Memorize TEAS test prep questions before you go for test

Even if you go through all TEAS course books, the situations asked in actual tests are totally different. Our TEAS braindumps contains every one of the interesting inquiries and answers that are not found in the course books. Practice with TEAS VCE test system and you will be certain for the genuine TEAS test.

Exam Code: TEAS Practice test 2022 by Killexams.com team
TEAS Test of Essential Academic Skills (Reading, Math, English, Science) Ver. 6, 2022

The ATI TEAS, or Test of Essential Academic Skills, is designed specifically to assess a student's preparedness entering the health science fields. The ATI TEAS test is comprised of 170 questions set up in a multiple-choice format with four-option answers. Questions are designed to test the basic academic skills you will need to perform in class in the areas of: Reading, Math, Science, and English and Language Usage.

Reading Mathematics Science English and Language Usage
Number of Questions 53 36 53 28
Time Limit (Minutes) 64 min 54 min 63 min 28 min
Specific Content Covered Key ideas and details
Craft and structure
Integration of knowledge & ideas
Pre-Test questions Numbers and algebra
Measurement and data
Pre-Test questions Human anatomy & physiology
Life and physical sciences
Scientific reasoning
Pre-Test questions Conventions of standard English
Knowledge of language
Vocabulary acquisition
Pre-Test questions

Passing the TEAS is a key component of getting into nursing and allied health schools, but 30% of qualified applicants are turned away from ADN, Diploma and BSN programs. Since its a comprehensive exam, youll be tested on four different subject areas, so thorough preparation is crucial. We recommend allowing at least 6 weeks of preparation prior to taking the TEAS. On a tighter schedule? Dont worry – we have solutions that fit any timeline.

64 Minutes
Reading 53
Key ideas and details 22
Craft and structure 14
Integration of knowledge and ideas 11
Pre-Test questions 6

54 Minutes
Mathematics 36
Number and algebra 23
Measurement and data 9
Pre-Test questions 4

63 Minutes
Science 53
Human anatomy and physiology 32
Life and physical sciences 8
Scientific reasoning 7
Pre-Test questions 6

28 Minutes
English and Language Usage 28
Conventions of standard English 9
Knowledge of language 9
Vocabulary acquisition 6
Pre-Test Questions 4

TOTAL (209 Minutes) 170

Test of Essential Academic Skills (Reading, Math, English, Science) Ver. 6, 2022
Admission-Tests Essential learner
Killexams : Admission-Tests Essential learner - BingNews https://killexams.com/pass4sure/exam-detail/TEAS Search results Killexams : Admission-Tests Essential learner - BingNews https://killexams.com/pass4sure/exam-detail/TEAS https://killexams.com/exam_list/Admission-Tests Killexams : ACT Score Decline: Lost Learners Not Learning Loss

This past week ACT, the Iowa City-based college admissions test publisher, released its annual performance report with the headline “Average ACT Score For the High School Class of 2022 Declines to Lowest Level in More Than 30 Years.”

This framing predictably sparked a media cycle stating plummeting scores have reached rock-bottom levels. As is far too common when test results are reported, these articles failed to look past the splashy headline and provided no underlying data-informed analysis of score changes. The resulting reporting predictably either parroted the ACT press release or joined the popular narrative of youth in academic decline and failing public schools.

The problem is that the data doesn’t actually show learning loss so much as it demonstrates ACT’s learner loss.

While the national average ACT score has fallen, the explanation for the score drop is far more nuanced than ACT’s press release encourages the media to report.

Yes, for the class of 1991 the average ACT composite score was 22.1 (out of 36) and for the class of 2022 it was 19.8. But for that number to mean the nation has a learning problem, as opposed to ACT having a problem, the examination of test scores must look at the pools of test takers over time and whether they are truly comparable.

Turns out the number of test takers and the demographic composition have shifted in a way that could explain the decline. Unfortunately, most media chose to ignore these shifting demographics (and the rank socioeconomic inequality in the k-12 school system that was recently exacerbated by a pandemic) and imply that students are failing to be taught or to learn.

A bit of history is in order.

The ACT was created in Iowa in 1959 and primarily required by colleges in the Midwest through the 1980s.

In 1990 roughly 35% of U.S. high school graduates took the ACT and many colleges wouldn’t accept it, instead preferring the SAT. It wasn’t until 2007, when Harvey Mudd College finally accepted the test for admission that all colleges in the U.S. accepted the ACT, as equivalent to the SAT.

As more colleges accepted either test for admission, ACT’s share of students increased. From 1990 onward, ACT saw a steady growth in test takers (particularly in coastal states), surpassing the SAT in number of test takers in 2009.

However, since ACT hit its peak participation in 2016 (with 64% of high school graduates taking the test), the company has been shedding test takers and scores have been falling.

ACT says it's a lack of knowledge and skills. But, maybe the answer lies in who has opted out of taking the test. The demographics of students taking the test has shifted.

States with high scoring students have abandoned the ACT at a much faster rate than states with historically lower scoring students. In fact, of the 10 highest scoring states in 2016, the number of ACT test takers dropped by 20,000 more than from the 10 lowest scoring states.

From 2016 to 2022, the lowest scoring 50% of the country shed 296,000 test takers while the highest scoring 50% saw a drop of 444,000 students. These shifts will lower the average test scores no matter what is actually happening in schools under the mantra of “college readiness.”

These changes are in part because states like Illinois, Michigan and Colorado have switched their contract for testing from ACT to the College Board’s SAT.

In other cases, students are opting to apply to college under test-optional or test-free admissions policies. More than 900 colleges offered test optional or free admissions in 2019 and that number spiked to more than 1800 since 2020.

In states, like California and Oregon, where all public colleges are either test-optional or test-free the decline in test takers is particularly drastic, with declines of 74% and 79%, respectively, since 2020.

Why isn’t ACT following best practices and encouraging good data science and good reporting? ACT’s own document warns that “best practice is to compare states where the same or similar percentages of graduates were tested” yet their press release ignores this advice.

Rose Babington, senior director for state partnerships for the ACT, rightfully said “Now more than ever, the last few years have shown us the importance of having high-quality data to help inform how we support students.”

But, what she neglected to emphasize the importance of and provide was high-quality data interpretation.

ACT could have encouraged the media, public, or policy makers to compare ACT score changes to SAT score changes.

SAT scores, which range from 400 to 1600, dropped only 11 points since 2021 and are essentially equal to 2020. Perhaps looking at college admissions tests as measures of national academic progress is not the right data or right use of available data. Looking at test score changes and ignoring underlying demographic changes has never been the right approach.

The misinterpreting of declining SAT scores from a College Board sponsored study, undermined faith in public schools in the 1970s and was used as the basis of the 1983 “Nation at Risk” report that spurred thirty years of test-based “accountability” that hasn’t appreciably benefited public education.

What incentive could a test publisher, especially one losing market share and customers, have to overlook interpretations beyond learning loss and school failure? Babbington may have provided some insight into that as well when she said “I think it also speaks to the need for earlier opportunities for assessment, for instructional improvement, and for conversation.”

ACT and other testing companies would have you believe that if you weigh the pig more frequently, the pig will get fatter. But it doesn’t work that way. You have to feed the pig.

We, the public, need to be wary of simplistic interpretation of complex data. Even if ACT (and SAT) performance wasn’t such a highly coachable socioeconomically correlative phenomenon, giving the test sooner and getting more data won’t Strengthen K-12 education or college readiness. Investing in quality teaching, curriculum, facilities, after-school activities and the tools to combat poverty will Strengthen academic outcomes.

Feed the pig, not the scale.

Mon, 17 Oct 2022 03:54:00 -0500 Akil Bello en text/html https://www.forbes.com/sites/akilbello/2022/10/17/act-score-decline-lost-learners-not-learning-loss/
Killexams : How to Use practice tests to Study for the LSAT No result found, try new keyword!Unlike other standardized tests, real LSAT tests are not hard to come by. In fact, the Law School Admission Council ... is more conducive to learning than taking a full test at once. Tue, 11 Oct 2022 01:36:00 -0500 text/html https://www.usnews.com/education/blogs/law-admissions-lowdown/articles/how-to-use-practice-tests-to-study-for-the-lsat Killexams : ACT test scores fall to lowest level in 30 years following pandemic

Scores on the ACT college admissions test by this year's high school graduates hit their lowest point in more than 30 years — the latest evidence of the enormity of learning disruption during the pandemic.

The class of 2022's average ACT composite score was 19.8 out of 36, marking the first time since 1991 that the average score was below 20. What's more, an increasing number of high school students failed to meet any of the subject-area benchmarks set by the ACT — showing a decline in preparedness for college-level coursework.

The test scores, made public in a report Wednesday, show 42% of ACT-tested graduates in the class of 2022 met none of the subject benchmarks in English, reading, science and math, which are indicators of how well students are expected to perform in corresponding college courses.

In comparison, 38% of test takers in 2021 failed to meet any of the benchmarks.

"Academic preparedness is where we are seeing the decline," said Rose Babington, senior director for state partnerships for the ACT. "Every time we see ACT test scores, we are talking about skills and standards, and the prediction of students to be successful and to know the really important information to succeed and persist through their first year of college courses."

ACT scores have declined steadily in recent years. Still, "the magnitude of the declines this year is particularly alarming," ACT CEO Janet Godwin said in a statement. "We see rapidly growing numbers of seniors leaving high school without meeting college-readiness benchmarks in any of the subjects we measure."

The results offer a lens into systemic inequities in education, in place well before the pandemic shuttered schools and colleges temporarily waived testing requirements. For example, students without access to rigorous high school curriculum suffered more setbacks during pandemic disruptions, Babington said. Those students are from rural areas, come from low-income families and are often students of color.

The number of students taking the ACT has declined 30% since 2018, as graduates increasingly forgo college and some universities no longer require admissions tests. But participation plunged 37% among Black students, with 154,000 taking the test this year.

Standardized tests such as the ACT have faced growing concerns that they're unfair to minority and low-income students, as students with access to expensive test prep or advanced courses often perform better.

Babington defended the test as a measure of college readiness. "Now more than ever, the last few years have shown us the importance of having high-quality data to help inform how we support students," Babington said.

Test scores now are optional for first-year student admission at many institutions. Some colleges, such as the University of California system, even opt for a test-blind policy, where scores are not considered even if submitted.

But many students still take the tests, hoping to get an edge in admissions by submitting their scores. Tyrone Jordan, a freshman at test-optional Arizona State University, said he took the ACT and the SAT to get ahead of other students and help him receive scholarships.

Jordan, who wants to pursue mechanical engineering, said he thinks his rigorous schedule at Tempe Preparatory Academy prepared him for college, and the standardized tests helped support him and his family financially.

"All the test did for me was supply me extra financial money," Jordan said.

While Jordan was always planning to take the test, many students struggle with access or choose not to take the test since their universities of choice no longer require it. In Alabama, Louisiana, Mississippi, Nevada, Tennessee and Wyoming, everyone is tested.

Wed, 12 Oct 2022 09:50:00 -0500 en-US text/html https://www.cbsnews.com/news/act-college-admissions-test-scores-drop-pandemic-slide/
Killexams : ACT test scores drop to lowest in 30 years

PHOENIX — Scores on the ACT college admissions test by this year’s high school graduates hit their lowest point in more than 30 years — the latest evidence of the enormity of learning disruption during the pandemic.

The class of 2022’s average ACT composite score was 19.8 out of 36, marking the first time since 1991 that the average score was below 20. What’s more, an increasing number of high school students failed to meet any of the subject-area benchmarks set by the ACT — showing a decline in preparedness for college-level coursework.

The test scores, made public in a report Wednesday, show 42 percent of ACT-tested graduates in the class of 2022 met none of the subject benchmarks in English, reading, science and math, which are indicators of how well students are expected to perform in corresponding college courses.

In comparison, 38 percent of test takers in 2021 failed to meet any of the benchmarks.

“Academic preparedness is where we are seeing the decline,” said Rose Babington, senior director for state partnerships for the ACT. “Every time we see ACT test scores, we are talking about skills and standards, and the prediction of students to be successful and to know the really important information to succeed and persist through their first year of college courses.”

ACT scores have declined steadily in recent years. Still, “the magnitude of the declines this year is particularly alarming,” ACT CEO Janet Godwin said in a statement. “We see rapidly growing numbers of seniors leaving high school without meeting college-readiness benchmarks in any of the subjects we measure.”

The results offer a lens into systemic inequities in education, in place well before the pandemic shuttered schools and colleges temporarily waived testing requirements. For example, students without access to rigorous high school curriculum suffered more setbacks during pandemic disruptions, Babington said. Those students are from rural areas, come from low-income families and are often students of color.

The number of students taking the ACT has declined 30 percent since 2018, as graduates increasingly forgo college and some universities no longer require admissions tests. But participation plunged 37 percent among Black students, with 154,000 taking the test this year.

Standardized tests such as the ACT have faced growing concerns that they’re unfair to minority and low-income students, as students with access to expensive test prep or advanced courses often perform better.

Babington defended the test as a measure of college readiness.

Wed, 12 Oct 2022 11:25:00 -0500 en-US text/html https://www.columbian.com/news/2022/oct/12/act-test-scores-drop-to-lowest-in-30-years/
Killexams : ACT College Admission Test Scores Drop To 30-Year Low As Effects Of Covid-Era Online Learning Play Out

Topline

High school students’ ACT college admission test scores fell to a three-decade low in 2022, according to a new report released Wednesday, falling for the fifth straight year as educators grapple with ongoing learning loss made worse by remote classes during the Covid-19 pandemic.

Key Facts

Students in the graduating high school class of 2022 averaged a score of 19.8 out of 36, the lowest score since 1991 on the admissions test, which colleges use to gauge students’ English, reading, math and science skills.

The average score is down from 20.3 in 2021, and 20.8 in 2018, which were down from a recent high of 21.2 in 2007 (SAT college admission test scores have also dropped slightly from 981 in 2007 to 927 in 2021).

Some 32% of 2022 graduates who took the test passed three out of four benchmarks—indicating whether they have a 50% chance of earning a B or higher in English, reading, math and science—down from 36% of students last year and 38% in 2018.

From 2018 to 2022, the percentage of students who passed the benchmark in the English section dropped from 60% to 53%, while students who passed the math benchmark fell from 40% to 31%.

Only 22% of the students met the benchmark in all four categories, down from 27% in 2018.

ACT CEO Janet Godwin said the decline can’t be blamed exclusively by learning disruptions from online learning and missed classes when schools were shuttered during the Covid-19 pandemic, but by “longtime systemic failures” that were “exacerbated by the pandemic.”

Crucial Quote

“The magnitude of the declines this year is particularly alarming, as we see rapidly growing numbers of seniors leaving high school without meeting the college-readiness benchmark in any of the subjects we measure,” Godwin said in a press release,

Key Background

Recent studies have linked online learning during the pandemic—when teachers were forced to completely pivot from in-person classes to lessons online—to disruptions in students’ math and reading comprehension. During that time, students were shown to have connected less with their teachers and classmates, and become distracted more easily while at home. The high school class of 2022 dealt with online learning for more than half of their time in high school, starting in March, 2020. Students who switched to online lessons from in-person classes for just a month missed the equivalent of seven to 10 weeks of math, Harvard University Center for Education Policy Research director Thomas Kane told NPR. The losses held true for younger students, as well. A National Assessment of Educational Progress report released last month found 9-year-olds’ reading levels suffered the biggest fall since 1990, while math scores had their biggest drop ever.

Tangent

Disparities between racial groups also increased over that pandemic, with Black students’ math scores falling 13 points, compared to white students’ scores falling five points, according to the Nation’s Report Card. Analysts at McKinsey & Company attribute the difference between races to variation in access to education, with Black and Hispanic students less likely to have access to internet or live interaction with teachers, despite being more likely to remain in remote classrooms.

Surprising Fact

Washington D.C. students had the highest ACT score (26.9), followed by California and Massachusetts (26.5), while the lowest scores were recorded in Nevada (17.3) and Mississippi (17.8).

Big Number

1.3 million. That’s how many students in the class of 2022 took the ACT test, or roughly 36% of graduating high school seniors, according to the report.

Further Reading

Pandemic-Era Policies Caused Dramatic Education Decline (Forbes)

Pandemic Set Students’ reading Levels Back Two Decades—Here’s Where It Dropped The Most (Forbes)

Tue, 11 Oct 2022 12:00:00 -0500 Brian Bushard en text/html https://www.forbes.com/sites/brianbushard/2022/10/12/act-college-admission-test-scores-drop-to-30-year-low-as-effects-of-covid-era-online-learning-play-out/
Killexams : Exams, family pressures taking a toll on students' mental health Killexams : Exams, family pressures taking a toll on students' mental health Sun, 16 Oct 2022 18:33:00 -0500 en text/html https://www.thehansindia.com/hans/young-hans/exams-family-pressures-taking-a-toll-on-students-mental-health-765704 Killexams : ACT test scores fall again. Could you ace the math or English tests? Find out here

At the end of the 2020 school year, students in grades three to eight were typically behind 8–12 points in math and 3–6 points in reading, according to Northwest Evaluation Association data released in 2021.

Test scores remain a strong indicator of learning loss, even when considering how the temporary closing of schools affected testing veracity. In order to break down precisely how these declining trends in math and reading have affected various demographics among all students, HeyTutor looked at the drop in test scores in reading and math for fourth and and eighth grade students before and after COVID-19. This article cites long-term trend data from the National Assessment of Educational Progress along with information from other news reports and studies.

Prior to the pandemic, long-term trends showed that math and reading scores for students ages 9 and 13 had fallen or remained the same since 2012, according to the NAEP. Since 1971, the organization, which operates under the auspices of the U.S. Commissioners of Education, has tracked how students ages 9, 13, and 17 are performing in math and reading.

NAEP notes that while average test scores in math and reading in 2012 surpassed those of the 1970s for students ages 9 and 13, average scores among 13-year-old students decreased between 2012 and 2020. Specifically, average math scores for 13-year-old students in the 10th, 25th, and 50th percentiles decreased between 2012 and 2020.

Average math scores for 9-year-old students in the 10th and 25th percentiles also fell during the same time period. Additionally, average reading scores for 13-year-old students were higher in 2012 than they were in 2020, however, variations in average reading scores for 9-year-old students between 2012 and 2020 were negligible.

Continue reading for a closer look at how the COVID-19 pandemic disrupted education in America.

Sun, 16 Oct 2022 00:30:00 -0500 en text/html https://omaha.com/news/national/act-test-scores-fall-again-could-you-ace-the-math-or-english-tests-find-out/article_efa80ad6-2bd0-56a5-b7c5-96d3db0aac91.html
Killexams : Should the Atar be scrapped? Seven experts on the student ranking system

In classrooms around Australia at this time of year, final-year high school students hunch over desks, furiously trying to distill and demonstrate years of learning and knowledge in their end-of-school tests. The ultimate result of these tests is an Atar, or Australian Tertiary Admission Rank.

It can be a confusing system to get your head around, so the University Admissions Centre has developed an animated explainer video. “If you’re struggling to understand what the Atar is all about, imagine that we’re talking about a fun run – like the Sydney City2Surf – instead,” the narrator says. “Your Atar is your rank in the HSC race.”

While students and schools can fixate on this end-of-school figure as a mark of their success, and many agree that some measure of scholastic achievement is essential for determining university entrance, Atar has come under criticism for treating learning as a race and for its limitations in considering individual skills and circumstances. More recently, as universities increasingly encourage students to apply with information other than their Atar (some studies suggest that less than a third of first-year students are offered a university place based on their Atar), the value of the Atar as a university entrance mechanism has been undermined.

So, we asked seven education experts and one student: if the role of Atar is to match students with the most suitable post-school pathway, is it fit for purpose? Here’s what they said.

‘The Atar is a completely unnecessary high-stakes element of learning’

Assoc Prof Rachel Wilson, centre for educational measurement and
assessment, University of Sydney

If we had a more sophisticated approach to exams and strengthened classroom assessment for the HSC, we wouldn’t need this additional calculation, the Atar. We need to design assessment with the learner experience in mind. We’ve all moved to the user experience in technology, but we haven’t done this in assessment in education.

We need a system that can be more inclusive so it must be built to the needs of the learner. Putting my psychologist’s hat on, this current generation have a lot of pressure on them that previous generations would not have had in their lives, and we need to be sensitive to those pressures. Asking them to deal with a completely unnecessary high-stakes element of their learning doesn’t seem productive.

A couple of things are important in assessment – children do learn for exams, but that is easier for higher-ability students, and much more challenging for lower-attaining students. We will always need a system for sorting when it comes to the provision of very high, and very expensive levels of education like university, but there are more effective and fair ways of doing it.

‘Some say the whole selection system is broken’

Sandra Milligan, director and enterprise professor, assessment research centre, Melbourne graduate school of education, University of Melbourne

When they were introduced, the Atar and its predecessors were welcomed. They were based on what is taught, not tests of “aptitude” or social status. The same rules applied to everyone. They were inexpensive for universities to use. And “scores” were reasonable predictors of success at university.

However, the idea of making such big decisions by exam-based ranking was a source of criticism right from the start. Do students who are best at exams make the best doctors or teachers or engineers or citizens? What about students who hadn’t had a fair go at school? Or students choosing courses to “not waste the marks” rather than out of genuine interest and commitment? Universities increasingly use evidence provided by principals or in interviews or via “portfolios”, or offering “bonus points” or “early entry”, or combinations of these. The great strengths of the Atar as a common currency – comparability, quality of assessment, book learning and transparency – are now increasingly at a discount. Students have to navigate a confusing array of cloudy options and shop around for the “easiest” option. Universities can tack this way and that to keep the numbers up. Some industry insiders even say that the whole selection system is broken.

The University of Melbourne’s Assessment Research Centre has been working with schools over a number of years to develop “new metrics of learning” that assess and report on more than just academic attainment, and which can support selection based on profiles of student capabilities and their match to course requirements. Learner profiles are informative about what a learner knows and can do, the standards they have reached, their interests and strengths, and their capacity to learn and keep learning, to collaborate, to communicate, to be good citizens. The assessments can meet rigorous standards of validity, reliability, comparability and transparency, and can be more inclusive. We think that in tandem with a successor to the Atar, assessments of general capabilities and associated profiles are the way of the future.

‘A limitation of Atar is that it only represents a narrow scope of what young people know and can do,’ Hayley McQuire says. Photograph: Prostock-studio/Alamy

‘Atar pressures left me and my peers burnt out’

Angelina Inthavong, first-year student, Australian National University

By the end of grade 12, myself and many of my peers were extremely burnt out. There was a lot of pressure placed on obtaining an Atar by schools when my final actual Atar was basically useless due to my early entry offers. Atar was extremely stressful and had a negative toll on my mental health. The current system does not adequately adjust for people from diverse backgrounds and further perpetuates disadvantage. There are still huge disparities in resources and support offered between private schools, public schools and schools in rural and remote areas, which means private schools have higher densities of high Atars. Due to my low socioeconomic background my parents encouraged me to apply for scholarships to private high schools due to the perceived educational advantage. This in itself is a privilege; to have a supportive home life.

The Atar system is elitist, assigning a nonreflective rank to students when the starting line is unequal. It is filled with gaps that leave students ineligible for an Atar and doesn’t properly adjust for people’s backgrounds.

‘We need to rethink the whole system of university entry’

Jenny Allum, head of school at Sceggs Darlinghurst

The Atar is a rank – it simply outlines the order in which universities will make offers to students. That system is not perfect, but at least it is transparent. Universities will select students somehow; whether on the presentation of a portfolio, interview, year 11 results school by school, their own testing regime, or other information. The Atar is at least clear and equitable – a student anywhere, at Sceggs or in any other school in the state, could look at the cutoffs for the course of their choice, set a goal for the Atar they wanted to achieve, and know that the process of determining their Atar was blind to which school they went to, which suburb they lived in, what resources they had access to.

The proliferation of early offers from universities has undermined that process and we now have an opaque, clandestine hybrid system. Who gets an early offer? What schools do they go to? We need to rethink the whole system of university entry but let’s continue to strive for one which is fair and equitable to all, transparent and understandable, and one that inspires confidence in students, parents and the community alike.

The Atar isn’t fit for purpose. But we don’t want students to have to sit five different examinations because they are applying to go to five different universities. We don’t want the stress of the HSC to be passed down to the end of year 11 examinations because that becomes the basis for determining early entry to university. We don’t want highly socioeconomically advantaged students to pay graphic designers and recruitment firms to help them publish the best portfolio they can to present their achievements.

‘We are changing the narrative away from Atar’

Michael Saxon, principal at Liverpool Boys high school

At Liverpool Boys high school we are changing the narrative away from the Atar as the sole focus. We measure the student’s capabilities across all their courses, not treat each course in isolation, producing a deeper academic picture of the young person. We use HSC assessment tasks to produce a capability profile for every student. We measure these areas: communication and collaboration, attitudes and values, practical and organisational, research and critical thinking, and innovation and creativity. Every student at the end of year 12 receives an HSC/Atar and a Capability Certificate measuring their success in these areas, straight from HSC tasks. There is growing interest from our local employers in valuing these certificates.

Every student has a unique capability profile and this indicates what sort of university course, Tafe course or job they may be suitable for. Using a broad range of capabilities to match students to pathways has real meaning for students and potential employers. These are the capabilities employers and universities want, and the capabilities young people need to be successful in tertiary studies.

‘The Atar … is not perfect, but at least it is transparent,’ Jenny Allum says. Photograph: Carly Earl/The Guardian

‘Australia is the only country that puts students under pressure for one number’

Pasi Sahlberg, professor of education at Southern Cross University

When the Covid pandemic first disrupted education and its traditional structures, there was a real opportunity to scrap Atar. It is noteworthy that Australia is the only country that sends students from high school to further studies or the world of work with one rank or value that is supposed to illustrate how competitive they are.

Most students never need their Atar anyway, so why do we continue to do this? Getting rid of the Atar would do away much of the between-student competition that distracts learning from deeper, interest-driven understanding (competencies) to narrow, surface-level adoption of knowledge.

What’s happening elsewhere? One common trend in places that have had high-stakes secondary school leaving examinations is to move towards assessment or qualification arrangements that reward students based on a wider range of competencies achieved in school that would benefit them in choosing further education or work. This would do away much of the unhelpful competition.

As many Australian experts have attested, Atar is not the best – let alone the only – way to predict students’ success in higher education. A better and less harmful way would be a competency-based reporting of students’ school performance and other passion-based merits gained during high school.

‘Atar exists in an education system that is not fit for purpose’

Hayley McQuire, co-chair of Learning Creates

A limitation of Atar is that it only represents a narrow scope of what young people know and can do – it does not reflect the full range of attributes that young people gain throughout their whole 12 years of schooling. However the Atar operates within a broader education system that is not fit for purpose in preparing young people with the skills and knowledge they need to navigate the future world of work, and the increasingly complex global issues that impact humanity. By broadening the way we value and recognise what young people learn, we would have the opportunity to think of new forms of credentials, new forms of assessments, guided by new learning ambitions.

No young person should leave school feeling like they have “failed”, but rather that the unique skill sets they hold match the pathways they’re passionate about.

‘Atar favours those who can handle the intensity of test pressure’

Dr Pearl Subban, Monash University, former year 12 coordinator

The Atar reduces 13 years of schooling to a single number, quantifying every academic, social and psychological experience at school. Can a number be fully representative of all an individual’s strengths, knowledge and skill, gleaned over a decade of learning and collective interaction? Additionally, the Atar appears to favour scores obtained under test conditions, positioning those who handle the intensity of test pressure much better than those who prefer self-pacing their learning. While the Atar provides an easily interpretable figure to universities and other tertiary institutions of how well a student can perform in the future, it may not provide an inclusive picture of a student’s overall ability.

A more balanced measure of how students perform may be more viable for the modern era. These could include assessments involving self-directed projects that consider effort, investment and personal discipline. Consequently, these self-applied tasks may yield a more accurate assessment of overall skill and knowledge than a single test result under test conditions. A holistic figure which draws on interpersonal, communication and academic skill may also reduce the significant drop out rate of first year university students, as the Atar does not gauge tenacity.

Sun, 16 Oct 2022 13:08:00 -0500 en text/html https://www.theguardian.com/australia-news/2022/oct/17/should-the-atar-be-scrapped-seven-experts-on-the-student-ranking-system
Killexams : Sharks in the water, cannabis education, the downside of rescheduling, and industry real talk: NY Cannabis Insider Live on 11/4

NY Cannabis Insider Live events bring together entrepreneurs and industry experts to discuss subjects essential to the New York State cannabis industry. Presented by Cannaspire, the Tarrytown conference will be held Friday, November 4, from 9:00 a.m. to 6:00 p.m. at the Westchester Marriott. Space is limited and tickets are expected to sell out. General admission tickets are $265.

Panelists will share their perspectives on the following subjects and there will be time for audience Q&A:

· The trials and tribulations of cannabis education: From kindergarten to college to retirement communities, education around cannabis is a tough but necessary undertaking for those passionate about informing our communities. Learn from our panelists about how these efforts are progressing in NY, as well as what obstacles are blocking progress – especially within higher-education.

· Real talk: Four interesting people from different parts of NY’s cannabis industry will gather on stage to ask each other their burning questions. No moderator. No pre-arranged questions. Just real talk.

· The downside of rescheduling: President Biden’s recent announcement about marijuana pardons and rescheduling cannabis caught the country by surprise in October. A panel of experts from the NYC and Hudson Valley Cannabis Industry Association will talk about what the president’s rescheduling directive could mean for the burgeoning industry in New York.

· Sharks in the water: Hear from industry veterans about the seedy underworld of early-stage cannabis markets, what’s currently taking place behind the scenes in NY and what to look out for when getting into this game.

· Additional sessions and a complete list of speakers will be announced soon.

Click here for more details and to purchase tickets.

NY Cannabis Insider Live events are attended by industry professionals, entrepreneurs and others looking to start their own cannabis business or evolve their current business. These events also attract cannabis-adjacent industries such as legal, security, retail, banking, finance, construction, engineering, business consultation and medical.

New York Cannabis Insider Live: Event Sponsors

Sponsors and partners for NY Cannabis Insider Live events are the businesses shaping the industry locally and regionally. Look for them at the event for advice and help with your cannabis business.

· Cannaspire provides the products, services, and consulting that business owners need to succeed in the cannabis industry, from application to expansion.

· Syracuse University College of Professional Studies is a global, inclusive and future-facing college, providing access to diverse students and learners seeking a Syracuse University degree, credential, certificate or education experience from anywhere in the world.

· Brown & Weinraub, PLLC is a leading-edge Government Relations & Strategic Consulting law firm representing a broad spectrum of business interests established and/or seeking to expand in New York.

· Green Light Law Group is a business and litigation law firm for the cannabis industry, empowering clients since 2014.

· Cannabis Workforce Initiative is a collaboration between the New York State School of Industrial and Labor Relations at Cornell University and the Workforce Development Institute. Its mission is to promote and support social equity in the adult-use cannabis market by providing quality workforce development and legal education.

· Dutchie powers the world’s best cannabis retailers from multi-state operators to locally owned dispensaries.

· NYSIF has a mission is to guarantee the availability of workers’ compensation and disability insurance with the lowest possible cost to New York employers while maintaining a solvent fund.

· Ayrloom is a vertically integrated cannabis company rooted in over 100 years of agricultural passion and expertise in New York State.

· NorthEast Extracts is a large CO2 processor 400 liter capacity offering industrial scale extraction, distillation, manufacture and distribution.

· Stephen Gould Corp Safely Lock creates custom child-resistant cannabis packaging.

· Blue Skies is a cannabis business consulting firm that provides personalized help at any stage of the marijuana licensing process.

· Tri-State Carbonation provides reliable quality-driven CO2 solutions for your grow house operations.

· Grow Controlled: creating the most sanitary, energy efficient, innovative, and environmentally friendly facilities in the industry.

· Cannabis360 generates awareness, engagement, and leads for your canna-business.

There are still sponsorships available for the event. Contact Lindsay Wickham, events specialist, for more information.

As entrepreneurs and cannabis professionals are preparing to move forward in the billion-dollar legal weed industry, NY Cannabis Insider Live events allow participants to learn about regulations, make connections, establish teams and foundations, and prepare business plans.

If you purchase a product or register for an account through one of the links on our site, we may receive compensation.

Mon, 17 Oct 2022 01:53:00 -0500 en text/html https://www.syracuse.com/marijuana/2022/10/sharks-in-the-water-cannabis-education-the-downside-of-rescheduling-and-industry-real-talk-ny-cannabis-insider-live-on-114.html
Killexams : ACT test scores drop to their lowest in 30 years in a pandemic slide

Students at Bear River High School in Grass Valley, Calif., gather to see their school schedules during the first morning of school in August. Elias Funez/AP hide caption

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Elias Funez/AP

Students at Bear River High School in Grass Valley, Calif., gather to see their school schedules during the first morning of school in August.

Elias Funez/AP

PHOENIX — Scores on the ACT college admissions test by this year's high school graduates hit their lowest point in more than 30 years — the latest evidence of the enormity of learning disruption during the pandemic.

The class of 2022's average ACT composite score was 19.8 out of 36, marking the first time since 1991 that the average score was below 20. What's more, an increasing number of high school students failed to meet any of the subject-area benchmarks set by the ACT — showing a decline in preparedness for college-level coursework.

The test scores, made public in a report Wednesday, show 42% of ACT-tested graduates in the class of 2022 met none of the subject benchmarks in English, reading, science and math, which are indicators of how well students are expected to perform in corresponding college courses.

In comparison, 38% of test takers in 2021 failed to meet any of the benchmarks.

"Academic preparedness is where we are seeing the decline," said Rose Babington, senior director for state partnerships for the ACT. "Every time we see ACT test scores, we are talking about skills and standards, and the prediction of students to be successful and to know the really important information to succeed and persist through their first year of college courses."

ACT scores have declined steadily in recent years. Still, "the magnitude of the declines this year is particularly alarming," ACT CEO Janet Godwin said in a statement. "We see rapidly growing numbers of seniors leaving high school without meeting college-readiness benchmarks in any of the subjects we measure."

The results offer a lens into systemic inequities in education, in place well before the pandemic shuttered schools and colleges temporarily waived testing requirements. For example, students without access to rigorous high school curriculum suffered more setbacks during pandemic disruptions, Babington said. Those students are from rural areas, come from low-income families and are often students of color.

The number of students taking the ACT has declined 30% since 2018, as graduates increasingly forgo college and some universities no longer require admissions tests. But participation plunged 37% among Black students, with 154,000 taking the test this year.

Standardized tests such as the ACT have faced growing concerns that they're unfair to minority and low-income students, as students with access to expensive test prep or advanced courses often perform better.

Babington defended the test as a measure of college readiness. "Now more than ever, the last few years have shown us the importance of having high-quality data to help inform how we support students," Babington said.

Test scores now are optional for first-year student admission at many institutions. Some colleges, such as the University of California system, even opt for a test-blind policy, where scores are not considered even if submitted.

But many students still take the tests, hoping to get an edge in admissions by submitting their scores. Tyrone Jordan, a freshman at test-optional Arizona State University, said he took the ACT and the SAT to get ahead of other students and help him receive scholarships.

Jordan, who wants to pursue mechanical engineering, said he thinks his rigorous schedule at Tempe Preparatory Academy prepared him for college, and the standardized tests helped support him and his family financially.

"All the test did for me was supply me extra financial money," Jordan said.

While Jordan was always planning to take the test, many students struggle with access or choose not to take the test since their universities of choice no longer require it. In Alabama, Louisiana, Mississippi, Nevada, Tennessee and Wyoming, everyone is tested.

Wed, 12 Oct 2022 07:26:00 -0500 en text/html https://www.npr.org/2022/10/12/1128376442/act-test-scores-pandemic
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