Preview SANS-SEC504 Exam Cram that are taken from real test

Essentially remember our SANS-SEC504 PDF Download and have a sure outlook on the Hacker Tools- Techniques- Exploits and Incident Handling test. You will breeze through your SANS-SEC504 test at excellent grades or your cashback. All that you need to breeze through the SANS-SEC504 test is given here. We have arranged a data set of SANS-SEC504 real questions taken from actual tests to permit you to remember and breeze through SANS-SEC504 test on the basic first endeavor. Basically set up our VCE Exam Simulator and get ready. You will breeze through the SANS-SEC504 test.

Exam Code: SANS-SEC504 Practice exam 2022 by Killexams.com team
SANS-SEC504 Hacker Tools, Techniques, Exploits and Incident Handling

- How to best prepare for an eventual breach
- The step-by-step approach used by many computer attackers
- Proactive and reactive defenses for each stage of a computer attack
- How to identify active attacks and compromises
- The latest computer attack vectors and how you can stop them
- How to properly contain attacks
- How to ensure that attackers do not return
- How to recover from computer attacks and restore systems for business
- How to understand and use hacking tools and techniques
- Strategies and tools for detecting each type of attack
- Attacks and defenses for Windows, UNIX, switches, routers, and other systems
- Application-level vulnerabilities, attacks, and defenses
- How to develop an incident handling process and prepare a team for battle
- Legal issues in incident handling

Topics
- Preparation
- Building an incident response kit
- Identifying your core incident response team
- Instrumentation of the site and system
- Identification
- Signs of an incident
- First steps
- Chain of custody
- Detecting and reacting to insider threats
- Containment
- Documentation strategies: video and audio
- Containment and quarantine
- Pull the network cable, switch and site
- Identifying and isolating the trust model
- Eradication
- Evaluating whether a backup is compromised
- Total rebuild of the Operating System
- Moving to a new architecture
- Recovery
- Who makes the determination to return to production?
- Monitoring to system
- Expect an increase in attacks
- Special Actions for Responding to Different Types of Incidents
- Espionage
- Inappropriate use
- Incident Record-keeping
- Pre-built forms
- Legal acceptability
- Incident Follow-up
- Lessons learned meeting
- Changes in process for the future
- Reconnaissance
- What does your network reveal?
- Are you leaking too much information?
- Using forward and reverse Whois lookups, ARIN, RIPE, and APNIC
- Domain Name System harvesting
- Data gathering from job postings, websites, and government databases
- Recon-ing
- Pushpin
- Identifying publicly compromised accounts
- Maltego
- FOCA for metadata analysis
- Aggregate OSINT data collection with SpiderFoot
- Scanning
- Locating and attacking personal and enterprise Wi-Fi
- Identifying and exploiting proprietary wireless systems
- Rubber Duckie attacks to steal Wi-Fi profiles
- War dialing with War-VOX for renegade modems and unsecure phones
- Port scanning: Traditional, stealth, and blind scanning
- Active and passive operating system fingerprinting
- Determining firewall filtering rules
- Vulnerability scanning using Nessus and other tools
- Distributing scanning using cloud agents for blacklist evasion
- Intrusion Detection System (IDS) Evasion
- Foiling IDS at the network level
- Foiling IDS at the application level: Exploiting the rich syntax of computer languages
- Web Attack IDS evasion tactics
- Bypassing IDS/IPS with TCP obfuscation techniques
- Enumerating Windows Active Directory Targets
- Windows Active Directory domain enumeration with BloodHound, SharpView
- Windows Command and Control with PowerShell Empire
- Operating system bridging from Linux to Windows targets
- Defending against SMB attacks with sophisticated Windows networking features
- Physical-layer Attacks
- Clandestine exploitation of exposed USB ports
- Simple network impersonation for credential recovery
- Hijacking password libraries with cold boot recovery tool
- Gathering and Parsing Packets
- Active sniffing: ARP cache poisoning and DNS injection
- Bettercap
- Responder
- LLMNR poisoning
- WPAD attacks
- DNS cache poisoning: Redirecting traffic on the Internet
- Using and abusing Netcat, including backdoors and insidious relays
- IP address spoofing variations
- Encryption dodging and downgrade attacks
- Operating System and Application-level Attacks
- Buffer overflows in-depth
- The Metasploit exploitation framework
- AV and application whitelisting bypass techniques
- Netcat: The Attacker's Best Friend
- Transferring files, creating backdoors, and shoveling shell
- Netcat relays to obscure the source of an attack
- Replay attacks
- Endpoint Security Bypass
- How attackers use creative office document macro attacks
- Detection bypass with Veil, Magic Unicorn
- Putting PowerShell to work as an attack tool
- AV evasion with Ghostwriting
- Attack tool transfiguration with native binaries
- Password Cracking
- Password cracking with John the Ripper
- Hashcat mask attacks
- Modern Windows Pass-the-Hash attacks
- Rainbow Tables
- Password guessing and spraying attacks
- Web Application Attacks
- Account harvesting
- SQL Injection: Manipulating back-end databases
- Session cloning: Grabbing other users' web sessions
- Cross-site scripting
- Denial-of-Service Attacks
- Distributed Denial of Service: Pulsing zombies and reflected attacks
- Local Denial of Service
- Maintaining Access
- Backdoors: Using Poison Ivy, VNC, Ghost RAT, and other popular beasts
- Trojan horse backdoors: A nasty combo
- Rootkits: Substituting binary executables with nasty variations
- Kernel-level Rootkits: Attacking the heart of the Operating System (Rooty, Avatar, and Alureon)
- Covering the Tracks
- File and directory camouflage and hiding
- Log file editing on Windows and Unix
- Accounting entry editing: UTMP, WTMP, shell histories, etc.
- Covert channels over HTTP, ICMP, TCP, and other protocols
- Sniffing backdoors and how they can really mess up your investigations unless you are aware of them
- Steganography: Hiding data in images, music, binaries, or any other file type
- Memory analysis of an attack
- Putting It All Together
- Specific scenarios showing how attackers use a variety of tools together
- Analyzing scenarios based on real-world attacks
- Learning from the mistakes of other organizations
- Where to go for the latest attack info and trends
- Hands-on Analysis
- Nmap port scanner
- Nessus vulnerability scanner
- Network mapping
- Netcat: File transfer, backdoors, and relays
- Microsoft Windows network enumeration and attack
- More Metasploit
- Exploitation using built in OS commands
- Privilege escalation
- Advanced pivoting techniques
- How to best prepare for an eventual breach
- The step-by-step approach used by many computer attackers
- Proactive and reactive defenses for each stage of a computer attack
- How to identify active attacks and compromises
- The latest computer attack vectors and how you can stop them
- How to properly contain attacks
- How to ensure that attackers do not return
- How to recover from computer attacks and restore systems for business
- How to understand and use hacking tools and techniques
- Strategies and tools for detecting each type of attack
- Attacks and defenses for Windows, UNIX, switches, routers, and other systems
- Application-level vulnerabilities, attacks, and defenses
- How to develop an incident handling process and prepare a team for battle
- Legal issues in incident handling

Hacker Tools, Techniques, Exploits and Incident Handling
SANS Techniques, resources
Killexams : SANS Techniques, resources - BingNews https://killexams.com/pass4sure/exam-detail/SANS-SEC504 Search results Killexams : SANS Techniques, resources - BingNews https://killexams.com/pass4sure/exam-detail/SANS-SEC504 https://killexams.com/exam_list/SANS Killexams : SC eBook preview: Threat hunting essentials

(This is an excerpt from the SC Media eBook Threat hunting essentials – How to craft an effective process.”  

Threat hunting, a cybersecurity discipline where skilled human operators investigate, identify, and eliminate threats or vulnerabilities to a network, is not a new practice. But in the last couple years, many more security practitioners have joined the fight. 

In 2020, only half of cybersecurity respondents to a SANS survey saw value in threat hunting, with another 30% unaware of how to even begin instituting it. But in this industry, much can change in two years.  

Flash forward to today, where several factors have jolted the cybersecurity community awake. Adversarial tactics continue to rapidly evolve. The number of interactive hacks involving creative scripting and “hands-on-keyboard” tactics increased by 400% in the year following the SANS survey. The pandemic shifted a significant chunk of the labor force to remote work environments. Under this new arrangement, many companies struggled to extend existing firewall protections of the office to geographically-dispersed employees, creating the conditions for a significantly larger attack surface.  

On top of this, organizations have added millions more endpoints and IoT devices to their networks. As a result, Security Operation Center (SOC) staff are under immense pressure to process ever larger volumes of data and distinguish genuine threats from network noise and false positives.  

Detection and response are no longer sufficient. All evidence suggests that organizations must go on the offensive by introducing effective threat hunting programs that can anticipate and prevent increasingly sophisticated attacks. 

This eBook, sponsored by Sophos, explores the essential tools and techniques of threat hunting, how to get started, and how to optimize. 

Covered in this eBook: 

  • Threat Hunting 101: Most organizations already employ some degree of cybersecurity: encryption, network security monitoring, web vulnerability scanning, firewalls, and antivirus software. So why bring in a threat hunting team? 
  • Threat Hunting challenges: A lot of tools are not natively engineered to block out the latest attack tactics. They’re not looking for familiar and ordinary, they’re scanning for what’s unfamiliar or out of the ordinary. 
  • Threat Hunting advancements: Threat hunting has advanced even in just the last couple years. A major reason is that organizations now have an incredibly wide array of sensors and measurement tools at their disposal to inform their threat hunts. 
  • Five steps to do Threat Hunting effectively: Threat hunting can benefit organizations by improving security posture and overall vigilance, cultivating a culture of proactive risk management and mitigation, and adding greater visibility of the attack surface and adversary tactics. The key is to take advantage of the wide array of sensors and measurement tools at your disposal and follow the five steps for effective threat hunting. 

Quotes: 

“Passively waiting for obvious evidence of intrusions isn't sufficient in today's world. Threat hunting is really the act of proactively searching for signs of potential future intrusions. In cybersecurity we tend to be on our back foot, but threat hunting allows us to get on our front foot as well.” -- Matt Hickey, a Director of Sales Engineering at Sophos  

“Even if you have really good tools in place – whether it be a firewall or endpoint protection – you're going to goof up. People turn off protections and add exclusions or write firewall rules that are overly permissive. They must accept the fact that they're going to make mistakes. So, the question is, how will you compensate for those mistakes when you do make them?” -- Greg Rosenberg, a Director of Sales Engineering at Sophos.  

Fri, 05 Aug 2022 07:49:00 -0500 en text/html https://www.scmagazine.com/resource/ransomware/sc-ebook-preview-threat-hunting-essentials
Killexams : NASA Astronauts Harvest Delicious Space Vegetables, Sans Soil

Get ready for space hydroponics.

Interstellar Salad

Earthly space travelers have been trying to perfect orbital botany for a while now. Stable, sustainable off world agricultural practices are needed to make longer term exploration missions possible, and though the International Space Station (ISS) has seen a few successful low-orbit gardening endeavors, all have used some sort of soil or soil-replacing growth media.

Now, thanks to NASA Flight Engineer Jessica Watkins, that could be starting to change. According to a NASA blog published last week, Watkins has begun to harvest radishes and mizuna greens aboard the ISS — grown without any soil whatsoever.

Growing any edible plants in space is always exciting, but using dirt-like growth materials presents potential resource, mess, and sanitation problems. And that's why Watkins' triumphant soilless crop could be a thrilling step towards a new age of interstellar discovery.

Space Veggies

Watkins grew the cosmic vegetables with the help of a system called XROOTS. Shorthand for the eXposed Root On-Orbit Test System, XROOTS using only hydroponic and aeroponic techniques to support a plant through all stages of growth, starting with a seed.

NASA says that the system — created by private sector company Sierra Space — is experimental, containing a number of different "independent growth chambers" that allow astronauts to test a variety of soil-free, air-and-water-based concoctions on different types of plants.

It doesn't look like the machine is quite ready to feed a village, and we're still waiting for a full culinary review of the off-planet veggies. But the XROOTS experiment was just launched back in February, and seeing as how it was meant to last 4-6 months, we're looking forward to any other crops and discoveries it might yield — not to mention the tech it could make possible down the road.

More on off-world botany: Bad News! The Plants Grown in Moon Soil Turned out Wretched


Tue, 28 Jun 2022 03:31:00 -0500 text/html https://futurism.com/the-byte/nasa-astronauts-harvest-space-vegetables
Killexams : Chromium Browsers Allow Data Exfiltration via Bookmark Syncing

Bookmark synchronization has become a standard feature in modern browsers: It gives Internet users a way to ensure that the changes they make to bookmarks on a single device take effect simultaneously across all their devices. However, it turns out that this same helpful browser functionality also gives cybercriminals a handy attack path.

To wit: Bookmarks can be abused to siphon out reams of stolen data from an enterprise environment, or to sneak in attack tools and malicious payloads, with little risk of being detected.

David Prefer, an academic researcher at the SANS Technology Institute, made the discovery as part of broader research into how attackers can abuse browser functionality to smuggle data out from a compromised environment and carry out other malicious functionality.

In a latest technical paper, Prefer described the process as "bruggling" — a portmanteau of browser and smuggling. It's a novel data exfiltration vector that he demonstrated with a proof-of-concept (PoC) PowerShell script called "Brugglemark" that he developed for the purpose.

The Fine Art of Bruggling

"There's no weakness or vulnerability that is being exploited with the synchronization process," Prefer stresses. "What this paper hones in on is the ability to name bookmarks whatever you want, and then synchronize them to other signed-in devices, and how that very convenient, helpful functionality can be twisted and misused in an unintended way."

An adversary would already need access — either remote or physical — to the environment and would have already infiltrated it and collected the data they want to exfiltrate. They could then either use stolen browser synchronization credentials from a legitimate user in the environment or create their own browser profile, then access those bookmarks on another system where they've been synchronized to access and save the data, Prefer says. An attacker could use the same technique to sneak malicious payloads and attack tools into an environment.

The benefit of the technique is, put simply, stealth.

Johannes Ullrich, dean of research at the SANS Institute, says data exfiltration via bookmark syncing gives attackers a way to bypass most host and network-based detection tools. To most detection tools, the traffic would appear as normal browser synch traffic to Google or any other browser maker. "Unless the tools look at the volume of the traffic, they will not see it," Ullrich says. "All traffic is also encrypted, so it is a bit like DNS over HTTPs or other 'living off the cloud' techniques," he says.

Bruggling in Practice

In terms of how an attack might be carried out in the real world, Prefer points to an example where an attacker might have compromised an enterprise environment and accessed sensitive documents. To exfiltrate the data via bookmark synching, the attacker would first need to put the data into a form that can be stored as bookmarks. To do this, the adversary could simply encode the data into base64 format and then split the text into separate chunks and save each of those chunks as individual bookmarks.

Prefer discovered — through trial and error — that modern browsers allow a considerable number of characters to be stored as single bookmarks. The genuine number varied with each browser. With the Brave browser, for example, Prefer discovered he could synchronize, very quickly, the entirety of the book Brave New World using just two bookmarks. Doing the same with Chrome required 59 bookmarks. Prefer also discovered during testing that browser profiles could synchronize as many as 200,000 bookmarks at a time.

Once the text has been saved as bookmarks and synchronized, all that the attacker would need to do is sign into the browser from another device to access the content, reassemble it, and decode it from base64 back into the original text.

"As for what kind of data could be exfiltrated via this technique, I think that's up to the creativity of an adversary," Prefer says.

Prefer's research was primarily focused on browser market share leader Google Chrome — and to a lesser extent on other browsers such as Edge, Brave, and Opera, which are all based on the same open source Chromium project that Chrome is built upon. But there's no reason why bruggling won't work with other browsers such as Firefox and Safari, he notes.

Other Use Cases

Significantly, bookmark syncing is not the only browser function that can be abused this way, Prefer says. "There are plenty of other browser features that are used in synchronization that could be misused in a similar way, but would require research to investigate," he says. As examples, he points to autofills, extensions, browser history, stored passwords, preferences, and themes, which can all be synchronized. "With a bit of research, it might turn out that they can also be abused," Prefer says.

Ullrich says Prefer's paper was inspired by earlier research that showed how browser extension syncing could be used for data exfiltration and command and control. With that method, however, a victim would have been required to install a malicious browser extension, he says.

Mitigating the Threat

Prefer says organizations can mitigate the risk of data exfiltration by disabling bookmark syncing using Group Policy. Another option would be to limit the number of email domains that are allowed to sign in for syncing, so attackers would not be able to use their own account to do it.

"[Data loss protection] DLP monitoring that an organization already performs can be applied here as well," he says.

Bookmark syncing would not work very well if the syncing happened at a slower speed, Ullrich says. "But being able to sync 200,000+ bookmarks, and only seeing some speed throttling after 20,000 or 30,000 bookmarks makes this [very] valuable," he says.

Thus, browser makers can make things harder for attackers for instance by dynamically throttling bookmark syncing based on factors like the age of an account or logins from a new geographic location. Similarly, bookmarks that contain base64 encoding could be prevented from syncing, as well as bookmarks with excessive names and URLs, Prefer says.

Mon, 01 Aug 2022 16:09:00 -0500 en text/html https://www.darkreading.com/cloud/chromium-browsers-data-exfiltration-bookmark-syncing
Killexams : RSA Conference 2022: News And Analysis

When the more than 36,000 attendees dispersed at the end of the RSA Conference in February 2020, no one could have foreseen what was coming—staggering worldwide deaths from the coronavirus, emergency pandemic lockdowns, an explosion in the number of people remotely working from home, high-profile cyberattacks, and record amounts of private and public funds poured into combating cyberthreats.

This week, attendees return to San Francisco for the first time in two years for an in-person RSA Conference, with last year’s conference having been held virtually due to COVID-19.

CRN will be providing live coverage of the event, so bookmark this page for the latest news, announcements, products and exclusive interviews from the show floor.

The 10 Coolest Cybersecurity Startups At RSA Conference 2022
Wabbi, Abnormal Security and Cyberhaven were among the cybersecurity startups at RSA Conference 2022 that caught CRN’s attention.

20 Hottest Cybersecurity Products At RSAC 2022
Pindrop, Randori and Abnormal Security were among the companies that stood out to CRN during RSA Conference 2022.

RSA Conference: Most Dangerous Cybersecurity Threats In 2022
The SANS Institute outlines what it considers the most potent attack techniques facing private and public organizations today.

Palo Alto Networks Debuts New ‘Autonomous SOC’ Technology
Nir Zuk, founder and CTO of the cybersecurity giant, tells CRN that more AI and fewer humans are the future of Security Operations Centers. ‘[Humans] cannot do all the work that‘s required —to look at all the data all the time and figure out if something is going on,’ he says.

10 Women Who Are Making A Difference In Cybersecurity
Female cybersecurity executives speak to CRN about their own journeys in the field and supply kudos to the RSA Conference for selecting so many women to supply keynotes and participate in panel discussions.

Here Are 10 Innovative Cybersecurity Startups To Watch In 2022
A panel of judges at RSA 2022 selected Israeli cybersecurity vendor Talon as the “Most Innovative Startup” at the conference. Here are the 10 startups that competed for that title.

Director Of National Intelligence: Information-Sharing Key To Conquering Cyberattacks
Sharing real-time information about threats and exchanging ideas on lessons learned is critical in battling the rise in cyberattacks, say Avril Haines, the U.S director of national intelligence, in a keynote session at the RSA Conference.

Cisco Security Cloud Unveiled, Highly Anticipated Cisco Plus SASE Offering Launches At RSA
The tech giant at RSA 2022 unveiled its strategy to help enterprises connect their entire security architecture via a new platform, Cisco Security Cloud. Also unveiled was the highly anticipated Cisco Plus XaaS SASE offering and several security capabilities and services for partners and enterprises.

RSA Conference 2022: Cybersecurity Is Now In ‘Fast-Forward’ Mode
Attendees return to San Francisco for the first time in two years for an in-person RSA Conference, with some telling CRN that they’re almost in awe at the transformation of the industry since 2020.

Mon, 06 Jun 2022 23:25:00 -0500 en text/html https://www.crn.com/rsa-2022
Killexams : Key ways to prevent phishing and vishing scams for seniors

You can read more articles like this at BoomersHub

It’s no secret that seniors are a prime target for cyber scammers.

These scams can be costly and can often lead to identity theft. Older adults lose around 3 billion US dollars annually to financial scams. According to various reports, the older you are, the higher the damage you incur.

Phishing scams are not limited to only financial frauds. There is online identity theft, romance scams, online shopping scams, tech support scams, and more! Unfortunately, these scams can be difficult to detect, as scammers often use techniques to make their messages seem legitimate. However, there are some simple ways to stop old people scams.

This blog post will discuss key ways to identify and prevent phishing and vishing scams from happening to you or your senior loved ones. Stay safe out there!

What is Phishing?

Phishing is a technique cyber criminals use to try and steal your personal information. They do it by sending you fake emails that look like they are from a legitimate company, like your workplace, bank or credit card provider. For example, they may send you an email that looks like it’s from your bank asking you to click on a link or provide personal information.

How does Phishing work?

The goal of phishing is to trick you into providing your personal information, such as your account password, Social Security number, or credit card details. They use fake emails or websites are used to lure people into revealing sensitive information. They also do phone phishing by calling from random numbers and trying to collect information during the conversation. While there are many types of phishing scams, they all share one common goal – to steal your identity or money. If you’re not careful enough, you can easily become a victim of Phishing.

Some Common Examples of Phishing

The most common types of Phishing are explained below:

Deceptive Phishing

Deceptive Phishing has been the most common phishing scam since the 1990s. It is an email scam where attackers try to steal victims’ confidential, personal information, or login details. They do it by impersonating an organization or person and sending emails with deceptive links. For example, a fake email from your bank asks you to click on a link and verify your account details.

Spear Phishing

In spear phishing, scammers target specific individuals instead of targeting a group of people. As a result, these attacks are more customized and harder to trace. Attackers do thorough research on the victim’s social media, workplace, and other personal activities, then use those against them to appear more authentic then trick victims into providing personal data.

According to SANS Institute, 95% of the attacks on corporate networks are the result of successful spear phishing. Example: Someone asking you to fill out ”a new employee handbook”.

Whaling

Whaling is the method of going after CEOs or executives of an organization. Scammers steal their login credentials and access sensitive company information. Your reporting officer or a senior executive asking you to make a payment or pass some confidential data urgently can be an example of whaling.

Pharming

In Pharming, attackers manipulate a website’s traffic or infect its DNS server to redirect users toward a fraudulent site. For example, you are trying to do an online banking transaction, but when you open the bank’s original website, it directs you to a different domain.

What Is Vishing?

As mentioned earlier, vishing attacks are a type of phishing scam where scammers make shady phone calls or leave voice messages to steal financial or personal information from people. It is also referred to as voice phishing. In vishing, attackers often call impersonate a bank employee, policeman, or government officials. They use persuasive language and tone to lure victims into sharing sensitive information.

Phishing vs. Vishing vs. Smishing: What’s the Difference?

Though vishing and smishing fall under the umbrella of Phishing, they share some subtle differences. Phishing, vishing, and smishing attacks have the same motto of stealing financial or personal information, but the communication medium is different in each. Phishing scams are primarily email attacks, while in vishing, attackers use phone calls or voice messages to steal information, and smishing is scamming through text messages.

Why are Seniors more Susceptible to phishing scams?

It is sad but true that older adults are one of the main victim groups of phishing scams. Though they might not outnumber the younger victims, the losses are way higher for seniors. The most vulnerable groups are people in their 80s. They can incur individual losses up to $1700 on average, which is four times higher than victims within the age range of 20-30.

Now let’s have a look at the reasons behind these phishing scams against elderly citizens:

  • Older people are perceived to be wealthier than younger ones.
  • Reports suggest seniors are less likely to report phishing scams.
  • Senior citizens may lack knowledge of digital security or different technologies.
  • They come from a more trustworthy and polite generation.
  • Seniors suffer from various health issues, like Alzheimer’s or disabilities, making them more vulnerable to phishing scams.
  • Many older adults lose their independence and rely on others to perform daily tasks. Unfortunately, scammers take advantage of their vulnerability.
  • Very often, seniors are left alone at home or senior care facilities, leading to social isolation. So, they might remain unaware of such crimes.

How do you avoid phishing scams?

So, how can you tell if an email, phone call, or text message is really from a company or if it’s just part of a phishing scam? We have got some tips for you on ways to stop old people scams!

  • Use security software to protect your PC, and enable auto-update.
  • Enable multi-factor authentication on your devices and across all social media accounts.
  • Create a backup for all data and files on external cloud storage or hard drive.
  • Use passcode, fingerprints, or face recognition options to prevent scammers from accessing your devices.
  • Enable the call recording system on your phone and record any suspicious conversation.
  • Stay informed about the latest phishing scams, and keep your friends and family updated as well.
  • Work on your impulses and avoid clicking any suspicious links without verifying the authenticity of the source.
  • Use browsers with anti-phishing toolbars.
  • Install extensions to block auto pop-ups and redirections.
  • Never share personal information or credentials over the phone or the internet.

What to do if you’re a Victim of a Phishing or Vishing Attack?

Do not panic if an unfortunate incident happens and you think you have been exposed to phishing scams, do not panic. There are ways to prevent, recover or minimize your damage. Below are some steps you can take to protect yourself if you have become a victim of phishing or vishing attacks.

Change passwords

The first thing one should do after becoming a phishing or vishing scam victim is to change their passwords and log out from all connected devices. Even if you have different passwords for different accounts, it is best to change those credentials as well.

Disconnect your device and contact IT Support

If your work computer is under a phishing attack, you should immediately disconnect the device from its home network and Wi-Fi. After that, contact IT support to let them know about the incident and follow their instructions. You may also inform the company personnel and check if any sensitive information was compromised.

Scan your devices for viruses

In case you have downloaded a suspicious attachment or clicked on an affected link, scan your device for potential viruses and malware. If you don’t know how to run scans or use anti-virus software, ask for help from a family member or an expert.

Report to IdentityTheft.gov Website

If you suspect the scammer has information such as your social security number, bank account details, etc., visit IdentityTheft.gov. There you will find specific steps that you need to take based on the data you lost.

Report to FTC (Federal Trade Commission)

Another step that can be taken is to report to the Federal Trade Commission (FTC). They can guide you through the process of verifying whether your personal information was stolen or not.

Report to Anti-Phishing Working Group

Anti-Phishing Working Group has a database of Verified credentials that are used in Phishing. They can analyze and detect the culprits if you share your experience and details of the suspected scam.

Report to Local Police Station

If you have been a victim of phishing or vishing scams, reporting to your local police station could be a good idea. If you have already incurred financial or identity damages, they can help you trace the scammer and recover the loss.

Stay calm and vigilant against future scams

It is important to stay calm after a phishing or vishing attack. Call a trusted friend or family member if you have anxiety or panic attacks. Once you have overcome the initial shock, report the incident to the appropriate authorities and stay extra careful about future scams.

Conclusion

Falling victim to phishing or vishing scams can happen to anyone. There is nothing to be ashamed of about it. However, if your elderly loved one is introverted or shy, they might not share any potential scams they have been a victim of. That is why it is important to talk about these online crimes and keep them informed about prevention techniques. Stay alert and look out for each other.

Sign up to BoomersHub’s email list to get such great content and tips related to making seniors’ lives easier. Call +(877) 409-0666 or email info@boomershub.com for any information or help related to seniors or senior living.

FAQs related to Phishing and Vishing Scams

What do I do if my elderly parent is being scammed?

If your elderly parent is being scammed, you can report it to your local police or Adult Protective Services. Also, if they have been a victim of phishing or fishing scams, immediately change their credentials and scan all devices for viruses.

Does the FBI investigate elder abuse?

Yes. FBI investigates elder abuse. Their Internet Crime Complaint Center investigates all kinds of online frauds.

Is scamming a federal crime?

Yes. Scamming or wire fraud are federal crimes. In the United States, a person can face up to 10 years in federal prison, depending on the nature and type of scam.

Why do fraudsters often target the elderly?

Older people are often deemed as a vulnerable group due to their physical and mental shortcomings due to age or related factors. That is one reason why fraudsters make them their target. Besides, senior citizens are less likely to report Phishing or any form of scams. That also encourages attackers to exploit them.

What to do if a senior is being scammed?

If a senior is being scammed, report to the Federal Trade Commission (FTC) and Adult Protective Services (APS) to inform them about the fraud. They will investigate the matter and provide instructions you may need to follow.

Is scamming the elderly illegal?

Scamming the elderly is illegal and a punishable offense. Fraudsters can face fines or jail time depending on the nature of the scam.

Which act is considered financial abuse of an elder?

Acts that are considered financial abuse of an elder under the Federal Elder Justice Act, 2010:

Illegal or improper use of money or property of an elderly or a person with a disability.

Theft, misappropriation, concealment, misuse, or fraudulent deprivation of finances or properties belonging to an older adult or disabled individual.

How to stop phishing emails?

To stop phishing emails, install security software and an anti-virus system on your devices. Protect your social media information and keep the privacy to ‘only me’ for email addresses or phone numbers. Also, add extensions on your browser to block unnecessary pop-ups.

What is vishing in cyber security?

Vishing is also referred to as voice fraud in cyber security, where scammers use voice calls or phone calls to persuade people to share sensitive information.

What is the difference between vishing and smishing?

The main difference between these two types of Phishing is that in smishing, victims receive fraudulent text messages, while in vishing, they get fraudulent phone calls. Example: can’t talk text me a scam, or getting a call saying you have won a prize and need to share your account details to avail the money.

How Can BoomersHub Help Seniors?

BoomersHub believes everyone deserves to live their life with dignity and respect. We have been working tirelessly to ensure the highest quality of support and resources for the elderly. Seniors and their families can find many quality articles concerning older adults on our blog and website. Besides, BoomersHub uses social media platforms to raise awareness about senior-related topics. Our experienced family advisors work alongside seniors and their families to find the best senior living facilities that provide them with a safe and nurturing environment.

Please visit our website or get in touch by calling +(877) 409-0666 or email at info@boomershub.com to avail of our free services!

You can read more articles like this at BoomersHub

Mon, 11 Jul 2022 20:00:00 -0500 en text/html https://www.wral.com/key-ways-to-prevent-phishing-and-vishing-scams-for-seniors/20366833/
Killexams : How CIOs Are Addressing The “Unsustainable” Security Challenge

The proliferation of cyber threats has become so great that earlier this year the Australian government issued the recommendation that organisations “urgently” adopt an enhanced cyber security posture.

“Many actors use common techniques such as exploiting internet-facing applications and spear phishing to compromise victim networks,” the advisory note states. “Organisations should ensure they have implemented mitigations against these common techniques and are prepared to detect and respond to cyber security incidents.”

Actually doing so is one of the greatest headaches that CIOs and CISOs have to grapple with, however. Over 80 per cent of businesses have had their security budgets increase in the past year, according to research by Accenture, and IT security budgets are now as much as 15 per cent of all IT spending. However, 81 per cent of IT leaders also state that this is unsustainable and that staying ahead of attackers is a constant battle of escalation.

Cyber security attacks are an inevitability that all businesses should now be prepared for. Rather than simply investing in technology, and hoping for the best, however, IT leaders need to be strategic and undertake risk management that best suits their business profile.

Understanding where the threats lie

The dominant theme of this year’s 2022 Security Exhibition & Conference (17-19 August) is the importance of having an innovative, technologically advanced and competitive industry that will meet the challenges of a new era in security.

What this means is that every company, and every sector, will be facing different security challenges, and a successful response will be down to how the IT security leaders interpret and tailor the response to their specific situation.

The event will feature a cross-section of keynote presentations at the conference with that in mind, as well as exhibitors on the floor that highlight solutions in action. From the impact that emerging technologies like AI, IoT and 5G will have on the security environment, to the blurring of the boundaries between physical security and cyber security, and the future of the built environment, the conference will delve into the implications of security across a broad range of different sectors. Other keynotes will focus on standards best practices and, specifically, how Australian organisations should be responding to global security challenges.

For CIOs and CISOs looking to think strategically about security, the focus of the event will be on practical and actionable insights. Keynotes will include use cases and case studies, with the emphasis being on what is being done now, set against the overall business objectives of the modern enterprise. There will also be a networking dinner gala, that will allow executives to trade thought leadership and make connections that will be critical to the sector-wide holistic approach to security moving forwards.

Security is still the art of following best practices

One good example of how the ASIAL Security Conference, within the Security Exhibition & Conference event, will address practical solutions to security challenges is the deep dive into digital transformation that will be the focus of one of the keynotes.

As noted in a report by PwC, an effective security response still typically involves getting the basic best practices right. It notes the government advice that “patching the holes” is a critically important step, but also notes that this isn’t necessarily as straightforward as it might first seem. “Businesses need to identify all Internet-facing devices in the organisation, ensure updates don’t break other processes, that a patch exists for specific software and configurations, and that they have the means to implement the update,” the report notes. “This scale of the problem can be overwhelming, so businesses should seek help if they have doubts.”

The same report also notes that another standard security best practice – adopting multi-factor authentication – can be difficult for CIOs to get over the line in enterprises because of the complexity that it can introduce to the environment. For these reasons, PwC recommends that CIOs lean on their consultants, partners and other resources to complement internal resources.

This is especially true given that a further headache that IT executives face is a severe cyber security skills shortage. Fortinet research shows that 64 per cent of A/NZ organisations agree that the skills shortage creates additional risks for their businesses.

Despite these challenges, CIOs can also not overlook the need to continue on their digital transformation journey. One of the keynotes at the ASIAL Security Conference – delivered by PwC’s Asia Pacific Chie Digital & Information Officer, Vishy Narayanan – will address this combination of challenges, highlighting the role that leaders play in these new IT environments, and the role that behavioural change, above and beyond any technology investment, plays in delivering transformation in a secure and sustainable manner.

Raw investment into technology is not a solution to the cyber security challenge that organisations face. Rather, CIOs and CISOs need to develop a strategic approach that views security as an enabler and facilitator of innovation, rather than a bottleneck.

For more information on the Security Exhibition & Conference or to purchase tickets to attend the ASIAL Security Conference, click here.

Wed, 13 Jul 2022 08:47:00 -0500 en-US text/html https://www.cio.com/article/402791/how-cios-are-addressing-the-unsustainable-security-challenge.html
Killexams : Tactical Resources Appoints Accomplished Metallurgical Specialist

Tactical Resources Corp.

- Former Mining Majors Metallurgist to Lead Development

VANCOUVER, British Columbia, July 28, 2022 (GLOBE NEWSWIRE) -- Tactical Resources Corp. (CSE: RARE) (OTC: USREF) (“Tactical Resources” or the “Company”), a mineral exploration and development company focused on the rare earth elements (“REEs”) that drive the critical technologies of the future, is pleased to announce the appointment of Turnstone Metallurgical Services (Turnstone), led by Marcus Tomlinson, PhD to undertake a lead role in the development of REE extraction and processing technologies.

  • PhD specialist bringing over thirty years of experience in metallurgical research, engineering, and operations support.

  • Advanced experience with Rare Earth Elements (REEs), including USA Rare Earth’s and Texas Mineral Resource Corp.’s Round-Top Project in the United States, as well as Lynas Corp.’s REE projects in China and Western Australia.

  • Fundamental knowledge in developing patented processes at Goldcorp Inc.

Based in Vancouver, Canada, Marcus Tomlinson brings over thirty years of experience in metallurgical research, engineering, and operations support. For over a decade, he worked in the Corporate Technical Services groups at Goldcorp and Barrick Gold. He founded Turnstone in April 2021 and has subsequently worked on the well-known Texas-based Round Top project in developing a fully integrated flowsheet to support development of this rare earth, lithium orebody.

Upon Newmont’s acquisition of Goldcorp, Marcus served as Director, Modelling in the Newmont Global Projects team (2020 to 2021) During this period he supported the expansion project at the world renowned Pueblo Viejo Mine, amongst other large-scale initiatives. At Goldcorp (2012-2019) he served in the corporate technical services team as Director Metallurgy & Research. During this time, he developed a patented process for concentrate enrichment, and supported pre-flotation and pyrite leach projects at the Peñasquito Mine. He also worked on projects to Improve leach efficiency and reduce effluent toxicity. He was also involved in development of Goldcorp’s GeoMet strategy to Improve predictability of metallurgical performance and financial expectations from projects and operations.

Prior to this, he served as Manager, Metallurgy with Barrick Gold Corporation (2008 to 2012) in the technical services group offering modelling and metallurgical support to global operations and development projects.

Marcus has also worked with a number of major Engineer companies, Worley Parsons Mining & Metals (2007 to 2008) in Australia, AMEC Americas Mining and Metals, Canada (2003 to 2007), Ausenco, Australia (2001 to 2003), AMEC Simons Mining Group, Canada, (1999-2001) and Fluor Daniel Mining & Minerals (1996 to 1999). His career started as a Senior Metallurgist with Anglo American Research Lab (1992 to 1995) in South Africa.

He gained REE knowledge working with Lynas Corp on their REE concentrate cracking, solvent extraction, and purification projects while working with Ausenco, AMEC and Worley Parsons.

As part of Tactical Resources commitment to becoming a premier American developer of Rare Earths products for the US supply chain, the Company is dedicated to identifying solutions aimed at advancing its prospective properties towards development-stage and ultimately commercial-stage activities.

Company CEO, Ranjeet Sundher, notes, “We are delighted to have the opportunity to benefit from the years of experience and breadth of knowledge Marcus brings to the team. To say he “has been there and done that,” would be a significant understatement. The ability to develop key extraction and processing technologies is crucial to our future strategic plans and ultimately will play a major role in our ability to commercialize our efforts. With the addition of Marcus to the team we have taken a major step towards achieving our goals. We welcome him to our venture and look forward to working together to unlock the potential value of domestic REE during these troubled times.”

Tactical Resources is committed to becoming a premier North American developer of REE products to meet domestic supply chain needs. The Company’s flagship Peak Project is a tailings offtake venture based upon active cut rock operations of the Sierra Blanca Quarry, LLC located in Hudspeth County, Texas located 68 miles southeast of El Paso, and two miles southeast of the Round Top Rare Earth Element project owned by Texas Minerals Resources Corporation & USA Rare Earth. For more information on the Peak Project, watch this video here, or visit the Tactical Resources website.

On Behalf of The Board of Directors,
Sincerely,

~Ranjeet Sundher~

Ranjeet Sundher
Chief Executive Officer & Director
Tactical Resources Corp.
www.tacticalresources.com

About Tactical Resources Corp. (CSE: RARE) (OTC: USREF)
Tactical Resources is a mineral exploration and development company focused on rare earth elements based in Vancouver, British Columbia, and holds interests at the Peak Project in western Texas, the Lac Ducharme property located in Quebec, and the SAM property in Northern Saskatchewan. The Company is also actively involved in the development of innovative metallurgical processing techniques to further unlock REE development potential. Find out more at: www.tacticalresources.com and follow us on Twitter.

Forward Looking Information Disclaimer

This news release contains statements and information that, to the extent that they are not historical fact, may constitute “forward-looking information” within the meaning of applicable securities legislation. Forward-looking information may include financial and other projections, as well as statements regarding future plans, objectives, or economic performance, or the assumption underlying any of the foregoing. In some cases, forward-looking statements can be identified by terms such as “may”, “would”, “could”, “will”, “likely”, “except”, “anticipate”, “believe”, “intend”, “plan”, “forecast”, “project”, “estimate”, “outlook”, or the negative thereof or other similar expressions concerning matters that are not historical facts. Examples of such statements include, but are not limited to, statements with respect to the preparation of an NI 43-101 technical report for the Peak Project, and increased demand for domestically produced REEs.

Forward-looking information is based on the assumptions, estimates, analysis, and opinions of management made in light of its experience and its perception of trends, current conditions and expected developments, as well as other factors that management believes to be relevant and reasonable in the circumstances at the date that such statements are made, but which may prove to be incorrect. The material factors and assumptions used to develop the forward-looking information contained in this news release include, but are not limited to, key personnel and qualified employees continuing their involvement with the Company; the Company’s ability to secure additional financing on reasonable terms; the competitive conditions of the sector in which the Company operates; and laws and any amendments thereto applicable to the Company.

Forward-looking information involves known and unknown risks, uncertainties and other factors that may cause the genuine results, performance or achievements of the Company to differ materially from any future results, performance or achievements expressed or implied by the forward-looking information, including, without limitation, risks relating to the future business plans of the Company; risks that the Company will not be able to retain its key personnel; risks that the Company will not be able to secure financing on reasonable terms or at all, as well as all of the other risks as described in the Company’s long form prospectus dated February 28, 2022, under the heading “Risks Factors.” Accordingly, readers should not place undue reliance on any such forward-looking information. Further, any forward-looking information speaks only as of the date on which such statement is made. New factors emerge from time to time, and it is not possible for the Company’s management to predict all such factors and to assess in advance the impact of each such factor on the Company’s business or the extent to which any factor, or combination of factors, may cause genuine results to differ materially from those contained in any forward-looking information. The Company does not undertake any obligation to update any forward-looking information to reflect information or events after the date on which it is made or to reflect the occurrence of unanticipated events, except as required by law, including securities laws.

The CSE has neither approved nor disapproved the contents of this news release. Neither the CSE nor its Market Regulator (as that term is defined in the policies of the CSE) accepts responsibility for the adequacy or accuracy of this release.

CONTACT INFORMATION

Tactical Resources Corp.
Investor Relations
Email: investors@tacticalresources.com
Telephone: +1 (778) 588-5483

Matt Chatterton, Director
Tel: +1 (778) 613-2068
Email: info@tacticalresources.com

Media Inquiries
media@tacticalresources.com

Thu, 28 Jul 2022 00:30:00 -0500 en-US text/html https://finance.yahoo.com/news/tactical-resources-appoints-accomplished-metallurgical-123000132.html
Killexams : 'Living off the cloud': Hackers modernise an old-school tactic

An old threat is new again — or never really went away.

As governments and other players increasingly turn to the cloud, malicious actors are following, adding "living off the cloud" attacks back into their repertoires.

Living off the land ploys see hackers use phishing or other methods to gain access to a victims' networks, then use the victims' own tools and services for malicious purposes. These attacks are particularly subtle and date back to at least 2013, according to cybersecurity firm Darktrace.

A newer subset of this is living off the cloud, which uses victims' cloud services.

According to cybersecurity firm LogRhythm, the attack's name comes from the physical world lifestyle of living off the land, in which practitioners rely on the food and other resources they harvest from surrounding nature. The cybersecurity equivalent is hackers relying on tools found in the victim's environment.

For example, bad actors could use the Windows Certutil tool — designed to let users get files from the Internet — to get malware, according to Johannes Ullrich, dean of research at the SANS Technology Institute. Hackers can fly under the radar by using the tool the way it was designed to function.

"To the defender, it looks just like a normal tool that's valid, that's good, being used to do things it's supposed to do," Ullrich told Government Technology.

Both criminally motivated and nation state perpetrators use living off the land techniques, Ullrich said, and it's been deployed both for indiscriminate attacks and those targeting specific victims. Hackers often used the method for espionage or to extort money by threatening to leak data.

Why hackers do it

Victims may find it easier to discover malicious code deployed on their networks than detect when a legitimate tool is used for harmful purposes.

Ullrich gave another example during an RSA Conference panel on new attack techniques: A malicious party might direct victims' backup solutions to also make copies to a storage destination owned by the hacker.

Attackers also might use cloud services to host malware, and send phishing links from web domains that users trust.

For example, cybersecurity firm Palo Alto Networks announced this week that the criminal group behind the SolarWinds attack has been hosting malware on popular cloud storage services like Google Drive and Dropbox. The hackers then send phishing emails with URLs, which will get malware from the cloud hosting and onto victims' systems if clicked.

"This is a new tactic for this actor and one that proves challenging to detect due to the ubiquitous nature of these services and the fact that they are trusted by millions of customers worldwide," Palo Alto wrote.

Victims also can't simply block domains or infrastructure from cloud services they still need for conducting business, said Katie Nickels, cybersecurity firm Red Canary's director of intelligence, during the RSA panel.

Cheap and subtle?

Perpetrators may also find living off the land attacks to be easier and more cost-effective, states LogRhythm. Hackers can skip building their own tools if they just use victims'. And using software their targets expect to see spares bad actors from needing to design programs capable of avoiding detection.

"Attackers that use already existing tooling avoid the need to build, test, and QA tools. They don't have to worry about compatibility, dependencies, and so forth," states LogRhythm.

The approach also may supply attackers some camouflage if they are detected. Cybersecurity firm CrowdStrike states that, "If everyone is using similar tools, it's more difficult to distinguish one group from another," making attacks difficult to attribute.

How well can we catch it?

Defenders can monitor for unusual patterns of behaviour to detect living off the land attacks, and Darktrace recommends using AI-powered tools to identify "subtle deviations" in activities. Ullrich said organisations would particularly want to examine patterns in data volume and files being sent to cloud services.

"But again, since pretty much anything is legitimately now using these cloud services, it can be very difficult to impossible to really distinguish the malicious use from the normal use of all these tools," he said. Attackers can also learn to keep their data exfiltration below the thresholds that would trigger warnings.

Another complication: hackers may linger on systems long after compromising them, all the while quietly collecting victims' data. Entities trying to establish what normal behaviour looks like on their systems — and thus, what, in comparison, is abnormal — must find a time before the compromise occurred. But they may find it challenging to determine how far back they need to look.

According to CrowdStrike "many sophisticated adversaries spend months and years in their victims' networks without being detected." Organisations thus must analyse past activities to identify if and when infiltrations may have occurred.

Endpoint detection and limiting opportunities

Endpoint monitoring can help detect misbehaviour after something has gone wrong, but trends like the shift to remote work have caused the number of endpoints to balloon, and organisations often rely on their cloud providers for help seeing what's happening. Those insights often aren't detailed enough to easily distinguish legitimate and nefarious activity, Ullrich said.

"Now, often, you rely on whatever monitoring these cloud providers built in. But that doesn't exist at the granularity of such where you could get a list of all your users, what files they uploaded and downloaded," Ullrich said.

Organisations may reduce their exposure to living off the cloud attacks by limiting how many cloud services they use — after all, malicious actors can't hack what isn't there. But of course, there's only so far governments can trim down on cloud use if they still want to serve their residents well.

Local governments offer a variety of digital services, which necessitates a level of cloud use, Ullrich acknowledged. And small governments that lack in-house IT staff often fill their technology needs by purchasing software-as-a-service (SaaS) solutions, he added.

"It's hard. It's one problem that isn't quite solved yet," Ullrich said. "Commercial as well as government organisations are struggling with how much cloud to use, where to use it, and then also how to monitor that activity." – Government Technology/Tribune News Service

Sun, 24 Jul 2022 14:01:00 -0500 en text/html https://www.thestar.com.my/tech/tech-news/2022/07/25/039living-off-the-cloud039-hackers-modernise-an-old-school-tactic
Killexams : Ban on single-use plastic: More sustainable restaurants are on the menu in Bengaluru

Changes in cooking techniques, edible plastic, sustainability workshops and better packaging are some of the highlights in Bengaluru eateries as ban on single-use plastic comes into play

Changes in cooking techniques, edible plastic, sustainability workshops and better packaging are some of the highlights in Bengaluru eateries as ban on single-use plastic comes into play

Once as ubiquitous a find as any, single-use plastic (SUP) is now being cracked down upon, under the nationwide ban on items such as plastic sticks on balloons, cutlery, straws, wrapping film on sweet boxes, invitation cards etc. from July 1.

The move is bound to impact eateries too, many of which still rely on plastic bowls, cutlery or straws.

Jagdish B., manager at the Millers Road branch of Kanti Sweets, says he has been receiving communication from the higher management for the past month about alternative packaging that will be incorporated soon. Since plastic films on sweet boxes is banned too, the store will soon shift to cardboard boxes or painted boxes sans any film.

“We have already started using paper bags to pack namkeen takeaways and within a week, we will use up our existing stock of plastic containers and move to boxes that are 100 microns in thickness,” he says. 

At Farmlore, a farm-to-plate fine dining experience in Sathnur village, the team relies on areca leaf containers. Now, with news of the ban, the kitchen staff is getting creative with spreading the message.

Conceptualised post the ban, their new dishes are a metaphor for how humans corrupt the ocean with plastic and oil. On the plate is a Kochi snapper fish, and splatters featuring coconut, spirulina blue algae (to resemble the ocean), and a charcoal oil slick. Resting atop the fish is edible plastic.

Another dish, served at the end encases mouth freshener within a thin pouch that looks eerily similar to plastic, but is actually made from potato starch. “It’s an homage to kindle the thought that plastic can exist long after we leave the world and are a hazard to our environment,” says chef Johnson Ebenezer, who co-founded Farmlore with Kaushik Raju. 

The team is going a step further to change their cooking techniques too. Sous vide is a popular technique where food, say meat, is placed in a vacuum sealed plastic pouch and slow-cooked for a long time in a water bath.

Cooks in Bengaluru are also trying to change their method of preparing food, such as sealing meat in a banana leaf and cooking.

Cooks in Bengaluru are also trying to change their method of preparing food, such as sealing meat in a banana leaf and cooking. | Photo Credit: file photo

“We’ve been trying to seal the meat in a tightly-wrapped banana leaf instead and it works just as well. It may not be an easy fight, but with some effort and innovation, we can try to reduce our reliance on plastic,” said Mr. Ebenezer. 

Chef Nayantara Menon Bagla too has started convincing her vendors to do away with plastic for the key ingredients. “For vegetables, I am asking my vendor to supply the ware in crates or cloth bags and for bread, talks are on to see if we can switch to air-tight boxes with beeswax paper to segregate the loaves,” says the partner at The Circus Canteen at BLR Creative Circus. 

Ashish D’Abreo of Maverick & Farmer is hoping to bring about a change on the consumer side too. The Halasuru-based coffee shop recently hosted a workshop with Bare Necessities, where participants were educated about being more conscious coffee consumers, including carrying personal reusable cups to cafes. 

Currently, the outlet receives 40-60 daily orders for takeaway or delivery, which means the coffee is served in paper cups with a thin plastic lining. Not ideal, agrees Mr. D’Abreo.

“Coffee chaff, a byproduct of the roasting process, is collected and sent to make reusable cups,” he says. These cups were introduced two months ago. “Our customers can avail this for a one-time cost of ₹160 and get a ₹10 discount on their coffee when they bring it in,” he said.

Aditi Dugar, Chief Advisor, Retail & Lifestyle, at ARAKU Coffee, credits the pandemic for bringing about a shift in collective consciousness. “Now more than ever, people are acutely aware of the products they consume,” she said.

The Indiranagar-based coffee shop doesn’t foresee an impact to day-to-day functioning with the ban, given that they don’t use SUP in their kitchen or delivery operations.

While Ms. Dugar calls the ban a step in the right direction, she is also cognisant of the fact that this move could hurt small business owners like hawkers and vendors since moving away from plastic is an expensive proposition.

There is an awareness that the ban on single-use plastic could hurt small business owners like hawkers and vendors, since moving away from plastic is an expensive proposition.

There is an awareness that the ban on single-use plastic could hurt small business owners like hawkers and vendors, since moving away from plastic is an expensive proposition. | Photo Credit: file photo

“Subsidies on eco-friendly alternatives could have helped small-business owners to take appropriate measures to brace for impact,” she says.

The higher costs is a point of concern for restaurants too. Cloud Kitchen and restaurant Chowman currently uses plastic containers over 100 microns, but planning for better alternatives is on the cards.

This, however, would mean that packaging expenses will double. Though welcoming of the ban, Debaditya Chaudhury, founder and managing director of Chowman, also says, “I hope the difference in pricing between SUP and the alternative is brought down to aid quicker adoption.” 

Tue, 12 Jul 2022 06:05:00 -0500 en text/html https://www.thehindu.com/news/cities/bangalore/ban-on-single-use-plastic-more-sustainable-restaurants-are-on-the-menu-in-bengaluru/article65616673.ece
Killexams : SC eBook preview: Threat hunting essentials

(This is an excerpt from the SC Media eBook Threat hunting essentials – How to craft an effective process.”  

Threat hunting, a cybersecurity discipline where skilled human operators investigate, identify, and eliminate threats or vulnerabilities to a network, is not a new practice. But in the last couple years, many more security practitioners have joined the fight. 

In 2020, only half of cybersecurity respondents to a SANS survey saw value in threat hunting, with another 30% unaware of how to even begin instituting it. But in this industry, much can change in two years.  

Flash forward to today, where several factors have jolted the cybersecurity community awake. Adversarial tactics continue to rapidly evolve. The number of interactive hacks involving creative scripting and “hands-on-keyboard” tactics increased by 400% in the year following the SANS survey. The pandemic shifted a significant chunk of the labor force to remote work environments. Under this new arrangement, many companies struggled to extend existing firewall protections of the office to geographically-dispersed employees, creating the conditions for a significantly larger attack surface.  

On top of this, organizations have added millions more endpoints and IoT devices to their networks. As a result, Security Operation Center (SOC) staff are under immense pressure to process ever larger volumes of data and distinguish genuine threats from network noise and false positives.  

Detection and response are no longer sufficient. All evidence suggests that organizations must go on the offensive by introducing effective threat hunting programs that can anticipate and prevent increasingly sophisticated attacks. 

This eBook, sponsored by Sophos, explores the essential tools and techniques of threat hunting, how to get started, and how to optimize. 

Covered in this eBook: 

  • Threat Hunting 101: Most organizations already employ some degree of cybersecurity: encryption, network security monitoring, web vulnerability scanning, firewalls, and antivirus software. So why bring in a threat hunting team? 
  • Threat Hunting challenges: A lot of tools are not natively engineered to block out the latest attack tactics. They’re not looking for familiar and ordinary, they’re scanning for what’s unfamiliar or out of the ordinary. 
  • Threat Hunting advancements: Threat hunting has advanced even in just the last couple years. A major reason is that organizations now have an incredibly wide array of sensors and measurement tools at their disposal to inform their threat hunts. 
  • Five steps to do Threat Hunting effectively: Threat hunting can benefit organizations by improving security posture and overall vigilance, cultivating a culture of proactive risk management and mitigation, and adding greater visibility of the attack surface and adversary tactics. The key is to take advantage of the wide array of sensors and measurement tools at your disposal and follow the five steps for effective threat hunting. 

Quotes: 

“Passively waiting for obvious evidence of intrusions isn't sufficient in today's world. Threat hunting is really the act of proactively searching for signs of potential future intrusions. In cybersecurity we tend to be on our back foot, but threat hunting allows us to get on our front foot as well.” -- Matt Hickey, a Director of Sales Engineering at Sophos  

“Even if you have really good tools in place – whether it be a firewall or endpoint protection – you're going to goof up. People turn off protections and add exclusions or write firewall rules that are overly permissive. They must accept the fact that they're going to make mistakes. So, the question is, how will you compensate for those mistakes when you do make them?” -- Greg Rosenberg, a Director of Sales Engineering at Sophos.  

Fri, 05 Aug 2022 07:52:00 -0500 en text/html https://www.scmagazine.com/editorial/resource/ransomware/sc-ebook-preview-threat-hunting-essentials
SANS-SEC504 exam dump and training guide direct download
Training Exams List