporter Taras Buria wrote a massive guide on what you can expect to see in the next feature update to Windows 11, which is version 22H2. Frankly, there is a lot to unpack so your best bet is to just provide Taras' piece a read-through here.

The Windows 11 logo with an arrow pointing back to indicate update uninstall

In a related stream, Taras also wrote a guide on how you can uninstall Windows 11 updates. There can be multiple reasons to do this, with the primary one being a botched update. In times like these, it is important to have a guide like this one handy.

Windows 11 build 25120 with the desktop search bar

Also, remember we talked about the latest Dev Channel build featuring a new search widget on the desktop? Check out Taras' guide here about how you can enable or disable it.

msedgeredirect screenshots installer

And while we are on this topic, it's important to remember that widgets in Windows 10 and 11 don't respect your default browser preferences. This includes the new desktop search widget too. So if you'd like to use the browser of your choice with these services, find out how to do so by reading Neowin co-founder Steven Parker's guide on the course here.

Logging off

Windows 11 promo

Our most interesting news item of this week is related to Windows 11 and Microsoft Teams' security struggling against white hat hackers at Pwn2Own 2022. On the first day of the event, the security of these software was breached multiple times with contestants netting hundreds of thousands of dollars from Microsoft as rewards. On the second day, Windows 11 fared a bit better and was able to prevent one out of two exploitations attempted on it. All in all, it is important to remember that events like these are good for consumers at the end of the day as vendors work more rigorously towards fixing security holes in their products.


Neowin Newsletter promo banner

If you'd like to get a weekly digest of news from Neowin, we have a Newsletter you can sign up to either via the 'Get our newsletter' widget in the sidebar, or through this link.

Missed any of the previous columns? Check them all out at this link.

Sat, 21 May 2022 13:17:00 -0500 Usama Jawad en text/html https://www.neowin.net/news/microsoft-weekly-windows-11-updates-teams-in-the-store-and-one-outlook/
9L0-623 exam dump and training guide direct download
Training Exams List