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SFU 2003-2004 Calendar


Actuarial Mathematics ACMA

Faculty of Science

No student may take, for further credit, any course offered by the Department of Statistics and Actuarial Science which is a prerequisite for a course the student has already completed with a grade of C- or higher, without permission of the department.
ACMA 310-3 Mathematics of Compound Interest
Measurement of interest, present value. Equations of value. Basic annuities: immediate, due, perpetuity. General annuities. Yield rates: cash flow analysis, reinvestment rate, portfolio and investment year methods. Amortization schedules and sinking funds. Bonds and other securities. Applications: real estate mortgages depreciation methods. Interest rate disclosure and regulation in Canada. This course covers the interest theory portion of Course 2 of the Society of Actuaries. (3-1-0) Pre/corequisite: MATH 152 must precede or be taken concurrently.
ACMA 315-3 Credibility Theory and Loss Distributions
Statistical distributions useful in general insurance. Inferences from general insurance data. Experience rating. Credibility theory: full credibility, partial credibility, Bayesian credibility. Estimation of loss distributions. Modelling loss distributions: ungrouped data, truncated and shifted data, clustering. Applications: inflation. This course covers part of the syllabus for Courses 3 and 4 of the Society of Actuaries. (3-0-0) Prerequisite: STAT 285 must precede or be taken concurrently.
ACMA 320-3 Actuarial Mathematics I
Survival distributions: age at death, life tables, fractional ages, mortality laws, select and ultimate life tables. Life insurance: actuarial present value function (apv), moments of apv, basic life insurance contracts, portfolio. Life annuities: actuarial accumulation function, moments of apv, basic life annuities. Net annual premiums: actuarial equivalence principle, loss function, accumulation type benefits. Actuarial reserves: prospective loss function, basic contracts, recursive equations, fractional durations. This course covers part of the syllabus for Course 3 of the Society of Actuaries. (3-1-0) Pre/corequisite: ACMA 310 (with a grade of C+ or higher). MATH 232 and STAT 285 must precede or be taken concurrently.
ACMA 335-3 Risk Theory
The economics of insurance: utility theory, optimal insurance. Individual risk models for a short term: individual claim, sums of independent claims, approximations for the distribution, applications. Collective risk models for a single period: aggregate claims, compound poisson distribution, approximations. Collective risk models over an extended period: claims processes, adjustment coefficient, discrete time model, surplus below the initial level, maximal aggregate loss. Applications: claim amount distribution, stop-loss reinsurance. This course covers part of the syllabus for Course 3 and background material for Course 4 of the Society of Actuaries. Corequisite: STAT 280 must precede or be taken concurrently. (3-1-0) Corequisite: STAT 285 must precede or be taken concurrently.
ACMA 395-3 Special subjects in Actuarial Science
subjects in areas of actuarial science not covered in the regular certificate curriculum of the department. Prerequisite: dependent on the subjects covered.
ACMA 425-3 Actuarial Mathematics II
Actuarial reserves: allocation of the loss to the policy years. Multiple life functions: joint-life, last-survivor. Multiple decrement models: stochastic and deterministic approaches, associated single decrement, fractional durations. Valuation theory for pension plans. Insurance models including expenses: gross premiums and reserves, type of expenses, modified reserves. Nonforfeiture benefits and dividends: equity concept, cash values insurance options, asset shares, dividends. This course covers part of the syllabus for Course 3and background material for Course 4 of the Society of Actuaries. (3-1-0) Prerequisite: ACMA 320.
ACMA 445-3 Survival Models
Actuarial survival models: select, aggregate, study design. Mathematics of survival models: distribution of T, parametric survival models, conditional and truncated distributions, transformed random variables. Life table: traditional form, fractional ages, select and ultimate tables. Estimating survival models from complete data samples: study design, exact time of death, grouped times of death. Estimating survival models from incomplete data samples: study design, moments procedures, maximum likelihood procedures. Estimation of parametric survival models. Evaluation of estimators from trial data. Aids: survival analysis of persons testing HIV+. This course covers part of the syllabus for Course 4 of the Society of Actuaries. (3-0-0) Corequisite: ACMA 320.
ACMA 465-3 Mathematics of Demography
Data: collection, errors. Measures of mortality and fertility: crude rates, age-specific rates, adjusted measures. Construction of life tables from census data: US 1979-81, Canada 1985-87. Stationary population: survivorship group, lexis diagram, applications. Stable population: foundations, growth rate, applications, quasi-stable populations. Population projections: inter-censal, post-censal, logistic curve, component method. Uses of census data. (3-0-0) Prerequisite: ACMA 320.
ACMA 490-3 Selected subjects in Actuarial Science
The subjects included in this course will vary from semester to semester depending on faculty availability and student interest. (3-0-0) Prerequisite: ACMA 310. Corequisite: ACMA 320 or permission of the Department of Statistics and Actuarial Science.
ACMA 495-3 Directed Studies in Actuarial Science
Independent study and/or research in subjects chosen in consultation with the supervising instructor. Prerequisite: written permission from the Department of Statistics and Actuarial Science undergraduate curriculum committee.

Archaeology ARCH

Faculty of Arts

ARCH 100-3 Ancient Peoples and Places
A broad survey of human cultural development from the late Palaeolithic/PalaeoIndian periods (ca 40,000 BP) to the rise of civilization and empires, in both the Old and New Worlds. (lecture/tutorial)
ARCH 105-3 The Evolution of Technology
A history of technology from earliest times to the beginning of the Industrial Revolution. The course will discuss the causes and effects of technological change, as illustrated by specific technological developments including stone tools, metallurgy, agriculture, etc. (lecture/tutorial)
ARCH 131-3 Human Origins
A non-technical survey of the primate background of humans, fossil primates, and fossil humans, and the associated evidence of cultural development. An introduction to physical anthropology. (lecture/tutorial)
ARCH 200-3 Special subjects in World Prehistory
Non-specialized introductory summaries of selected regional subjects in world prehistory. (lecture)
ARCH 201-3 Introduction to Archaeology
A survey of methods used by archaeologists to discover and interpret the past. Examples will be drawn from selected sites and cultures around the world. Students who have taken ARCH 101 may not register in ARCH 201. (lecture/tutorial)
ARCH 223-3 The Prehistory of Canada
A summary review of the pre-contact native cultures of Canada, from their beginnings to the arrival of Europeans, as revealed by archaeology. Lectures focus on how and when the first humans appeared in the land now known as Canada, and how their cultures changed over time, organized in terms of eight `archaeological regions,' beginning with the Atlantic coast and then moving west and north. (lecture)
ARCH 226-3 The Prehistory of Religion: Shamans, Sorcerers and Saints
Charts the emergence and changes in the expression of human religious behavior. It covers the earliest rituals of the Palaeolithic, the importance of fertility cults, ancestor cults, alliance rituals, shamans, witchcraft, and monotheism. (lecture) Prerequisite: any lower division archaeology or anthropology course.
ARCH 272-3 Archaeology of the Old World
A survey of the major centres of Old World cultural development from the Palaeolithic to the Bronze Age. Basic concepts used in reconstructing prehistoric cultures, and the artifactual and contextual evidence for the development of culture. (lecture/tutorial) Prerequisite: ARCH 100 or 201.
ARCH 273-3 Archaeology of the New World
A survey of prehistoric cultures of North and South America. The peopling of the New World, the rise of the pre-Columbian civilizations of Mexico and Peru, and the cultural adaptations by prehistoric populations to other parts of the New World. (lecture/tutorial) Prerequisite: ARCH 100 or 201.
ARCH 301-3 Prehistoric and Indigenous Art
Art styles and traditions of prehistoric and preliterate peoples in one or more world cultural areas. (lecture)
ARCH 311-5 Archaeological Dating
A study of various scientific methods of dating archaeological samples, including Carbon 14, thermoluminescence, obsidian-hydration, fission track, potassium-argon, magnetic, and other dating techniques. (lecture/seminar) Prerequisite: PHYS 181 or permission of department.
ARCH 321-3 Archaeology of Britain
A survey of the archaeological evidence for human occupation of the British Isles from Paleolithic to Medieval periods. This course will emphasize the interpretation of archaeological data, and for later periods, the integration of archaeological study with documentary research. (lecture) Prerequisite: ARCH 201 and 272, or permission of instructor. Students with credit for Archaeology of Britain when taken as a Special subjects course, may not take ARCH 321 for further credit.
ARCH 330-3 Prehistory of Latin America
Intensive study of the prehistoric cultures of Latin America. Emphasis will be on the development of the civilizations of prehistoric Mexico and Peru. (lecture) Prerequisite: ARCH 273.
ARCH 332-3 Special subjects in Archaeology I
This course will be offered from time to time to meet special needs of students and to make use of specializations of visiting faculty members. (lecture/seminar) Prerequisite: to be announced in the Course Timetable and exam Schedule.
ARCH 333-3 Special subjects in Archaeology II
This course will be offered from time to time to meet special needs of students and to make use of specializations of visiting faculty members. (lecture/seminar) Prerequisite: to be announced in the Course Timetable and exam Schedule.
ARCH 334-3 Special subjects in Archaeology III
This course will be offered from time to time to meet special needs of students and to make use of specializations of visiting faculty members. (lecture/seminar) Prerequisite: to be announced in the Course Timetable and exam Schedule.
ARCH 335-5 Special Laboratory subjects in Archaeology
This is a laboratory course that will be offered from time to time to meet special needs of students and to make use of specializations of visiting faculty members. (lecture/laboratory) Prerequisite: to be announced in the Course Timetable and exam Schedule.
ARCH 336-3 Special subjects in Prehistoric and Indigenous Art
Art styles and traditions of prehistoric and preliterate peoples in selected world cultural areas. (lecture/seminar) Prerequisite: to be announced in the Course Timetable and exam Schedule.
ARCH 340-5 Zooarchaeology
An introduction to the study of animal remains from archaeological sites. Coverage of the major concepts and methods used in the study of animal remains and detailed practical coverage of the vertebrate skeleton. (lecture/laboratory) Prerequisite: ARCH 201.
ARCH 344-3 Primate Behavior
The evolution of the primate order and the ecology and behavior characterizing the different grades of primates: prosimians, monkeys, and apes. Current trends in interpreting primate behavior are emphasized. (lecture) Prerequisite: ARCH 131 or any lower division biology course.
ARCH 349-5 Management of Archaeological Collections
The philosophy, policies and practices of the care of archaeological collections. This lecture and laboratory course treats the practical problems of designing museum programs within a framework of legal responsibilities for collections. Contemporary issues such as repatriation will be discussed. (lecture/laboratory) Prerequisite: three 200 division archaeology courses.
ARCH 350-0 Practicum I
First semester of work experience in the Archaeology Co-operative Education Program. Prerequisite: normally 45 semester hours with a CGPA of 3.0 and the following courses are recommended: both ARCH 131 and 201; either ARCH 272 or 273; and three of ARCH 372, 373, 376, 377, 386, 442.
ARCH 351-0 Practicum II
Second semester of work experience in the Archaeology Co-operative Education Program. Prerequisite: normally 45 semester hours with a CGPA of 3.0 and ARCH 350.
ARCH 360-5 Native Cultures of North America
A descriptive study of the cultures of North American natives north of Mexico, as they were at initial European contact, organized on a culture area basis. Native groups in each area will be discussed in terms of languages, population estimates, early post-contact history and its impact on traditional ways of life, dominant ethnographic economic/adaptive emphases, socio-political organization, religion, ceremony and warfare. (lecture/seminar) Prerequisite: ARCH 201 and 273.
ARCH 365-3 Ecological Archaeology
Deals with the techniques for reconstruction of past environments, as well as the effect of environment on past settlements and people. Environment as considered in the course will encompass the presence of other settlements, and deal with relationships among settlements. (lecture) Prerequisite: ARCH 201.
ARCH 370-3 Western Pacific Prehistory
The exploration of prehistoric developments in the Western Pacific region, beginning with the first traces of humans, dealing with problems in the rise of civilization, and finally, tracing the voyages of the early Pacific navigators. (seminar) Prerequisite: ARCH 272.
ARCH 372-5 Material Culture Analysis
Analysis and interpretation of archaeological material culture. This lecture and laboratory course combines the practical problems of recognition and interpretation of archaeological specimens, typology, seriation, and statistical procedures with the basic principles of archaeological theory. (lecture/laboratory) Prerequisite: ARCH 201.
ARCH 373-5 Human Osteology
A detailed study of the human skeleton with emphasis on lab and field techniques. (lecture/laboratory) Prerequisite: ARCH 131.
ARCH 374-3 Prehistory of South and East Asia
Survey of prehistoric development and cultural origin(s) of Japan, China, Mainland Southeast Asia, and India. (lecture) Prerequisite: ARCH 272.
ARCH 376-5 Quantitative Methods in Archaeology
Theory, method, and operation of the application of statistical techniques to the description, classification, analysis, and interpretation of archaeological data. (lecture/seminar) Prerequisite: ARCH 201, and either STAT 203 (formerly 103) or PSYC 210.
ARCH 377-5 Historical Archaeology
An introduction to theory and method in North American historical archaeology. Laboratory instruction is provided in historic artifact analysis and interpretation. (lecture/seminar/laboratory) Prerequisite: ARCH 201 and one lower division ARCH course.
ARCH 378-3 Pacific Northwest North America
The prehistory and cultural traditions of the region. The content, antecedents, relationships, and changes in these cultures through time. Technological, socio-economic, and environmental factors in culture growth. (lecture) Prerequisite: ARCH 273.
ARCH 385-5 Paleoanthropology
The relationship between culture and biology in prehistoric human evolution. The recognition and critical evaluation of the significance of the similarities and differences among fossil human types. (lecture) Prerequisite: ARCH 131 and 272.
ARCH 386-3 Archaeological Resource Management
Surveys the origins, implementations, and need for archaeological heritage legislation on an international and national scale. Topical issues associated with contract archaeology, public archaeology, native heritage, and avocational societies are incorporated. (lecture/seminar) Prerequisite: ARCH 201.
ARCH 390-5 Archaeobotany
An introduction to the recovery and analysis of macroscopic archaeological plant remains. The major methodological and interpretive issues in archaeobotany will be covered, with an emphasis on plant domestication in selected regions of the world. (lecture/laboratory) Prerequisite: ARCH 201 and either 272 or 273.
ARCH 432-5 Advanced Physical Anthropology
An intensive investigation of the theory and problem areas in physical anthropology. (lecture/laboratory/seminar) Prerequisite: ARCH 373 and either 344 or 385.

ARCH 433, 434, and 435 are normally taken as a block in one semester as the Archaeological Field School. Students enrolling for these courses must seek permission from the Department of Archaeology before final registration.

ARCH 433-6 Background to Field Work
Lectures cover the archaeological background and rationale for specific field research questions, the critical relationship in any field project between the research questions asked and the methods and techniques employed, and the craft of field work including use of equipment, specific excavating, recording and cataloguing techniques, field safety and camp life. Prerequisite: normally taken concurrently with ARCH 434 and 435; ARCH 131 and 201; at least one group I course, permission of the department.
ARCH 434-3 Exercises in Mapping and Recording
A series of exercises in which the student must demonstrate the ability to apply the various recording and mapping skills covered in the course. The graded exercises are done individually and in teams, both on-campus and in the field. Prerequisite: normally taken concurrently with ARCH 433 and 435; ARCH 131 and 201; at least one group I course; permission of the department.
ARCH 435-6 Field Work Practicum
A practical application of the background knowledge and specific techniques of ARCH 433 and 434. It takes place in a research oriented field excavation. Evaluation of student performance is based upon assessments of efficiency and accuracy of excavation techniques/recording procedures, and upon the student's overall contribution to the smooth functioning of the team. Prerequisite: normally taken concurrently with ARCH 433 and 434; ARCH 131 and 201; one group I course; permission of the department.
ARCH 438-5 Geoarchaeology
This course introduces the concept of archaeological sites as active constituents in natural Quaternary land-forming and land-altering systems. Lectures will focus on all processes which may have contributed to the present geomorphological contexts of archaeological sites and their sedimentary and pedological contents. (lecture) Prerequisite: ARCH 201 and either 272 or 273.
ARCH 442-5 Forensic Anthropology
Current techniques in identification of latest human skeletal remains. (lecture/lab/seminar) Prerequisite: ARCH 373.
ARCH 450-0 Practicum III
Third semester of work experience in the Archaeology Co-operative Education Program. Prerequisite: normally 45 semester hours with a CGPA of 3.0 and ARCH 351.
ARCH 451-0 Practicum IV
Fourth semester of work experience in the Archaeology Co-operative Education Program. Prerequisite: normally 45 semester hours with a CGPA of 3.0 and ARCH 450.
ARCH 471-5 Archaeological Theory
The cultural, evolutionary, physical, and distributional principles which underlie the prediction and reconstruction of the past. (lecture/seminar) Prerequisite: ARCH 131, 201, 272 and 273.
ARCH 479-3 Directed Readings
Directed readings for upper level students who desire to study selected subjects in depth. Prerequisite: permission of the department.
ARCH 480-5 Directed Laboratory/Library/Field Research
A course in which students can undertake specific laboratory, library or field based research supervised by a faculty member. It is open to students from other departments. Prerequisite: permission of the department.
ARCH 485-5 Lithic Technology
An in-depth study of how to manufacture and analyse stone tools. Includes rock and mineral identification, stone working by students, fracture mechanics, and relevance to theoretical problems. (lecture/laboratory) Prerequisite: ARCH 372.
ARCH 498-5 Honors Reading
Directed readings in a selected field of study under the direction of a faculty member. Papers will be required. Prerequisite: permission of the department.
ARCH 499-5 Honors Thesis
An honors thesis of some ten to fifteen thousand words will be written under the direction of a faculty member. Prerequisite: permission of the department.

Asia-Canada ASC

Faculty of Arts

Department of Humanities

ASC 101-3 Introduction to Asia-Canada Studies I
An introductory course on Asia-Canada interactions. It will survey various issues, both historical and contemporary, including those involving Asian-Canadians. (lecture/tutorial)
ASC 102-3 Introduction to Asia-Canada Studies II
An introductory course on Asian civilizations in three areas: East Asia, Southeast Asia and South Asia. A survey course, it is designed to cover multiple dimensions of people's lives and history in Asia. (lecture/tutorial)
ASC 200-3 Introduction to Chinese Culture
An introduction to historical and cultural perspectives on China. subjects covered will include different aspects of traditional Chinese culture with a view to understanding contemporary Chinese society. (lecture/tutorial) Prerequisite: 15 semester hours. Students who have taken GS 201 or GS 251 may not take this course for further credit.
ASC 201-3 Introduction to Japanese Culture and History
An introductory course on Japanese culture and history. It is designed for students with no Japanese background and with no Japanese speaking ability. The course will cover the basic aspects of Japan: geography, history, culture, politics, economy, etc. (lecture/tutorial) Prerequisite: 15 semester hours. Students who have taken this course as JAPN 250 may not take this course for further credit.
ASC 202-3 Studies in Asian Cultures
An introduction to East, Southeast or South Asian art, literature, history or philosophy. The emphasis will be on the cultural importance of the themes covered and on their relationship to contemporary societies. (lecture/tutorial) Prerequisite: 15 semester hours. Students who have taken GS 251 cannot take this course for further credit.
ASC 205-3 Special Topics: Field Studies in Chinese Culture
This course is part of the core courses offered in the China Field School covering subjects on various aspects of Chinese culture and society, from Chinese medicine, martial arts, painting and calligraphy, etc. to contemporary life and local history in the area. (tutorial) Prerequisite: 15 semester hours. Students who have take GS 201 or 251 may not take this course for further credit.
ASC 300-3 Asians and North Americans in Public Discourse
A cross-cultural examination of the ways we perceive and represent each other in public discourse, including literature, news media, cinema, and other education and entertainment media. (seminar) Prerequisite: 45 credit hours and ASC 101 or 102 or permission of the instructor.
ASC 301-3 Asia-Canada Identities: Experiences and Perspectives
This course will explore the experience of Asian immigrants and their children, focusing in particular on social and cultural aspects. (seminar) Prerequisite: 45 credit hours and ASC 101 or 102 or permission of the instructor.
ASC 302-3 Selected subjects in Chinese Studies
Content will vary according to interests of faculty and students but will involve China-related study within one or more of the social science or humanities disciplines. (seminar) Prerequisite: 30 credit hours. Recommended: ASC 200.
ASC 303-3 Selected subjects in Japanese Studies
Content will vary according to interests of faculty and students but will involve Japanese-related study within one or more of the social science or humanities disciplines. (seminar) Prerequisite: 30 credit hours. Recommended: ASC 201.
ASC 400-3 Selected subjects in Asia-Canada Studies
(seminar) Prerequisite: 45 credit hours.
ASC 401-3 Directed Studies
Individual study. Prerequisite: ASC 101 or 102, and one ASC 300 level course and permission of the program director.

Biological Sciences BISC

Faculty of Science

See also courses listed under Marine Science (MASC). Note: Entry into courses numbered 300 and above normally requires completion of the lower division core in Biological Sciences (see Lower Division Core in the Biological Sciences section of the Calendar). Prerequisites for any course may be waived with the approval of the department.
BISC 004-3 Apiculture: An Introduction to Bees and Beekeeping
The course will stress the biology of bees as well as management for honey production, and will provide the necessary information required to begin beekeeping. Lecture subjects will include basic honeybee biology, beekeeping equipment, seasonal management, and disease prevention. (3-0-1) Prerequisite: open to all students.
BISC 100-4 Introduction to Biology
An introduction to the basic concepts of biology, emphasizing evolution as a unifying theme. subjects include cell structure, mitosis and meiosis, DNA structure and function, evolution and population and ecosystem ecology. (3-1-3) Students with credit for BISC 101 or a succeeding biology course may not take BISC 100 for further credit. Students with credit for biology 12 normally will not be permitted to take this course for credit.
BISC 101-4 General Biology
This course offers an introduction to the biochemical and physiological mechanisms of living organisms. subjects covered include cell structure and function, DNA replication and the flow of genetic information, enzyme function, metabolism and physiology of microorganisms, plants and animals. (2-1-4) Prerequisite: high school biology 12 (or equivalent) or BISC 100. BISC 101 and 102 may be taken in any order.
BISC 102-4 General Biology
The course begins by surveying the diversity of life, and its evolutionary history on earth. The student is introduced to the study of genetics, development and evolution, giving an overview of how these processes interact to produce form and function. The principles of behavior and ecological relationships of organisms to each other and their environment are also studied. (2-1-4) Prerequisite: high school biology 12 (or equivalent) or BISC 100. BISC 101 and 102 may be taken in any order.
BISC 202-3 Genetics
Principles and concepts of the transmission of genetic information treated comparatively in man, animal, plant and microbe. (3-1-0) Prerequisite: BISC 101 and 102.
BISC 204-3 Introduction to Ecology
An introduction to biotic-environmental relationships and dynamics; ecological concepts; population dynamics, variation, adaptation and evolution. (3-1-0) Prerequisite: BISC 101 and 102. Credit will not be granted for both BISC 204 and GEOG 215.
BISC 272-3 Special subjects in Biology
Selected subjects in areas not currently offered within the undergraduate course offerings in the Department of Biological Sciences. Prerequisite: to be announced in the Course Timetable and exam Schedule. Entry into this course normally requires completion of the lower division core for biological sciences, or permission of the department.
BISC 302-3 Genetic Analysis
Discussion and manipulations of some of the organisms and techniques applicable to genetic analysis. (2-0-4) Prerequisite: BISC 202.
BISC 303-3 Microbiology
The biology of micro-organisms and their significance in the understanding of cellular processes. (2-0-4) Prerequisite: MBB 221.
BISC 304-3 Animal Ecology
A study of the interrelationships of animals and their physical and biotic environment. (3-1-0) Prerequisite: BISC 204.
BISC 305-3 Animal Physiology
A comparative study of basic physiological mechanisms in invertebrates and vertebrates. (3-1-0) Prerequisite: MBB 221 and PHYS 102 with a grade of C- or better.
BISC 306-3 Invertebrate Biology
An introduction to selected invertebrate phyla with an emphasis on functional morphology, diversity and ecology. (3-0-3) Prerequisite: BISC 204.
BISC 307-3 Animal Physiology Laboratory
A laboratory course using contemporary techniques of animal physiological research. (1-1-4) Prerequisite: BISC 305 and 329.
BISC 310-3 The Natural History of British Columbia
An introduction to the natural history of British Columbia, studying the ecology, distribution, and general characteristics of organisms representative of various biotic regions of the province - terrestrial, maine or freshwater. The particular taxa and regions studies may vary between offerings. Field trips of one to four days are normally a required part of the course. (3-0-4) Prerequisite: 75 credit hours including BISC 101 and 102.
BISC 312-3 Environmental Toxicology I
An introductory course in environmental toxicology which will concentrate on the biologist's perspective and will "bridge the gap" between traditional biology courses and formal toxicology courses. The course is required for a minor and extended studies diploma program in Environmental Toxicology. (3-1-0) Prerequisite: BISC 101, 102 and 204 or EVSC 200, with grades of C- or better.
BISC 313-3 Environmental Toxicology II
This course introduces students to basic principles of toxicology and several classes of widely encountered environmental pollutants. Emphasis is on toxicology as an interdisciplinary science. This course is a prerequisite for all advanced toxicology courses. (3-1-0) Prerequisite: MBB 221. Corequisite: BISC 312.
BISC 316-3 Vertebrate Biology
A review of the evolution and the taxonomy of the vertebrate classes. A comparative study of their organ systems and functions with particular reference to reproduction. A comparison of the functional morphology of some species by laboratory dissections. (3-0-4) Prerequisite: BISC 101 and 102.
BISC 317-3 Insect Biology
Life histories, bionomics, comparative morphology, and classification of insects and related organisms. A collection may be required, depending on instructor. (2-0-4) Prerequisite: BISC 101 and 102.
BISC 326-3 Biology of Algae and Fungi
A survey of form, function and phenetics. (2-0-4) Prerequisite: BISC 101 and 102.
BISC 329-4 Introduction to Experimental Techniques
This course is designed to introduce students to basic measurement methods and instrumentation as used in modern biology. (2-0-5) Prerequisite: CHEM 121 and 122, MBB 221, PHYS 102, STAT 201.
BISC 333-3 Developmental Biology
Classical and modern experimental approaches will be described for understanding development of embryos of several species having common and distinctive features. These approaches are at the organismal, cellular, molecular and genetic levels. (3-1-0) Prerequisite: BISC 202 and MBB 222. Students with credit for BISC 203 may not complete BISC 333 for further credit.
BISC 337-3 Plant Biology
An introductory course covering many aspects of plant biology including the origin and evolution of plants, basic anatomy, plant growth and development and the utilization and impact of plants in human society. (3-0-4) Prerequisite: BISC 101 and 102.
BISC 341-0 Practicum I
First semester of work experience in the Biological Sciences Co-operative Education Program. Prerequisite: acceptance in the biological sciences co-operative education program.
BISC 342-0 Practicum II
Second semester of work experience in the Biological Sciences Co-operative Education Program. Prerequisite: BISC 341 and readmission to the science co-operative education program.
BISC 356-3 Plant Development
This course explores the mechanisms underlying plant development from the molecular genetic to the whole plant level. The role played by hormones and the environment in the regulation of development will be emphasized. (3-0-0) Prerequisite: MBB 222, BISC 337.
BISC 366-3 Plant Physiology
The plant's physical environment and the physiological basis (mechanisms and principles) of the interaction between plants and their environment in relation to their survival and ecological distribution. (3-1-0) Prerequisite: MBB 221.
BISC 367-3 Plant Physiology Laboratory
A laboratory course using contemporary techniques of plant physiological research. (1-1-4) Prerequisite: BISC 329 and 366.
BISC 372-3 Special subjects in Biology
Selected subjects in areas not currently offered within the undergraduate course offerings in the Department of Biological Sciences. Prerequisite: to be announced in the Course Timetable and exam Schedule.
BISC 400-3 Evolution
The comparative biology of change mechanisms in living systems. The origin of life, major evolutionary trends in geological time, and the comparison of adaptive processes at species, population and individual levels. Man's origin and the special biological significance of human adaptive capacities. (3-1-0) Prerequisite: 75 credit hours including BISC 101 and 102.
BISC 403-3 Current subjects in Cell Biology
The lectures will explore two or three major themes in current cell biology, such as cell motility, the cell cycle, and cellular signalling. A critical component of the course is to develop an understanding of the experimental basis of our knowledge about cells. (3-1-0) Prerequisite: MBB 221 and 222.
BISC 404-3 Plant Ecology
The study of the distribution and abundance of plants, including how individuals, populations, and communities are affected by abiotic (climate, soil) and biotic (competition, herbivory) factors. A major focus will be life history evolution (pollination, defence, disperal). Experimental and observational laboratory exercises are primarily conducted outdoors. (2-0-4) Prerequisite: BISC 204.
BISC 405-3 Cell Physiology
The physiology of cells with emphasis on the physical and chemical nature of specialized activities. (2-0-4) Prerequisite: BISC 307, or KIN 306, or BISC 305 and 329, all with grades of C- or better.
BISC 406-3 Marine Biology and Oceanography
An introduction to the marine environment, marine organisms and the ecological and oceanographic processes affecting them. (2-0-4) Prerequisite: BISC 306 or 316.
BISC 407-3 Population Dynamics
An evaluation of factors influencing the natural fluctuation of regulation of animal population numbers. (3-1-0) Corequisite: BISC 304.
BISC 410-3 Behavioral Ecology
An introduction to the evolution of behavior and its adaptiveness in a natural context. (3-1-0) Corequisite: BISC 304 or permission of the department.
BISC 414-3 Limnology
An integrated examination of biological, chemical and physical processes in lakes and running water ecosystems. Interactions among biological, chemical and physical controls on the structure, function and dynamics of aquatic ecosystems are emphasized. Environmental problems resulting from human disturbances to aquatic ecosystems are examined. (2-0-4) Prerequisite: 75 credit hours in a science program, including BISC 204 or GEOG 215, or permission of the instructor.
BISC 416-3 Fish Biology
An introduction to the biology of fishes with an emphasis on classification, evolution, anatomy, physiology, and ecology. (3-0-4) Prerequisite: BISC 316 or permission of the department.
BISC 417-3 Entomology
Analysis of the biological characteristics which enable insects to be successful organisms in nature as well as highly successful pests. Particular emphasis on characteristics which render insects vulnerable to various types of pest management. Laboratory includes recognition of insect pests and project work on selected types of problems encountered by professional entomologists. (2-0-3) Prerequisite: BISC 317.
BISC 419-3 Wildlife Biology
Theoretical and applied aspects of ecology and behavior in relation to wildlife populations and their habitats, with emphasis on important mammals and birds in British Columbia. Attendance on local field trips is required. (2-0-4) Prerequisite: BISC 304. Recommended: BISC 316.
BISC 422-3 Population Genetics
Theoretical and experimental aspects of inheritance at the population level. subjects include Hardy-Weinberg, one- and two-locus selection theory, introduction to quantitative genetics, and Fisher's fundamental theorem of natural selection. (3-1-0) Prerequisite: BISC 202 and STAT 201.
BISC 425-3 Biology and Society
The objectives of this course are to demonstrate the relevance of contemporary research in biological sciences to society, teach critical thinking, develop analytical skills and ability to communicate, and encourage students to evaluate the diverse perspectives that influence societal decisions about issues for which scientific analyses are significant. Course format will include lectures, discussion, guest speaker seminars, videos and student presentations. (3-0-0) Prerequisite: BISC majors.
BISC 429-3 Experimental Techniques I: Separation Methods
Theory and practice of analytical and preparative separation methods in biology. (1-1-6) Prerequisite: BISC 329.
BISC 430-3 Plant Pathology
Fungi, bacteria, viruses, nematodes, parasitic higher plants and insect vectors as agents of plant disease will be considered. Etiology and ecology of host-parasite relationships will be emphasized via examination of selected economically and/or aesthetically important plant diseases. (3-0-4) Prerequisite: BISC 326 or 337.
BISC 431-4 Molecular Biotechnology
Laboratory with accompanying lectures to provide practical experience in the application of recombinant DNA technology to basic and applied research. (3-0-6) Prerequisite: BISC 331. Corequisite: MBB 322 and/or BISC 402 concurrently.
BISC 432-3 Chemical Pesticides and the Environment
The physical, chemical and biological properties of chemical pesticides; risks and benefits associated with their use in pest management. (3-1-0) Prerequisite: MBB 321 or 322. Recommended: for those who wish entry to the Master of Pest Management program.
BISC 434-3 Paleoecology and Palynology
The principles of paleoenvironmental reconstruction, emphasizing the study of pollen grains, spores, and other microfossils in solving problems of paleobiology and earth history. (2-0-4) Prerequisite: minimum 60 credit hours including BISC 204, or GEOG 215. Some background in botany, biogeography, or earth sciences is desirable.
BISC 435-3 Introduction to Pest Management
Survey of the natures, causes and consequences of pest problems and of the natural and applied factors and processes that determine their occurrence and intensity. (3-0-0) Prerequisite: BISC 317, or 75 credit hours.
BISC 439-3 Industrial Microbiology
This course introduces students to the use of microorganisms in biotechnology, e.g. in the environmental, pharmaceutical and chemical industries. The lectures will cover the unique physiology/biochemistry of industrial microorganisms and their use in processes such as fermentation, bioremediation, chemical synthesis and protein production. The laboratory component is designed as a series of exercises that form a complete research project. (2-0-6) Prerequisite: BISC 303 or equivalent.
BISC 443-0 Practicum III
Third semester of work experience in the Biological Sciences Co-operative Education Program. Prerequisite: BISC 342 and readmission to the science co-operative education program.
BISC 444-0 Practicum IV
Fourth semester of work experience in the Biological Sciences Co-operative Education Program. Prerequisite: BISC 443 and readmission to the science co-operative education program.
BISC 445-3 Environmental Physiology of Animals
A discussion of the physiological mechanisms and adaptations which permit animals to live in diverse environments. The course will adopt a comparative approach to physiology. (3-1-0) Prerequisite: BISC 305.
BISC 446-0 Practicum V
Fifth semester of work experience in the Biological Sciences Co-operative Education Program. Prerequisite: BISC 444-0 and readmission to the science co-operative education program.
BISC 449-3 Experimental Techniques III: Histochemistry
Techniques in histochemistry. Principles and application of bright-field-phase contrast fluorescence - and interference microscopy; microspectrophotometry. (1-1-6) Prerequisite: BISC 329.
BISC 453-3 Advanced Developmental Biology
Intensive examination of the latest research literature in modern molecular studies of the development and differentiation of animal systems. Emphasis will be on molecular mechanism which underlie basic development phenomena. (3-0-0) Prerequisite: BISC 333 (or 203) and 331.
BISC 455-3 Endocrinology
A study of endocrine organs and their role in integrating physiological functions in animals. (3-1-0) Prerequisite: BISC 305 and one of BISC 306 or 316.
BISC 457-3 Plant Molecular Biology and Biotechnology
An introduction to plant molecular biology and the techniques and applications of plant genetic engineering. (3-0-4) Prerequisite: BISC 331, or permission of the department.
BISC 471-475-3 Special subjects in Biology
Selected subjects not currently offered within the undergraduate course offerings in the department of Biological Sciences. Prerequisite: to be announced within the Course Timetable and exam Schedule.
BISC 490-5 Research Design
Prerequisite: completion of all lower division biological sciences courses, plus upper division BISC courses appropriate to the subject of the intended research as determined by the departmental undergraduate curriculum committee; completion of all physics, chemistry and mathematics requirements for the major or honors program; at the time of application, students will normally have a CGPA of 3.00 (B standing). BISC 490 may be taken in the semester prior to BISC 491/492 by students intending to complete the three course ISS.
BISC 491-5 Research Technique
Prerequisite: completion of all lower division biological sciences courses, plus upper division BISC courses appropriate to the subject of the intended research as determined by the departmental undergraduate curriculum committee; completion of all physics, chemistry and mathematics requirements for the major or honors program; at the time of application, students will normally have a CGPA of 3.00 (B standing). Corequisite: BISC 490 and 492.
BISC 492-5 Research Reporting
Prerequisite: completion of all lower division biological sciences courses, plus upper division BISC courses appropriate to the subject of the intended research as determined by the departmental undergraduate curriculum committee; completion of all physics, chemistry and mathematics requirements for the major or honors program; at the time of application, students will normally have a CGPA of 3.00 (B standing). Corequisite: BISC 490 and 491.
BISC 498-3 Undergraduate Research I
Prerequisite: 90 semester hours. A student will be permitted to enrol in this course only if he/she obtains the prior written agreement of a professor to act as research advisor.
BISC 499-3 Undergraduate Research II
A student will be permitted to enroll in this second research course only with the prior written agreement of a professor to act as research advisor. A different advisor is required than for BISC 498. Prerequisite: 90 credit hours.

Business Administration BUS

Faculty of Business Administration

See also courses listed under Business Administration and Economics (BUEC). All upper division BUS courses have a prerequisite of 60 credit hours. However, approved Business Administration majors or minors may take 300 division BUS courses upon completion of 45 credit hours. For a course to be accepted as fulfilling a prerequisite, or for a core course to be accepted in a student's program in Business Administration, a student must have obtained a minimum grade of C- (C minus).
BUS 130-3 Business in the Networked Economy I
The management and operation of business, including the principles, concepts, ideas and tools used by managers. Management in the contemporary world of high technology is emphasized, featuring examples and cases involving high-tech firms. In addition, the course exposes students to international and local business issues, and to large companies as well as to smaller, entrepreneurial firms. Students with credit for TECH 128, 129 and 130 may not take this course for further credit.
BUS 131-3 Business in the Networked Economy II
Introductory knowledge and skills for developing business goals, vision, direction and ultimately a successful business plan are emphasized. Marketing and financial planning in the context of development of a business plan is addressed, including elements of the marketing mix (product planning, market selection, proximity pricing and distribution), and key concepts associated with analysing financial resources. Students with credit for TECH 131, 132 and 133 may not take this course for further credit. Prerequisite: BUS 130.
BUS 207-3 Managerial Economics
Emphasis is upon the relevance of economic models to business decision-making and, in particular, upon the rational analysis of choice alternatives within the firm. Course will include consideration of optimizing techniques and analysis of risk, demand, production and profit in addition to examination of long-term investment decisions and business forecasting. (lecture/tutorial) Prerequisite: ECON 103, 105; MATH 157; 15 credit hours. Students with credit for ECON 301 or BUS 307 may not take BUS 207 for further credit.
BUS 225-0 Co-op Practicum I
This is the first semester of work experience for students in the Co-operative Education Program. It provides an opportunity to integrate theory and practice. This course is open only to co-op students. The co-op program co-ordinator must be contacted at the beginning of the semester prior to registration for this course.
BUS 237-3 Introduction to Computers and Information Systems in Business
An introduction to computer based information systems and to their applications in business, including a discussion of issues involved in the use of information systems by management. The course also provides hands on tutorial experience in the use of computers, with particular emphasis on business applications of micro computers. (lecture/tutorial) Prerequisite: 15 credit hours. Students who have obtained credit for, or are currently enrolled in a computing science course at the 200 level or higher may not take BUS 237 for further credit. Students may not receive credit for both BUS 237 and 337.
BUS 242-3 Introduction to Financial Management
This course is designed to introduce students to the concepts and techniques of corporate financial analysis. The goal is to provide them with the skills and understanding necessary to apply financial tools in a work-related context. Three primary financial functions are considered: management of working capital, the investment decision, and funds acquisition. The course also covers issues from financial accounting related to the development of financial statements and financial statement analysis. Prerequisite: MATH 110. Special Instructions: this course is only open for credit to students in the integrated studies program within the bachelor of general studies degree.
BUS 251-3 Financial Accounting I
An introduction to financial accounting, including accounting terminology, understanding financial statements, analysis of a business entity using financial statements. Includes also time value of money and a critical review of the conventional accounting system. (lecture/tutorial) Prerequisite: 15 credit hours.
BUS 254-3 Managerial Accounting I
Theory and methods of cost compilation for managerial planning, control and decision making; the use of budgets and analysis in planning and controlling operations, establishing supervisory and departmental responsibility, and various techniques of measuring results. (lecture/tutorial) Prerequisite: BUS 251; 15 credit hours. Students with credit for BUS 324 or 328 may not take BUS 254 for further credit.
BUS 272-3 Behavior in Organizations
Theories, concepts and issues in the field of organizational behavior with an emphasis on individual and team processes. Core subjects include employee motivation and performance, stress management, communication, work perceptions and attitudes, decision-making, team dynamics, employee involvement and conflict management. of (lecture/tutorial) Prerequisite: 15 credit hours; one of ENGL 101, 102, 103, 104, 105, 199, PHIL 001, 100, 120.
BUS 303-3 Business, Society and Ethics
This course examines and reviews contemporary thinking on the changing role of business and business persons in the operations of society, particularly Canadian society. The course explores the changing legal, ethical and regulatory environments of business focusing on the critical alignments - values, policies, technology and legal approaches - between the modern organization and its broader public. (lecture) Prerequisite: 60 credit hours.
BUS 312-4 Introduction to Finance
Role and function of financial managers, financial analysis, compound interest valuation and capital budgeting, management of current assets, introduction to financial instruments and institutions. (lecture/tutorial) Prerequisite: BUS 254 (or 324); 60 credit hours. Recommended: BUS 207 or ECON 301.
BUS 315-4 Investments
Investments from an individual and institutional point of view. subjects include: bond valuation and the term structure of interest rates, stock valuation, portfolio theory, asset pricing models, efficient markets and portfolio performance evaluation. (lecture/tutorial) Prerequisite: BUS 312, 336 and 207 or ECON 301; 60 credit hours.
BUS 316-3 Derivative Securities
The role derivative securities, mainly options and futures contracts, in controlling risk and enhancing profit opportunities. Valuation of derivative securities. The organization of options and futures markets and the mechanics of trading. (lecture) Prerequisite: BUS 312, 336; 60 credit hours. Students with credit for BUS 416 may not take BUS 316 for further credit.
BUS 319-3 Integrative Financial and Managerial Accounting
For students planning further course work in accounting. Its integrative approach includes financial and managerial accounting topics, alternative accounting models, accounting systems and accounting data management, international accounting and accounting ethics. (lecture/tutorial) Prerequisite: BUS 254 (or 324 or 328), 237 and 60 credit hours.Students with credit for BUS 252 may not take BUS 319 for further credit. Corequisite: BUS 254 can be taken concurrently with BUS 319.
BUS 320-3 Financial Accounting: Assets
In-depth coverage of the accounting methods, problems and limitations associated with assets. Alternative valuation bases will be emphasized and illustrated together with the impact on income. Integration of theory and practice in relation to the treatment of assets. (lecture/tutorial) Prerequisite: BUS 319; 60 credit hours.
BUS 321-3 Financial Accounting: Equities
In-depth coverage of accounting, methods, problems, and limitations, associated with liabilities and owners' equity. An introduction to the unique aspects and issues of accounting for not-for-profit organizations will also be provided. (lecture/tutorial) Prerequisite: BUS 320-3; 60 credit hours.
BUS 325-0 Co-op Practicum II
This is the second semester of work experience for students in the Co-operative Education Program. It provides an opportunity to integrate theory and practice. This course is open only to co-op students. The co-op program co-ordinator must be contacted at the beginning of the semester prior to registration for this course.
BUS 326-0 Co-op Practicum III
This is the third semester of work experience for students in the Co-operative Education Program. It provides an opportunity to integrate theory and practice. This course is open only to co-op students. The co-op program co-ordinator must be contacted at the beginning of the semester prior to registration for this course.
BUS 327-0 Co-op Practicum IV
This is the fourth semester of work experience for students in the Co-operative Education Program. It provides an opportunity to integrate theory and practice. This course is open only to co-op students. The co-op program co-ordinator must be contacted at the beginning of the semester prior to registration for this course.
BUS 329-3 Income Taxation for Business Decision-Making
An examination of the underlying principles, concepts and methodology of income taxation in Canada, with emphasis upon the use of current reference sources. The course focus will be upon business taxation. (lecture) Prerequisite: 60 credit hours. Corequisite: BUS 321 or permission of Faculty.
BUS 336-4 Data and Decisions II
This course is an extension of BUEC 232. It develops and applies the quantitative models that are most directly relevant to business decisions. Beginning with material on multiple regression and forecasting modeling, the course moves on to decision analysis, business simulation, quality control, and an introduction to optimization. (lecture/tutorial) Prerequisite: MATH 157 and BUEC 232, 60 credit hours.
BUS 341-3 Fundamentals of Marketing for Integrated Studies Programs
This course is intended to be a first course in marketing management. Its purpose is to present students with the fundamentals of the marketing management process and of the importance of marketing in general. You will also develop some insight into the complex area of marketing decision-making and what marketing managers need to know to be effective. By applying fundamental marketing concepts, students will be able to solve real life marketing problems. Particular emphasis will be placed on understanding consumer behavior and segmentation analysis, the management of promotion, product-related decision-making and market distribution. Uncontrollable environmental elements pertinent to marketing planning will also be discussed. (3-0-0) Prerequisite: 60 credit hours. This course is only open for credit to students in the Integrated Studies Program within the bachelor of general studies degree.
BUS 343-3 Introduction to Marketing
The environment of marketing; relation of social sciences to marketing; evaluation of marketing theory and research; assessment of demand, consumer behavior analysis; market institutions; method and mechanics of distribution in domestic, foreign and overseas markets; sales organization; advertising; new product development, publicity and promotion; marketing programs. (lecture/tutorial) Prerequisite: 60 credit hours.
BUS 344-3 Business to Business Marketing
This course deals with the marketing of products and services to industrial and other non-consumer sector buyers. The student will be expected to apply previously acquired marketing skills to purchasing situations which arise between organizations. Due to the nature of manufacturing activity in this province, industrial marketing will be approached from a resource industry based standpoint where discussions permit. (lecture/tutorial) Prerequisite: BUS 343; 60 credit hours.
BUS 346-3 International Business
Study of international environment and its impact on business behavior: cultural, social, economic and institutional factors; major functions of international business; export and import trade, foreign investment, production and marketing operations; theoretical principles, government policies, business practices. (lecture) Prerequisite: 60 credit hours.
BUS 347-3 Consumer Behavior
A study of the manner in which decisions are made in the market place, by both the ultimate consumer and the industrial buyer. Course will include consideration of consumer decision processes, individual and group influences and special cases such as brand loyalty and consumerism. (lecture/tutorial) Prerequisite: BUS 343; 60 credit hours.
BUS 360-3 Business Communication
This course is designed to assist students to Boost their written and oral communication skills in business settings. The theory and practice of business communication will be presented. subjects include analysis of communication problems, message character, message monitoring, message media. Exercises in individual and group messages and presentations will be conducted. (lecture) Prerequisite: 60 credit hours.
BUS 362-4 Information Analysis and Systems Design
The course focuses on the various issues involved in investigating, analysing and designing systems, and the strategies used to manage the process. In addition, students will make use of computer-aided software engineering (CASE) tools in laboratory, performing their systems analysis and design. (seminar/laboratory) Prerequisite: BUS 237; 60 credit hours.
BUS 364-3 Information Systems in Organizations and Society
This course is directed at the student as a consumer and a manager of systems within organizations, and as a member of society. We will discuss the use of information technology in the functional areas of business as a method of control as well as its implication in improving efficiency and effectiveness within organizations. The student will be encouraged to form his/her own opinions about this very pervasive technology. (lecture) Prerequisite: BUS 237; 60 credit hours.
BUS 374-3 Organization Theory
This course will examine theories of organization which use the organization as a basic unit of analysis. It will show how the structure and internal processes of an organization are linked to and partially determined by forces in the external environment of the organization. Contextual factors such as the technology and corporate strategy of the organization will also be examined. (lecture/tutorial) Prerequisite: 60 credit hours; BUS 272 (or 372).
BUS 380-3 Comparative Management
This course examines the major similarities and differences in management systems and practices in a variety of countries, including western Europe, East Asia, Middle East, and Latin America. subjects include the following: comparative management frameworks, managing cultural differences, cross-cultural business negotiations, and international human resource management. (seminar) Prerequisite: BUS 272; 60 credit hours. Students with credit for BUS 430 may not take BUS 380 for further credit. Recommended: BUS 346.
BUS 381-3 Introduction to Human Resource Management
Subjects include human resource planning, job analysis and design, recruitment, employment equity, selection and placement, performance appraisal, compensation and benefits, training and development, occupational health and safety, and industrial relations. For each subject an overview of current Canadian issues and practices is presented. (lecture/tutorial) Prerequisite: BUS 272 (or 372); 60 credit hours.
BUS 393-3 Commercial Law
Common law, equity, and statute law; contracts, agency, and negotiable instruments; partnership and corporation law; international commercial law. (lecture/tutorial) Prerequisite: 60 credit hours. BUEC 391 is not to be taken concurrently with BUS 393.
BUS 394-3 Selected subjects in Business Administration
The subject matter will vary from semester to semester depending upon the interest of Faculty and students. (lecture/tutorial) Prerequisite: permission of the Faculty; 60 credit hours.
BUS 395-3 Selected subjects in Business Administration
The subject matter will vary from semester to semester depending upon the interest of faculty and students. (lecture/tutorial) Prerequisite: permission of the Faculty; 60 credit hours.
BUS 403-3 Seminar in Business and Society
Advanced subjects in business and society. Specific emphasis may vary and may include the evolution of the business system in Canada, foreign investment and its impact, consumerism, environmental protection, business ideologies, etc. (seminar) Prerequisite: 90 credit hours, BUS 360.
BUS 410-3 Financial Institutions
An examination of financial institutions and the markets in which they operate. subjects may include: institutional structure, financial contract forms, valuation and pricing relationships, financial intermediation, financial transacting, the regulatory environment, risk measurement and hedging strategies. (seminar) Prerequisite: BUS 315, 316, 360; 60 credit hours.
BUS 413-4 Corporate Finance
Corporate decisions in the context of financial markets. subjects include: real asset investments, financing alternatives, dividend policy, working capital management, and corporate securities valuation. (seminar) Prerequisite: BUS 315, 316, 360; 60 credit hours.
BUS 417-3 Security Analysis
This course covers the historical, theoretical and practical issues involved in the market valuation of securities. Three general areas are studied: valuation of fixed income securities; valuation of equity securities; and subjects in portfolio management. Prerequisite: BUS 315, 360. Students who have taken BUS 492 under the syllabu Security Analysis may not take BUS 417 for further credit.
BUS 418-3 International Financial Management
An introduction to international financial markets and institutions and to the management of assets and liabilities in an international/multinational setting. subjects to be covered include: exchange rate determination and management of foreign exchange risk; interest rate swaps; international portfolio management; comparative markets; and country risk. (seminar) Prerequisites: BUS 315, 316, 360; 60 credit hours.
BUS 419-3 Advanced Derivative Securities
This is a second course in derivative securities. subjects may include: extensions of the Black-Scholes model, pricing of American options, interest rate derivatives, complex derivatives and real options. Prerequisite: BUS 316, 360. Students who have taken BUS 493 under the syllabu Advanced Derivative Securities may not take BUS 419 for further credit.
BUS 420-3 Advanced Accounting
In-depth coverage of advanced accounting topics, specifically issues relating to business combinations and foreign currency. Consideration is also given to the interpretation and analysis of financial statements. (seminar) Prerequisites: BUS 321, 360; 60 credit hours.
BUS 421-3 Accounting Theory
Consideration of methods by which accounting theory is developed and examination of specific models including historical costs, replacement costs, resale price and price level adjustment models. (seminar) Prerequisites: BUS 321, 360, BUS 207 or ECON 301; 60 credit hours.
BUS 424-3 Managerial Accounting II
Process costing; joint and by-product costing; inventory planning and control; cost accounting and statistical methods, relationship to operations research. (seminar) Prerequisites: BUS 319, 336, 360, 75 credit hours.
BUS 425-0 Co-op Practicum V
This is the fifth semester of work experience for students in the accounting Co-operative Education Program. It provides an opportunity to integrate theory and practice. This course is open only to accounting co-op students. The co-op program co-ordinator must be contacted at the beginning of the semester prior to registration for this course.
BUS 426-3 Auditing Concepts and Methods
A study of the conceptual foundations and the nature and purpose of the external audit function. The course will also discuss some of the more latest developments in auditing such as comprehensive auditing, computer auditing, and the use of statistical methodology in auditing. (seminar) Prerequisite: BUS 321, 360 and 60 credit hours.
BUS 431-3 Business with East Asian Countries
This course examines the opportunities and challenges of doing business with the Pacific Rim countries such as China, Japan and Korea. subjects include the following: the political and economic systems as they affect foreign investment; social and cultural systems as they affect management practices; the conduct of business negotiations for market entry; and marketing strategies. (seminar) Prerequisite: BUS 346, 360; 60 credit hours.
BUS 432-3 International Human Resources Management
Significance of multinational complexity and diversity (cultural, economic, demographic, etc.) to the human resource function. Interplay among human resource functions (employee procurement, allocation, utilization), types of employees, and countries of operation. (seminar) Prerequisite: BUS 360, 381; 60 credit hours. Recommended: BUS 346.
BUS 435-3 Management of International Firms
Strategic requirements for the management of multinational corporations. Firm-specific and institutional challenges facing global managers in formulating and implementing profitable strategies. (seminar) Prerequisite: BUS 346, 360; 60 credit hours.
BUS 437-3 Decision Analysis in Business
A seminar in the use of Bayesian techniques in business decisions. (seminar) Prerequisite: BUS 336, 360; 60 credit hours.
BUS 440-4 Simulation in Management Decision Making
Development and use of simulation models as an aid in making complex management decisions. Hands on use of business related tools for computer simulation. Issues related to design and validation of simulation models, the assessment of input data, and the interpretation and use of simulation output. (seminar) Prerequisite: BUS 336, 360; 60 credit hours.
BUS 442-4 Introduction to Marketing Research
A course in the management of marketing research. The basics of the design, conduct, and analysis of marketing research studies. (seminar) Prerequisite: BUS 343, 336, 360; 60 credit hours.
BUS 445-3 Analysis of Data for Management
The analysis and interpretation of data, particularly multivariate data. This course is complementary to BUS 442 but may be taken independently. Applications in management science and information systems, organizational behavior and other areas as well as in marketing will be examined. (seminar) Prerequisite: BUS 343, 336, 360; 60 credit hours.
BUS 446-4 Marketing Strategy
Marketing strategy focuses on the analysis of market problems and opportunities and the development of appropriate strategies. subjects include: analytical techniques, strategic planning methods and managerial problems of planning. Case analysis and problem solving will be the major orientation of the course. (seminar) Prerequisite: BUS 312, 347, 360; 60 credit hours.
BUS 447-3 Global Marketing Management
The marketing of goods and services in an international context, with emphasis on Pacific Rim countries. Theoretical concepts, environmental influences. Researching and forecasting international markets. The management of international marketing. (seminar) Prerequisite: BUS 343, 360; 60 credit hours. Recommended: BUS 346.
BUS 448-4 Advertising and Sales Promotion
An integrative approach to the study of promotion including advertising publicity, personal selling and sales promotion; evaluation of the role promotion has in marketing and the economy; formulation and analysis of promotional goals, planning, organizing and controlling; utilization of market research studies; forecasting, budgeting, media selection; promotion institutions. (seminar) Prerequisite: BUS 347, 360; 60 credit hours.
BUS 449-3 Ethical Issues in Marketing
A critical examination of subjects such as consumerism, marketing ethics, and social responsibility, efficiency of marketing or ecological marketing. The particular emphasis may vary depending on the interests of the class and instructor. (seminar) Prerequisite: BUS 343, 360; 60 credit hours.
BUS 462-4 Management Support Systems
This course is designed to familiarize the student with theories, tools and techniques for management support systems. The course will cover subjects from decision support systems (DSS), executive support systems (ESS) and expert systems (ES). It will cover a variety of DSS, ESS and ES tools ranging from spreadsheets to fourth generation languages accessing corporate databases, to expert system shells and executive support system builders. (lecture/laboratory) Prerequisite: BUS 336, 360, 362 (or 364); 60 credit hours.
BUS 464-3 Building Business Systems
Two trends are shaping the use of information in organizations: the increasing importance of cross-functional business processes and the use of enterprise resource planning (ERP) information systems to support these processes. This course will take a closer look at techniques for analysing, designing, and implementing information systems and information technology in support of integrated business processes. The material will be drawn from literature in the business process re-engineering and enterprise resource planning subject areas. (3-0-1) Prerequisite: BUS 360, 362 (or CMPT 370). Recommended: CMPT 100.
BUS 466-3 Managing Data Communications
The students will be exposed to business issues in the planning, implementation and management of data communications in organizations. They will study the changes taking place in industry as a result of new data communications technology. Also, they will become familiar with the various technical levels of communications systems, and the various standards and configurations that are currently being used. The Novel NetWare LAN system will be used as an example of a communications system, to demonstrate issues and operations required of a communications network manager. (seminar) Prerequisite: BUS 360, 362 (or 364); 60 credit hours.
BUS 468-3 Management Issues in Information Systems
The focus of this course is on the management, not the technical, issues surrounding Information Technology. Using cases, the course will introduce various theories and models of the management of information technology (IT), the application of IT to management situations, and some of the current issues surrounding IT. (seminar) Prerequisite: BUS 360, 364; 60 credit hours. Corequisite: BUS 462 and/or 466 can be taken concurrently with BUS 468.
BUS 472-3 Seminar in Organizational Behavior
Advanced subjects in organizational behavior. Specific emphasis may vary depending on special interest of faculty. However, general content will extend basic theories and problem descriptions covered in BUS 272 and 374 and will include advanced organizational theory and special subjects in personnel. (seminar) Prerequisite: BUS 272 (or 372) or 374; 360; 60 credit hours.
BUS 473-4 Operations Management
The management of operating systems including allocation and scheduling of resources; control of costs, inventories, quality, and manpower; design of operating systems including location, layout and manpower; establishment of work methods and standards. (seminar) Prerequisite: BUS 336, 360; 60 credit hours.
BUS 477-4 New Venture Planning
Emphasis will vary but may include in any given semester consideration of small business in the Canadian economy, career comparisons in small and large businesses, evaluation of new ventures, organization, capitalization, planning, marketing and financial management. (seminar) Prerequisite: BUS 312, 343, 360; 90 credit hours.
BUS 478-3 Seminar in Administrative Policy
Integration of the various areas of business for the purpose of analysing and recommending strategies for planning and decision-making within the firm and a defined environment. (seminar) Prerequisite: BUS 207, 312, 343, 360 and either BUS 374 or 381; 90 credit hours.
BUS 480-3 Negotiation/Conflict Resolution for Integrated Studies Programs
Overall, the course will be a combination of theory, discussion, instructor demonstration, skill practice in large and small groups and small group practice of the four-stage negotiation/conflict resolution model/process. The students in this course will learn about and be able to discuss interest-based negotiation and conflict resolution theory, strategize and plan for various negotiations and conflict situations and be able to put into practice a practical, efficient and productive process for negotiating agreements and resolving conflict. (3-0-0) Prerequisite: BUS 360; 60 credit hours. This course is only open for credit to students in the Integrated Studies Program within the bachelor of general studies degree.
BUS 481-3 Human Resource Planning and Staffing
Development of specific manpower objectives from an analysis of organizational goals and strategy. An analysis of procedures and skills which are used to translate objectives into staffing decisions such as employee selection and placement. (seminar) Prerequisite: BUS 272 (or 372), BUEC 232 (or STAT 270), BUS 360, 381; 60 credit hours.
BUS 482-3 Reward Systems and Employee Development
The design and administration of reward systems and employee development programs. How these systems and programs are affected by internal and external factors such as organizational goals, corporate strategy, technology, labor markets, and government regulations. (seminar) Prerequisite: BUS 272 (or 372), BUS 360, 381; 60 credit hours.
BUS 484-3 Workplace Industrial Relations
The administration of the day-to-day employment relationships of both unionized and non-unionized settings. Workplace industrial relations as a system of resolving conflicts between employee and employer interests and its implications for the attainment of due process in the workplace and the flexibility and efficiency of work organization. (seminar) Prerequisite: BUS 360; 60 credit hours; one of BUS 381 or BUEC 384.
BUS 487-3 Organizational Development and Change
This course examines the underlying concepts, principles and assumptions of organizational development. Throughout the course, organizations are viewed as systems composed of subsystems in dynamic interaction. (seminar) Prerequisite: BUS 360, 60 credit hours, BUS 374 or 381.
BUS 488-3 Human Relations in Business
The study of individual and group behavior in business organizations; management-employee relations; systems of communication; role and status; compensation, motivation, morale and productivity; organizational conflict, change and balance. (seminar) Prerequisite: BUS 360, 60 credit hours, BUS 374 or 381.
BUS 490-491-3 Selected subjects in Business Administration
The subject matter will vary from semester to semester depending upon the interest of faculty and students. Prerequisite: permission of the faculty; 60 credit hours. This course is only open for credit to students in the Integrated Studies Program within the Bachelor of General Studies degree completion program.
BUS 492-495-3 Selected subjects in Business Administration
The subject matter will vary from semester to semester depending upon the interests of faculty and students. (seminar) Prerequisite: permission of the faculty; 60 credit hours.
BUS 496-5 Selected subjects in Business Administration
The subject matter will vary from semester to semester depending upon the interests of faculty and students. (seminar) Prerequisite: permission of the faculty; 60 credit hours.
BUS 498-3 Directed Studies
Independent practicing and research on subjects selected in consultation with the supervising instructor. Prerequisite: permission of the faculty; 60 credit hours.
BUS 499-5 Directed Studies
An intensive and independent practicing and research course on subjects selected in consultation with the supervising instructor, and approved by the dean of the faculty. Prerequisite: permission of the faculty; 60 credit hours.

Business Administration and Economics BUEC

Faculties of Business Administration and Arts

See also course descriptions for Business Administration (BUS) and Economics (ECON). BUEC courses are offered jointly by the Faculty of Business Administration and the Department of Economics. They may count for credit in either Business Administration or Economics programs, but not for both. A student may not receive credit for both BUEC courses and (former) ECON/COMM courses which have the same number. For a course to be accepted as fulfilling a prerequisite, or for a required course to be accepted in a student's economics program, a grade of C- or higher must be obtained.
BUEC 232-4 Data and Decisions I
An introduction to business statistics with a heavy emphasis on applications and the use of EXCEL. Students will be required to use statistical applications to solve business problems. (3-1-0) Prerequisite: MATH 157 and 15 credit hours. MATH 157 may be taken concurrently with BUEC 232. STAT 270, Introduction to Probability and Statistics, will be accepted in lieu of BUEC 232. Students with credit for STAT 270 may not take BUEC 232 for further credit.
BUEC 280-3 Introduction to Labor Economics
Basic analysis of the labor market and the industrial relations system with emphasis on the major issues of public policy in Canada. (lecture/tutorial) Prerequisite: ECON 103 or 200 and 105 or 205. Students who have taken ECON 301, 305 or 381 may not take BUEC 280 for further credit.
BUEC 333-4 Statistical Analysis of Economic Data
An introduction to the use and interpretation of statistical analysis in the context of data typical of economic applications. (lecture/tutorial/laboratory) Prerequisite: ECON 103 or 200, 105 or 205, BUEC 232 or STAT 270, MATH 157 and 30 credit hours. Students with credit for ECON/COMM 236 may not take BUEC 333 for further credit.
BUEC 384-3 Industrial Relations
This course examines industrial relations systems, focusing on the economic and policy environment and how this shapes the strategic choice of alternate employment systems. Characteristics, conflict resolution processes and outcomes of various employment systems will be examined. (lecture/tutorial) Prerequisite: ECON 103 or 200 and 105 or 205; 60 credit hours. Students with credit for BUEC 386 may not take BUEC 384 for further credit. Recommended: BUS 272.
BUEC 391-3 Law in the Economic Society
An introductory examination of the history, evolution and aspirations of the rule of law in general, and as pursued and developed within civil and common law jurisdictions with emphasis on the working of the Canadian Federal and Provincial legislative, administrative and judicial forces, in particular. Students will be encouraged to identify and analyse various socio-economic legal issues and how legal principles are developed within the concepts of Canadian law and its reaction to evolving socio-economic forces that affect our individual and collective legal rights, duties and privileges and powers. (lecture/tutorial) Prerequisite: 60 credit hours. BUEC 391 may not be taken concurrently with BUS 393. Students with credit for BUEC 293 may not take BUEC 391 for further credit.
BUEC 396-3 The Structure of Industry
Examination of the structure, conduct and performance of specific industries, exploring the degree of concentration, the nature and extent of competitive behavior and the factors affecting particular industry patterns. Emphasis will be upon the Canadian economy, and consideration will be given to the efforts and implications of "non-pure" competitive structures. (lecture/tutorial) Prerequisite: ECON 103 or 200 and 105 or 205; 60 credit hours.
BUEC 485-3 Collective Bargaining
The collective agreement negotiation process and work stoppage: analytics, experience, legal and market constraints. Contents of the collective agreement. Administration of the collective agreement. Roles of third parties in collective bargaining. (lecture/tutorial) Prerequisite: ECON 103 or 200 and 105 or 205 and BUEC 384; BUS 360; 60 credit hours. Students with credit for BUEC 385 or 386 may not take BUEC 485 for further credit.
BUEC 495-3 Legal Aspects of Economic Relationships
A selected number of legal concepts will be examined in depth together with their effects on economic relationships. (seminar) Prerequisite: BUEC 391, ECON 103 or 200 and ECON 105 or 205; 90 credit hours; or permission of the faculty or department.

Canadian Studies CNS

Faculty of Arts

CNS 160-3 The Social Background of Canada
This course analyses the foundations and attributes of modern Canadian society using an interdisciplinary approach. As an introduction to Canadian Studies, the major themes of the course are social conflict and social change. subjects include French-English relations, Canada and the United States, ethnicity and multiculturalism, industrialism, regional conflict, social movements, nationalism and Canada's social structure, classes and elites. (lecture/tutorial)
CNS 210-3 Foundations of Canadian Culture
An introductory study of Canada, which uses a variety of disciplinary methods to understand and assess Canada's unique culture. The course draws on material from history, law, literature, politics, sociology and the fine arts in order to explore regional diversity and national needs and the nature of Canada as a bilingual and multicultural state. (lecture/tutorial)
CNS 280-3 Canadian Political Economy
An introductory study of Canada's political economy, stressing the interrelated nature of Canada's economic and political life. The course focuses on current economic problems and policies, taking into account the geographical, historical and political environments. subjects include the resource and industrial structures, research and development, the public sector, fiscal and monetary policy, the role of the state, trade and foreign ownership, energy, regional disparity, corporate concentration and the political economy of federalism. (lecture/tutorial) This course is identical to POL 223 and students cannot take both courses for credit.
CNS 360-4 Interdisciplinary Readings in Canadian Studies
Allows students to pursue in depth a particular Canadian problem from an interdisciplinary perspective. Prerequisite: 60 credit hours. Please refer to course outline before registering.
CNS 390-3 Hockey in Canadian Popular Culture
The game of hockey is perhaps the most central and pervasive form of popular culture in Canada. It has been called the "tie that binds," the "common passion," and the "Canadian game." This course seeks to create a critical understanding of how hockey's significance extends far beyond the ice rink into the cultural, economic and political spheres of Canadian society. (lecture/tutorial) Prerequisite: at least 60 credit hours. Students who have taken this course as CNS 390 subjects in Canadian Popular Culture cannot take this course for further credit.
CNS 391-3 Special Canadian Topics
An intensive interdisciplinary exploration of particular subjects that illustrate aspects of the Canadian reality. (seminar) Prerequisite: 60 credit hours.
CNS 392-3 Cyberspace: The Next Canadian Frontier?
Examines cyberspace and virtual reality as the next Canadian frontier to be explored. The cross-section of material from various disciplines will be used as a starting point to study the advancements in cyberspace and virtual reality research, with an aim to situate a "Canadian cultural consciousness," and/or a "Canadian sensibility" towards this new and burgeoning "space." (seminar) Prerequisite: 60 credit hours. Students who have taken CNS 391 Special Canadian Topics: Cyberspace: the Next Frontier? may not take CNS 392 for further credit.
CNS 481-3 Special Regional Topics
The role of the regions of regionalism in Canada is increasingly problematical, as the burden of the unity debate extends outwards from the Ontario/Quebec divide. This seminar will provide students with a grounding in interdisciplinary readings pertaining to the syllabu and an opportunity to pursue directed research on a specific syllabu of their choice. (0-3-0) Prerequisite: 60 credit hours. Students who have taken CNS 481 Special subjects may not take CNS 481 for further credit.
CNS 490-5 The Canadian Intellectual Tradition
An interdisciplinary seminar examining some of the major forces that have shaped and continue to shape Canadian thought, expression and society. Materials and theories will be drawn from historiography, history, philosophy, religion, politics, political economy, policy studies, literature, art and sport. Prerequisite: at least 60 credit hours.
CNS 491-3 Technology and Canadian Society
This course examines and assesses technology and its impact on Canadian society. It concentrates on 20th century technology and uses a case study approach examining some broad themes in the study of technology such as; technological determinism, technological impact assessment, innovation, technology as progress, technological dependency, technological sovereignty, and bias in technology. Prerequisite: at least 60 credit hours.
CNS 495-5 Canadian Studies Honors Essay
An essay required of each honors student in Canadian Studies, based on a substantial interdisciplinary research effort by the student under the supervision of Canadian Studies faculty in the appropriate disciplines. A paper based on the essay must be presented in a Canadian Studies seminar. (independent study) Prerequisite: registration as honors student in Canadian Studies.

Chemistry CHEM

Faculty of Science

See also courses listed under Nuclear Science (NUSC).
Graduate Courses
Graduate courses are available to senior undergraduate students for upper division chemistry credit. Refer to the Graduate Studies section and consult an advisor for specific course offerings.
CHEM 110-3 Introductory Chemistry
General fundamental concepts and nomenclature; stoichiometry and chemical calculations; nuclear and atomic structures, chemical bonding; properties of gases, liquids, solids and solutions; chemical kinetics and chemical equilibrium. This course has the same lecture component as CHEM 111 but no laboratory work. Students who intend to take further laboratory courses in chemistry must take CHEM 111. (3-1-0) Prerequisite: BC high school mathematics 12 (or equivalent) or permission of the department. No previous training in chemistry is required for this course. Students with credit for high school chemistry 12 (or equivalent), or any university chemistry course may not take CHEM 110 or 111 for further credit. Students may not count both CHEM 110 and 111 for credit. Corequisite: If BC high school mathematics 12 credit not obtained, then MATH 100 must be taken as a corequisite to CHEM 110.
CHEM 111-4 Introductory Chemistry and Laboratory
General fundamental concepts and nomenclature; stoichiometry and chemical calculations; nuclear and atomic structures, chemical bonding; properties of gases, liquids, solids and solutions; chemical kinetics and chemical equilibrium. This course includes a laboratory component. (3-1-2) Prerequisite: BC high school mathematics 12 (or equivalent) or permission of the department. No previous training in chemistry is required for this course. Students with credit for high school chemistry 12 (or equivalent), or any university chemistry course may not take CHEM 110 or 111 for further credit. Students may not count both CHEM 110 and 111 for credit. Corequisite: If BC high school Mathematics 12 credit not obtained, then MATH 100 must be taken as a corequisite to CHEM 111.
CHEM 120-3 General Chemistry I
Atomic and molecular structure; chemical bonding; thermochemistry; elements; periodic table; gases, liquids, solids, and solutions. This course has the same lecture component as CHEM 121 but no laboratory work. Students who intend to take further laboratory courses in chemistry must take CHEM 121. (3-1-0) Prerequisite: BC high school chemistry 12 or CHEM 111 or CHEM 110 (or 101). Students may not count both CHEM 120 and 121 for credit. Recommended: MATH 151 (or 154) and PHYS 120 (or 101) as a corequisite.
CHEM 121-4 General Chemistry and Laboratory I
Atomic and molecular structure; chemical bonding; thermochemistry; elements; periodic table; gases liquids, solids, and solutions. This course includes a laboratory component. (3-1-2) Prerequisite: BC high school chemistry 12 or CHEM 111 (or 101 and 106). Students may not count both CHEM 120 and 121 for credit. Recommended: MATH 151 (or 154) and PHYS 120 (or 101) as a corequisite.
CHEM 122-2 General Chemistry II
Chemical equilibria; electrochemistry; chemical thermodynamics; kinetics. Students who intend to take further laboratory courses in chemistry should take CHEM 122 concurrently with CHEM 126. (2-1-0) Prerequisite: CHEM 121 or 120 (or 102) Recommended: MATH 152 (or 155) and PHYS 121 (or 102) as a corequisite.
CHEM 126-2 General Chemistry Laboratory II
Experiments in chemical equilibrium, acids and bases, qualitative analysis, electrochemistry and chemical kinetics. (0-0-4) Prerequisite: CHEM 121 (or 102 and 115). Corequisite: CHEM 122.
CHEM 215-4 Introduction to Analytical Chemistry
The principles of analytical chemistry and their practical application to solution samples. Titrimetric and electrochemical methods. (2-0-4) Prerequisite: CHEM 122 (or 103) and 126 (or 118).
CHEM 230-3 Inorganic Chemistry
The chemistry of the elements and their inorganic compounds in terms of fundamental concepts of perodicity of properties, valence, ionization potential, electron affinity, electronegativity, stability of oxidation states, bonding, structure and stereochemistry. Co-ordination complexes and organometallic chemistry. (3-1-0) Prerequisite: CHEM 122 (or 103). Corequisite: students who expect to take further courses in inorganic chemistry should take the laboratory course CHEM 236 concurrently with 230.
CHEM 236-2 Inorganic Chemistry Laboratory
An introduction to the synthetic and spectroscopic techniques used in the preparation and characterization of both main group and transition metal compounds. (0-0-4) Prerequisite: CHEM 122 and 126 (or 103 and 118). Corequisite: CHEM 230.
CHEM 260-4 Atoms, Molecules, Spectroscopy
Elements of physical chemistry from the molecular point of view. Introduction to quantum chemistry, atomic and molecular structure, and spectroscopy. (3-1-2) Prerequisite: CHEM 122 (or 103), MATH 152, PHYS 121. Recommended: MATH 232.
CHEM 281-4 Organic Chemistry I
Structure, bonding, physical and chemical properties of simple organic compounds. Introduction to spectroscopy. Kinetics and mechanisms of organic reactions. This course includes a laboratory component. (3-1-2) Prerequisite: CHEM 121. Corequisite: CHEM 122 (or 103).
CHEM 282-2 Organic Chemistry II
Polyfunctional organic compounds and complex organic reactions. Introduction to natural products. (2-1-0) Prerequisite: CHEM 281.
CHEM 286-2 Organic Chemistry Laboratory II
Laboratory work chosen to complement CHEM 282. (0-0-4) Prerequisite: CHEM 281. Corequisite: CHEM 282.
CHEM 306-0 Practicum I
This is the first semester of work experience in a co-operative program available to students planning to pursue a career in chemistry or related areas. Prerequisite: completion of 28 credit hours in a science program, including first-year calculus, chemistry and physics. Minimum CGPA 2.67 (or permission of co-op co-ordinator).
CHEM 307-0 Practicum II
This is the second semester of work experience in the Chemistry Co-operative Education Program. Prerequisite: CHEM 306 and completion of 42 credit hours toward a BSc degree. Minimum CGPA 2.67 (or permission of co-op co-ordinator).
CHEM 316-4 Introductory Instrumental Analysis
Principles and applications of basic analytical instrumentation based upon spectroscopy, chromatography and electrochemistry. (2-0-4) Prerequisite: CHEM 215 (or 218). Students may not count both CHEM 316 and 416 for credit.
CHEM 317-2 Analytical Environmental Chemistry
Principles and applications of the methodologies of analytical chemistry employed in the determination of substances in air, water, and soil, with particular emphasis upon sampling and trial preparation. (0-0-4) Prerequisite: CHEM 316 and 371. Corequisite: CHEM 372 should be taken concurrently.
CHEM 332-3 The Chemistry of Transition Metals
The synthesis and characterization of classical and organometallic complexes of the transition metals, and their physical and chemical properties. (3-1-0) Prerequisite: CHEM 230 and 236.
CHEM 333-3 Inorganic Chemistry of Biological Processes
An introduction to the principles governing the formation, properties and investigation of metal-ligand complexes with special reference to the role of metals in biological processes. (3-1-0) Prerequisite: BICH 321 (or 301); or CHEM 282 (or 250) and CHEM 230 (or 232.)
CHEM 336-2 Advanced Inorganic Chemistry Laboratory
Laboratory experiments in co-ordination, organometallic and solid state chemistry, involving synthesis, characterization and spectroscopy. (0-0-4) Prerequisite: CHEM 236. Corequisite: CHEM 332 must precede or be taken concurrently.
CHEM 340-3 Materials Chemistry
Bonding in solid state materials. Introduction to symmetry and its applications in materials science. Structure and physical properties of solid state materials. (3-1-0) Prerequisite: completion of 60 credit hours in a science or applied science program, including first year chemistry, physics and calculus.
CHEM 360-3 Thermodynamics and Chemical Kinetics
Elements of physical chemistry from the macroscopic point of view. Thermodynamics, and its applications to chemical equilibrium. Chemical kinetics and reaction rate theories. (3-1-0) Prerequisite: CHEM 122 (or 103), MATH 152 (or 155), PHYS 121 (or 102). Recommended: MATH 251.
CHEM 366-2 Physical Chemistry Laboratory I
Experiments in thermodynamics, chemical kinetics, electrochemistry, and atomic and molecular structure. (0-0-4) Prerequisite: CHEM 260. Corequisite: CHEM 360.
CHEM 367-2 Physical Chemistry Laboratory II
Continues CHEM 366. (0-0-4) Prerequisite: CHEM 366.
CHEM 371-3 Chemistry of the Aqueous Environment
An introduction to chemical processes in the aqueous environment. Quantitative treatment of the variables determining the composition of natural systems. Chemistry of aqueous toxic agents, wastewater treatment, and related matters. (3-1-0) Prerequisite: CHEM 281 (or 150) and CHEM 360 (or 261).
CHEM 372-3 Chemistry of the Atmospheric Environment
Quantitative treatment of chemical and physical processes in the atmospheric environment. Chemistry of the troposphere including air pollution and climate change. Chemistry of the stratosphere including ozone depletion. Environmental radioactivity. Current topics. (3-1-0) Prerequisite: CHEM 281 (or 150) and CHEM 360 (or 261).
CHEM 380-4 Chemical and Instrumental Methods of Identification of Organic Compounds
Basic principles of infrared, ultraviolet, nuclear magnetic resonance and mass spectroscopy as applied to the identification of organic compounds. (2-0-4) Prerequisite: CHEM 282 and 286 (or 250 and 255).
CHEM 381-4 Intermediate Organic Chemistry
An intermediate level course in modern organic chemistry, including both theoretical design of synthetic routes and practical training in the laboratory. The central subjects to be discussed include methods to form carbon-carbon bonds, use of organometallic reagents, asymmetric synthesis, pericyclic reactions, the use of enzymes in organic synthesis, and the automation of synthetic organic chemistry. Prerequisite: CHEM 380.
CHEM 406-0 Practicum III
This is the third semester of work experience in the Chemistry Co-operative Education Program. Prerequisite: CHEM 307 and completion of 56 credit hours toward a BSc degree. Minimum CGPA of 2.67 (or permission of co-op co-ordinator).
CHEM 407-0 Practicum IV
This is the last semester of work experience in the Chemistry Co-operative Education Program. Prerequisite: CHEM 406. Minimum CGPA of 2.67 (or permission of co-op co-ordinator).
CHEM 408-0 Practicum V
Optional semester of work experience in the Chemistry Co-operative Education Program. Prerequisite: CHEM 407.
CHEM 419-3 Special subjects in Analytical Chemistry
Principles and applications of emerging techniques in analytical chemistry. (3-1-0) Prerequisite: CHEM 316.
CHEM 432-3 Organometalic Chemistry
The organometallic chemistry of the transition elements; the synthesis, characterization and catalytic behavior of organometallic compounds. (3-1-0) Prerequisite: CHEM 332.
CHEM 439-3 Special subjects in Inorganic Chemistry
An in-depth treatment of a current syllabu in inorganic chemistry. Contact the department for information regarding the syllabu to be covered in a given semester. (3-1-0) Prerequisite: CHEM 332.
CHEM 440-3 Solid State Materials Chemistry
The study of the detailed chemistry of solid state inorganic materials in terms of crystal structures, bonding, preparative methods, analytical and characterization techniques, mixed valence states, solid solutions, defects and non-stoichiometry, molecular mechanisms of the optical, electronic, ionic, magnetic and dielectric properties, and materials applications in advanced technology. (3-1-0) Prerequisite: CHEM 340.
CHEM 442-3 Polymeric Materials Chemistry
The course covers the detailed chemistry of polymers, including polymer structure, studies of polymer solutions, molecular weight determination, and the synthesis of polymers. In addition, subjects of current interest in polymer science will be discussed. (3-2-0) Prerequisite: CHEM 282.
CHEM 444-3 Organic Materials Chemistry
Emphasis will be placed on the synthesis and properties of materials that are useful in the design of electrooptical devices, such as light emitting diodes (LEDs) and liquid crystal displays (LCDs). subjects to be discussed will include liquid crystals, conjugated polymers, and the assembly of thin film materials. A case study approach will be employed in order to provide an overview of these areas of research, with examples taken from the primary literature. (3-1-0) Prerequisite: CHEM 282.
CHEM 450-3 Physical Organic Chemistry
A study of the structure, stereochemistry and conformation of molecules and their effect on the reactivity of organic molecules. The physical basis of organic chemistry. (3-1-0) Prerequisite: CHEM 360 (or 261) and 380.
CHEM 452-3 Bio-organic Chemistry
An advanced treatment of the use of enzymes in organic synthesis, the use of stable and radioisotopes in the study of enzymatic processes and the design of enzyme inhibitors. (3-1-0) Prerequisite: CHEM 381 or permission of the department.
CHEM 455-3 Synthetic Organic Chemistry
This course teaches the principles involved in the planning and execution of the synthesis of organic molecules. Emphasis is on synthesis of naturally occurring compounds of biological importance. (3-1-0) Prerequisite: CHEM 381 or permission of the instructor.
CHEM 459-3 Special subjects in Organic Chemistry
An advanced, in-depth treatment of a specialized area of organic chemistry. (3-1-0) Prerequisite: CHEM 380 or permission of the instructor.
CHEM 460-3 Advanced Physical Chemistry
Statistical thermodynamics, kinetic theory of gases, transport properties, intermolecular forces, electrical properties of molecules, properties of ionic solutions, Debye-Hückel theory, electrochemistry. (3-1-0) Prerequisite: MATH 251; CHEM 260 and 360, or PHYS 385 and 344 (or 244).
CHEM 462-3 Molecular Spectroscopy
Atomic spectra. Electronic, vibrational and rotational spectra of diatomic and polyatomic molecules. The Raman effect. Nuclear and electron spin resonance. Symmetry classification of molecules and their energy levels. (3-1-0) Prerequisite: CHEM 260 or PHYS 385.
CHEM 464-3 Quantum Chemistry
Fundamentals of quantum mechanics and its principal results and techniques as applied to atoms and molecules: atomic structure, molecular bonding, rotations and vibrations of molecules, symmetry of atomic and molecular orbitals. (3-1-0) Prerequisite: CHEM 260, MATH 232, 251; or PHYS 385. Recommended: MATH 310.
CHEM 465-3 Electrochemistry
Modern techniques and concepts in electrochemistry. subjects include equilibrium and dynamic electrochemistry, ion transport and voltammetry. Electrochemical systems of increasing importance including chemically modified electrodes, fuel cells and solar energy conversion applications will also be discussed. (3-1-0) Prerequisite: CHEM 360.
CHEM 468-469-3 Special subjects in Physical Chemistry
Selected subjects of physical chemistry not regularly covered in the chemistry undergraduate course offerings. subjects may vary from year to year and may include (but are not limited to): chemical kinetics, electrochemistry, magnetic resonance, polymer chemistry, surface chemistry. (3-1-0) Prerequisite: CHEM 260 and 360 (or 261 and 360) or permission of the instructor.
CHEM 481-5 Undergraduate Research
Experimental and/or theoretical research; preparation of a written report and oral presentation in research seminar format. Admission requires selection of a faculty supervisor and submission of a research proposal. Prospective students must contact the chemistry advisor to register their interest in this course before the last day of classes of the previous semester. The research proposal is due by the end of the examination period preceding the research semester. Prerequisite: permission of the department; knowledge of chemistry at an advanced level. Normally taken after completion of 300 level course requirements.
CHEM 482-3 Directed Study in Advanced subjects of Chemistry
Directed practicing in a syllabu chosen in consultation with a supervisor. Admission requires selection of a faculty supervisor and submission of a study syllabu to the department a least one month prior to the start of the semester in which the course will be taken. Prerequisite: permission of the department. Normally taken during the fourth year of study.
CHEM 483-5 Honors Research
Experimental and/or theoretical research; preparation of a written report and oral presentation in research seminar format. Admission requires selection of a faculty supervisor and submission of a research proposal. Prospective students must contact the chemistry advisor to register their interest in this course before the last day of classes of the previous semester. The research proposal is due by the end of the examination period preceding the research semester. Prerequisite: CHEM 481 and permission of the department. Credit for this course may only be applied to the honors chemistry program.

Chinese CHIN

Faculty of Arts

Department of Linguistics

Language Training Institute

CHIN 100-3 Mandarin Chinese I
Introduction to the study of Mandarin Chinese and to the development of basic oral and written skills. The course will study phonetics, vocabulary, syntax, grammar and culture. (tutorial) Prerequisite: permission of the instructor.
CHIN 101-3 Mandarin Chinese II
Continues to build on all four language skills acquired in CHIN 100. (tutorial) Prerequisite: CHIN 100 or permission of the department.
CHIN 151-3 Spoken Mandarin for Speakers of Other Chinese Dialects
This course is especially designed for native speakers of Chinese Dialects other than Mandarin who, though able to read and write Chinese fluently, have no knowledge of spoken Mandarin. Speakers of a Chinese dialect who have taken Mandarin courses should not take this course. (tutorial) Prerequisite: ability to read, write and speak a Chinese dialect.
CHIN 152-3 Spoken Mandarin for Speakers of Other Chinese Dialects II
This is a second course in conversational Mandarin for Cantonese speakers. Students enrolled in this course should already have a good command of Chinese practicing and writing. This course is designed for Cantonese speakers who have acquired basic skills in Mandarin phonetics to continue to build vocabulary and gain fluency in Mandarin. CHIN 152 will continue to develop aural comprehension and oral fluency. Contrasts between Mandarin and Cantonese will continue to be made in pronunciation, diction, vocabulary, idiomatic expressions and subtle differences in grammar. (0-4-0) Prerequisite: CHIN 151 or equivalent.
CHIN 185-6 Intensive Mandarin Chinese in the China Field School
This six week intensive language study course will be taken by all students registering in the China Field School. Upon arrival at the university in China, students will be assigned to two course sections at the appropriate level according to their language skills from beginners to upper intermediate in reading, writing, comprehension, conversation and grammar. For students wanting to continue their language studies at SFU after attending the field school, the Chinese language instructor will conduct a placement interview and assign the appropriate course level. (tutorial)
CHIN 200-3 Mandarin Chinese III
Continues to build on all four skills of the language acquired in CHIN 101/102, with special emphasis on improving the students' spoken facility in the language. (tutorial) Prerequisite: SFU CHIN 101, 102 or permission of the department. Students with credit for CHIN 201 (taken prior to spring semester 1999) cannot take CHIN 200 for further credit.
CHIN 201-3 Mandarin Chinese IV
Continues to build on all four skills of the language acquired in CHIN 200, with special emphasis on improving the students' spoken facility in the language. (tutorial) Prerequisite: SFU CHIN 200 or permission of the program advisor.

Cognitive Science COGS

Faculty of Arts

COGS 100-3 Introduction to Cognitive Science
This course provides a basic integrative overview of how cognitive science aspires to integrate the empirical findings, theories, and methods of psychology, neuroscience, linguistics, computing science and philosophy. (lecture/tutorial) Prerequisite: Open to all students. Students with credit for COGS 200 may not take COGS 100 for further credit.
COGS 300-3 Special subjects in Cognitive Science
An interdisciplinary exploration of latest work on some special syllabu in cognitive science (such as vision, reasoning, connectionism, etc.) (lecture) Prerequisite: lower division cognitive science course requirements. Students with credit for COGS 400 may not take COGS 300 for further credit.
COGS 370-0 Cognitive Science Practicum I
First semester of work experience in the Cognitive Science Co-operative Education Program. Students should apply to the Faculty of Arts co-operative education co-ordinator by the end of the third week of the semester preceding the employment semester. Prerequisite: normally 30 credit hours, including COGS 100 and four other courses in the Cognitive Science program, with a minimum CGPA of 2.75.
COGS 371-0 Cognitive Science Practicum II
Second semester of work experience in the Cognitive Science Co-operative Education Program. Students should apply to the Faculty of Arts co-operative education co-ordinator by the end of the third week of the semester preceding the employment semester. Prerequisite: successful completion of COGS 375 and 45 credit hours with a minimum CGPA of 2.75.
COGS 470-0 Cognitive Science Practicum III
Third semester of work experience in the Cognitive Science Co-operative Education Program. Students should apply to the Faculty of Arts co-operative education co-ordinator by the end of the third week of the semester preceding the employment semester. Prerequisite: successful completion of COGS 371 and 60 credit hours with a minimum CGPA of 2.75.
COGS 471-0 Cognitive Science Practicum IV
Fourth semester of work experience in the Cognitive Science Co-operative Education Program. Students should apply to the Faculty of Arts co-operative education co-ordinator by the end of the third week of the semester preceding the employment semester. Prerequisite: successful completion of COGS 470 and 75 credit hours with a minimum CGPA of 2.75.
COGS 490-5 Honors Project I
An in-depth investigation of a syllabu in Cognitive Science culminating in a critical literature review and the formulation of a research proposal. (seminar/tutorial) Prerequisite: approval of cognitive science steering committee after student has completed a cognitive science major and at least two courses specified under honors in the program calendar entry.
COGS 491-5 Honors Project II
The research proposed in COGS 490 is executed, culminating in the completion of a substantive piece of research. (seminar/tutorial) Prerequisite: approval of Cognitive Science steering committee either when student has completed COGS 490 or when student is taking COGS 490.

Communication CMNS

Faculty of Applied Sciences

CMNS 110-3 Introduction to Communication Studies
An introduction to selected theories about human communication. This course is required for a major, honors or minor in communication. (lecture/tutorial)
CMNS 130-3 Explorations in Mass Communication
An introduction to the role of mass communication (radio, television, telecommunications and the press) in Canadian society. This course is required for a major, honors or minor in communication. (lecture/tutorial)
CMNS 200-3 Effective Communication
Introduction to techniques and methods of communicating effectively in complex organizations; with the media, government, the public; in the work place, in local and international business and trade, etc. The challenge of working in meetings, doing research in teams, preparing analytic/technical reports and press statements, managing complex interactive communication processes will be addressed, with special reference to the role of culture, policy, and law, technical change, and potential conflict. (seminar) Prerequisite: 25 credit hours. Recommended: for communication co-op students.
CMNS 210-3 Media History
An assessment of the social implications of developments in information technology from prehistory to the middle of the 20th century. subjects include: the origins of symbolic representation; the oral tradition; the significance of different systems of writing and numeration; the consequences of print; and the initial changes brought about by electronic media. (lecture/tutorial) Prerequisite: CMNS 110.
CMNS 220-3 Understanding Television
This course examines television, both as a medium of communication and an element of culture. (lecture/tutorial) Prerequisite: CMNS 110 or 130.
CMNS 221-3 Media and Audiences
An introduction to the study of popular culture and mass media, with a focus on the organization and role of audiences. (lecture/tutorial) Prerequisite: CMNS 110 or 130.
CMNS 223-3 Advertising as Social Communication
An interdisciplinary examination of the significance of advertising as a social message system in our consumer society. The course proposes an analytical method for appreciating the changing styles and functions of advertising in the 20th century. (lecture/tutorial) Prerequisite: CMNS 110 or 130.
CMNS 226-3 Digital Media Communication Techniques
This course introduces students to a variety of digital media communication technologies and techniques, including image and sound capturing and manipulation, Internet-based publishing and research, digitizing, editing and archiving. Design and management tasks involved in communicating using digital media are also introduced, including strategic and research planning, data integrity management, file structuring and packaging and work presentation. (lecture/lab) Prerequisite: CMNS 110 and 130. Recommended: CMNS 220.
CMNS 230-3 Introduction to Communication Media
Provides an overview of the development of broadcasting and telecommunication systems in Canada and their relationship to contemporary society. subjects covered include the history of the CBC, cable television, the domestic film production industry, Canadian satellite development, and alternative media in Canada. (lecture/tutorial) Prerequisite: CMNS 130.
CMNS 235-3 Introduction to Journalism in Canada
An overview of journalism as a social, cultural and political institution in Canada. subjects include: themes of news; print and electronic journalism; journalism and politics; history of Canadian journalism; legal, technological, professional, corporate and ethical influences. (lecture/tutorial) Prerequisite: CMNS 130.
CMNS 240-3 The Political Economy of Communication
Examination of the political and economic processes that have generated the policies and structures of mass media, telecommunications and related industries, and the role of the mass media in determining local, national, and international policy. (lecture/tutorial) Prerequisite: CMNS 130. Recommended: CMNS 230.
CMNS 247-3 International Communication
A survey and analysis of opportunities and constraints in the field of international communication. The course will consider perspectives from which to understand and address regional differences, universal patterns of communication in international relations, and in development co-operation. Comparative and contrastive examples will be drawn from communication practices current in the Asia-Pacific region. (lecture/tutorial) Prerequisite: 45 or more credit hours; at least two lower division courses in Communication. Students with credit for CMNS 346 may not take this course for further credit. Recommended: LING 260 and/or SA 101.
CMNS 253-3 Introduction to Information Technology: The New Media
An introduction to new communication/information technologies, seen as new media of communication: the technologies, their uses, and the social issues arising from them. (lecture/tutorial) Prerequisite: CMNS 110 or 130.
CMNS 258-3 Introduction to Electroacoustic Communication
An introduction to the tape medium as a communicational tool and to electroacoustic aspects of communication in general. Specific techniques of field recording, interviewing, editing, tape transformations, sound object manipulation, and basic studio techniques will be presented and students will use the school's studio facilities. Applications of the tape medium to such areas as media analysis, aural history, social documentation, interpersonal communication, and tape music composition will be discussed. (lecture/laboratory)
CMNS 259-3 Acoustic Dimensions of Communication I
A course designed to develop the student's perception and understanding of sound and its behavior in the interpersonal, social, environmental, media and creative fields. The acoustic and psychoacoustic bases of sound will be introduced with special reference to acoustic design, the electroacoustic media, and sonic environments. (lecture/laboratory)
CMNS 260-3 Introduction to Empirical Communication Research Methods
An introduction to empirical research methods in diverse traditions of communication enquiry. Some methods recognize communication as everyday interactions; others analyse communication as a process; still others blend traditional scientific empiricism with analytical and critical methods derived from the arts and humanities. subjects include: paradigms, conceptualizing and operationalizing research, sampling, interviews, surveys, unobtrusive observation, content analysis, and the role of statistics in communication research. (lecture/tutorial) Prerequisite: CMNS 110 or 130.
CMNS 261-3 Documentary Research in Communication
Media and communication studies often utilize historical, governmental and corporate records. The course introduces the techniques necessary to analyse the primary source documents. (lecture/tutorial) Prerequisite: CMNS 110 or 130.
CMNS 286-3 Selected Topics
Analysis of a particular syllabu in the general area of communication. (lecture/tutorial) Prerequisite: CMNS 110 and 130.
CMNS 304-4 Communication and the Language of Everyday Life
An introduction to context theory and media literacy. Films and documentaries are used as texts for the study of communication and popular culture. (lecture/tutorial) Prerequisite: 45 credit hours including CMNS 110 and 130.
CMNS 310-4 Communication Thought in the Evolution of the Social Sciences
An examination of discussions of human communication in the social thought of the 18th and 19th centuries, including that of Rousseau, Monboddo, Marx, Darwin and Tylor. (lecture/tutorial) Prerequisite: CMNS 210.
CMNS 320-4 Children, Media and Culture
The course examines the part played by communication media in children's lives by reviewing the debates and research in this field. Specific attention will be paid to the issues of violence, literacy, imagination, quality and marketing through an examination of the critical writing and advocacy movements which have arisen around the problem of children's media. (lecture/tutorial) Prerequisite: 60 credits including two of CMNS 220, 221, 223, 226. Strongly recommended: CMNS 362 or 363.
CMNS 321-4 The Cultural Production of Popular Music
Examination of the cultural production of popular music with emphasis on the relationship between the nature and strategies of popular music production and the patterns of its audience consumption. (lecture/tutorial) Prerequisite: CMNS 221.
CMNS 323-4 Cultural Dimensions in Advertising
This course develops a critical overview of the contemporary debates about the consumer society. This exploration of consumer culture begins by examining latest characterizations of the psycho-social dynamics of consumption in consumer culture. It goes on to trace the historical formation of advertising as a key cultural practice, mediating the market transactions between producers and consumers. The marketing communication model is the focus of a detailed examination of the increasingly sophisticated co-ordination of communication and consumer research activities. (lecture/lab) Prerequisite: 60 credit hours, including two of CMNS 220, 221, 223 or 226. Strongly recommended: CMNS 362 or 363.
CMNS 324-4 Media, Sports and Popular Culture
This course examines the changing relationships between media, sport and popular culture in both a North American and a global context. The course adopts a broadly historical perspective, beginning with an exploration of the role of the mass press in the popularization and commercialization of sport in the 19th century, moving on to consider the close interrelationships that grew up between sport and radio, and sport and television, and finally examining sport as a key element of national popular cultures and identity formation as well as an important part of the broader entertainment industries in the age of digital technologies, media convergence, and globalization. (lecture/tutorial) Prerequisite: 60 credit hours, including two of CMNS 220, 221, 223, 240. Cannot be taken for further credit is student has taken CMNS 386 under same title.
CMNS 326-4 Applied Media Workshop: On The Hill
This course provides an opportunity for students to build on the knowledge they have acquired in Digital Media Communication Techniques (CMNS 226), and apply that knowledge to the production of the School of Communication's web based news magazine and documentary program On The Hill (www.sfu.ca/oth). Students will draw on their understanding of public communication in democracies and media analysis skills to create new and innovative visual and aural journalism. In addition, students will learn to build teamwork skills as they produce segments for the shows in groups. The course seminars will emphasize communication design, and the social and ethical issues which arise when working with documentary and news material for public dissemination. (seminar/laboratory) Prerequisite: permission of instructor, and 60 credit hours including CMNS 226 and 235.
CMNS 331-4 News Discourse and Political Communication
An examination of journalism and the news media as a set of institutions with important political and ideological roles. The course overviews theoretical perspectives and applies selected theoretical concepts to such subjects as influences on media content, how news generates meaning, ideological aspects of media frames, and the evaluation of journalism's performance in relation to normative expectations of democratic political communication. (lecture/tutorial) Prerequisite: two of CMNS 230, 235 and 240.
CMNS 333-4 Broadcasting Policy and Regulation in the Global Context
Television - in broadcast, cable and video-on-demand formats - has dominated the cultural industries of Canada. Traditionally seen as important to political and cultural self-determination, broadcasting strategy, business and government policies are now being adapted in view of globalization of technologies which are altering the production, financing, and distribution of new and existing information and entertainment services. This course focuses on developing applied business and public policy analytic skills. Tools of on-line searches, presentation software, the rudiments of strategic analysis of industrial sectors (strengths, weaknesses, threats, opportunities) and technical policy writing will be covered. A simulation will be staged around a convergence theme drawn from technology, business, or public interest policy issues. (seminar) Prerequisite: CMNS 230 253, and 261.
CMNS 334-4 Cultural Policy
Examination of the modern foundations and current policy processes of federal, provincial and municipal policies for the arts, cultural industries and heritage. Related social policies, such as bilingualism and multiculturalism, and the international context of Canadian cultural policy, will also be addressed. (seminar) Prerequisite: CMNS 230 and 261.
CMNS 342-4 Science and Public Policy I: Risk Communication
The course examines communication in the relation between science (technology) and public policy, and more particularly, in the evaluation of risk. (lecture/tutorial) Prerequisite: CMNS 260 or 261.
CMNS 346-4 Communication and Development
An introduction to explanations and interpretations of the roles of communication in development, and the historical framework through which such analysis is made. It shows how an unequal structure of world political economy is conserved in association with ever increasing amounts of information and new means to communicate. Examples from Canada and other countries will be used. (lecture/tutorial) Prerequisite: 60 credit hours including CMNS 110 or 130. Students who have taken CMNS 345 may not take CMNS 346 for further credit.
CMNS 347-4 Communication in Conflict and Intervention
The role of communication, and in particular the mass media, in various types of conflict and the uses of communication-based strategies in the intervention, arbitration and mediation of those conflicts. (lecture/tutorial) Prerequisite: 60 credit hours including CMNS 110 and 130. Recommended: CMNS 247 and 362.
CMNS 353-4 Social Contexts of Information Technology
Examination of a particular application of information/communication technology, focussing on the technology itself and its capabilities; how it is implemented, and what social impacts it has on the people who use it. Emphasis is placed on understanding how the system works in the ongoing social context in which it is developed, installed and used. The specific application studied may vary from semester to semester. (lecture/laboratory) Prerequisite: CMNS 253; and CMNS 261 or 362.
CMNS 354-4 Communication and Social Issues in Design
This course will explore social issues and values in designing technology, through a focus on both the objects and processes of design. Emphasis will be placed on communication between participants in the design process, and identification of social issues and values that influence design. Students will work in cross-disciplinary groups during labs. Lab exercises will emphasize making decisions that occur during the design process explicit, and making values that enter into design processes explicit. (lecture/lab) Prerequisite: 60 credit hours, including any one of CMNS 253; CMPT 275; KIN 201, 205 or ENSC 100. CMNS students must also have completed CMNS 362 or 363.
CMNS 358-4 Sound Tape Recording: Theory and Uses
An intermediate level studio workshop to develop the student's skills in the tape medium and his/her understanding of the communicational implications of sound when processed in that medium. (seminar/laboratory) Prerequisite: CMNS 258 with a grade of B or higher, and approval of instructor.
CMNS 359-4 Acoustic Dimensions of Communication II
A special subjects course and small class work group at an intermediate level in acoustic communication dealing intensively with specific problems in psychoacoustics, acoustic design, soundscape studies, noise in the community, acoustic aspects of social organization, the acoustic aspects, language and interpersonal communication, electronic sound production, media analysis, theories of sound cognition, and information processing. (seminar/laboratory) Prerequisite: CMNS 259.
CMNS 362-6 Evaluation Methods for Applied Communication Research
Research design and techniques for the study of the introduction, uses and consequences of new media and technologies, new communication policies and practices in their socio-economic and cultural context, and communication in innovation and change. (lecture/tutorial/laboratory) Prerequisite: at least 60 credit hours, including two of CMNS 253, 260 or 261.
CMNS 363-6 Approaches to Media and Audience Research
A survey and application of research approaches to media and audience analysis including content analysis, textual analysis, agenda setting, effects research, focus group and survey research, message evaluation and audience studies. (lecture/lab) Prerequisite: at least 60 credit hours, including one of CMNS 220, 221 or 223, and CMNS 260.
CMNS 371-4 The Structure of the Book Publishing Industry in Canada
An analysis of the various facets of the book publishing industry in Canada including ownership patterns, legal foundations, criteria for book selection and marketing. Includes examination of both commercial and educational publishing. The industry will be analysed within the framework of Canadian cultural and other government policies affecting the industry. (distance education) Prerequisite: 60 credit hours.
CMNS 372-4 The Publishing Process
This introductory course follows the book-publishing process from the acquisition and editing of manuscripts through to production, promotion and distribution. With each topic, the seminar proceeds from basic concepts and precepts to case studies of particular kinds of publishing companies (e.g., literary, regional and general trade) and particular types of books (e.g., children's, genre, fiction and poetry). Students work in groups that simulate the decision-to-publish process. Required readings focus on the history of book publishing, as well as on current developments. (seminar) Prerequisite: 60 credit hours.
CMNS 375-4 Magazine Publishing
This course addresses the basic concepts and practices used in the magazine publishing industry in the areas of business, writing, editing, design, marketing, advertising, distribution, and production. It emphasizes readership and editorial policy, new technology and changing costs and revenue patterns. (lecture/tutorial) Prerequisite: 60 credit hours.
CMNS 386-4 Special subjects in Communication
Intensive analysis of a particular syllabu in the general area of communication. (seminar) Prerequisite: depends on topic; published before registration.
CMNS 387-4 Special subjects in Communication
Intensive analysis of a particular syllabu in the general area of communication. (seminar) Prerequisite: depends on topic, published before registration.
CMNS 395-0 Communication Practicum I
Work experience in the School of Communication's Co-operative Education Program. Prerequisite: Students must register with the co-op co-ordinator by the end of the third week of the semester preceding the work semester. Normally, students will have completed 28 semester hours and have a minimum GPA of 2.70. Credit is given as pass/withdraw (P/W).
CMNS 396-0 Communication Practicum II
The second semester of work experience in the School of Communication's Co-operative Education Program. Prerequisite: CMNS 395 and normally the completion of 42 semester hours, and a minimum GPA of 2.70. Credit is given as pass/withdraw (P/W).
CMNS 408-4 Communication Network Project Group
An advanced workshop in network analysis focussed on applied research. (laboratory) Prerequisite: two upper division CMNS courses and permission of the instructor.
CMNS 410-4 Media and Ideology
An advanced seminar in media studies focussing upon theoretical debates about the allegedly ideological character of mass media and mass culture. (seminar) Prerequisite: 75 credit hours, including CMNS 310. Recommended: CMNS 331 and SA 327. Students who have taken CMNS 422 may not take this course for further credit.
CMNS 425-4 Applied Communication for Social Issues
An advanced seminar in applied communication that focuses on the research and strategic design of media messages, campaigns and programs for public awareness, education, and social change. This course involves the application of theories and approaches in critical media analysis to the tasks of media design and media use for public understanding, engagement and participation around social issues. (seminar) Prerequisite: 75 credit hours, including CMNS 260 or 261; and CMNS 321 or 323.
CMNS 426-4 Video Design for Social Communication
The workshop examines the growing role that video is playing in a variety of public relations, industrial, advocacy and educational contexts. The emphasis of this course is on issues of communication design in relation to the goals and values in specific communication forums. (seminar/lab) Prerequisite: 75 credit hours, including CMNS 226 and two of CMNS 220, 326, 358.
CMNS 428-4 Media Analysis Project Group
An advanced workshop in media analysis focussed on applied research. (laboratory) Prerequisite: two upper division CMNS courses and permission of instructor.
CMNS 431-4 News Research and Analysis
Applied research seminar using techniques of textual and contextual analysis to test media themes and explore patterns of coverage and omission in Canada's new media. Students also have an opportunity to publicize their work through the NewsWatch Canada Project. (seminar) Prerequisite: instructor's permission, normally granted on the basis of a CGPA of at least 3.0, and 75 credit hours, including at least one of CMNS 235, 331 or 335, and at least one of CMNS 261 or 363. Students who took CMNS 421, 428 or 486 when these courses were offered as the Project Censored Seminar (since 1994-1) may not take this course for further credit.
CMNS 433-4 Issues in Communication and Cultural Policy
Advanced seminar on current issues in communication policy. subjects will be selected from among current policy issues in local, national and international aspects of broadcasting, the cultural industries, the arts and heritage. (seminar) Prerequisite: 75 credit hours including CMNS 333 or 334.
CMNS 435-4 Information Rights in the Information Age
An advanced seminar to examine key information-policy issues and the actors involved in setting policy (governments, information industry, news media, libraries, citizen groups) in Canada, with international comparisons. (seminar) Prerequisite: 75 credit hours, including CMNS 261 and one of CMNS 253, 333, 334, 335, 353.
CMNS 436-4 Telecommunication Regulation in North America
Development of the theory and practice of regulation of the telecommunications industry in Canada and the USA. (seminar) Prerequisite: at least 75 credit hours including CMNS 230, 240 and 333.
CMNS 437-4 Media Democratization: From Critique to Transformation
An advanced seminar on the normative debates, social bases, and strategic potential for media democratization in the context of economically developed liberal democracies like Canada and the United States. This course complements other courses which critically examine state communication policies and the political economy and allegedly ideological character of corporate media. Here, we focus on campaigns and movements in civil society to define and build alternative communicative forms based on equality, democratic participation and/or human rights. (seminar) Prerequisite: 75 credit hours, including CMNS 235, 240 or 331. Cannot be taken for further credit if student has taken CMNS 428 or 487 under the same title.
CMNS 438-4 Communication Policy Project Group
An advanced workshop in communication policy in media and information technology focussed on applied research. (laboratory) Prerequisite: two upper division CMNS courses and permission of the instructor.
CMNS 444-4 Political Economy of International Communication
An examination of the domestic and international implications of the development of mass media and telecommunications and the differential impact of the free flow of technology and information. (seminar) Prerequisite: 75 credit hours, including CMNS 240.
CMNS 446-4 The Communication of Science and the Transfer of Technology
Evaluation of the communication of scientific knowledge and the transfer of technology, both within industrialized settings and to non-industrialized settings. Specific reference to the communication of values related to the use of technologies and the role of science and technology in international development. (seminar) Prerequisite: 75 credit hours, including CMNS 261 and 346. Recommended: CMNS 253, 260, 362.
CMNS 447-4 Negotiation and Dialogue as Communication
This course provides frameworks and tools with which to understand and evaluate negotiation and evaluate negotiation as a form of communication. The objective of the course is to provide an understanding of the role of communication in the negotiating process, and the consequences of different kinds of negotiation strategies in intercultural, international, competitive, and conflictual situations. It combines theoretical discussion with practical case studies, involves guest negotiators and analysts, and provides an appreciation of the world-wide scale and importance of negotiation as a basis for clarifying relationships. (seminar) Prerequisite: 75 credit hours, including CMNS 347 and 362.
CMNS 448-4 International Communication Project Group
An advanced workshop in international communication and development focussed on applied research. (laboratory) Prerequisite: two upper division CMNS courses and permission of the instructor.
CMNS 453-4 Issues in the Information Society
Advanced seminar to discuss issues in the interplay between contemporary society and new computer/communication technologies, at the level of comprehensive theories of society, on one hand, and major public policy, on the other. (lecture/lab) Prerequisite: 75 credit hours, including CMNS 253 and 362.
CMNS 454-4 Computer Mediated Work and Workplace Communication
An investigation of the content, quality and character of jobs and workplace communication systems that involve computers. An examination of the influence of managerial goals and workplace relations on the design and choice of hardware and software for: office automation; computer-aided and computer-integrated manufacturing systems; computer-aided design, expert systems, and electronic networks. (lecture/seminar) Prerequisite: 75 credit hours including CMNS 110 and 130. Recommended: CMNS 253, 353, 362.
CMNS 455-4 Women and New Information Technologies
In the 1970s, technological change came under the scrutiny of a wide range of interest groups. Research concerned with women and technological change documented that women were affected differently by technology than men, and that, in general, women occupy different positions in the technological change process than men. As interest in women and technological change has grown in the past 25 years, the benefits of focusing on gender as a variable of study have extended beyond making women's experiences visible. Focusing on gender offers the possibility of discovering theoretical limitations which, when addressed, have implications that extend beyond the interests of women. (seminar/lab) Prerequisite: 75 credit hours, including any one of CMNS 253, 353, or 453; CMPT 320; WS 204.
CMNS 456-4 Communication to Mitigate Disasters
An examination of the special role communication and information systems play in efforts to mitigate effects of major emergencies and disasters. subjects include: Canadian and international disaster management programs, practices and issues; principles of emergency communication planning and operation, and the application and influence of new communication and information technologies (including electronic networks) in hazard information gathering, interpretation, exchange and management. (seminar/lab) Prerequisite: 75 credit hours, including one of CMNS 230, 253 or 353.
CMNS 458-4 Information Technology Project Group
An advanced workshop in applied information technology and its evaluation focussed on applied research. (laboratory) Prerequisite: two upper division CMNS courses and permission of instructor.
CMNS 472-4 Books, Markets and Readers
This course will examine the major markets for the sale of books, book buying and book reading. Special emphasis will be placed on popular genres and successful authors and outlets such as independent and chain bookstores, book clubs, libraries and specialty stores. (seminar) Prerequisite: 75 credit hours including CMNS 372.
CMNS 473-4 Publication Design and Print Production
An examination of theory, principles and applications in publication design and print production including computer applications. The course focuses on magazines, books and electronic formats. Creative, marketing and managerial issues will all be explored. (lecture/laboratory) Prerequisite: 75 credit hours.
CMNS 474-4 The Business of Publishing
This course examines business practices within publishing firms. It emphasizes financial planning and operations, acquisitions, marketing and promotion. (seminar) Prerequisite: 75 credit hours including CMNS 372.
CMNS 478-4 Publishing Project Group
An advanced workshop in publishing analysis or design focussed on applied research. (laboratory) Prerequisite: two upper division CMNS courses and permission of the instructor.
CMNS 480-2 Directed Study
Independent practicing and research on subjects selected in consultation with the supervising instructor. Prerequisite: two upper division CMNS courses and consent of instructor. No more than 10 hours of directed study may be taken.
CMNS 481-3 Directed Study
Independent practicing and research on subjects selected in consultation with the supervising instructor. Prerequisite: two upper division CMNS courses and consent of instructor. No more than 10 hours of directed study may be taken.
CMNS 482-4 Directed Study
Independent practicing and research on subjects selected in consultation with the supervising instructor. Prerequisite: two upper division CMNS courses and consent of instructor. No more than 10 hours of directed study may be taken.
CMNS 483-5 Directed Study
Independent practicing and research on subjects selected in consultation with the supervising instructor. Prerequisite: two upper division CMNS courses and consent of instructor. No more than 10 hours of directed study may be taken.
CMNS 486-4 Special subjects in Communication
Intensive analysis of a particular syllabu in the general area of communication and/or attention to the work of a particular writer or school of thought. (seminar) Prerequisite: permission of the instructor.
CMNS 487-4 Special subjects in Communication
Intensive analysis of a particular syllabu in communication and/or attention to the work of a particular writer or school of thought. (seminar) Prerequisite: permission of instructor.
CMNS 488-4 Special subjects in Communication
Intensive analysis of a particular syllabu in the general area of communication. (seminar) Prerequisite: depends on topic; published before registration.
CMNS 489-4 Field Placement
For students who have at least 24 upper level credit hours in communication, this course offers the opportunity to work under faculty supervision in a field placement situation related to one of the areas of concentration in communication. Arrangements for field placement and faculty supervision are the responsibility of the student, and enrolment will depend upon the availability of faculty resources in any semester. Prerequisite: 75 credit hours and permission of the school.
CMNS 494-0 Communication Practicum III
The third semester of work experience for students in the School of Communication's Co-operative Education Program. Prerequisite: CMNS 396 and normally 56 semester hours, and a minimum GPA of 2.70. Credit is given as pass/withdraw (P/W).
CMNS 495-0 Communication Practicum IV
The last semester of work experience for students in the School of Communication's Co-operative Education Program. Credit is awarded as in CMNS 395, 396, or 494. Prerequisite: CMNS 494 and a minimum GPA of 2.70. Credit is given as pass/withdraw (P/W).
CMNS 496-0 Communication Practicum V
Optional semester of work experience for students in the School of Communication's Co-operative Education Program. Prerequisite: CMNS 495 and a minimum GPA of 2.70. Credit is given as pass/withdraw (P/W).
CMNS 497-5 Honors Research Proposal
Presentation and discussion in a seminar format of honors student research projects and colloquia of interest. Course may be offered on a pass/fail basis. Prerequisite: students accepted into honors program only.
CMNS 498-10 Honors Research Project
Intensive work in a particular syllabu in the general field of communication. Involves either group or individual research project under the direct supervision of at least two School of Communication faculty members who will provide guidance and critical feedback as necessary. Prerequisite: successful completion of CMNS 497.

Community Economic Development CED

Faculty of Arts

CED 201-3 Introduction to Community Economic Development
A survey of community economic development. The focus of this course is on understanding the strengths and weaknesses of conventional approaches to economic development; the rationale for alternative approaches to economic development; the varying definitions and interpretations of community and of development; and the components which must be addressed by any coherent economic development strategy. Prerequisite: CED certificate program approval, 30 credit hours or permission of the CED Centre. Corequisite: certificate students may not take this course concurrently with upper division CED courses.
CED 301-4 Sustainable Community Development
A more sophisticated theoretical foundation for understanding sustainable development at the community level, including an integrated approach to environmental, economic, and social aspects of development. The course includes sections on natural and social capital, and on making community policy (e.g., the role of local government, economic instruments. etc.) which are essential for the subsequent 400 level courses in the program. Prerequisite: CED certificate program approval and CED 201 or CED diploma program approval or completion of 60 credit hours.
CED 401-4 Concepts, Techniques and Principles for CED Practice
Study of concepts and techniques for economic and policy analysis in community economic development. (seminar) Prerequisite: CED 301 or permission of the CED Centre.
CED 403-4 Models and Cases in Community Economic Development
An integration of social, economic and ecological issues from previous CED courses with the methods for case studies of communities and their socio-economic development processes. (seminar) Prerequisite: CED 301, or permission of CED Centre.
CED 404-4 Project in CED
Provides a situation in which a student applies ideas and models acquired in the program to a practical problem in community economic development. Prerequisite: CED 301, 401, and 403.
CED 410-4 Special subjects in Community Economic Development
A specific syllabu within the field of CED, not covered by regularly scheduled, required courses in the program. Prerequisite: CED 301 or permission of the CED Centre.
CED 412-4 Directed Studies in Community Economic Development
This is an individual study course designed to permit students to significantly expand their knowledge base and apply their critical thinking in CED. The student must develop a readings list in consultation with the CED centre's academic supervisor and obtain approval for it. A critical, annotated bibliography must be regularly submitted throughout the semester, and a final paper will be required. Non post baccalaureate diploma students must apply for special permission to take this course. Enrollment is limited. Prerequisite: community economic development post baccalaureate diploma program approval, CED 301 and 401.

Computing Science CMPT

Faculty of Applied Sciences

See also courses listed under Mathematics and Computing Science (MACM).
CMPT 001-3 Computers and the Activity of People
Concerned with computer literacy and appreciation. What are computers? What do they do? How do they do it? How will they affect us? Illustrations given of applications of computing in the arts, commerce, industry, science and everyday activity. Programming is introduced but not emphasized; instead, students will be exposed to a variety of computer hardware and software elements that are in wide use. (lecture/laboratory) No special prerequisite. Students with a grade of B or higher in BC high school computer science 12, or those who have obtained credit for or are currently enrolled in any other Computing Science course may not take CMPT 001 for further credit.
CMPT 100-3 Software Packages and Programming
Introduction to the fundamentals of computer operation and computer programming. The use of software packages is emphasized, focussing on spreadsheets, databases, and presentation graphics. Techniques of solving problems using structured programs in a modern database programming environment are introduced. (lecture/laboratory) Prerequisite: BC mathematics 12 or MATH 100 or MATH 110. Students who have taken CMPT 101, 102, or 103 may not take CMPT 100 for further credit.
CMPT 101-4 Introduction to Computer Programming
This course is an introduction to problem solving using a computer and is intended as a first computing course for those wishing to major in Computing Science or a related program. subjects include: techniques and methodologies for the analysis and decomposition of the problem; the structural and algorithmic design of a solution; and the modular implementation and testing of the design. Structured programming using sub-programs, recursion, modules and libraries. Structured data objects including arrays, strings and records. (lecture/laboratory) Prerequisite: MATH 100. MATH 100 is waived for those with a minimum grade of B in BC high school mathematics 12. Students with credit for CMPT 102, 103 or 104 may not take CMPT 101 for further credit.
CMPT 102-3 Introduction to Scientific Computer Programming
A programming course which will provide the science student with a working knowledge of a scientific programming language and an introduction to computing concepts, structured programming, and modular design. The student will also gain knowledge in the use of programming environments including the use of numerical algorithm packages. (lecture/laboratory) Corequisite: MATH 152 or 155 (or 158). Students with credit for CMPT 101, 103 or 114 may not take CMPT 102 for further credit.
CMPT 104-2 Computer Programming
This course is intended for students who may not take CMPT 101 because they already have credit for CMPT 102 or 103. The course includes a review of the concept of an algorithm and structured programming using sub-programs, modules, recursion, and structured data objects. (lecture/laboratory) Prerequisite: CMPT 102 or 103. Students with credit for CMPT 101 may not take CMPT 104 for further credit.
CMPT 110-3 Event-Driven Programming in Visual Basic
Introduction to programming in the event-driven paradigm using the Visual Basic language. Forms, controls, events, menus, objects; subprograms, modular design; decisions and repetition; file and data management; special features. Students who have obtained credit for, or are currently enrolled in a computing science course at the 200 level or higher may not take CMPT 110 for further credit except with permission of the School of Computing Science. (lecture/laboratory) Prerequisite: BC mathematics 12 (or equivalent) or MATH 100 or MATH 110.
CMPT 118-3 Special subjects in Computer and Information Technology
Special subjects in computing science which are of current interest to non-computing students. The course will be offered from time to time depending on availability of faculty and on student interest. Students who have obtained credit for, or are currently enrolled in a computing science course at the 200 level or higher, may not take CMPT 118 for further credit. (3-0-0)
CMPT 150-3 Introduction to Computer Design
Digital design concepts are presented in such a way that students will learn how logic blocks can be designed and employed to construct a simple computer. subjects covered include: basic Von Neumann computer architecture; an introduction to assembly language; combinational logic design; and sequential logic design. An interactive logic simulation environment will be provided for assignments. Assembly language programming is introduced. (3-1-0) This course is identical to ENSC 150 and students cannot take both courses for credit. Students who have taken CMPT 290 cannot take this course for further credit.
CMPT 165-3 Introduction to Multimedia and the Internet
The goal of this course is to serve as an introduction to the use of computers in everyday life. Concepts underlying the use of multimedia and the Internet are examined, as are its applications in various fields. Students who have obtained credit for, or are currently enrolled in a computing science course at the 200 level or higher may not take CMPT 165 for further credit. Students who have taken CMPT 118 may not take CMPT 165 for further credit.
CMPT 201-4 Data and Program Abstraction
Introduction to various widely used data structures such as strings, sets, stacks, queues, lists, hash tables and trees, and algorithms for searching and sorting. Several powerful tools and concepts such as interpretive languages, functional programming, modularization, abstract data types, object-oriented programming, specialized debuggers, extensible languages and automatic garbage collection will also be covered. (lecture/laboratory) Prerequisite: CMPT 101 (or 104) and MACM 101.
CMPT 212-3 Object-Oriented Applications Design in C++
Introduction to object-oriented software design concepts, the object-oriented features of the C++ language, other advanced C++ features, plus a simple introduction to the fundamentals of graphical user interfaces and the development of windowed applications. (lecture/laboratory) Prerequisite: CMPT 101 (or 104). Recommended: CMPT 201.
CMPT 218-3 Special subjects in Computing Science
Special subjects in computing science which are of current interest or are not covered in the regular curriculum will be offered from time to time depending on availability of faculty and on student interest. (lecture/tutorial) Prerequisite: CMPT 201.
CMPT 250-3 Introduction to Computer Architecture
This course deals with the main concepts embodied in computer hardware architecture. In particular, the organization, design and limitations of the major building blocks in modern computers is covered in detail. subjects will include: processor organization; control logic design; memory systems; and architectural support for operating systems and programming languages. A hardware description language will be used as a tool to express and work with design concepts. Prerequisite: CMPT/ENSC 150, or CMPT 290 or 105 with permission of instructor. This course is identical to ENSC 250 and students cannot take both courses for credit. Students who have taken CMPT 390 may not take CMPT 250 for further credit.
CMPT 275-4 Software Engineering I
Introduction to software engineering techniques used in analysis/design and in software project management. The course centres on a team project involving requirements gathering, object analysis and simple data normalization, use-case-driven user documentation and design followed by implementation and testing. Additionally, there is an introduction to project planning, metrics, quality assurance, configuration management, and people issues. (lecture/laboratory) Prerequisite: CMPT 201, MACM 101 (or CMPT 205), MATH 151.
CMPT 300-3 Operating Systems I
This course aims to provide the student an understanding of what a modern operating system is - and the services it provides. It also discusses some basic issues in operating systems and provides solutions. subjects include multiprogramming, process management, memory management, and file systems. (lecture/laboratory) Prerequisite: CMPT 201, MACM 101 (or CMPT 205). Students with credit for CMPT 401 may not take CMPT 300 for further credit.
CMPT 301-3 Information Systems Management
subjects include strategic planning and use of information systems, current ad future technologies, technology assimilation, organizational learning, end-user computing, managing projects and people, managing production operations and networks, evaluating performance and benefits, crisis management and disaster recovery, security and control, financial accountability, and proactive management techniques for a changing environment. (lecture/laboratory) Prerequisite: CMPT 201.
CMPT 305-3 Computer Simulation and Modelling
Introduces the techniques for modelling and computer simulation of complex systems. The philosophy and practice of modelling and of Monte Carlo simulation will be reviewed. The student will learn at least one simulation language (SIMULA, SIMSCRIPT, GPSS, CCS or other languages implemented at Simon Fraser University), apply it to a model, and simulate a non-trivial system from his/her area of interest. (lecture/laboratory) Prerequisite: CMPT 201, MACM 101 (or CMPT 205), STAT 270 (or MATH 272).
CMPT 307-3 Data Structures and Algorithms
Analysis and design of data structures for lists, sets, trees, dictionaries, and priority queues. A selection of subjects chosen from sorting, memory management, graphs and graph algorithms. (lecture) Prerequisite: CMPT 201, MACM 201, MATH 152 and MATH 232.
CMPT 308-3 Computability and Complexity
This course introduces students to formal models of computations such as Turing machines and RAMs. Notions of tractability and intractability are discusses both with respect to computability and resource requirements. The relationship of these concepts to logic is also covered. Prerequisite: MACM 201.
CMPT 310-3 Artificial Intelligence Survey
Provides a unified discussion of the fundamental approaches to the problems in artificial intelligence. The subjects considered are: representational typology and search methods; game playing, heuristic programming; pattern recognition and classification; theorem-proving; question-answering systems; natural language understanding; computer vision. (lecture/laboratory) Prerequisite: CMPT 201 and MACM 101 (or CMPT 205).
CMPT 318-3 Special subjects in Computing Science
Special subjects in computing science at the 300 level. subjects that are of current interest or are not covered in regular curriculum will be offered from time to time depending on availability of faculty and on student interest. Prerequisite: CMPT 201.
CMPT 320-3 Social Implications of a Computerized Society
An examination of social processes that are being automated and implications for good and evil, that may be entailed in the automation of procedures by which goods and services are allocated. Examination of what are dehumanizing and humanizing parts of systems and how systems can be designed to have a humanizing effect. (lecture/seminar) Prerequisite: a course in computing science and 45 credit hours. Students with credit for CMPT 260 may not take CMPT 320 for further credit.
CMPT 340-3 Computers in Biomedicine
The principles involved in using computers for data acquisition, real-time processing, pattern recognition and experimental control in biology and medicine will be developed. The use of large data bases and simulation will be explored. (lecture/laboratory) Prerequisite: completion of 60 credits including CMPT 101 (or 102, 103 or 104 with a grade of B or higher).
CMPT 341-3 Introduction to Computational Biology
This course introduces students to the computing science principles underlying computational biology. The emphasis is on the design, analysis and implementation of computational techniques. Possible subjects include algorithms for sequence alignment, database searching, gene finding, phylogeny and structure analysis. (3-0-0) Prerequisite: CMPT 201, MACM 201.
CMPT 354-3 Database Systems I
Logical representations of data records. Data models. Studies of some popular file and database systems. Document retrieval. Other related issues such as database administration, data dictionary and security. (lecture/laboratory) Prerequisite: CMPT 201, MACM 101.
CMPT 361-3 Introduction to Computer Graphics
This course provides an introduction to the fundamentals of computer graphics. subjects include graphics display and interaction hardware, basic algorithms for 2D primitives, anti-aliasing, 2D and 3D geometrical transformations, 3D projections/viewing, Polygonal and hierarchical models, hidden-surface removal, basic rendering techniques (color, shading, raytracing, radiosity), and interaction techniques. (lecture/laboratory) Prerequisite: CMPT 201 and MATH 232. Students with credit for CMPT 351 may not take CMPT 361 for further credit.
CMPT 363-3 User Interface Design
This course provides a comprehensive study of user interface design. subjects include: goals and principles of UI design (systems engineering and human factors), historical perspective, current paradigms (widget-based, mental model, graphic design, ergonomics, metaphor, constructivist/iterative approach, and visual languages) and their evaluation, existing tools and packages (dialogue models, event-based systems, prototyping), future paradigms, and the social impact of UI. (lecture/laboratory) Prerequisite: CMPT 201.
CMPT 365-3 Multimedia Systems
Multimedia systems design, multimedia hardware and software, issues in effectively representing, processing, and retrieving multimedia data such as text, graphics, sound and music, image and video. (lecture/laboratory) Prerequisite: completion of 60 credits including CMPT 201.
CMPT 370-3 Information System Design
This course focuses on the computer-related problems of information system design and procedures of design implementation. Well-established design methodologies will be discussed, and case studies will be used to illustrate various techniques of system design. (lecture/laboratory) Prerequisite: CMPT 275 and 354.
CMPT 371-3 Data Communications and Networking
Data communication fundamentals (data types, rates, and transmission media). Network architectures for local and wide areas. Communications protocols suitable for various architectures. ISO protocols and internetworking. Performance analysis under various loadings and channel error rates. (lecture/laboratory) Prerequisite: CMPT 201, CMPT/ENSC 150 or CMPT 290 and MATH 152 or equivalent.
CMPT 379-3 Principles of Compiler Design
This course covers the key components of a compiler for a high level programming language. subjects include lexical analysis, parsing, type checking, code generation and optimization. Students will work in teams to design and implement an actual compiler making use of tools such as lex and yacc. Prerequisite: MACM 201, CMPT 150 and 201.
CMPT 383-3 Comparative Programming Languages
Various concepts and principles underlying the design and use of modern programming languages are considered in the context of procedural, object-oriented, functional and logic programming languages. subjects include data and control structuring constructs, facilities for modularity and data abstraction, polymorphism, syntax, and formal semantics. (lecture/laboratory) Prerequisite: CMPT 201, MACM 101 (or CMPT 205).
CMPT 384-3 Symbolic Computing
This course considers modelling and programming techniques appropriate for symbolic data domains such as mathematical expressions, logical formulas, grammars and programming languages. subjects include recursive and functional programming style, grammar-based data abstraction, simplification and reduction transformations, conversions to canonical form, environment data structures and interpreters, metaprogramming, pattern matching and theorem proving. (lecture/laboratory) Prerequisite: CMPT 201; MACM 101 (or CMPT 205).
CMPT 401-3 Operating Systems II
This second course on operating systems studies in depth some of the issues introduced in CMPT 300, as well as new, more advanced subjects in modern operating systems. subjects may include interprocess communication, threads, remote procedure calls, language constructs for concurrency, deadlocks, virtual machines, distributed systems, distributed concurrency control, group communication, issues in file system design, security and protection, performance evaluation. (lecture/laboratory) Prerequisite: CMPT 300 and 371.
CMPT 405-3 Design and Analysis of Computing Algorithms
Models of computation, methods of algorithm design; complexity of algorithms; algorithms on graphs, NP-completeness, approximation algorithms, selected topics. (lecture) Prerequisite: CMPT 307.
CMPT 406-3 Computational Geometry
Mathematical preliminaries; convex hull algorithms; intersection problems; closest-point problems and their applications. (lecture) Prerequisite: CMPT 307.
CMPT 407-3 Computational Complexity
Machine models and their equivalences, complexity classes, separation theorems, reductions, Cook's theorem, NP-completeness, the polynomial time hierarchy, boolean circuit models and parallel complexity theory, other subjects of interest to the students and instructor. (lecture) Prerequisite: CMPT 307.
CMPT 408-3 Theory of Computer Networks/Communications
Network design parameters and goals, dynamic networks and permutations, routing in direct networks, structured communication in direct networks, other subjects of interest to the students and instructor. Prerequisite: CMPT 307 and 371.
CMPT 409-3 Special subjects in Theoretical Computing Science
Current subjects in theoretical computing science depending on faculty and student interest. (lecture) Prerequisite: CMPT 307.
CMPT 411-3 Knowledge Representation
Formal and foundational issues dealing with the representation of knowledge in artificial intelligence systems are covered. Questions of semantics, incompleteness, non-monotonicity and others will be examined. As well, particular approaches, such as procedural or semantic network, may be discussed. (lecture/laboratory) Prerequisite: completion of nine credit hours in Computing Science upper division courses or, in exceptional cases, permission of the instructor.
CMPT 412-3 Computational Vision
Computational approaches to image understanding will be discussed in relation to theories about the operation of the human visual system and with respect to practical applications in robotics. subjects will include edge detection, shape from shading, stereopsis, optical flow, Fourier methods, gradient space, three-dimensional object representation and constraint satisfaction. (lecture/laboratory) Prerequisite: MATH 152, and nine credit hours in Computing upper division courses or permission of the instructor.
CMPT 413-3 Computational Linguistics
This course examines the theoretical and applied problems of constructing and modelling systems, which aim to extract and represent the meaning of natural language sentences or of whole discourses, but drawing on contributions from the fields of linguistics, cognitive psychology, artificial intelligence and computing science. (lecture/laboratory) Prerequisite: completion of nine credit hours in Computing Science upper division courses or, in exceptional cases, permission of the instructor.
CMPT 414-3 Model-Based Computer Vision
This course covers various subjects in computer vision with the emphasis on the model-based approach. Main subjects include 2-D and 3-D representations, matching, constraint relaxation, model-based vision systems. State-of-the-art robot vision systems will be used extensively as study cases. The solid modelling and CAD aspects of this course should also interest students of computer graphics. (lecture/laboratory) Prerequisite: MATH 152 and nine credit hours in CMPT upper division courses, or permission of the instructor.
CMPT 415-3 Special Research Projects
To be individually arranged.
CMPT 416-5 Special Research Projects
To be individually arranged.
CMPT 417-3 Intelligent Systems
Development of intelligent (aka expert) systems, the MYCIN system, abduction and uncertain reasoning, intelligent systems in the Prolog language, modern model-based systems, constraint reasoning methods, exhaustive vs. incremental search techniques, constraint logic programming methods, applications in diagnosis, scheduling, planning, process control and animation. (lecture) Prerequisite: CMPT 384.
CMPT 419-3 Special subjects in Artificial Intelligence
Current subjects in artificial intelligence depending on faculty and student interest. (lecture/laboratory) Prerequisite: CMPT 310 or permission of the instructor.
CMPT 426-0 Practicum I
The first semester of work experience for students in the Computing Science Co-operative Education Program. It provides an opportunity to integrate theory and practice. Prerequisite: the computing science co-op co-ordinator must be contacted at the beginning of the semester prior to registration for this course.
CMPT 427-0 Practicum II
The second semester of work experience for students in the Computing Science Co-operative Education Program. It provides an opportunity to integrate theory and practice. Prerequisite: the computing science co-op co-ordinator must be contacted at the beginning of the semester prior to registration for this course.
CMPT 428-0 Practicum III
The third semester of work experience for students in the Computing Science Co-operative Education Program. It provides an opportunity to integrate theory and practice. Prerequisite: the computing science co-op co-ordinator must be contacted at the beginning of the semester prior to registration for this course.
CMPT 429-0 Practicum IV
The fourth semester of work experience for students in the Computing Science Co-operative Education Program. It provides an opportunity to integrate theory and practice. Prerequisite: the computing science co-op co-ordinator must be contacted at the beginning of the semester prior to registration for this course.
CMPT 430-0 Practicum V
The fifth (and optional) semester of work experience for students in the Computing Science Co-operative Education Program. It provides an opportunity for a high degree of specialization. Prerequisite: the computing science co-op co-ordinator must be contacted at the beginning of the semester prior to registration for this course.
CMPT 454-3 Database Systems II
An advanced course on database systems which covers crash recovery, concurrency control, transaction processing, distributed database systems as the core material and a set of selected subjects based on the new developments and research interests, such as object-oriented data models and systems, extended relational systems, deductive database systems, and security and integrity. (lecture/laboratory) Prerequisite: CMPT 300 and 354.
CMPT 459-3 Special subjects in Database Systems
Current subjects in database and information systems depending on faculty and student interest. (lecture/laboratory) Prerequisite: CMPT 354.
CMPT 461-3 Advanced Computer Graphics
This course covers advanced subjects and techniques in computer graphics. subjects include: solid modelling, curves and surfaces, fractals, particle systems, advanced rendering techniques (color spaces, shading, raytracing, radiosity, texture mapping, stereoscopy), animation, and post-production techniques. Applications in virtual reality, human figure animation, CAD, scientific visualization, and other research areas will be discussed. (lecture/laboratory) Prerequisite: CMPT 361 and MACM 201. Students with credit for CMPT 451 may not take CMPT 461 for further credit.
CMPT 466-3 Animation
subjects and techniques in animation, including: The history of animation, computers in animation, traditional animation approaches, and computer animation techniques such as geometric modelling, interpolation, camera controls, kinematics, dynamics, constraint-based animation, realistic motion, temporal aliasing, digital effects and post production. Prerequisite: CMPT 361 or permission of the instructor.
CMPT 469-3 Special subjects in Computer Graphics
Current subjects in computer graphics depending on faculty and student interest. (lecture/laboratory) Prerequisite: CMPT 361.
CMPT 470-3 Web-based Information Systems
This course examines: two-tier/multi-tier client/server architectures; the architecture of a Web-based information system; web servers/browser; programming/scripting tools for clients and servers; database access; transport of programming objects; messaging systems; security; and applications (such as e-commerce and on-line learning). Prerequisite: CMPT 354 and 371.
CMPT 471-3 Networking II
This course covers the fundamentals of higher level network functionality such as remote procedure/object calls, name/address resolution, network file systems, network security and high speed connectivity/bridging/switching. (lecture/laboratory) Prerequisite: CMPT 300 and 371.
CMPT 475-3 Software Engineering II
Students will study in-depth the techniques, tools and standards needed in the management of software development. subjects will include software process and quality standards, life cycle models, requirements specification issues, project estimation, planning and tracking, project management tools, team dynamics and management, configuration and change management techniques and tools, metrics, quality assurance and test techniques, professional and legal issues. Prerequisite: CMPT 275 and 15 semester hours of upper division courses. Recommended: co-op experience.
CMPT 479-3 Special subjects in Computing Systems
Current subjects in computing systems depending on faculty and student interest. (lecture/laboratory) Prerequisite: CMPT 401.
CMPT 481-3 Functional Programming
The functional style of programming will be examined in the context of a modern functional language such as Haskell. subjects will include lazy evaluation and infinite data structures, higher order functions, pattern matching, program transformation and verification, and polymorphic types. (lecture/laboratory) Prerequisite: CMPT 383.
CMPT 487-3 Software Engineering Tools and Environments
The design and construction of software engineering tools and environments is examined as well as the effects of their use in the software life cycle. subjects include design tools, language-based editors, tools for measurement, analysis, testing and documentation, program transformation and manipulation systems, configuration and version control tools, and software development and maintenance environments. (seminar/laboratory) Prerequisite: CMPT 275, 383 and 384.
CMPT 489-3 Special subjects in Programming Languages
Current subjects in programming languages depending on faculty and student interest. (lecture/laboratory) Prerequisite: CMPT 383.
CMPT 499-3 Special subjects in Computer Hardware
Current subjects in computer hardware depending on faculty and student interest. (laboratory) Prerequisite: CMPT/ENSC 250 or CMPT 390.

Contemporary Arts FPA

Faculty of Arts

Notes:
Courses marked with an asterisk (*) may be of particular interest to students in other departments. The subject matter (and prerequisites) of special or selected subjects courses vary by semester. Students are reminded that the School for the Contemporary Arts is an interdisciplinary fine and performing arts department, and are strongly advised to acquaint themselves with the courses available under all of the disciplinary sub-headings below. Where a prerequisite is or includes `prior approval,' approval must be obtained before registering in the course. Contact the school for further information. FPA courses are listed under the subheads noted below; the discipline is also indicated by the middle digit of the course number. 0, 8 interdisciplinary or school-wide 1 art and culture studies 2 dance 3 film 4 music 5 performance stream in theatre 6 visual art 7 production stream in theatre 9 video (film) Examples: FPA 120 - dance; FPA 140 - music; FPA 111 - art and culture studies

Art and Culture Studies

FPA* 111-3 Issues in the Fine and Performing Arts
This course introduces students to some basic issues in the fine and performing arts through the presentation and discussion of selected works in dance, film, music, theatre and visual art. It is designed to provide students who intend further study in one or more of these arts some familiarity with critical issues affecting all of them. It is a recommended preparation for the school's upper division history and critical courses. (lecture/tutorial)
FPA* 211-3 Introduction to Contemporary Theory in the Arts
This course extends the interdisciplinary study of the arts begun in FPA 111 by introducing some of the basic terms and concepts of contemporary cultural theory. Problems in the interpretation of specific works, selected from across the fine and performing arts, will be approached through concepts derived from semiotics, structuralism, post-structuralism, psychoanalysis and feminist theory. (lecture/tutorial) Prerequisite: FPA 111 or 24 credit hours in the Faculty of Arts.
FPA* 289-3 Selected subjects in the Fine and Performing Arts I
A specific syllabu in fine and performing arts which is not otherwise covered in depth in regular courses and which is not appropriately placed within a single arts discipline. The work will be practical (studio), theoretical, or a combination of the two, depending on the particular syllabu in a given semester. Prerequisite: will vary according to the topic.
FPA* 311-5 Interdisciplinary Studies in the Arts
An historical, theoretical or thematic syllabu in the fine and performing arts presenting an in-depth investigation of interdisciplinary approaches to the study of art and culture. (lecture/seminar) Prerequisite: 45 credit hours which must include FPA 111 or another critical or history course within the School for the Contemporary Arts. The course may be repeated when different subjects are offered. Recommended: FPA 211.
FPA* 313-5 Arts, Audience, Patronage, Institutions
An investigation of the fine and performing arts, their audiences, patronage and institutions in a specific historical context. Students will gain an in-depth understanding of a selection of art works and their relationship to their specific cultural context. (lecture/seminar) Prerequisite: 45 credit hours which must include FPA 111 or another critical or history course within the School for the Contemporary Arts. The course may be repeated when different subjects are offered. Students who have completed FPA 313 prior to 1998 may take this course for further credit only if the syllabu differs from the former course. Recommended: FPA 211.
FPA* 389-3 Selected subjects in the Fine and Performing Arts II
A specific syllabu in fine and performing arts which is not otherwise covered in depth in regular courses and which is not appropriately placed within a single arts discipline. The work will be practical (studio), theoretical, or a combination of the two, depending on the particular syllabu in a given semester. Prerequisite: will vary with the topic.
FPA 400-3 Directed Studies (Studio)
An opportunity for advanced students to carry out an independent project which is planned and completed in close consultation with the supervisory instructor. Before registration, the student must submit a written proposal outlining the project in detail to the chosen supervisor for approval. Directed studies courses may not be used as a substitute for existing courses. (directed study) Prerequisite: 60 credit hours plus a minimum standing of completion of second year in any of the programs offered in the School for the Contemporary Arts and prior approval.
FPA 401-3 Directed Studies (Theory/History)
This course is intended to provide opportunity for advanced students to carry out an independent project which is planned and completed in close consultation with the supervisory instructor. Before registration, the student must submit a written proposal outlining the project in detail to the chosen supervisor for approval. Directed Studies courses may not be used as a substitute for existing courses. (directed study) Prerequisite: 60 credit hours plus a minimum standing of completion of second year in any of the programs offered in the School for the Contemporary Arts and prior approval.
FPA 402-4 Directed Studies (Studio)
Provides an opportunity for advanced students to carry out an independent project which is planned and completed in close consultation with the supervisory instructor. Before registration, the student must submit a written proposal outlining the project in detail to the chosen supervisor for approval. Directed Studies courses may not be used as a substitute for existing courses. (directed study) Prerequisite: 60 credit hours plus a minimum standing of completion of second year in any of the programs offered in the School for the Contemporary Arts and prior approval.
FPA 403-4 Directed Studies (Theory/History)
This course is intended to provide opportunity for advanced students to carry out an independent project which is planned and completed in close consultation with the supervisory instructor. Before registration, the student must submit a written proposal outlining the project in detail to the chosen supervisor for approval. Directed Studies courses may not be used as a substitute for existing courses. (directed study) Prerequisite: 60 credit hours plus completion of second year in any of the programs offered in the School for the Contemporary Arts and prior approval.
FPA 404-5 Directed Studies (Studio)
Provides an opportunity for advanced students to carry out an independent project which is planned and completed in close consultation with the supervisory instructor. Before registration, the student must submit a written proposal outlining the project in detail to the chosen supervisor for approval. Directed Studies courses may not be used as a substitute for existing courses. (directed study) Prerequisite: 60 credit hours plus a minimum standing of completion of second year in any of the programs offered in the School for the Contemporary Arts and prior approval.
FPA* 411-3 Interdisciplinary Studies in the Contemporary Arts
This course is an interdisciplinary investigation of key issues in the contemporary arts. (seminar) Prerequisite: at least 45 credit hours including FPA 211 or another critical or history course within the School for the Contemporary Arts.
FPA* 412-4 Advanced Seminar in Art and Culture Studies
Provides an in-depth investigation of a selected theoretical, historical or thematic syllabu in art and culture studies. This course requires independent research leading to a substantial paper, as well as directed practicing preparation for seminars. subjects will vary from semester to semester. The course may be repeated when different subjects are offered. (seminar) Prerequisite: eight upper division credit hours including one of FPA 311 or 313.
FPA 489-5 Interdisciplinary Project in Fine and Performing Arts
This course permits students to explore the relationships among the arts by undertaking creative projects involving more than one art form. Students will work under the close supervision of one or more faculty and will be required to discuss their work on a regular basis with others involved in the course. Prerequisite: will vary according to the topic.

Dance

FPA* 120-3 Introduction to Contemporary Dance
Development of movement skills through fundamentals of contemporary dance technique, explorations in improvisation, and short composition studies. An introduction to dance literature will focus on selected topics. (studio)
FPA 122-4 Contemporary Dance I
First studio course in a series designed for students intending to pursue a major or extended minor in dance. Emphasizes work in modern dance and ballet technique and introduces theoretical approaches to modern dance. (studio) Prerequisite: prior approval as a result of an audition. Corequisite: dance majors and extended minors must take FPA 129 and 122 concurrently.
FPA 123-4 Contemporary Dance II
Second studio course in a series designed for students intending to pursue a major or extended minor in dance. Emphasizes work in modern dance and ballet technique and introduces theoretical approaches to modern dance. (studio) Prerequisite: FPA 122.
FPA 124-3 Dance Improvisation
Selected dance improvisational skills will be explored in a variety of solo, duet, small group and large group forms through structured movement themes. Emphasis will be on sensory awareness, elements of movement, and literal and abstract imagistic stimuli. (studio) Recommended: dance or theatre experience.
FPA* 129-3 Fundamental Integration of Human Movement
This studio/theory course incorporates techniques of body awareness, centering, and structural realignment. The course will be of interest to dancers, actors, kinesiologists, and athletes. (seminar/studio) Corequisite: dance majors and dance extended minors must take FPA 122 and 129 concurrently.
FPA 220-4 Contemporary Dance III
Studio work designed to develop technical facility in movement and acquaint the student with form and style in contemporary dance. (studio) Prerequisite: FPA 123.
FPA 221-4 Contemporary Dance IV
Studio work designed to develop technical facility in movement and acquaint the student with form and style in contemporary dance. (studio) Prerequisite: FPA 220.
FPA 224-3 Dance Composition I
Study in the craft of dance composition emphasizing specific problems in space, time, dynamics, structure and imagery. Students will perform compositions for critical analysis and participate in the rehearsal and performance of their colleagues' compositions. (studio) Prerequisite: FPA 123.
FPA* 226-3 Dancing in Cyberspace
This is an on-line course that introduces students to the virtual body in cyberspace and its creative potential. A 3-D human animation software program will be utilized to explore human movement through experientially designed sequences. Aesthetic and socio-technological issues of the human body representation will be addressed. (seminar/lab) Prerequisite: basic computer skills.
FPA* 227-3 History of Dance: The 20th Century
Study of the development of modern dance and the reformation of the ballet in the 20th century. Emphasis will be placed on seminal dance artists and the impact their work has had upon the art form in western theatre dance. (lecture/seminar) Students with credit for FPA 328 may not take this course for further credit. Recommended: FPA 127
FPA* 229-3 Selected subjects in Dance I
A specific syllabu in dance which is not otherwise covered in depth in regular courses. The work will be practical (studio), theoretical, or a combination of the two, depending on the particular syllabu in a given semester. Prerequisite: FPA 122 and/or prior approval.
FPA 320-4 Contemporary Dance V
The first of four upper division courses which build upon the movement vocabulary of modern dance. (studio) Prerequisite: FPA 221.
FPA 321-4 Contemporary Dance VI
Continues and expands upon the work undertaken in FPA 320. (studio) Prerequisite: FPA 320.
FPA 322-3 Ballet I
This course explores the vocabulary and movement range of classical ballet technique on the elementary level. Attention will be given to the understanding of body placement, balance flexibility and strength. Practical studio experience is offered within the context of specific theoretical principles. (studio) Prerequisite: FPA 221.
FPA 323-3 Ballet II
This course explores the vocabulary and movement range of classical ballet technique on the lower intermediate level. Further attention will be given to the understanding of body placement, balance, flexibility and strength. Practical studio experience is offered within the context of specific theoretical principles. (studio) Prerequisite: FPA 322.
FPA 324-3 New Dance Composition
Students will be introduced to traditional choreographic structures and explore new directions in composition. Emphasis will be on the creation and analysis of work generated by extending the parameters of source, style and form in contemporary dance. (studio) Prerequisite: FPA 124, plus one of 224, 230, 240, 245, 252, 253 or 260.
FPA 325-3 Special Project in Dance Composition
A specific syllabu or set of ideas will form the basis for choreographic exploration. Students will create one or more works and participate in research and critical analysis, depending on the particular syllabu in a given semester. (studio) Prerequisite: 40 credits in FPA courses.
FPA 326-3 Repertory I
This is one of two courses which provide advanced level dance students the opportunity to work as an ensemble rehearsing and preparing for a series of public performances. Choreography will be created and/or selected by a faculty director. (studio) Prerequisite: FPA 123 and prior approval. Corequisite: students must be concurrently enrolled in a technique course at an appropriate level.
FPA 327-3 Repertory II
This is one of two courses which provide advanced level dance students with the opportunity to work as an ensemble rehearsing and preparing for a series of public performances. Choreography will be created and/or selected by a faculty director. (studio) Prerequisite: FPA 123 and prior approval. Corequisite: students must be concurrently enrolled in a technique course at an appropriate level.
FPA 329-3 Selected subjects in Dance II
A specific syllabu in dance which is not otherwise covered in depth in regular courses. The work will be practical (studio), theoretical or a combination of the two, depending on the particular syllabu in a given semester. Prerequisite: FPA 220 and/or prior approval.
FPA 420-4 Contemporary Dance VII
The third of four upper division courses which build upon the movement vocabulary of modern dance. (studio) Prerequisite: FPA 321.
FPA 421-4 Contemporary Dance VIII
Continues and expands the work undertaken in FPA 420. (studio) Prerequisite: FPA 420.
FPA 425-5 Intensive Studies in Performance
Advanced performance studies in intensive specialized workshops and/or participation in choreographic projects culminating in public performance. Course content may include interdisciplinary collaborations and a variety of performance styles and techniques. (studio) Prerequisite: prior approval by application.
FPA 426-3 Dance/Movement Analysis
An introduction into the theory and practice of movement analysis based on recognized theories of analysis. Experiential work may be included in the course and a dance or similar movement background is necessary. (studio/seminar) Prerequisite: FPA 120 or 123 or 151.
FPA 427-3 Ballet III
This course is an extension of classical ballet technique on an upper intermediate level. Understanding of basic principles is assumed and attention will be focused on combinations of movement, musicality and performance. (studio) Prerequisite: FPA 323.
FPA 428-3 Ballet IV
This is an advanced course. Students must have a thorough background in the vocabulary and techniques of classical ballet. Attention will be given to movement sequences from the ballet repertoire. (studio) Prerequisite: FPA 427.

Film

FPA 130-4 Fundamentals of Film
Introduces students to the basic components of filmmaking through lectures, film screenings and creative projects in the various media that combine to form cinema. (seminar/laboratory) Prerequisite: prior approval through formal application. Students who have taken FPA 132, 133,134 or 230 may not take FPA 130 for further credit. A laboratory fee is required. Students should be advised that course activities may require additional costs.
FPA 131-4 Filmmaking I
An introductory course in 16 mm. film production, emphasizing creative use of the medium. Each student is expected to conceive, direct and edit a short film with a non-synchronous sound track, as well as participate in the making of class exercises and other students' films. (production) Prerequisite: FPA 130 and prior approval. A laboratory fee is required. Students should be advised that film production will probably incur significant costs in addition to lab fees. Students who completed FPA 230 The Crafts of Film I in spring 1990 or earlier may not take this course for further credit.
FPA* 136-3 The History and Aesthetics of Cinema I
This course will examine the early development of cinema from 1890 until about 1945, with particular emphasis on the fundamental principles of film as an art form. A substantial number of films will be shown during laboratory sessions. (lecture/tutorial/laboratory) Students with credit for FPA 236 offered in 1982/83 and prior years may not take this course for further credit.
FPA* 137-3 The History and Aesthetics of Cinema II
This course will examine selected developments in cinema from 1945 to the present, with attention to various styles of artistic expression in film. A substantial number of films will be shown during laboratory sessions. (lecture/tutorial/laboratory) Students with credit for FPA 237 offered in 1982/83 and prior years may not take FPA 137 for further credit.
FPA 230-5 Filmmaking II
The first of two courses (FPA 231-5 is the second) which form an intensive study of the craft of sync-sound 16 mm. filmmaking, with an emphasis on production planning, creative development and the shooting and editing of short films. In-class exercises and film screenings will lead to the production of several original films. Each student will be expected to play major creative and technical roles in these productions. (production) Prerequisite: FPA 131, one of FPA 136 or 137 and prior approval. Students should be advised that film production will probably incur significant costs in addition to lab fees. Students who have taken FPA 330 for credit may not take FPA 230 for further credit. Corequisite: FPA 233. A laboratory fee is required.
FPA 231-5 Filmmaking III
This course continues the work begun in FPA 230-5 Filmmaking II. Students will acquire proficiency in film technique through lab exercises, readings and film screenings. As well, all students will participate in the completion of short original sync-sound 16 mm. films which were begun in FPA 230. Emphasis is placed on the development of means for creative expression supported by technical skills. (production) Prerequisite: FPA 230, 233 and laboratory fee required. Students should be advised that film production will probably incur significant costs in addition to lab fees.
FPA 232-3 Film Sound
Through lectures, demonstrations and studio work, students will be introduced to several aspects of location sound recording and audio post production for film and video. subjects will include synchronization systems and techniques, editing, music scoring, mixing and both analog and digital sound technology. (lecture/laboratory) Prerequisite: FPA 131 or 147 and prior approval. Students who have completed FPA 330 may not take FPA 232 for further credit. Recommended: CMNS 258.
FPA 233-2 The Techniques of Film
This course covers the technical aspects of basic 16 mm. production skills: camera, lighting, sound, editing, lab processes. These skills are taught as discrete units of instruction, with lab exercises and exams at the end of each unit. (laboratory) Prerequisite: FPA 131 and prior approval. Laboratory fee required. This course is not a duplicate of FPA 233 Video Production. Corequisite: FPA 230.
FPA* 236-3 Cinema in Canada
Examines the achievements of dramatic, documentary and experimental filmmaking in Canada from the earliest days until the present. Special attention will be paid to the cinemas of Quebec and western Canada, and to the cultural, political and theoretical traditions that have shaped contemporary cinema in Canada. (lecture/seminar) Prerequisite: FPA 136 or137, or 30 credit hours.
FPA* 237-3 Selected subjects in Film and Video Studies
This course will cover a specific syllabu within the field of film and video studies not covered in depth in regularly scheduled courses, such as: a national cinema; film and politics; Quebec cinema; documentary film and video, etc. Weekly screenings will be accompanied by lecture/seminar sessions. The course may be repeated for credit if a different syllabu is taught. (lecture/seminar) Prerequisite: FPA 136 or 137.
FPA 238-3 Screenwriting I
This course introduces the methodologies of writing for the screen in various styles, including dramatic, documentary and experimental forms, with an emphasis on structure and the creative expression of visual ideas. Students will perform a variety of writing assignments and each will be expected to complete one or more short original scripts. (seminar) Prerequisite: one of FPA 136,137 or 253 and prior approval. Students who have taken FPA 332 for credit may not take FPA 238 for further credit.
FPA 290-2 Video Production I
This course will provide students a grounding in technical aspects of video production. The course will be organized around a series of labs and demonstrations that will provide students an opportunity to gain hands-on experience in video production and post production. It is expected that individuals will complete this course with sufficient technical training to be able to apply this information successfully to their own artistic pursuits. (production) Prerequisite: six hours credit in FPA and prior approval. Students who have taken FPA 233 Video Production for credit may not take FPA 290 for further credit. Laboratory fee required.
FPA 332-3 Film Production Seminar
Facilitates an in-depth understanding of the organizational aspects of film production, with emphasis on pre-production planning. The class will study methods of proposal writing, pre-production and production, developing production packages for short film and video projects. This course is strongly recommended for all students intending to take FPA 430. (seminar) Prerequisite: FPA 231 or prior approval.
FPA 333-3 Cinematography and Lighting
This course emphasizes advanced 16 mm. production skills in cinematography and lighting. Students are expected to participate in intensive camera exercises, as well as to play significant crew roles on fourth year films. (laboratory) Prerequisite: FPA 231 and prior approval. Students who have taken FPA 331 The Crafts of Film III may not take this course for further credit. Laboratory fee required.
FPA 334-3 Selected subjects in Film and Video Production
This course will cover a specific syllabu within the field of film and video production not covered in depth in regularly scheduled courses, such as optical printing techniques, film and video editing, experimental film and video production, or documentary film and video production. (seminar/studio) Prerequisite: FPA 231 and prior approval.
FPA* 335-4 Introduction to Film Theory
This course is concerned with the systematic understanding of the general phenomenon called Cinema rather than with the properties or techniques of individual films. Various theoretical positions will be assessed and compared in terms of cinematic practice and its ideological functions. (lecture/seminar) Prerequisite: six credits from among FPA 136, 137, 211, 236, 237. Students who have taken FPA 234 for credit may not take FPA 335 for further credit. Recommended: FPA 211.
FPA* 337-3 Intermediate Selected subjects in Film and Video Studies
An intermediate course in critical studies, addressing a variety of subjects under this number; for instance, specific genre or area studies (comedy, film noir, science fiction, etc.); national cinemas; film analysis; Third World film, video art, experimental film, etc. The course may be taken again for credit if the syllabu changes. (lecture/seminar) Prerequisite: will vary according to subject matter. Students who have taken FPA 339 Selected subjects in Film for credit may not take the same syllabu under FPA 337 for further credit.
FPA 338-3 Screenwriting II
This course will present advanced theory and techniques for writing dramatic, experimental and documentary film and video scripts. Additional subjects covered include script analysis, production breakdown, and the writing of treatments and proposals. (lecture/seminar) Prerequisite: one of FPA 238 or 353 or 457 and prior approval. Recommended: strongly recommended for all students developing projects for production in FPA 430.
FPA 339-3 Directing and Acting for Film and Video
This course acquaints intermediate level students in film, video and theatre with techniques of dramatic film performance. Students will be expected to perform as both actors and directors on scene work in class. subjects covered include auditioning, script analysis, role preparation, rehearsal, blocking for the camera, and directing techniques. (seminar/studio) Prerequisite: FPA 131 or 151 and prior approval. Students who have completed Directing and Acting for Film as FPA 379 in spring 1990 or earlier, may not take this course for further credit. This course is not a duplicate of FPA 339 Selected subjects in Film, available in summer 1990 and earlier.
FPA 390-3 Video Production II
This course is intended for students interested in video as a means of artistic expression. Students will be encouraged to challenge accepted notions of the video medium and explore the creative possibilities of multi channel presentations. The course comprises a series of technical workshops, screenings and group seminars whose purpose is to develop an awareness of the creative and conceptual possibilities of the medium of video. Students will be expected to initiate and complete a short video project based on an idea of their own choosing. Projects which involve school-wide interdisciplinary collaborations will be encouraged. Prerequisite: prior approval through written proposal for a ten minute video project or installation; an interview; plus FPA 290 or equivalent video experience. A laboratory fee is required. Students should be advised that video production may require personal funding beyond the lab fee.
FPA 393-2 Techniques of Video
This is an intermediate course that teaches the fundamentals of digital video production and post-production. Students will be introduced to DV camera technology and non-linear editing, and will have an opportunity to become familiar with and explore the potential of digital video technology. This course is intended for third year film students preparing for their fourth year productions. (lecture/laboratory) Prerequisite: FPA 290 or equivalent and prior approval. Laboratory fee required.
FPA 430-5 Filmmaking IV
The first half of a two-semester project in advanced film and/or video production. Students are expected to participate in the realization of one or more projects during the two semesters. Students seeking entry into this course are required to present a completed script (for a drama) or detailed proposal (for a documentary or experimental film) prior to registration. The exact nature of each student's participation will be determined in consultation with the instructor. (production) Prerequisite: FPA 231 and 10 credit hours in film or video studies plus prior approval. This course is open only to approved film majors. Students should be advised that film production will probably incur significant financial costs in addition to required lab fees.
FPA 432-5 Filmmaking V
This course is intended for completion of film and video projects begun in FPA 430. Particular emphasis will be given to advanced film craft in the post-production phase. The exact nature of each student's participation will be determined in consultation with the instructor. (laboratory) Prerequisite: FPA 430. A laboratory fee is required. Students should be advised that film production will probably incur significant costs in addition to lab fees.
FPA* 436-3 Advanced Seminar in Film and Video Studies
This course features intensive study and analysis of selected subjects in film theory, history, criticism and aesthetics. Examples include: work of specific directors or periods; theories of narrativity; ideological analysis; particular aspects of national cinemas, etc. The course may be repeated for credit if a new syllabu is taught. (seminar) Prerequisite: FPA 335 or permission of instructor.

Music

FPA* 104-3 Music Fundamentals
This course is designed to provide a basic understanding of the elements of music and teaches the skill of practicing music notation. An introduction to music theory and exposure to the application of music materials in a wide spectrum of music literature will be accompanied by practical exercises. The course is designed for students with no formal music training. (seminar/studio)
FPA* 140-3 Music in the 20th Century
An introductory survey of major historical trends and practices of music in the 20th century as revealed by the study of selected music examples. Critical issues fundamental to an understanding of contemporary composition will be examined (e.g. impressionism, twelve-tone music, indeterminacy, the role of technology, improvisation). (lecture) Prerequisite: FPA 104.
FPA 145-3 Introduction to Music Composition and Theory
This course introduces basic concepts of music composition such as melody and pitch organization, harmony, rhythm and form. The fundamental principles of theory and acoustics (e.g. voice-leading, overtone structure, metre) will be studied with particular reference to composition. Students will compose short works within given guidelines that address specific compositional issues. (lecture/studio) Prerequisite: FPA 104.
FPA 147-3 Introduction to Electroacoustic Music
An introduction to the application of electroacoustic technology to music, including the concepts of the audio signal, signal processing and sound synthesis in their musical applications. The techniques of tape music, electronic music and computer music composition will be introduced and their role in both studio composition and live performance will be discussed. Practical experience in several of these areas is included in the lab component. (lecture/laboratory) Prerequisite: prior approval.
FPA 240-3 Contemporary Music Performance I
Performance of works from the contemporary music repertoire for instruments and voice. A range of material will be covered from more improvisational pieces to conventionally notated scores. (studio) Prerequisite: audition/interview.
FPA* 243-3 Gamelan I
Practical and theoretical study of music for gamelan ensemble, based on, but not limited to, traditional Javanese music. This course is designed as an introduction to the study of the music of non-Western cultures and as a method of developing ensemble musicianship. (seminar/studio) Prerequisite: prior approval.
FPA 244-3 Theory of Contemporary Music
The theoretical investigation of the basic materials of the tempered chromatic scale, alternative tuning systems, and contemporary practices of texture and rhythm. Analysis of a wide range of music, score-reading and exposure to recorded music will be part of the course. (lecture/seminar) Prerequisite: FPA 140 and 145.
FPA 245-3 Music Composition I
Composition for small instrumental groups, electroacoustic resources or combinations of instruments and electronics. Students are also encouraged to do work involving collaboration with dance, film, theatre and visual art. In addition to individual composition lessons, students will be required to attend a composition seminar where the practice of composition will be discussed. Seminar subjects will include orchestration, world repertoire, and issues of music technology. (seminar/studio) Prerequisite: FPA 145 and prior approval.
FPA 246-3 Music Composition II
This course is a continuation of FPA 245. (seminar/studio) Prerequisite: FPA 245.
FPA 247-3 Electroacoustic Music I
The theory and practice of electroacoustic music technology and composition. In addition to expanding upon the issues introduced in FPA 147, the course will examine through lecture and studio work the following topics: analog and digital synthesis, microcomputer use, the multi-track studio, signal processing, communication protocols such as MIDI and sampling techniques. (lecture/laboratory) Prerequisite: FPA 147.
FPA* 249-3 Selected subjects in Music I
A specific syllabu in music which is not otherwise covered in depth in regular courses. The work may be practical (studio), theoretical or a combination of the two, depending on the particular syllabu in a given semester. Prerequisite: FPA 140 and/or prior approval.
FPA 340-3 Contemporary Music Performance II
A continuation of FPA 240. (studio) Prerequisite: FPA 240.
FPA* 341-3 World Music
The relationship of music and culture, with emphasis on traditional and contemporary music in Asia, Africa, the Middle East, Latin America and the Caribbean, and indigenous cultures of North America. Specific cultural areas may be selected for intensive study in any particular semester. (lecture) Prerequisite: 45 credit hours.
FPA 343-3 Gamelan II
Continuation of FPA 243, with increased emphasis on the theoretical and ethnomusicological aspects of gamelan. (seminar/studio) Prerequisite: FPA 243.
FPA 344-3 Contemporary Music Analysis and Criticism
An in-depth investigation of selected social, critical and theoretical issues associated with contemporary music, with special emphasis on the period c. 1945 to the present. Issues discussed might include such theoretical concerns as integral serialism; indeterminacy; process music; timbral concerns; or new approaches to melody, harmony and tonality. Critical subjects such as music and technology; popular music and the mass media; or critical issues connected with world music might also be considered. The material of the course will be presented through the study of scores, recorded examples and when possible, live concerts. (lecture) Prerequisite: FPA 244.
FPA 345-3 Music Composition III
This course is a continuation of FPA 246. (seminar/studio) Prerequisite: FPA 246 or 247, and prior approval.
FPA 346-3 Music Composition IV
This course is a continuation of FPA 345. (seminar/studio) Prerequisite: FPA 345.
FPA 347-3 Electroacoustic Music II
An advanced examination of the aesthetics, technology, and compositional approaches of electroacoustic music. subjects may include computer music programming, performance systems, compositional strategies and their relationship to technology, synthesis and processing techniques and the analysis of works. (seminar/studio) Prerequisite: FPA 245 and 247. Students with credit for FPA 347 under its former title may take this course for further credit.
FPA 349-3 Selected subjects in Music II
A specific syllabu in music which is not otherwise covered in depth in regular courses. The work may be practical, theoretical or a combination of the two, depending on the particular syllabu in a given semester. (studio) Prerequisite: FPA 245 and/or prior approval.
FPA 443-3 Gamelan III
Continuation of FPA 343 with emphasis on the technique of the elaborating instruments of the gamelan ensemble. (seminar/studio) Prerequisite: FPA 343.
FPA 445-3 Composition V
This course is a continuation of FPA 346. (seminar/studio) Prerequisite: FPA 346.
FPA 446-3 Music Composition VI
This course is a continuation of FPA 445. (seminar/studio) Prerequisite: FPA 445.
FPA 447-3 Computer Music Composition
The theory and practice of digital techniques and computer systems as applied to sound synthesis and music composition. The course will consider the major types of hardware and software systems developed for music from 1955 to the present, and will discuss such issues as machine programmability, user interaction, acoustic models for sound synthesis, and compositional algorithms. Students will have the opportunity for practical compositional work. (tutorial/studio) Prerequisite: FPA 347. Recommended: CMPT 001 or 110.

Theatre

FPA* 150-3 Introduction to Acting I
An approach to the elements of acting based on improvisation, with some attention to working from established texts. Focus will be placed on the development of the actor's instrument. The work will include the development of individual powers of expression - vocally, physically, intellectually, imaginatively, and emotionally. (studio)
FPA* 151-3 Introduction to Acting II
Expands the work of Acting I with an increased emphasis on text, leading to scene work. (studio) Prerequisite: FPA 150. Students who have completed FPA 152 may not take 151 for further credit.
FPA* 170-3 Introduction to Production Technology
An introduction to the processes, tools and technology used in the production and presentation of the fine and performing arts. Course requirements will include hands-on assignments in the production of theatre, dance, music and visual art events. Students will work directly with equipment and materials, and are expected to be involved in work on productions and exhibitions outside of lecture and lab hours. Similar commitments in FPA 170 and 171 preclude taking the two courses concurrently. Laboratory fee required. (lecture/laboratory)
FPA* 171-3 Stage and Production Management
An introduction to the management, and organization of the performing arts. This course will provide a grounding for students who wish to become further involved in the administration of the performing arts and will include practical experience. Students will be expected to be involved in production work outside of regular seminar hours. Similar commitments in FPA 170 and 171 preclude taking the two courses concurrently. (seminar/open lab)
FPA 250-3 Acting I
Begins the concentrated work of training the actor in both the freedom and the control of voice and body. This is accomplished through: work on the self as a source of personal imagery and as a potential wellspring of characters, work with other actors in ensemble relationships, work on text as a blueprint for expression, scene study as a vehicle for the realization of the specific dramatic content and overall shape of a play. (studio) Prerequisite: prior to registration in this course, the student must pass a successful audition. Corequisite: FPA 254.
FPA 251-3 Acting II
Continues and expands upon the work undertaken in Acting I. (studio) Prerequisite: FPA 250 and 254. Corequisite: FPA 255.
FPA 252-3 Playmaking I
Introduces elements of playmaking such as self scripting, mask exploration, clowning and political theatre. The objective is to enable students to make their own theatre. (studio) Prerequisite: admission to FPA 250 or prior approval. Laboratory fee required.
FPA 253-3 Playmaking II
Expands the work undertaken in Playmaking I emphasizing writing skills and story structure. (studio) Prerequisite: FPA 150, 151 and prior approval.
FPA 254-2 Theatre Laboratory I
This is the first of four courses in performance research, each of which is `attached' to one of the four courses: FPA 250, 251, 350 and 351. The work comprises voice and speech training. (laboratory) Prerequisite: prior approval. Corequisite: FPA 250 and 129.
FPA 255-3 Theatre Laboratory II
This is the second of four courses in performance research. The work comprises voice and speech training. (laboratory) Prerequisite: FPA 250 and 254. Corequisite: FPA 251.
FPA* 257-3 Context of Theatre I
A conceptual approach to a selected body of dramatic work focussing on the detailed structural analysis of dramatic texts, their historical context, their development and production histories. Particular emphasis will be placed upon the evolving relationship between theatre and its audience. (lecture/seminar)
FPA* 259-3 Selected subjects in Theatre I
A specific syllabu in theatre which is not otherwise covered in depth in regular courses. The work may be practical (studio), theoretical or a combination of the two, depending on the particular syllabu in a given semester. Prerequisite: prior approval.
FPA* 270-3 Technical Theatre
For students who have gained a basic familiarity with technical theatre. The course will offer continued training in staging, audio and lighting for theatre, dance and music presentations. (lecture/laboratory) Prerequisite: FPA 170.
FPA 271-3 Stage Management Practice
Provides in-depth training for stage management in the performing arts. Intended for students who have some familiarity with theatrical production and will be of value to any student interested in the management of public presentations. Continues the exploration of stage management techniques begun in FPA 171 and uses both academic and professional productions as subjects for investigation. Prerequisite: FPA 171.
FPA 350-3 Acting III
Continues and expands work undertaken in FPA 250 and 251, with an increased emphasis on work with established texts. (studio) Prerequisite: FPA 251 and 255. Corequisite: FPA 354.
FPA 351-3 Acting IV
Continues and expands on the work undertaken in Acting III. (studio) Prerequisite: FPA 350 and 354. Corequisite: FPA 355.
FPA 352-3 Playmaking III
Continues the development of playmaking research through intensive studio work consisting of the deconstruction or adaptation of a major dramatic text. Provides the basis for a public presentation in the subsequent semester. (studio) Prerequisite: FPA 251 and 255.
FPA 353-3 Playmaking IV
Black Box Theatre. Students will continue playmaking research through the creation of an ensemble season in a series of public presentations. (studio) Prerequisite: second year standing in a studio discipline and prior approval.
FPA 354-2 Theatre Laboratory III
This is the third of four courses in performance research comprising voice and speech training. (laboratory) Prerequisite: FPA 251, 255. Corequisite: FPA 350.
FPA 355-2 Theatre Laboratory IV
This is the fourth of four courses in performance research, comprising voice and speech training. (laboratory) Prerequisite: FPA 350, 354. Corequisite: FPA 351 and 426.
FPA* 357-3 Context of Theatre II
A conceptual approach to a selected body of dramatic work. The detailed structural analysis of dramatic texts, their historical context, their development and production histories. Particular emphasis will be placed upon the evolving relationship between theatre and its audience. (lecture/seminar) Prerequisite: 24 lower division credit hours or prior approval.
FPA 359-3 Selected subjects in Theatre II
A specific syllabu in theatre which is not otherwise covered in depth in regular courses. The work may be practical (studio), theoretical or a combination of the two, depending on the particular syllabu in a given semester. (studio) Prerequisite: FPA 250 and/or prior approval.
FPA 372-3 Technical Production I
Students with basic production and design experience will undertake intermediate level responsibilities. As crew chiefs, stage management personnel and designers, students will be required to research problems in construction, staging and organization of production and to apply their solutions within the production process. Prerequisite: FPA 270 or 271 and prior approval.
FPA 373-3 Technical Production II
A continuation of FPA 372-3. Students with some intermediate level technical theatre experience will undertake further production responsibilities. Prerequisite: FPA 372 and prior approval.
FPA 374-3 Stage Lighting
This course explores contemporary stage lighting for theatre, dance and opera. Participants will review the principles of theatrical lighting instruments and control systems and will experiment with the components of lighting design in a variety of studio projects. This course will require a practicum in an actual performance. (seminar/laboratory) Prerequisite: FPA 270 and prior approval. Students with credit for FPA 371 may not take FPA 374 for further credit.Laboratory fee required.
FPA 375-3 Stage Design
For students with an intermediate level of knowledge of technical theatre. Students will study various scenographic techniques and be required to solve theoretical problems related to aspects of production. (seminar/laboratory) Prerequisite: FPA 270. Students with credit for FPA 370 may not take FPA 375 for further credit. Laboratory fee required.
FPA 450-3 Advanced Studio Skills
Primarily a course in public performance, with the option of focusing on other advanced studio skills. The objective is to integrate and implement the techniques acquired in the earlier studios. (studio) Prerequisite: prior approval or audition.
FPA 453-3 Selected subjects in Directing
Primarily a course in the fundamentals of directing leading to public performance of student directed projects. The course allows the option of public performance with a professional director. The focus is to integrate and implement the techniques acquired in the earlier studios. (seminar/studio) Prerequisite: FPA 150, 151, and prior approval.
FPA 457-3 Context of Theatre III
An analytical approach to a selected body of dramatic work. Course content includes an intensive consideration of practical dramatic techniques such as story structure and dramaturgy. (seminar) Prerequisite: 45 credit hours and prior approval.
FPA 472-3 Technical Production III
Senior students with extensive experience in production and design will be assigned major production responsibilities. As senior designers and production management personnel, students will be required to apply their skills in a major production role. Prerequisite: FPA 373 and prior approval.
FPA 473-5 Technical Production IV
Students with extensive experience in production and design will be assigned major production responsibilities. As senior designers and production management personnel, students will be required to apply their skills in a major production role. Prerequisite: FPA 373 and prior approval.

Visual Art

FPA* 160-3 Introductory Studio in Visual Art I
A hands-on studio course modeled on the progressive development of artistic practice from simple mark-making to full scale installation. Through a process of continuous transformation, an original idea is developed in a sequence of methods, materials and scales. Some research is required. (studio) Prerequisite: prior approval, based on an application to the school. A course materials fee is required.
FPA* 161-3 Introductory Studio in Visual Art II
A continuation of the work begun in FPA 160, with emphasis on particular problems in the visual arts worked through a series of projects, culminating in the Campus Project, a site-specific public work designed, built and installed at the end of the semester. Some research is required. (studio) Prerequisite: FPA 160. A course materials fee is required.
FPA* 163-3 Issues in Spatial Presentation
An interdisciplinary studio course concentrating on ideas of spatial perception, modification and installation, as they generally apply to the arts. From conceptualization and drawn perspective plans, to methods of scaling, projection, and construction and manifestation in actual space. (studio) Laboratory fee required.
FPA* 167-3 History of Art: 1839-1939
An introduction to the history of the visual arts from the beginnings of photography around 1839 up to WW II. A chronological review of the major works, movements and artistic developments in Europe and North America, placed in their social, institutional and stylistic context. (lecture)
FPA* 168-3 History of Art: 1940-Present
This course covers the development of western art from the second world war to the present with attention to the important artists, artworks, ideologies and movements of this period. Debates around modernism, postmodernity, postcolonialism, feminism and the avant-garde will be systematically explored in relation to these factors. (lecture)
FPA 260-3 Studio in Visual Art I
This course permits students to work extensively in a mature critical studio environment on a combination of freely chosen and assigned projects in various contemporary media. practicing will be required. (studio) Prerequisite: FPA 161. A course materials fee is required.
FPA 261-3 Studio in Visual Art II
Continues work done in FPA 260-3. Work will combine freely chosen and assigned projects in a variety of contemporary media. Readings will be required as an integral part of studio work. (studio) Prerequisite: FPA 260 and status as an approved visual art major. A course materials fee is required.
FPA 262-3 Drawing I
This studio course introduces basic drawing skills, media and techniques. Drawing is taught in the context of its functions in contemporary art. Basic skills, approaches and techniques are practised both to develop students' physical abilities and their capacities to use drawing as a creative and imaginative method in all artistic work. (studio) Prerequisite: FPA 160.A course materials fee is required.
FPA 263-3 Painting I
This course introduces students to painting as an art form, through the acquisition and application of skills and concepts relevant to the practice of the medium in a contemporary context. Students will work through problems and projects assigned by the instructor to develop their technical abilities in relation to subjects and content. (studio) Prerequisite: FPA 160. A course materials fee is required.
FPA 265-3 Photography I
This course introduces students to the technical and material problems of photography as an art form and its relation to current art discourses and issues. Students will work through projects assigned by the instructor to develop their technical abilities in relation to subjects and content. (studio) Prerequisite: FPA 160. A course materials fee is required.
FPA* 269-3 Selected subjects in Visual Art I
A specific syllabu in visual art which is not otherwise covered in depth in regular courses. The work may be practical (studio), theoretical or a combination of the two, depending on the particular syllabu in a given semester. (studio) Prerequisite: will vary according to the topic.
FPA 360-3 Studio in Visual Art III
An open critical studio course. Students are required to have a program of work prepared at the beginning of the semester. This program will constitute the basis of the student's work in the course, and will be the subject of continuing critical discussion. This discussion will be integrated with theoretical studies in the parallel seminar course, FPA 366. (studio) Prerequisite: FPA 261 and status as an approved major in visual art. A course materials fee is required. Corequisite: FPA 366.
FPA 361-3 Studio in Visual Art IV
An open critical studio course. It will continue and extend work done in FPA 360. Students are required to have a program of work prepared at the beginning of the semester. This program will form the basis of the student's work in the course, and will be the subject of continuing critical discussion. This discussion will be integrated with theoretical studies in the parallel seminar course, FPA 367. (studio) Prerequisite: FPA 360 and 366. Corequisite: FPA 367. A course materials fee is required.
FPA 362-3 Drawing II
A studio course in advanced drawing skills, media and techniques. Drawing is taught in the context of its functions in contemporary art. Advanced skills, approaches and techniques are practised both to develop students' physical abilities and their capacities to use drawing as a creative and imaginative method in all artistic work. (studio) Prerequisite: FPA 262 and status as an approved major or extended minor in visual art. A course materials fee is required.
FPA 363-3 Painting II
This is an advanced course in contemporary problems of painting emphasizing the acquisition and application of skills and concepts relevant to the practice of the medium in a contemporary context. Students will work through problems and projects assigned by the instructor to develop their technical abilities in relation to subjects and content. (studio) Prerequisite: FPA 263 and status as an approved major or extended minor in visual art. A course materials fee is required.
FPA 364-3 Sculpture II
This is an advanced studio course in the development of sculpture as an art form, through the acquisition and application of skills and concepts relevant to the practice of the medium in a contemporary context. Students will work through problems and projects assigned by the instructor to develop their technical abilities in relation to subjects and content. (studio) Prerequisite: FPA 264 or 170, and status as an approved major or extended minor in visual art. A course materials fee is required.
FPA 365-3 Photography II
This is an advanced studio course in the technical and material problems of photography as an art form and its relation to current art discourses and issues. Course techniques are divided between darkroom work and computer digital imaging. Students will work through projects assigned by the instructor to develop their technical abilities in relation to subjects and content. (studio) Prerequisite: FPA 265 and status as an approved major or extended minor in visual art. A course materials fee is required.
FPA 366-3 Seminar in Visual Art I
A seminar course to be taken by all students in FPA 360. It deals with visual art subjects of an historical, critical and theoretical nature which concern practising artists in the contemporary context. Students will be required to present research papers. Each research subject will be studied in connection with the student's own artistic work. Senior students in other disciplines with appropriate background may request approval to take this course. (seminar) Prerequisite: FPA 211. Visual art major students transferring into third year may request approval to take FPA 211 concurrently. Corequisite: FPA 360.
FPA 367-3 Seminar in Visual Art II
A seminar course to be taken by all students in FPA 361. It deals with visual arts subjects of an historical, critical and theoretical nature which concern practising artists in the contemporary context. Students will be required to present research papers. Each research subject will be studied in connection with the student's own artistic work. Senior students in other disciplines with appropriate background may request approval to take this course. (seminar) Prerequisite: FPA 366. Visual art major students transferring into third year may request approval to take FPA 211 concurrently. Corequisite: FPA 361.
FPA 369-3 Selected subjects in Visual Art II
A specific syllabu in visual art which is not otherwise covered in depth in regular courses. The work may be practical (studio), theoretical or a combination of the two, depending on the particular syllabu in a given semester. (studio) Prerequisite: will vary according to the topic.
FPA 460-3 Studio in Visual Art V
This course permits students to work in an open studio situation. Students propose an independent program of work in the media of their choice at the beginning of the semester and develop it in critical dialogue with the instructor(s). (studio) Prerequisite: FPA 361, 367 and status as an approved major in visual art. A course materials fee is required.
FPA 461-5 Studio in Visual Art VI
Permits students completing the visual art major to work in an open and critical studio situation. Students continue to develop a body of work begun in FPA 460 for their graduating exhibition at the end of the semester. Preparation and installation of the exhibition is part of the course requirement. (studio/seminar) Prerequisite: FPA 460 and status as an approved major in visual art. A course materials fee is required.

Criminology CRIM

Faculty of Arts

CRIM 101-3 Introduction to Criminology
subjects will include: examination of different terms and concepts commonly used in criminology, such as crime, delinquency, deviance, criminal, victim, rehabilitation and treatment. Criminology as a body of knowledge and as a profession. Position and subject matter of criminology. Relationship between criminology and other academic disciplines. Specificity of criminology. Relationship between theory and practice. History and evolution of criminological thought. Elements of continuity and discontinuity between classical and modern theories of criminality. Levels of explanations in criminology. Practical applications of criminology. The foundations of a modern criminal policy. (lecture/tutorial) Prerequisite: students who have completed any or all of CRIM 101, 103 and 104 may not register for CRIM 100 or 102.
CRIM 103-3 Psychological Explanations of Criminal and Deviant Behavior
An introduction to, and critical examination of, biogenetic, psychiatric, and psychological explanations of criminal and deviant behavior. Special attention will be given to the hypothesized links between criminality and genetics, physiology, the endocrine system, mental disorders, personality, moral development, and other forms of social learning. (lecture/tutorial) Students who have completed any or all of CRIM 101, 103 and 104 may not register for CRIM 100 or 102. Recommended: PSYC 100 and 102.
CRIM 104-3 Sociological Explanations of Criminal and Deviant Behavior
A survey of some major sociological perspectives on crime and deviance that will include both mainstream and critical theories. These will include: anomie, neutralization, control, group conflict, sub-cultural, ecological, functionalist and critical theories. Critical analysis of the assumptions upon which each theory is based. Examination of the similarities and differences between/among the various explanations. (lecture/tutorial) Students who have completed any or all of CRIM 101, 103 and 104 may not register for CRIM 100 or 102. Recommended: SA 150.
CRIM 131-3 Introduction to the Criminal Justice System - A Total System Approach
Introductory analysis of the structure and operation of the Canadian criminal justice system. Examination of the patterns of crime and victimization; police operations, discretion and decision making; the criminal courts, including sentencing; the corrections system, including correctional institutions and community-based models; the youth justice system. Patterns of contact and conflict between various social groups and the criminal justice system. (lecture/tutorial)
CRIM 135-3 Introduction to Canadian Law and Legal Institutions: A Criminal Justice Perspective
A general introduction to the fundamental and competing principles of jurisprudence and to the basic legal institutions of Canada. Prepares students for those law and law related courses offered within the School of Criminology and will consider the history of Canadian law, the development of the Canadian constitution, the system of Canadian courts and the roles and responsibilities of members of the legal profession. In addition, the course will consider the nature of legal reasoning, the doctrine of precedent, principles of statutory interpretation and will also introduce the fields of contract, torts, administrative law, and family law. Also examines the process of law reform in Canada. (lecture/tutorial)
CRIM 161-0 Practicum I
First semester of work experience in the Criminology Co-operative Education Program. (practicum) Prerequisite: 30 semester hours (at least fifteen completed at Simon Fraser University) including CRIM 101, 220, 131, 135 and one of PSYC 210, STAT 101 or 203, with a cumulative grade point average of not less than 2.75. Students should apply to the Faculty of Arts co-op co-ordinator one semester in advance.
CRIM 203-3 Historical Reactions to Crime and Deviance
Historical review of society's reaction to crime and deviance, relating this history to religious, political, social and philosophical movements and schools of thought. Consideration of the history and evolution of punishment and penal methods and the historical forces influencing the development, implementation, and modification of these methods. (lecture/tutorial) Prerequisite: any 100 level CRIM course.
CRIM 210-3 Law, Youth and Young Offenders
An analysis of the definition and control of youthful misconduct in an historical and contemporary context. Attention is focused upon: the social construction of `juvenile delinquency', the decline of the concept, and the emergence of the concept of the `young offender'; the Young Offenders Act and related legislation; the growth of the welfare state and the role of social workers in `policing' youth and families; explanations for the criminal behavior of young persons; state and private sector programs designed to deal with such behavior. (lecture/tutorial) Prerequisite: any 100 level CRIM course.
CRIM 213-3 Introduction to Women and Criminal Justice
This course offers an historical and analytical overview of women and crime, taking into account the role of gender in both criminality and social responses to crime. Specific emphasis will be given to feminist theories. Attention will focus on the specific crimes and patterns of control and punishment. (lecture/tutorial) Prerequisite: any 100 level CRIM course.
CRIM 220-3 Research Methods in Criminology
An introduction to criminological research that is intended to develop the student's research and analytical skills. Specifically, the course will focus on the theory of inquiry, the logic, and structure of criminological inquiry, research design, data gathering, analysis and reporting. (lecture/tutorial) Students with credit for CRIM 120 may not take CRIM 220 for further credit. Recommended: any 100 level CRIM course.
CRIM 230-3 Criminal Law
Nature, purpose, scope, sources and basic principles of the criminal law. Study of certain fundamental legal concepts such as mens rea, negligence and strict liability. Analysis of the concept of criminal responsibility in Canada. Critical examination of the legislative policies expressed in the Criminal Code. Study of the basic elements of a criminal offence. Examination of the legal principles relating to certain specific crimes and to certain major defences. Impact of Canadian Charter of Rights and Freedoms on the criminal law. (lecture/tutorial) Prerequisite: CRIM 135.
CRIM 231-3 Introduction to the Judicial Process
A critical examination and evaluation of the judicial process. An introduction to the criminal courts and the legal profession. The structure and functions of the criminal court system and its relationship to other branches of government. The role of the criminal court judge, prosecutor, lawyer, jury, witness, expert, etc. Appointment, tenure, removal of judges; the social psychology of the courts; the jury system; plea bargaining; judicial behavior of the courts; the courts and the community; public opinion, attitudes and images of the courts; the mass media and the courts. (lecture/tutorial) Prerequisite: CRIM 131. Recommended: CRIM 135.
CRIM 241-3 Introduction to Corrections
An examination of the organization, structure and operation of contemporary Canadian corrections. A consideration of the history and development of provincial and federal correctional systems. The role of sentencing in the correctional process and alternatives to confinement. Discussion of the social organization of correctional institutions, including the inmates, correctional officers, correctional treatment staff and administrators. Parole board decision making and the issues surrounding the re-entry of offenders into the community. Community-based corrections programs and outcomes. (lecture/tutorial) Prerequisite: CRIM131.
CRIM 251-3 Introduction to Policing
An examination of the organization and operation of contemporary Canadian policing. Consideration of the history and development of policing in Canada, the role of the police in Canadian society and the police occupation, including recruitment and training. Discussion of police decision making and the exercise of discretion, police powers, and structures of accountability. Managing the police organization. Examination of police-community relations and crime prevention initiatives. (lecture/tutorial) Prerequisite: CRIM 131. Students with credit for CRIM 151 may not take CRIM 251 for further credit.
CRIM 261-0 Practicum II
Second semester of work experience in the Criminology Co-operative Education Program. (practicum) Prerequisite: successful completion of CRIM 161 and 45 credit hours with a minimum CGPA of 2.75.
CRIM 300-3 Current Theories and Perspectives in Criminology
A detailed examination of current theories and perspectives in criminology. The content of the course will change with developments in the area. Students can expect to study biological, psychological and sociological theories and perspectives, as well as those from other relevant disciplines and fields of inquiry (e.g. geography, political science and cultural studies). (lecture/tutorial) Prerequisite: one of CRIM 100, 101 or 102.
CRIM 301-3 Crime in Contemporary Society
Contemporary issues, problems and themes pertinent to the field of criminology. Development, character and function of criminology as an academic and professional discipline. Status of criminology in the Canadian context. Selected issues of the study of crime, law and justice which will vary depending on instructor. (lecture/tutorial) This course may not be taken by students who are majoring or minoring in Criminology.
CRIM 302-3 Critical Approaches to Crime and Deviance
Critique of traditional criminological theory and of the conventional approaches to the problems of crime and punishment. Critique of classical etiological criminology. Examination of the relationships between crime, class and power. The criminal as a scapegoat for the system. The stereotype of the criminal. Street crime vs. corporation and state crime. Criticism of treatment ideology and techniques. Comparison of conservative and radical criminal policy. The controversy about the possibility of a value-free social science and about the political commitment of the social scientist. (seminar) Prerequisite: one of CRIM 100, 101 or 102.
CRIM 310-3 Young Offenders and Criminal Justice: Advanced Topics
This course will examine, on a semester basis, some of the more complex contemporary issues relating to young offenders and justice. For any given semester, the content of the course will reflect current controversies as well as faculty and student interests. subjects may include social control theory and juvenile justice; an assessment of theories of rehabilitation; the legal philosophy of the young offenders legislation and its Impact on Juvenile justice; and an evaluation of diversion, deinstitutionalization and de-legalization in Canada and the United States. (seminar) Prerequisite: one of CRIM 100, 101 or 102; 210.
CRIM 311-3 Minorities and the Criminal Justice System
An analysis of political, economic, and ethnic minorities and their relationship with the criminal justice system. Critical analysis of possible discordance, disharmony or conflict between ethnic and racial minorities such as Native Indians, Inuit, Metis, Doukhobor and others and the legal and social norms of the `host' majority. Women and the criminal justice system. (seminar) Prerequisite: one of CRIM 100, 101 or 102.
CRIM 312-3 Criminological Perspectives on Social Problems
Involves detailed study of forms of deviance that have been commonly defined as constituting `social problems.' Consideration of drug abuse (alcohol, nicotine, heroin and others), suicide, prostitution, obscenity, gambling and abortion. Justifications for present legislative policy and the relationship between these activities and the criminal justice system. (seminar) Prerequisite: one of CRIM 100, 101 or 102.
CRIM 313-3 Specific Types of Crimes
Critical analysis of a specific type of crime with particular emphasis on the nature, the incidence, correlates, control and prevention. Special attention may be given to white collar crime, computer crime, organized crime, violent crimes, political crimes, sexual offence, professional crimes, mortality crime, etc. (seminar) Prerequisite: one of CRIM 100, 101 or 102.
CRIM 314-3 Mental Disorder, Criminality and the Law
Critical examination of the impact of psychiatry and related clinical professions on the criminal justice system. Relationship between institutions of mental health and legal control. The relevance of psychiatric theory and decision-making for the processing of mentally disordered offenders. The role of forensic clinicians in the courts, prisons, mental hospitals and related agencies. Specific issues addressed in this course will include psychiatric assessment, criminal responsibility, fitness to stand trial, prediction of dangerousness, treatment of mentally ill criminals and the penal and therapeutic commitment of the insane. (seminar) Prerequisite: one of CRIM 100, 101 or 102. Recommended: CRIM 131.
CRIM 315-3 Restorative Justice
An examination and analysis of the principles, assumptions, key concepts and applications of restorative (Transformative) justice. The course will contrast restorative justice with the dominant retributive/punitive model of justice and provide an introduction to a variety of both established and emerging expressions of restorative justice including, victim/offender reconciliation programs, family/group conferencing and circle remedies. Prerequisite: CRIM 131 and one of CRIM 100 or 101 or 102.
CRIM 320-3 Quantitative Research Methods in Criminology
A detailed examination of the quantitative research methods and techniques most frequently used in criminological research. Advantages and shortcomings of each method and the appropriateness of each technique for criminological research. Problems of pure and applied research. Specific issues of interdisciplinary research. Critical evaluation of the quantitative methods used in certain major criminological studies. (lecture/tutorial) Prerequisite: one of CRIM 100, 101 or 102; one of CRIM 120 or 220. CRIM 320 may be taken concurrently with CRIM 321.
CRIM 321-3 Qualitative Research Methods in Criminology
A detailed examination and application of qualitative research methods and techniques most frequently used in criminological research. Advantages and disadvantages of each method and the appropriateness of each technique for criminological research. Ethics of criminological research. Specific issues of interdisciplinary research. Critical evaluation of qualitative methods used in certain major criminological studies. Prerequisite: one of CRIM 100, 101 or 102; one of CRIM 120 or 220. This course may be taken concurrently with CRIM 320.
CRIM 330-3 Criminal Procedure and Evidence
Critical examination of selected subjects in criminal procedure and evidence, including jurisdiction, police powers of search and seizure, the right to counsel and pre-trial and trial procedures. Brief survey of the system of rules and standards by means of which the admissibility of evidence is determined. Close examination of the Charter of Rights and Freedoms and its impact on criminal procedure and evidence. (lecture/tutorial) Prerequisite: one of CRIM 100, 101 or 102; 230.
CRIM 331-3 Advanced Criminal Law
An extension of CRIM 230, this course will examine Canadian criminal law in greater depth as well as in comparison with other jurisdictions. Each semester several substantive areas will be analysed closely. The areas to be examined will be determined by student interest but may include sexual offences, public order offences, mental disorder and the criminal process, property offences, etc. (seminar) Prerequisite: one of CRIM 100, 101 or 102; 230.
CRIM 332-3 Sociology of Law
Introduction to the theory of sociology of law. Law and social structure. Law as a product of a social system and as an instrument of social change. Social functions of the law. Relationship between law and the structure and function of various other social institutions. The process of law-making. Process by which various interests become translated into legal rules. The social reality of the law; the law in action. Social sciences findings into the operation and practice of the law. Critical and feminist perspectives on law. Public knowledge, awareness, opinions and attitudes to the law, sanctions and the criminal justice system. (lecture/tutorial) Prerequisite: one of CRIM 100, 101 or 102; 135.
CRIM 333-3 Women, Law and the State
This course will provide an in-depth consideration of feminist perspectives on the relationship of women to the state and the law. The nature of the contribution of criminal and family law to the reproduction of gender relations will be analysed. The implications of legal intervention and non-intervention in family relations, sex-specific and sex-related legislation will be examined. Theoretical concepts and issues such as patriarchal relations, sexuality and reproduction, and formal and informal control will be addressed. (seminar) Prerequisite: one of CRIM 100, 101 or 102; 135. Recommended: CRIM 213.
CRIM 335-3 Human Rights and Civil Liberties
A study of the relationship between the government and the individual. Focus upon the Canadian Charter of Rights and Freedoms and its interpretation by the judiciary. Examination of the issues of equality before the law, freedom of speech, freedom of religion and freedom of expression. A study of human rights at the international, federal and provincial levels. (lecture/seminar) Prerequisite: CRIM 330.
CRIM 336-3 Corporate Crime and Corporate Regulation
An examination and analysis of the nature, scope and impact of corporate crime, the principal organizational, social, political and economic factors involved in the definition and commission of such crime, and the ways in which governments and organizations respond to the problem. Particular types of corporate crime will be used as vehicles for exploring the legal and administrative framework that defines and regulates corporate wrongdoing. (seminar) Prerequisite: one of CRIM 100, 101 or 102; 135. Recommended: CNS 280 or ECON 101.
CRIM 338-3 Philosophy of Law
Introduction to the philosophy of law. Concepts of law, constitution and sovereignty. The nature and sources of the law. Examination of natural law, legal positivism, Kelsen's pure theory of law, legal realism, modern normative and analytical theories, critical legal theory and feminist theory. (lecture/tutorial) Prerequisite: one of CRIM 100, 101 or 102; 135.
CRIM 343-3 Correctional Practice
An in-depth consideration of a range of factors influencing contemporary correctional practice. The fundamental tension between the interests of offenders and the requirements of those managing correctional programs; the context provided by underlying theoretical assumptions about correctional practice and by influences such as public perceptions, politics and the economy. (seminar) Prerequisite: one of CRIM 100, 101 or 102. Recommended: CRIM 241.
CRIM 345-3 Theoretical Perspectives on Punishment
Examines theories of punishment in Western societies, with a particular emphasis on the `revisionist' literature i.e. that which explains punishment techniques in terms of social-structural relationships rather than the rhetoric of reformers. The course also examines competing explanations of the demise of corporal punishment and the ascendance of incarceration at the end of the eighteenth and beginning of the nineteenth century, the advent of various kinds of `community corrections' through the twentieth century, and changes in punishment and social control with the advent of `risk society.' (2-1-0) Prerequisite: one of CRIM 100, 101 or 102.
CRIM 350-3 Techniques of Crime Prevention I
Techniques of mobilizing community resources for crime prevention. Organizing, implementing and managing citizen efforts to reduce crime. Recruiting citizen assistance, training requirements, establishing and operating citizen organizations, evaluating results. Organizing programs for reducing criminal opportunity, programs for education, employment and recreation. Operating youth services centres, residential programs, crisis intervention and emergency centres. (lecture/seminar) Prerequisite: one of CRIM 100, 101 or 102.
CRIM 352-3 Environmental Criminology: Theory and Practice
Explores the history of the field of environmental criminology and critically examines the theoretical approaches within the field. Special emphasis is placed upon the relationship between crime, fear and the environment, the criminality of place and the decision processes involved in criminal events. Prerequisite: one of CRIM 100, 101 or 102.
CRIM 355-3 The Forensic Sciences
This course will examine the use and interpretation of physical forensic evidence in court. It will critically examine and evaluate the major forensic sciences used in criminal investigations today, as well as look at the crime scene. Subjects examined will include forensic pathology, odontology, biology, DNA evidence, firearms evidence, toxicology chemistry and questioned documents. Techniques will be illustrated with case studies. (lecture/tutorial) Prerequisite: one of CRIM 100, 101 or 102.
CRIM 361-0 Practicum III
Third semester of work experience in the Criminology Co-operative Education Program. (practicum) Prerequisite: successful completion of CRIM 261 and 60 credit hours with a minimum CGPA of 2.75.
CRIM 369-4 Professional Ethics and Interpersonal Skills in Criminal Justice
Immediate ethical issues confronting the professional in the criminal justice system are examined. Such concerns include privileged communications and confidentiality in fields and research situations; the conflict between the professional's duty to protect society and her/his duty to the client; ethics of decision-making; research ethics; situation ethics; professional ethical codes and legal constraints on professional conduct. Different modes of personal interaction in selected parts of the criminal justice system are examined and taught. Mixed problems of skill and ethics are explored in controlled laboratory settings. (lecture/laboratory) Prerequisite: one of CRIM 100, 101 or 102; reserved for criminology majors and honors. This course is a prerequisite for CRIM 462. Completion of this course does not certain admission to field practice.
CRIM 370-3 Directed Readings
Independent readings in a selected field of study, under the direction of a single faculty member. Papers will be required. Prerequisite: CRIM 320 and 330, and written application to the school no later than the last day of classes of the preceding semester. CRIM 370 and 470 may not be taken concurrently.
CRIM 402-3 Biological Explanations of Crime
Examines possible biological factors that could result in a predisposition towards criminal behavior. These include not only the genetic factors that affect behavior and therefore could potentially predispose towards crime, but also biochemical, neurological, nutritive and accidental effects such as head injuries. This course will look critically at all evidence both for and against any possible biological predispositions for criminogenic behaviors, together with the interaction with the environment. In particular, moral and ethical issues will be considered and debated. Prerequisite: one of CRIM 100, 101 or 102. Students with credit for CRIM 416 in the summer 2000 or 2001 semester may not take CRIM 402 for further credit.
CRIM 410-3 Decision-Making in Criminal Justice
Examination of the factors which influence decision making in the criminal justice system. The exercise of discretion by criminal justice personnel; the role of organizational policies and priorities in decision making; the involvement of victims and the public. Consideration of decision making at specific stages of the criminal justice process. (seminar) Prerequisite: CRIM 131.
CRIM 412-3 Crime, the Media and the Public
Focus is upon the relationship among the content of media, especially books, films and TV. There will be an examination of the type and frequency of crimes associated with displays in the media, either coincidentally or causally, and the perception by and impact upon the public of such relationships (physically and psychologically). In addition, there will be an examination of the nature of political efforts by members of the public to alter this inferred relationship through law enforcement and legislative measures. (seminar) Prerequisite: one of CRIM 100, 101 or 102.
CRIM 413-3 Terrorism
This course will consider the nature, extent, and basis of terrorism as an official crime throughout the world and its impact upon criminal justice systems. Theoretical explanations in a comparative perspective will be employed to examine the impact of terrorism on various countries and the response of governments to it. (seminar) Prerequisite: one of CRIM 100, 101 or 102.
CRIM 416-418-3 Current Issues in Criminology and Criminal Justice
A critical analysis of certain `hot' issues in criminology and criminal justice. The subjects covered change from semester to semester. (seminar) Prerequisite: one of CRIM 100, 101 or 102. A student may not take for credit toward the degree more than three special subjects courses (i.e. CRIM 416, 417, 418).
CRIM 419-3 Indigenous Peoples, Crime, and Criminal Justice
An in-depth examination of indigenous peoples and the criminal justice system. Historical and contemporary consideration of indigenous-white contact. Indigenous conflict with the law and involvement in the criminal justice system. Crime and the delivery of criminal justice services in the Canadian north, including the role of the RCMP and the activities of the circuit criminal court. Examination of federal and provincial policies designed to reduce over-representation of indigenous peoples in the criminal justice system. The creation of indigenous-controlled programs and criminal justice structures to reduce indigenous conflict with the law. Comparative study of other jurisdictions including Greenland, the United States and Australia. (seminar) Prerequisite: one of CRIM 100, 101 or 102.
CRIM 420-3 Advanced subjects in Criminological Research
An extension of CRIM 220 and 320, this course will examine one or more of the following: evaluative research in the criminal justice context; techniques and efficacy of predicting delinquency and recidivism; survey research; archival, historical or legal methods; field research, etc. (lecture/seminar) Prerequisite: one of CRIM 100, 101 or 102; 320 and 321.
CRIM 430-3 Judicial Administration and Planning
Theory and practice of court administration. Examination of the organization of court systems with particular attention to problems of administration and planning. Discussion of the various functions involved in court administration including court registries; court reporting; caseflow management; the role of the judiciary in administration; personnel, fiscal and records management; and information systems. (lecture/seminar) Prerequisite: one of CRIM 100, 101 or 102; 131 and 231.
CRIM 431-3 Comparative Criminal Justice Systems
Critical examination of the theory and method of comparative criminal justice. Review of common law systems, civic law systems, and socialist law systems. Specific consideration of the development, structure and operation of the criminal justice systems in selected countries, which may include England, France, Federal Republic of Germany, the former Soviet Union, the People's Republic of China, and Japan. Focus on the impact of historical, social, political, religious and cultural factors on the criminal justice process. Consideration, of the structure and operation of various components of the criminal justice process in selected countries, including the police, criminal courts, and corrections. (seminar) Prerequisite: one of CRIM 100, 101 or 102.
CRIM 432-3 Gender in the Courts and the Legal Profession
The gendered nature of law will be addressed through an examination of its underlying factual assumptions, and the use of social science research as evidence in equality litigation. The use of the charter, human rights legislation, and other legal means to achieve gender equality through the legal system in the areas of work, employment and pay equity, and compensatory schemes for personal injuries will also be examined. This course will also examine women's struggles to gain admittance to the legal profession, and the barriers which may still prevent them from participating equally in the profession today. (seminar) Prerequisite: CRIM 330.
CRIM 435-3 Adult Guardianship Law
A comprehensive exploration of the law affecting adult guardianship, substitute decision-making, and adult protection in Canada, including a detailed examination of the form, content and philosophical underpinnings of the relevant legislation in British Columbia. subjects include assessing mental incapability, powers of attorney, living wills and health care directives, end of life decision-making, the law affecting consent to health care, and court-ordered guardianship for adults. Prerequisite: one of CRIM 100, 101 or 102. Recommended: one of CRIM 330 or 335. This course is identical to GERO 435 and students cannot take both courses for credit. Students with credit for CRIM 418 when offered as Adult Guardianship Law, and GERO 410 when offered as Adult Guardianship Law, may not take CRIM 435 or GERO 435 for further credit.
CRIM 436-3 Corporate Crime and Corporate Regulation: Advanced Topics
A detailed examination and analysis of particular types of corporate wrongdoing and the nature and impact of the relevant legal and administrative framework. The subjects will be selected by the particular course instructor and will, therefore, vary according to the instructor's interests as well as topicality. The areas of corporate crime which are chosen may include one or more of the following: `economic crimes' such as violations of statutes which regulate competition, protect intellectual property, and safeguard stock market investors; crimes against the environment such as air and water pollution; and, crimes against consumers including the marketing of hazardous products, contaminated food, or dangerous drugs and devices. (seminar) Prerequisite: one of CRIM 100, 101 or 102. Recommended: CRIM 336.
CRIM 437-3 Crime and Misconduct in the Professions
This course will examine the use of self regulation by professional organizations (e.g. law societies, colleges of physicians and surgeons, stock exchanges) and the increasing demand by other occupational groups and social and economic entities to be governed by these internal controls in addition to, or in lieu of, the criminal law. It will specifically examine how the criminal law is used in the context of self-regulation and how professionals can bypass the criminal law through self-regulating organizations. The professions will be examined in the context of administrative, civil and criminal law. Implications for self regulation in other areas and the future of self-regulation will also be considered. (seminar) Prerequisite: CRIM 330.
CRIM 442-3 Correctional Practice: Advanced Topics
An in-depth examination of the various community-based and institutional programs and techniques utilized in correctional systems. The choice of programs and techniques will depend upon the instructor but may include a range of restorative justice initiatives (e.g. victim-offender reconciliation, family-group conferencing, and circle remedies), traditional psychodynamic therapies (e.g. behavior modification and guided group interaction) and education or skill development programs. The course may include a consideration of the applicability of the precepts of clinical criminology to correctional practice. (seminar) Recommended: CRIM 315 and 343.
CRIM 450-5 Techniques of Crime Prevention II
Introduction to the modern techniques of crime prevention. Emphasis will be on crime prevention and reduction in fear of crime. Crime prevention through social change. Crime prevention through environmental design. Crime prevention through physical planning and architectural design. The concept of `defensible space.' Obstructing and reducing the opportunities for the commission of crimes. Evaluating crime prevention programs. (lecture/laboratory) Prerequisite: one of CRIM 100, 101 or 102.
CRIM 451-3 Advanced Techniques in Forensic Science
Looks at the advanced and sometimes more controversial areas of forensic science used in the criminal justice system today. Most areas are those outside the crime lab and require extensive and in-depth training in a very focused field. Seminars may cover areas such as the use of polygraph, blood spatter pattern analysis, entomology, pathology, odontology, anthropology, genocide investigation, facial approximation, crime scene analysis on land, underwater and mass homicide scenarios. (0-3-0) Prerequisite: one of CRIM 100 or 101 or 102. Students with credit for CRIM 420 in 01-3, 00-3, 99-3, 98-3 or 97-3 may not take CRIM 451 for further credit. Recommended: CRIM 355.
CRIM 455-3 Law Enforcement Administration and Planning
This course will cover the following topics: theory and practice of organization and administration of law enforcement agencies. Professional police management. Internal relations. Police strikes. Problems of law enforcement manpower: recruitment, selection, education, training, manpower alternatives, forecasting manpower needs. Problems of development, promotion and advancement. Personnel supervision, internal discipline. Problems of communication, information and statistics. Improving resource allocations by means of operational research. Evaluative research; cost-benefit analysis. Computer uses in law enforcement. Police-community relations. Improving police image and public attitudes towards the police. Relations with other sectors of the criminal justice system. (lecture/seminar) Prerequisite: one of CRIM 100, 101 or 102; 131 and 251.
CRIM 461-0 Practicum IV
Fourth semester of work experience in the Criminology Co-operative Education Program. (Practicum) Prerequisite: successful completion of CRIM 361 and 75 credit hours with a minimum CGPA of 2.75.
CRIM 462-15 Field Practice
Supervised three month field practicum in selected criminal justice agencies. Students are required to complete a series of reports addressing theoretical and practical issues relating to their placement as well as to attend regular feedback seminar discussions with faculty supervisors and other field practicum students. Prerequisite: prior approval of the school and a minimum CGPA of 2.5 is required. Applicants must be formal criminology majors or honors students, and must be registered in or have completed CRIM 320, 321 and 369. A minimum grade of B- in CRIM 369 is required. Only under exceptional circumstances, to a limit of three credit hours, and with the formal written approval of the director of the undergraduate program, will registration for course work in addition to CRIM 462 be permitted.
CRIM 470-5 Directed Studies
Independent research in a selected criminological area, under the direction and supervision of at least one faculty member. A research report is required. Prerequisite: CRIM 320, 321 and 330. Written application to the school no later than the last day of classes of the preceding semester. Reserved for criminology honors and majors. Recommended: CRIM 370.
CRIM 490-5 Honors Thesis I
An in-depth investigation of a selected syllabu in criminology, including a comprehensive review of the literature as well as initial and partial completion of the thesis research. Open only to students who have been admitted to the criminology honors program.
CRIM 491-5 Current Theory and Research in Criminology: Advanced Topics
A detailed and comprehensive examination of the dominant theoretical research programs currently found in criminology. The subject matter of the seminars may change from year to year according to topicality and may include the following: biological theory and research; social psychological research programs (e.g., social learning theory); environmental criminology; left realism; feminism; post structuralism and post modernism. Students are also required to attend a weekly pro-seminar. (seminar) Prerequisite: normally open only to students who have been admitted to the criminology honors program. Other students may be admitted under exceptional circumstances with the written permission of the director of undergraduate programs.
CRIM 499-12 Honors Thesis II
An honors thesis is a research report written under the supervision of a faculty member, a copy of which is to be permanently lodged in the School of Criminology. Students are required to attend a weekly seminar at which various issues associated with the linking of theory and method are examined and where students can both discuss their progress and share their research experiences. On completion, the thesis is to be orally defended in a school seminar. Open only to students who have been admitted to the criminology honors program. Students are not permitted to take other courses while enrolled in this course. Prerequisite: a minimum grade of B in CRIM 490 and 491 is required.

Undergraduate Semester in Dialogue DIAL

DIAL 390-5 Undergraduate Semester: Dialogue
The Dialogue component of the Undergraduate Semester at the Centre for Dialogue will immerse students in the art and practice of thinking and communicating. The focus will be on strategies and methods to use in understanding diverse perspectives. Students will have an opportunity to expand their verbal and written communication skills as well as explore dialogues as a developing academic field. The specific focus of the course and the assignments will be linked and interwoven with the current semester's offering of DIAL 391 and 392, which must be taken simultaneously with DIAL 390. (0-5-0) Prerequisite: 45 credit hours prior to beginning the Undergraduate Semester at the Centre for Dialogue. Students should apply two semesters before the semester in which they wish to enroll. Corequisite: DIAL 391, 392.
DIAL 391-5 Undergraduate Semester: Seminar
subjects covered each semester will vary, but generally each course will examine a subject that encourages broad approaches and probes provocative issues. The course will consist of discussions led by faculty, frequent visits from relevant off-campus experts, a heavy practicing load, and a number of individual and group student projects. Learning will be active rather than passive, stimulating students to research, explore and discuss rather than following a lecture format. (0-5-0) Prerequisite: 45 credit hours prior to beginning the Undergraduate Semester at the Centre for Dialogue. students should apply two semesters before the semester in which they wish to enroll. Corequisite: DIAL 390, 392.
DIAL 392-5 Undergraduate Semester: Final Project
For their final project, each student will produce a manuscript suitable for submission to a major public media outlet on a syllabu relevant to the course focus for that semester. (0-5-0) Prerequisite: 45 credit hours prior to beginning the Undergraduate Semester at the Centre for Dialogue. Students should apply two semesters before the semester in which they wish to enroll. Corequisite: DIAL 390, 391.

Earth Sciences EASC

Faculty of Science

EASC 101-3 Physical Geology
An introduction to the origin and character of minerals, rocks, earth structure, earth surface processes and plate tectonic theory. (2-0-3) Students with credit for GEOG 112 cannot take this course for further credit.
EASC 102-3 Historical Geology
An introduction to the study of the evolution of the earth; the geological time scale, fossils and evolution; stratigraphic concepts; geological history of western Canada. (2-0-2) Prerequisite or corequisite: EASC 101 or GEOG 111. With the permission of the instructor, students with credit for geology 12 may have the prerequisite waived.
EASC 103-3 The Rise and Fall of the Dinosaurs
An introductory course that deals with the class Dinosauria, and in particular, how our understanding of this extinct group of animals has been radically altered in the light of new discoveries during the last few decades. The course addresses the rise of the dinosaurs, criteria for the recognition of the different groups, fossil data regarding dinosaur metabolism, evidence of dinosaur behavior, possible evolutionary relationships with birds and so-called feathered dinosaurs, and theories of dinosaur extinction. (2-0-2)
EASC 201-3 Stratigraphy and Sedimentation
An introduction to the nature, origin and interpretation of stratified earth materials. Principles of lithostratigraphy, biostratigraphy and chronostratigraphy. Sequence stratigraphy. The facies concept. (2-0-2) Prerequisite: EASC 101 or GEOG 111; and EASC 102.
EASC 202-3 Introduction to Mineralogy
Introduction to crystallography, crystal chemistry and chemical properties and chemical principles necessary for the study of minerals. (2-0-3) Prerequisite: EASC 101. Corequisite: CHEM 121.
EASC 203-3 Paleontology
Principles of classification, morphology and development of the major groups of animals and plants in the geological record; the paleoecologic significance of fossils. (2-0-2) Prerequisite: EASC 102. Recommended: BISC 102
EASC 204-3 Structural Geology I
Description, classification and interpretation of earth structures: folds, faults, joints, cleavage and lineations. Elementary rock mechanics. (2-0-3) Prerequisite: EASC 101 and 102, PHYS 120.
EASC 205-3 Introduction to Petrology
Optical phenomena related to the use of the polarizing microscope in the identification of minerals in thin section. Petrogenesis and classification of igneous sedimentary and metamorphic rocks. Hand specimen and thin section identification of rocks and minerals. (2-0-3) Prerequisite: EASC 202, CHEM 122, PHYS 121 and 131.
EASC 206-1 Field Geology I
Seven days of field excursions to demonstrate the geology of British Columbia. (field study) Prerequisite: EASC 101 and 102.
EASC 207-3 Introduction to Geophysics
An introduction to geophysics emphasizing seismic, magnetic and gravimetric observations of the Earth. Applied geophysics. (2-0-3) Prerequisite: EASC 101, PHYS 121 and 131.
EASC 208-3 Introduction to Geochemistry
Distribution and cycles of elements, minerals and rocks on and within Earth. Understanding and evolution of Earth systems through high and low temperature fluid-rock ineraction, aqueous geochemistry, stable and radiogenic isotopes. (2-0-3) Prerequisite: EASC 101, CHEM 121, 122 and 126.
EASC 301-3 Igneous and Metamorphic Petrology
Mineralogy, phase relations, origin of igneous rocks; classification of igneous rocks. Mineralogy and textures of metamorphic rocks; hand trial and thin sections. (2-0-3) Prerequisite: EASC 205 and 208.
EASC 302-3 Sedimentary Petrology
Description and classification, field and microscopic identification of sedimentary rocks; petrogenesis and paleoenvironmental reconstruction. (2-0-3) Prerequisite: STAT 101, EASC 201 and 205.
EASC 303-3 Environmental Geoscience
Environmental geology is a branch of geology which deals with the relationship of people to their geological habitat. subjects covered will include environmental impact of mineral extraction and logging; erosion and sedimentation in rural and urban environments; mass movements in mountainous terrain. (2-0-2) Prerequisite: 75 credit hours including six credit hours in Earth Sciences and GEOG 213.
EASC 304-3 Hydrogeology
Introduction to the theory of groundwater flow; flow nets; well hydraulics; regional groundwater evaluation. (2-0-3) Prerequisite: one of PHYS 102 or 121, and one of EASC 101 or GEOG 111.
EASC 306-2 Field Geology II
A ten day field camp held after final exams in the Spring semester. The camp will focus on the field methods of logging, mapping and interpreting rocks in the field setting. Field locations will vary from year to year. (field study) Prerequisite or corequisite: EASC 201, 204, 205, 206 and GEOG 213.
EASC 307-3 Applied Geophysics
Application, instrumentation and limitations of electrical, electromagnetic, ground penetrating radar and seismic methods for engineering and geoscience applications. (2-0-3) Prerequisite: EASC 207.
EASC 309-3 Global Tectonics
The study of motion and deformation of the earth's crust and upper mantle at a regional and global scale. A detailed examination of plate tectonic theory: plate boundary types, mechanics of plate movements, basin formation and mountain building. Case studies of major orogenic belts of the world highlighting regional structural deformation processes in response to tectonic stresses. (2-0-3) Prerequisite: EASC 201, 204, 205, 206 and 207. Students who completed EASC 407 prior to fall 1998 may not take this course for credit.
EASC 313-3 Introduction to Soil and Rock Engineering
An introduction to the engineering properties and behavior of soil and rock. Laboratory and field measurements of soil and rock properties. Applications in engineering design will be illustrated with case studies of slope stability, road design, foundations and underground excavations. Emphasis will be placed on the importance of soil and rock mechanics in the resources sector. (2-0-2) Prerequisite: EASC 101, 204 or permission of instructor.
EASC 317-3 Global Geophysics
Application of geophysical methods to the study of the Earth's evolution and its interior structure: geometrical nature of plate tectonics on a sphere; the Earth's magnetic field and its use in reconstruction of past plate motions; earthquake seismology and understanding the deep interior, gravity and lithospheric flexure, radioactive decay and an absolute geological time scale; heat loss and mantle convection; structure of oceanic lithosphere; structure of continental lithosphere; the early Earth and the tectonics of other planets. (2-0-2) Prerequisite: EASC 207 or permission of instructor.
EASC 401-3 Mineral Deposits
The petrology and genesis of metalliferous ore deposits; description of classic ore deposits; the occurrence and exploitation of industrial and non-metallic minerals. (2-0-3) Prerequisite: EASC 201, 204, 208 and 301.
EASC 402-3 Sedimentology
Sediment transport in fluids, the formation, character and classification of internal structures in sediments and paleoenvironmental analysis. (2-0-3) Prerequisite: EASC 302.
EASC 403-3 Quaternary Geology
Stratigraphy and history of the quaternary period with emphasis on glaciation, glacial sediments, and holocene alluvial fills. (2-0-3) Prerequisite: EASC 201 and GEOG 313.
EASC 404-3 Structural Geology II
Application of advanced concepts in structural geology to a variety of tectonic problems; deformation mechanisms; flow concepts applied to ductile deformation; description and interpretation of microstructural fabrics; strain partitioning from grain scale to global scale. (2-0-3) Prerequisite: EASC 202, 204, 205, 309.
EASC 406-3 Field Geology III
An advanced field study course that provides real-world examples of major subjects in the earth sciences. This involves lectures, seminars and preparation of a term paper and guidebook during the term which serve as background for a 14-18 day field component held shortly after the spring examination period (generally early May). The field component encompasses a fast-paced excursion to a variety of field sites (which change yearly). (field study) Prerequisite: EASC 306 and a minimum of nine other credit hours in upper division earth science courses (or permission of the instructor). Recommended: EASC 309.
EASC 408-3 Regional Geology of Western Canada
The stratigraphy, structure and historical geology of western Canada. Terrain analysis. Important mineral and fossil sites will be discussed. (2-0-3) Prerequisite: EASC 309. Students who completed EASC 305 prior to fall 1998 may not take this course for credit.
EASC 409-3 Rivers: Environments and Engineering
Fluid mechanics of open channel flow, channel formation and maintenance, sediment transport and deposition, and river engineering case studies. (2-0-2) Prerequisite: EASC 201, GEOG 313, MATH 152 and PHYS 121.
EASC 410-3 Groundwater Geochemistry and Contaminant Transport
An introduction to chemical and mass transport processes in groundwater regimes. subjects include the basic principles of aqueous geochemistry, the evolution of groundwater in different natural geological environments, and contaminant hydrogeology. The processes and principles governing mass transport, including advection, dispersion and diffusion are emphasized. (2-0-3) Prerequisite: EASC 304, CHEM 121. Recommended: CHEM 122.
EASC 411-3 Applied Environmental Geology
The application of geologic principles and techniques to environmental problems. Emphasis will be placed on urban and forested environments at both local and regional scales. Geologic case histories. (2-0-3) Prerequisite: EASC 206, 303. Recommended: GEOG 253, 313.
EASC 412-3 Advanced Geochemistry
Application of thermodynamics to earth science problems, experimental study of mineral equilibria, theoretical development of geothermobarometers for earth systems science, the importance of aqueous and gaseous phases in the transport and precipitation of geological phases framed within the context of global tectonics, and the application of stable and radiogenic isotopes to problems within the earth sciences. (2-0-2) Prerequisite: EASC 208, 301.
EASC 413-3 Forestry Geotechnics
Terrain stability, channel, watershed and gully assessments in forested terrain. Slope failure mechanisms in soil and rock. Methods of slope stability analysis. Techniques of slope reinforcement and stabilization. Slope monitoring. Forest road construction and deactivation. Introduction to risk assessment and decision analysis. (2-0-2) Prerequisite: EASC 313 or permission of instructor.
EASC 416-3 Field Techniques in Hydrogeology
This course is intended to complement the theoretical aspects of hydrogeology by providing students with hands-on experience using dyrogeological equipment, and implementing sampling and testing protocols. The course involves a series of pre-field session assignments consisting of the analysis and interpretation of geophysical, geochemical and surficial geology data, and a week at a hydrogeology field site on the Fraser River delta, British Columbia. After the field work, students will conduct extensive analysis and interpretation of data gathered during the field session, complete exercises and prepare a written report. The course runs for about three weeks following spring semester final examinations. (field study) Prerequisite: EASC 304. Corequisite: EASC 410. Recommended: EASC 207 and/or 307.
EASC 417-3 Seismology
Elasticity theory and the elastodynamic wave equation; P waves, S waves, and surface waves; reflection and refraction of plane waves; courses and seismometers' earthquakes, Earth structure and plate tectonics of Western Canada; seismic surveying methods in exploration of Earth's crust and detection of hydrocarbons. (2-0-2) Prerequisite: MATH 251 and PHYS 121 or permission of instructor. Recommended: EASC 101, MATH 232 and 252.
EASC 418-1 Terrain Stability: Assessment and Mitigation
A field-based course dealing with site specific assessment of the areas to be logged or impacted by road construction. subjects covered will include terrain stability assessment field procedures, environmental impact and mitigation in forest terrains, forestry-related landslides, forest road construction and deactivation. Rock slope stability assessment. (1-0-1) Prerequisite: EASC 313, 411 and 413.
EASC 419-1 Forest Harvesting Technology
A field-based course dealing with techniques used in the harvesting of timber; their impact and mitigation. subjects covered will include forest harvesting techniques (ground-based systems, cable systems, aerial systems, hand logging and horse logging), elements of operational logging (layout of cut blocks and road systems), and forest development plans. (1-0-1) Prerequisite: EASC 313, 411 and 413.
EASC 491-1 Directed Readings
A course in which practicing and research, and/or field work will be supervised by a faculty member. (seminar) Prerequisite: 75 credit hours including 30 hours in earth sciences courses and permission of the department.
EASC 492-2 Directed Readings
A course in which practicing and research, and/or field work will be supervised by a faculty member. (seminar) Prerequisite: 75 credit hours including 30 hours in earth sciences courses and permission of the department.
EASC 493-3 Directed Readings
A course in which practicing and research, and/or field work will be supervised by a faculty member. (seminar) Prerequisite: 75 credit hours including 30 hours in earth sciences courses and permission of the department.
EASC 499-9 Honors Thesis
Will include experimental and/or theoretical research in earth sciences or a related discipline, and the preparation of a thesis (research report). Selection of a research syllabu and preparation of the thesis will be done in consultation with a faculty member in earth sciences. A research seminar will be delivered at the end of the semester. (student project) Prerequisite: 105 credit hours, admittance to the honors program and consent of a thesis supervisor.

Economics ECON

Faculty of Arts

See also courses listed under Business Administration and Economics (BUEC). Prerequisites for any course may be waived for individual students by the department. In order for a course to be accepted as fulfilling a prerequisite, or for a required course to be accepted in a student's program in Economics (i.e. major, joint major, honors, joint honors or minor), a student must have obtained a grade of C- or higher.
ECON 102-3 Contemporary World Economies
An examination of the nature, experience and prospects of economies with differing structures, systems and levels of economic development. Consideration of the role, merits and problems of economic planning, both in developed and less developed countries. (lecture/tutorial) Students with credit for Economics courses at the 200 (or higher) division (excluding ECON 200 and 205) may not take ECON 102 for further credit.
ECON 103-3 Principles of Microeconomics
The principal elements of theory concerning utility and value, price and costs, factor analysis, productivity, labor organization, competition and monopoly, and the theory of the firm. (lecture/tutorial) Prerequisite: 12 credit hours. Students with credit for ECON 200 cannot take ECON 103 for further credit.
ECON 105-3 Principles of Macroeconomics
The principal elements of theory concerning money and income, distribution, social accounts, public finance, international trade, comparative systems, and development and growth. (lecture/tutorial) Prerequisite: 12 credit hours. Students with credit for ECON 205 cannot take ECON 105 for further credit.
ECON 110-3 Foundations of Economic Ideas
A preliminary approach designed to familiarize students with economic ideas and methods of economic analysis. The focus will vary from semester to semester. (lecture) Students with credit for ECON 100 cannot take ECON 110 for further credit.
ECON 208-3 History of Economic Thought
A study of the evolution of the main concepts of economic theory. Attention will be given to the relationship between doctrines and the economic, political, and social environment in which they developed. (lecture/tutorial) Prerequisite: ECON 103 or 200 and 105 or 205. Students with credit for ECON 308 may not take ECON 208 for further credit.
ECON 210-3 Money and Banking
Banking theory and practice in a Canadian context; the supply theory of money; the demand for money and credit creation; monetary policy in a centralized banking system and in relation to international finance. (lecture/tutorial) Prerequisite: ECON 103 or 200 and 105 or 205. Students with credit for ECON 310 cannot take ECON 210 for further credit.
ECON 250-3 Economic Development in the Pre-Industrial Period
The pre-industrial period. History of the economic development of civilization from ancient times until the industrial revolution. Emphasis will be placed on the influence of geographical factors, discoveries and inventions, religion, and social organization and customs. (lecture/tutorial) Prerequisite: ECON 103 or 200 and ECON 105 or 205. Students with credit for ECON 150 cannot take ECON 250 for further credit.
ECON 260-3 Environmental Economics
Economic analysis of environmental problems (water and air pollution, etc.). Evaluation of market failures due to externalities and public goods. Market and non-market regulation of environmental problems. (lecture/tutorial) Prerequisite: ECON 103 or 200. Students with credit for ECON 360 cannot take this course for further credit.
ECON 261-3 Resources and the Economy of British Columbia
Review of the development of the British Columbia economy with particular emphasis on the role played by natural resources. Examination of the economics of major BC natural resources and the design of policies for their exploitation. (lecture/tutorial) Prerequisite: ECON 103 or 200 and 105 or 205. Students with credit for ECON 201 cannot take this course for further credit.
ECON 278-0 Economics Practicum I
First semester of work experience in the Economics Co-operative Education Program. Prerequisite: 30 credit hours including ECON 103 or 200 and ECON 105 or 205. At least 12 of these 30 credit hours must be completed at Simon Fraser University with a minimum CGPA of 2.75. Students should apply to the Faculty of Arts co-op co-ordinator by the end of the third week of the preceding semester.
ECON 279-0 Economics Practicum II
This is the second semester of work experience in the Economics Co-operative Education Program. Prerequisite: economics lower division requirements and completion of 45 semester hours at least 12 of which must be completed at Simon Fraser University, with a CGPA of 2.75. Students should apply to the Faculty of Arts co-op co-ordinator by the end of the third week of the preceding semester.
ECON 282-3 Selected subjects in Economics
The subject matter will vary from semester to semester. (lecture/tutorial) Prerequisite: ECON 103 or 200, and 105 or 205.
ECON 290-3 Canadian Microeconomic Policy
A general survey of Canadian microeconomic policy issues. The course covers subjects such as regulation, taxation, environmental and resource policy, health care, education and income distribution. (lecture/tutorial) Prerequisite: ECON 103 or 200 and ECON 105 or 205.
ECON 291-3 Canadian Macroeconomic Policy
A general survey of Canadian macroeconomic policy issues. subjects will include the costs of inflation and unemployment, monetary and fiscal policy, the effects of government debt and exchange rate policy. (lecture/tutorial) Prerequisite: ECON 103 or 200 and ECON 105 or 205.
ECON 300-3 Introduction to Economic Concepts and Issues
The objective of this course is to introduce students to the economic approach to decision-making by individuals, firms and institutions. They will see how economic analysis can be used to interpret current economic issues and as an aid to the formation and evaluation of government policy. The course will focus on both microeconomic and macroeconomic concepts. By exploring economic issues, the course will encourage critical thinking and develop problem-solving skills. (3-0-0) Prerequisite: this course is available only to students who are registered in the Integrated Studies Program.
ECON 301-5 Intermediate Microeconomic Theory
The study of the main principles and techniques of economic analysis in their application to modern theories of price, production, distribution, and the theory of the firm. (lecture/tutorial) Prerequisite: ECON 103 or 200 and ECON 105 or 205; MATH 157; and two 200 division ECON or BUEC courses (excluding BUEC 232), 60 credit hours or permission of the department.
ECON 305-5 Intermediate Macroeconomic Theory
Concepts and methods of analysis of macroeconomic variables - consumption, investment, government and foreign trade. Classical and Keynesian models compared; analysis of economic statics and dynamics. (lecture/tutorial) Prerequisite: ECON 103 or 200 and 105 or 205; MATH 157; and two 200 division ECON or BUEC courses (excluding BUEC 232), 60 credit hours or permission of the department.
ECON 309-5 Introduction to Marxian Economics
Examination of Marx's economic theory, with particular emphasis on capital, theories of surplus value, and the Grundrisse. Consideration of earlier work as the basis for studying the above. Identification of the critical differences between Marxian economic theory and the dominant schools of economic theory in North America. (lecture/tutorial) Prerequisite: ECON 103 or 200 and 105 or 205, or permission of the department; 60 credit hours.
ECON 325-3 Industrial Organization
Introduces students to the economics of imperfect competition. subjects covered include the theory of the firm, market structure, and various aspects of firm strategy such as pricing, advertising, product differentiation, and innovation. Related questions of public policy will also be addressed. Prerequisite: ECON 301; 60 credit hours.
ECON 331-5 Introduction to Mathematical Economics
The mathematical interpretation of fundamental economic concepts; demand, supply, competitive equilibrium. Application of the calculus to production and distribution theory, growth models and investment theory. Differential and difference equations in dynamic economic models. Introduction to activity analysis. (lecture/tutorial) Prerequisite: ECON 103, 105 and MATH 157 or 151; 60 credit hours.
ECON 342-3 International Trade
subjects discussed in this course are: gains from trade in a classical world; the modern theory of international trade; factor price equalization; empirical tests and extensions of the pure theory model; economic growth and international trade; the nature and effects of protection; motives and welfare effects of factor movements; multinational enterprises; the brain drain; customs union theory; pollution control and international trade. (lecture/tutorial) Prerequisite: ECON 103 or 200 and 105 or 205; 60 credit hours or permission of the department. Students with credit for ECON 442 cannot take this course for further credit.
ECON 345-3 International Finance
Foreign exchange markets; determination of spot and forward exchange rates; Euro currency markets; balance of payments statistics; international adjustment theory; income price and exchange rate effects; the role of international short term capital flows; the international monetary system: gold standard, freely floating rates, dollar gold exchange standard, centrally created reserves. (lecture/tutorial) Prerequisite: ECON 103 or 200 and 105 or 205; 60 credit hours or permission of the department. Students with credit for ECON 445 cannot take this course for further credit.
ECON 353-4 Economic History of Canada
Analysis of leading issues in Canadian economic history. The historical experience of other areas will be examined when useful contrasts can be made. (lecture/tutorial) Prerequisite: ECON 301; 60 credit hours.
ECON 355-4 Economic Development
Analysis of theories of economic development. Consideration will be given to the requirements of successful development, to aspects of international co-operation, and to procedures of economic planning. Problems of emerging countries and models of various developing economies will be studied. (lecture/tutorial) Prerequisite: ECON 103 or 200 and 105 or 205; 60 credit hours. Students with credit for ECON 455 may not take ECON 355 for further credit.
ECON 362-4 Economics of Natural Resources
Application of economic analysis to natural resource problems and efficient management practice; public policy considerations in respect to development and conservation; benefit-cost analysis. (lecture) Prerequisite: ECON 301; 60 credit hours.
ECON 367-3 Transportation
The economic function of transportation; analysis of cost, demand and pricing in various transportation industries; evaluation of public policy toward provision of transportation facilities and the regulation of transport industries. (lecture/tutorial) Prerequisite: ECON 103 or 200 and 105 or 205; 60 credit hours.
ECON 368-3 Regional Economic Analysis
Introduction to regional impact analysis. Analysis of economic models of industrial location and spatial equilibrium. Examination of regional growth theories and their policy implications. Presentation of techniques for analysis of regional economic structure and performance. (lecture/tutorial) Prerequisite: ECON 103 or 200 and 105 or 205; 60 credit hours. Students with credit for ECON 365 may not take this course for further credit.
ECON 378-0 Economics Practicum III
This is the third semester of work experience in the Economics Co-operative Education Program. Prerequisite: economics lower division requirements and completion of 60 credit hours, at least 12 of which must be completed at Simon Fraser University with a CGPA of 2.75. Students should apply to the Faculty of Arts co-op co-ordinator by the end of the third week of the preceding semester.
ECON 379-0 Economics Practicum IV
This is the last semester of work experience in the Economics Co-operative Education Program. Prerequisite: ECON 301-5 or ECON 305-5 and 75 credit hours with a CGPA of 2.75. Students should apply to the Faculty of Arts co-op co-ordinator by the end of the third week of the preceding semester.
ECON 381-4 Labor Economics
Analysis of the economics of the labor market with particular emphasis on wage determination, the concept of full employment, and manpower policies. (lecture/tutorial) Prerequisite: ECON 301; 60 credit hours.
ECON 382-383-3 Selected subjects in Economics
The subject matter will vary from semester to semester. (lecture/tutorial) Prerequisite: ECON 103 or 200 and 105 or 205; 60 credit hours.
ECON 387-3 Selected subjects in Economics
The subject matter will vary from semester to semester. (lecture/tutorial) Prerequisite: ECON 103 or 200 and 105 or 205; 60 credit hours.
ECON 388-3 Introduction to Law and Economics
An introduction to the economic analysis of law, emphasizing the concepts of transaction costs and property rights. A variety of subjects will be analysed, ranging from the allocative effects of alternative property rights to contract tort and nuisance law, out-of-court settlements and alternative legal fee structures. (lecture/tutorial) Prerequisite: ECON 301; 60 credit hours.
ECON 390-3 Canadian Economic Policy
A description and analysis of all types of Canadian economic problems without devoting too much attention to any one specialized area. Both macro and microeconomic problems will be discussed. subjects will include inflation, employment, stability, growth, regional problems, agricultural policies, national identity problems, international policy, natural resource policies with particular emphasis on current problems. (lecture/tutorial) Prerequisite: ECON 103 or 200 and 105 or 205; 60 credit hours.
ECON 392-3 Public Economics: Role of Government
The study of the normative rationale for government in a market economy through an analysis of distributional issues, public goods, externalities, non-competitive market structures, and asymmetric information. (lecture/tutorial) Prerequisite: ECON 301; 305; 60 credit hours.
ECON 393-3 Public Economics: Taxation
The study of the public economics of taxation including the efficiency and distributional aspects of taxation, the incentive effects of taxation, tax incidence, tax evasion and fiscal federalism. (2-1-0) Prerequisite: ECON 301 and 305; 60 credit hours.
ECON 395-5 Comparative Economic Systems
Economic analysis of various methods of the allocation of resources and distribution of income. Comparative study of capitalist, communist, socialist, and mixed forms of national economic organization. (lecture/tutorial) Prerequisite: ECON 103 or 200 and 105 or 205; 60 credit hours.
ECON 398-3 Directed Studies
Independent practicing and research on subjects selected in consultation with the supervising instructor. This course can only be taken once for credit towards a degree or diploma. Prerequisite: ECON 103 or 200 and ECON 105 or 205; 60 credit hours.
ECON 402-3 Advanced subjects in Microeconomics
A series of subjects of a more technical nature than those developed in ECON 301. The subjects include demand, supply, general equilibrium, and applied welfare measures. (seminar) Prerequisite: ECON 301, 305 and 331; 60 credit hours.
ECON 403-3 Advanced subjects in Macroeconomics
A series of subjects of a more technical nature than those developed in ECON 305. The subjects include treatment of rational expectations, the welfare costs of inflationary finance, theories of unemployment and inflation. (seminar) Prerequisite: ECON 301, 305 and 331; 60 credit hours.
ECON 404-3 Honors Seminar in Methodology of the Social Sciences
Critical discussion of contemporary and original papers in the social sciences. Emphasis will be on the objectives, the logical aspects, and the testability of social science theories and models. (seminar) Prerequisite: 70 credit hours.
ECON 407-3 Seminar in Marxian Economics
Examination of particular areas of current interest and work in Marxian economics. Focus will vary from semester to semester. (seminar) Prerequisite: ECON 309 or permission of the department.
ECON 410-3 Seminar in Monetary Theory
Analysis of money as an economic variable; role of money in micro and macroanalysis. (seminar) Prerequisite: ECON 210 or 310, 301, and 305; 60 credit hours.
ECON 422-3 Seminar in Game Theory
An introduction to the basic concepts of game theory and their application to problems in a number of areas. (seminar) Prerequisite: ECON 301, 60 credit hours; or permission of the department.
ECON 425-3 Seminar in Industrial Organization
This course will cover subjects in industrial organization in depth. subjects may include theories of the firm and contractual behavior, the economics of vertical restraints, product differentiation, theories of market structure, an analysis of empirical industrial organization studies, subjects in competition policy or antitrust law, public utility regulation. Emphasis will be given to covering a limited number of issues in detail rather than attempting a broad survey of industrial organization theories. (seminar) Prerequisite: ECON 301; 60 credit hours.
ECON 428-3 Seminar in Behavioral and Applied Economics
This is a research course covering subjects in experimental economics, tests and economic behavior, and issues in applied economics. Experimental economic methods, results, and their implications for economic analyses will be reviewed. Individual projects will be designed and carried out by participants. (seminar) Prerequisite: ECON 301 and 305, 60 credit hours; or permission of the department.
ECON 431-5 Intermediate Mathematical Economics
The application of input-output studies, linear programming and the theory of games to economic analysis. Dynamic models, general equilibrium models and the mathematics of marginal analysis. (lecture/tutorial) Prerequisite: ECON 301 and 305; MATH 232 or ECON 331; 60 credit hours.
ECON 435-5 Quantitative Methods in Economics
The application of econometric techniques to the empirical investigation of economic issues. (lecture/tutorial) Prerequisite: ECON 301 and 305; BUEC 333; 60 credit hours.
ECON 443-3 Seminar in International Trade
Focus will vary from semester to semester. (seminar) Prerequisite: ECON 301, 305 and 342; or permission of the department; 60 credit hours.
ECON 446-3 Seminar in International Finance
Focus will vary from semester to semester. (seminar) Prerequisite: ECON 301, 305 and 345, or permission of the department; 60 credit hours.
ECON 450-3 Seminar in Quantitative Economic History
Focus will vary from semester to semester. (seminar) Prerequisite: ECON 301, 305 and 353 or permission of the department; 60 credit hours.
ECON 451-3 Seminar in European Economic History
A detailed examination of the major issues in European economic history. (seminar) Prerequisite: ECON 301 and 305; 60 credit hours. Students with credit for ECON 351 may not take ECON 451 for further credit.
ECON 455-3 Seminar In Economic Development
subjects in economic development. (seminar) Prerequisite: ECON 305 and 355, and 60 credit hours.
ECON 460-3 Seminar in Environmental Economics
Focus will vary from semester to semester. (seminar) Prerequisite: ECON 301, 305; 60 credit hours.
ECON 478-0 Economics Practicum V
This is an optional semester of work experience in the Economics Co-operative Education Program. Prerequisite: ECON 301, 305, one 400 division course and 90 credit hours and a CGPA of 2.75. Students should apply to the Faculty of Arts co-op co-ordinator by the third week of the preceding semester.
ECON 480-3 Seminar in the Economics of Labor Market Policy
Seminar focusing on public policy as it relates to employment and income security. Special emphasis will vary from term to term, but may include such subjects as examinations of current manpower, welfare and public insurance programs, labor legislation, and private institutional practices (such as union-management pension arrangements) that may affect income security. (seminar) Prerequisite: either ECON 381 or both of 301 and 305; 60 credit hours.
ECON 482-484-3 Selected subjects in Economics
The subject matter will vary from semester to semester depending upon the interests of faculty and students. (seminar) Prerequisite: ECON 301 and 305; 60 credit hours.
ECON 490-3 Seminar in Public Choice
The application of economic theory to political market place. subjects may include the economics of constitutions, voting, democracy, bureaucracy, rent-seeking, and redistribution. (seminar) Prerequisite: ECON 301 and 305; 60 credit hours.
ECON 492-3 Seminar in Public Economics
This seminar course considers subjects such as the potential role for government through an analysis of distributional issues, public goods, externalities, non-competitive market structures, and asymmetric information. It may also include subjects like the incentive effects of taxation, tax incidence, tax evasion and subjects in fiscal federalism. (0-3-0) Prerequisite: ECON 392 or 393.
ECON 496-3 Selected subjects in Economics
The subject matter will vary from semester to semester depending upon the interests of faculty and students. (seminar) Prerequisite: ECON 301 and 305; 60 credit hours.
ECON 498-3 Directed Studies
Independent practicing and research on subjects selected in consultation with the supervising instructor. This course may not be repeated for additional credits. Prerequisite: ECON 301 and 305 and permission of the undergraduate chair of the department; 60 credit hours.
ECON 499-6 Honors Seminar in Economics
The purpose of this course is to permit the student to expand and develop a paper that has been prepared for a previous course into an honors paper. (seminar) Prerequisite: ECON 301, 305; one additional 400 level course in Economics, minimum CGPA of 3.0. Pre- or corequisite: 435.

Education EDUC

Faculty of Education

EDUC 100-3 Selected Questions and Issues in Education
This course introduces students to a small but representative trial of basic questions and issues in education. Students will examine questions relating to: the concept or idea of education; learning and the learner; teaching and the teacher; and more generally, the broader contexts of education. This course also introduces students to different ways of exploring educational questions and issues - from philosophical and critical analysis, to historical and cross-cultural studies, to empirical research. Cannot be taken for credit by students with credit for 300 and 400 level education courses.
EDUC 220-3 Introduction to Educational Psychology
A survey of educational research and theories concerning motivation, learning, development, and individual differences in classroom settings. May be applied towards the certificate in liberal arts.
EDUC 222-3 Research Methods in Educational Psychology
An introductory survey of research methods used in developing and testing theories in educational psychology. Illustrations are drawn from published research in educational psychology. Corequisite: EDUC 220-3
EDUC 230-3 Introduction to Philosophy of Education
This course provides prospective teachers and others interested in education an opportunity to examine a variety of educational problems from a philosophical perspective. The central concern of the course is to elucidate the nature of education as a phenomenon distinct from such activities as training, schooling, and socialization. May be applied towards the certificate in liberal arts.
EDUC 240-3 Social Issues in Education
Social functions of the school; education and socialization; social, political, economic and cultural influences on the institutions and practices of education. May be applied towards the certificate in liberal arts.
EDUC 250-3 Studies in the History of Education in the Western World
This course will consist of a study of major trends in educational practice from antiquity to the present. May be applied towards the certificate in liberal arts.
EDUC 252-4 Introduction to Reflective Practice
Provides opportunities for prospective teachers to begin their development as reflective practitioners. Through readings, classroom activities and discussions, and interactions with students and practicing teachers, students will be exposed to various educational issues and questions. They will be given time to explore their own values and beliefs about education and teaching. Time will be spent observing in a selection of local schools, and there will be opportunities to work with children individually, and in small and large groups. Students with credit for EDUC 401 or holding a teaching certificate may not take this course for credit.
EDUC 260-3 Learning and Teaching Through Technology
Provides a practical and theoretical exploration of technology use in K-12 classroom settings. Introduces current technologies that potentially impact student learning as well as a variety of issues and problems surrounding the use of learning technologies in schools. Also offers opportunities to explore technology-based innovations not yet broadly used in schools. Prerequisite EDUC 220.
EDUC 298-299-2,3 Special Topics
Courses will explore issues of current concern. Subjects to be taught and the exact assignment of credit (2 or 3) will be announced prior to the beginning of each semester. Course may be on a pass/fail basis. A maximum of 12 credit hours in education special subjects courses may be used towards a bachelor of education degree.
EDUC 311-3 Foundations in Aboriginal Education, Language and Culture
An introduction to Aboriginal education in Canada and BC. There will be a critical examination of historical and contemporary issues in education and an exploration of culturally based Aboriginal education grounded in Aboriginal philosophies. Prerequisite: 60 credit hours.
EDUC 320-3 Instructional Psychology
This course examines theories of instruction and research about learning, motivation, individual differences, and social environments as foundations for designing instruction. subjects include: models of cognition; models of motivation and beliefs; metacognition, self-regulated learning, and learning skills; problem solving and transfer; cognitive processing models of instruction in mathematics, science, social studies, practicing and composition. Prerequisite: EDUC 220.
EDUC 322-3 The Social Lives of School Children
An overview of theory, research and practice concerning social emotional development and social interactions and relationships in the school context. Emphasis on the role of peer relationships in development and the role of the school in supporting positive interactions. Prerequisite: EDUC 220 or PSYC 250.
EDUC 323-3 Introduction to Counselling Theories
Survey of theories undergirding counsellor and teacher interventions aimed at promoting emotional growth, development and personal change. Examination of theories and their sociological, cultural and philosophical contexts. Exploration of links between frequently used interventions and the implicit theories underlying these strategies. Students who have credit for EDUC 425 cannot take EDUC 323 for further credit. Prerequisite: EDUC 220 or equivalent, and 60 credit hours.
EDUC 325-3 Assessment for Classroom Teaching
A survey of assessment methods that contribute to improving teaching and learning, and for making judgements and decisions about qualities of teaching, the classroom environment, and student achievement and growth. subjects include: goal and task analysis, validity and reliability, observing and assessing classroom processes and environments, self-report methods, assessing student achievement, published tests of achievement and aptitude, marking and reporting. Prerequisite: EDUC 220.
EDUC 326-3 Classroom Management and Discipline
An examination of contemporary approaches to classroom management and discipline, including a consideration of legal, organizational and administrative issues. The major goal of the course is to enable students to comprehend the basic principles and tenets of a number of management approaches and to translate these principles into specific teaching strategies and skills. Prerequisite: EDUC 401/2 or one of EDUC 100, 220, 230, 240.
EDUC 327-3 Self, Psychology and Education
A critical examination of theoretical and empirical programs of inquiry in educational psychology that are concerned with the self (e.g., self-esteem, self-concept, self-directed or self-regulated learning). Students will participate in a wide-ranging seminar that considers subjects such as the relationship between personal and social being, historical perspectives on the self, the formation of social identity, the roles of memory, imagination, and narrative inselfhood, the development of agency and self, and education and personhood. Prerequisite: 60 hours of credit, including one of EDUC 220, 230, 240 or 250.
EDUC 328-3 Career Education and Career Counselling
An introduction to theories of career choice, adjustment and development. Emphasis on critical evaluation of established theories that are influential in the development of career education curricula and in the practice of career counselling. Prerequisite: EDUC 220 or 401/402.
EDUC 330-3 Movement Language Elements for Dance in Education
In this experiential course students will develop an understanding of the movement concepts (action, space, time, force, relationship) which are the framework for making and teaching dance. This course will explore dance as a non-verbal expressive language, and will introduce students to a variety of aspects of dance within the curriculum. Previous dance training is not required. Prerequisite: 60 credit hours including six hours in EDUC courses.
EDUC 341-3 Literacy, Education and Culture
An introduction to the study of literacy from an interdisciplinary perspective, one which explores the role of literacy in social development, the economic and cultural values of literacy, and the effects of literacy on cognitive processes. The particular concern of this course is with the formal transmission of literacy in educational institutions. The course will especially address the varying conceptions of literacy that educators have traditionally valued, and the research that aims to explain, justify, and prescribe educational practices intended to increase literacy. This course is required for the certificate in literacy instruction. Prerequisite: 60 hours of credit.
EDUC 351-3 Teaching the Older Adult
This is a basic course in adult education for students from all disciplines, of particular interest to those working (or preparing to work) with older adults. The goal is to assist students to develop more effective strategies for meeting the needs of an aging population through education. Prerequisite: 60 credit hours.
EDUC 352-4 Building on Reflective Practice
Building on the experience of EDUC 252, prospective teachers will continue to develop their reflective practice. Various educational issues related to the caring for children and the creation of learning communities will be explored. Prospective teachers will spend time in classrooms exploring the importance of connected learning experiences for children. Students with credit for EDUC 401 or holding a teaching certificate may not take this course for credit. Prerequisite: EDUC 252.
EDUC 355-4 Theatre in an Educational Context
This course deals with teaching theatre in an educational context. It will develop knowledge of theatre skills, and introduce students to a variety of approaches and techniques for teaching theatre and doing theatre in the schools. Prerequisite: 60 credit hours.
EDUC 358-3 Foundations of Educational Technology
A survey of major traditions of research and development in educational technology, including the arguments and assumptions they make about what constitutes a valuable educational outcome. Focus on analysing and understanding educational technologies as cultural tools that are both shaped by and in turn shape teaching and learning in K-12 schools. Prerequisite: EDUC 260.
EDUC 367-4 Teaching Children from Minority Language Backgrounds in Elementary Classrooms
This course is intended for prospective or practicing elementary school teachers who are interested in enhancing educational practice for children of minority language backgrounds (those often labelled as ESL students) within the context of their mainstream classrooms. Participants will consider theory and research in second language learning, examine recommendations for classroom practice and develop plans for practice relevant to their own educational milieu. Prerequisite: 60 hours of credit.
EDUC 370-399-2,3,4,6 Special Topics
Course will explore major issues of present concern. Subjects to be taught and the exact assignment of credit (3, 4 or 6) and prerequisites will be announced prior to the beginning of each semester. Course may be given on a pass/fail basis. A maximum of 12 credit hours in Education Special subjects courses may be used toward a bachelor of education degree.
EDUC 401-8 Introduction to Classroom Teaching
A half semester of observation and experience in a BC school during which two students work as a team with a teacher selected by school authorities and appointed by Simon Fraser University as a school associate. Students observe, teach and participate in school routines and programs. Grading is on a pass/withdraw basis. (Not offered in summer semester.)
EDUC 402-7 Studies of Educational Theory and Practice
A half semester of study which provides students with workshops, seminars, and lectures designed to introduce them to basic curriculum and methods appropriate for the age/grade level in which they expect to teach. Students will also be given an introduction to generic teaching skills, as well as to current issues in educational theory and practice. Grading is on a pass/withdraw basis. (Not offered in summer semester.) Corequisite: EDUC 401
EDUC 404-0 Course Work Semester
Students undertake 14 semester credit hours of studies in Education to complete the professional development program requirements. Prerequisite: EDUC 401/402.
EDUC 405-15 Teaching Semester
A full semester of classroom experience supervised by University appointed school associates. The school placement is appropriate to the grade level and subject specialties which the student expects to teach after graduation. Grading is on a pass/withdraw basis. (Not offered in summer semester.) Prerequisite: EDUC 401/402.
EDUC 406-12 Supervised Observation and Teaching
Education 406 is designed for those who need to meet BC certification requirements. It is a supervised orientation/observation/teaching sequence of approximately ten weeks, in a BC public school. This practicum is designed as an opportunity to familiarize students with the British Columbia school system and update their teaching skills. Prerequisite: permission will not be given to students without previous teaching experience. Grading will be on a pass/withdrawal basis. Students with credit for EDUC 407 may not take EDUC 406. EDUC 406 is not applicable toward the credit requirements for a degree or diploma, i.e. not counted in total credits.
EDUC 411-3 Investigations in Mathematics for Secondary Teachers
Students examine secondary mathematics from an advanced standpoint, focusing on problem solving, investigating connections among various subjects and representations, and situating secondary mathematics in a broader context, both mathematical and historical. Corequisite: EDUC 415 or appropriate math background and permission of instructor.
EDUC 412-4 Designs for Learning: Secondary Language Arts
Focuses on teaching secondary school language arts and addresses aspects of the theory and practice of language arts education. Students examine their own thinking about language arts education through critical reflection, work with the prescribed curriculum, and explore various ways to develop engaging learning experiences for young adults within a consistent framework using appropriate instructional materials and methods. Prerequisite: EDUC 401/402. Students who have credit for EDUC 472 prior to the 2001-2 semester cannot take EDUC 412 for further credit.
EDUC 414-4 Designs for Learning: Secondary Social Studies
Focuses on teaching secondary school social studies and addresses aspects of the theory and practice of social studies education. Students examine their own thinking about social studies education through critical reflection, work with the prescribed curriculum, and explore various ways to develop engaging learning experiences for young adults within a consistent framework using appropriate instructional materials and methods. Prerequisite: EDUC 401/402. Students who have credit for EDUC 474 cannot take EDUC 414 for further credit.
EDUC 415-4 Designs for Learning: Secondary Mathematics
Focuses on teaching secondary school mathematics. Students explore mathematical learning, their own mathematical thinking and curriculum; and plan mathematical instruction within a consistent framework using appropriate instructional materials and methods. Prerequisite: EDUC 401/402. Students who have credit for EDUC 475 prior to the 2001-2 semester cannot take EDUC 415 for further credit.
EDUC 416-4 Designs for Learning: Secondary Science
Focuses on teaching secondary school science. Students explore the sciences and aspects of learning science; examine their own scientific thinking; work with the prescribed curriculum; and plan science learning experiences within a consistent framework using appropriate instructional materials and methods. Prerequisite: EDUC 401/402. Students who have credit for EDUC 476 prior to the 2001-2 semester cannot take EDUC 416 for further credit.
EDUC 422-4 Learning Disabilities
A study of conceptual and historic foundations of learning disabilities and an introduction to the methodologies of diagnosis and of learning disabilities. Prerequisite: 60 hours of credit. Corequisite: EDUC 220.
EDUC 423-4 Helping Relationships
Introduction to the rationale for and the practice of basic counselling skills. Emphasis on the development of counselling skills as a means of establishing effective helping relationships in educational settings. Prerequisite: EDUC 323.
EDUC 424-4 Learning Disabilities: Laboratory
Supervised experience in analysis and evaluation of treatment strategies to be used with classroom students having learning disabilities. Prerequisite or corequisite: EDUC 422.
EDUC 426-4 Teaching Children and Youth with Special Needs
An introduction to the field of special education including studies of the definitional criteria and characteristics of major categories of special need, and the distinctive instructional challenges associated with these categories. The course focuses on the special learning needs of school age students, both elementary and secondary school levels, and emphasizes both the analysis of issues and treatment needs across the array of special needs. Prerequisite: 60 hours of credit.
EDUC 428-4 Nature and Nurture of Gifted Students
Concepts and practices related to the nature and nurture of the potential for giftedness in educational settings will be introduced. Theoretical and historical foundations of common practices in gifted education will be covered. Grading will be on a pass/fail basis. Prerequisite: EDUC 220 or PSYC 250 or PYSC 302 and EDUC 401/402.
EDUC 430-4 Designs for Learning Dance
This course is for students and teachers with some movement and dance experience who are planning to teach dance in school or recreational settings. Students will continue experiential and theoretical explorations of movement language framework concepts with increasing emphasis on expressive, formal and critical aspects of dance and movement education. Prerequisite: EDUC 330 and either EDUC 401/402, or permission of instructor.
EDUC 433-4 Philosophical Issues in Curriculum
Examines fundamental philosophical issues involved in designing, evaluating, or changing educational curricula. Such issues as the nature and justification of educational curriculum, the components of a rational curriculum, the nature of knowledge and its differentiation, curriculum integration and the education of the emotions. Also deals with such current issues as the place of behavioral objectives in education, the hidden curriculum and the sociology of knowledge. Prerequisite: 60 credit hours including 6 hours in EDUC courses or EDUC 401/402.
EDUC 437-4 Ethical Issues in Education
Ethical problems in education are identified and examined. Four major areas of concern are explored: 1. the normative character of education as a whole; 2. the justification of education; 3. ethical questions related to equality, autonomy, interpersonal relationships, and rights in education; 4. moral education and values education. Prerequisite: EDUC 230 or EDUC 401/402 or permission of the instructor.
EDUC 441-4 Multicultural/Anti-Racist Education
Focuses on developing approaches for multicultural and anti-racist teaching. subjects include: diversity of race, language and culture among learners; identifying the operation of racism, prejudice and discrimination in classrooms and schools; becoming familiar with a variety of approaches such as: co-operative learning, culturally appropriate assessment, and community involvement to counteract and prevent negative classroom and school dynamics; identifying bias in curriculum resources; and locating entry points in selected curriculum areas (e.g. language arts, social studies, art, music, etc.) for integrating approaches which employ a range of multicultural/anti-racist curriculum resources. Prerequisite: EDUC 240 or SA 333, and EDUC 401/402.
EDUC 445-4 Legal Context of Teaching
This course is designed to provide education students, teachers, counsellors and school administrators with a comprehensive understanding of the legal issues and potential legal liabilities encountered in the BC public school system. Special attention is devoted to the legal dimensions and consequences of routine classroom and administrative activity. subjects include: sexual abuse by school board employees; negligence and supervision; private lifestyles and community standards; discipline and corporal punishment; sexual harassment in the workplace; responsibility for curriculum fulfillment; liability outside school hours; and the AIDS controversy. Prerequisite: 60 hours of credit.
EDUC 446-4 Law for the Classroom Teacher
The course provides teachers with the necessary background understanding of the law and legal practices required to teach the law-related dimensions of the BC curricula. The major focus will be on the areas of law, and legal concepts and procedures included in the secondary social studies and law 12 curricula. Prerequisite: 60 hours of credit.
EDUC 448-4 Law in the Curriculum
The justification and practise of law-related education in the K-12 curriculum are the subjects of this methodology course. Students will examine the place of law in the curriculum, existing resources and appropriate teaching strategies and will have the opportunity to develop unit plans and curriculum materials. Emphasis is on developing and implementing law-related programs in the classroom. Prerequisite: 60 hours of credit.
EDUC 450-4 Classroom French Curriculum Studies
This course is intended for students who would like to gain a broader view of the French second language teacher profession while improving their knowledge of the language and culture in a classroom context. The general objective of this course is to help prospective French teachers to better understand the pedagogical relevance of and the relationship between cultural competence and communicative competence. Prerequisite: When the course is offered in French, 60 hours of credit and 12 credits of French or equivalent. When the course is offered in English, 60 hours of credit.
EDUC 451-4 Classroom French Curriculum Practices
The general objective of this course is to help prospective and practicing French teachers better understand the pedagogical and cultural relevance of a variety of French language registers and of their significance to second language teaching. Prerequisite: When the course is offered in French, 60 hours of credit and 12 credits of French or equivalent. When the course is offered in English, 60 hours of credit.
EDUC 452-8 Environmental Education
This course will examine the educational problems entailed in developing human awareness and understanding of the environment. The course will explore environmental issues through a multi-disciplinary approach and will relate historical and contemporary problems in human-environment interactions to school curricula from the elementary to the secondary level. Includes a laboratory component. Grading will be on a pass/fail basis. A 35 field activity fee will be levied in this course. Normally offered in summer session only. Prerequisite: EDUC 401/402.
EDUC 456-4 Models of the Contemporary Arts in Education
Major conceptions of educational value in the contemporary arts, and application of these ideas to the development of visual arts programs in the schools. Prerequisite: 60 hours of credit.
EDUC 457-4 Drama and Education
This course deals with theory, curricula and methodologies in drama education. subjects will include a selection from the following: aims of drama education; drama as methodology; role of the teacher in the drama classroom; evaluating students in drama classes; creative drama; the use of improvisation and storytelling; incorporating film and video work into drama classes; developing major projects with students such as choral dramatization, docudrama, anthology, and readers theatre; introducing scene work, stagecraft, and theatre history. Prerequisite: EDUC 401/402.
EDUC 459-4 Instructional Activities in Physical Education
This course focuses on theory and curriculum of school physical education programs. Emphasis is given to the movement education orientation as it pertains to the various program activities and approaches applicable to primary, intermediate and secondary levels. Prerequisite: EDUC 401/402.
EDUC 463-4 Multimedia for Curriculum Design
This course focuses primarily on the evaluation of the use of multimedia software packages in relation to important curricular and instructional issues. A secondary focus will be the student design and production of a multimedia package for use in an educational setting. Prerequisite: EDUC 260 or permission of instructor.
EDUC 464-4 Early Childhood Education
Current trends, issues and research relating to the education of young children. Prerequisite: EDUC 401/402 or PSYC 250.
EDUC 465-4 Children's Literature
Historical, sociological and literary perspectives on literature for children. Prerequisite: 60 hours of credit.
EDUC 467-4 Curriculum and Instruction in Teaching English as a Second Language
Students will learn to use English language teaching grammar appropriately, to evaluate and use methods of teaching English as a second language, to do error analyses, and to adapt commercial programmes to the specific needs of learners. This course is designed for teachers and prospective teachers. Prerequisite: 60 hours of credit and ENGL 370 or a linguistics course.
EDUC 468-4 Cognition and Language in ESL Instruction
Cognitive approaches to second language learning; syntactic and vocabulary differences in content-area subjects; language learning strategies; visual literacy; self directed language learning. Prerequisite: 60 hours of credit and one linguistics course.
EDUC 469-4 Music Education as Thinking in Sound
Understanding the language of music, both historical and contemporary, and use of electronic and acoustic instruments in the general music classroom. Prerequisite: 60 hours of credit.
EDUC 471-4 Curriculum Development: Theory and Practice
Explorations of curriculum theory and processes of development with applications at different levels and in several subject areas. Prerequisite: 60 hours of credit.
EDUC 472-4 Designs for Learning: Elementary Language Arts
Focuses on developing knowledge, skills and strategies to create a rich and stimulating language arts program in the elementary classroom. Issues in reading, writing, speaking and listening will be examined through current theory and teaching practice. Prerequisite: EDUC 401/402. Students who have credit for EDUC 472 prior to 2001-2 semester cannot take EDUC 472 for further credit.
EDUC 473-4 Designs for Learning: Reading
This course offers both theoretical and practical information about teaching practicing in primary and early intermediate grades. Prerequisite: EDUC 401/402.
EDUC 474-4 Designs for Learning: Elementary Social Studies
Focuses on teaching elementary school social studies and addresses aspects of the theory and practice of social studies education.Students examine their own thinking about social studies education through critical reflection, work with the prescribed curriculum, and explore various ways to develop engaging learning experiences for children within a consistent framework using appropriate instructional materials and methods. Prerequisite: EDUC 401/402. Students who have credit for EDUC 474 prior to 2001-2 semester cannot take EDUC 474 for further credit. Students with credit for EDUC 414 cannot take EDUC 474 for further credit.
EDUC 475-4 Designs for Learning: Elementary Mathematics
Focuses on teaching elementary school mathematics. Students explore mathematical learning, their own mathematical thinking, and curriculum; and plan mathematical instruction within a consistent framework using appropriate instructional materials and methods. Prerequisite: EDUC 401/402. Students who have credit for EDUC 475 prior to 2001-2 semester cannot take EDUC 475 for further credit.
EDUC 476-4 Designs for Learning: Elementary Science
Focuses on teaching elementary school science. Students explore science, aspects of learning science, and their own scientific thinking; work with the prescribed curriculum; and plan science learning experiences within a consistent framework using appropriate instructional materials and methods. Prerequisite: EDUC 401/402. Students who have credit for EDUC 476 prior to 2001-2 semester cannot take EDUC 476 for further credit.
EDUC 477-4 Designs for Learning: Art
This course introduces students to the main ideas, skills, materials, resources, understandings and organizational concerns involved in teaching art in schools. Prerequisite: EDUC 401/402.
EDUC 478-4 Designs for Learning: Music
This course is designed for in-service and pre-service teachers who would like to acquire the skills that will allow them to teach music competently and creatively. They will learn basic conducting techniques, design their own curriculums and have an opportunity to prepare and teach their own lesson plans. Previous musical experience is welcome, but not required. Prerequisite: EDUC 401/402.
EDUC 479-4 Designs for Learning: Physical Education
This course is designed to assist teachers in planning and implementing physical education programs in British Columbia schools. It will involve a practical consideration of instructional strategies and curriculum planning in physical education, particularly as they apply to the games, dance and gymnastics areas of the curriculum. Prerequisite: EDUC 401/402. Corequisite: EDUC 459.
EDUC 480-4 Designs for Learning: French as a Second Language
Deals with a variety of approaches, teaching strategies and curricula, for teaching French as a second language in elementary and secondary schools. Prerequisite: EDUC 401/402. Instruction given in French.
EDUC 481-4 Designs for Learning: French Immersion and Programme-cadre de Français
History, definition and growth of immersion (a Canadian phenomenon) and its relations to programme-cadre in British Columbia. Emphasis on integration of four skills (listening, speaking, practicing and writing) particularly on speaking. Error analysis, teaching techniques and development of activity centres. Exploration and adaptation of various commercial programs in different subjects (e.g. French, math). Prerequisite: EDUC 401/402 (French Immersion). Instruction given in French.
EDUC 482-4 Designs for Learning: Information Technology
In this course, students develop a critical understanding of information technologies in education and learn how to integrate these technologies into classroom settings. An emphasis is on teaching strategies and methods as they complement the guidelines set forth in the BC Information Technology Curriculum. Prerequisite: EDUC 260 and 401/402 or permission of instructor.
EDUC 483-8 Designs for Learning: Curriculum Studies
Development of conceptual and technical skills through workshops, seminars, and directed and independent study. Deals with human development and learning in the school. Stress will be placed on approaches to individualizing instruction and to integrating the curriculum in different subject areas. It will normally be taught by two or more faculty members. Prerequisite: EDUC 401/402.
EDUC 485-8 Designs for Learning: Writing
The course is designed to help students become better teachers of writing. Students will be involved in four aspects of teaching writing: teacher as writer, teacher as teacher of writing skills, teacher as researcher, teacher as developer of curriculum. Techniques for providing effective writing experiences will be studied, demonstrated and practised. Students will observe, use and evaluate these techniques. Course content: teacher as writer - writing skills, audience, purpose, writing process, self-evaluation. Teaching writing - research, skill acquisition, self-disclosure, risk and creativity, thought and discipline, evaluation. Teacher as researcher - reflective observation, analysis of data, program evaluation, peer support systems. Teacher as developer of curriculum - student writing, drama, literature, use of texts. Prerequisite: EDUC 401/402.
EDUC 486-489-3,4,6 Special Topics
Sections will deal with major issues of present concern. Subjects to be discussed will be announced during the semester prior to that in which the course is to be offered. The exact assignment of credit hours (3, 4 or 6) and prerequisites for the special subjects offering will be announced prior to the beginning of each semester. A maximum of 12 credit hours in education special subjects courses may be used toward a bachelor of education degree.
EDUC 490-492-2,4 Directed Study
Directed study in education under the supervision of a faculty member. Prerequisite: 60 credit hours and a CGPA of 3.0, consent of supervising faculty member, and approval of the director of undergraduate programs. A maximum of three directed studies courses will be approved for a maximum of 12 credits. Directed studies courses may not parallel regularly taught courses. A student may take a maximum of two directed studies courses with the same faculty member. Applications are available in the undergraduate programs office.
EDUC 495-498-3,4,6 Special Topics
Sections will deal with major issues of present concern. Subjects to be discussed will be announced during the semester prior to that in which the course is to be offered. The exact assignment of credit hours (3, 4 or 6) for the special subjects offering will be announced prior to the beginning of each semester. Prerequisite: this will be announced prior to the beginning of each semester. A maximum of 12 hours in education special subjects courses may be used toward a bachelor of education degree. Please refer to SA 333 Sociology of Education, as this course is also accepted as education credit.

Education Professional EDPR

Faculty of Education

EDPR 384-399-2,3,4,5,6 Special Topics
These field based courses will explore issues of concern to experienced practising educators. Courses may be offered on a pass/withdrawal basis. Prerequisite: EDUC 405 or special permission of the instructor.
EDPR 410-413-2,3,4,5 Field Based Studies in Curriculum Development
These courses are intended for practising teachers, school administrators or other practising educators who are involved in curriculum development. They provide opportunities for members of the teaching profession to work on curriculum development projects under the supervision of faculty members and/or distinguished practitioners designated by the faculty. Those wishing to undertake a field based studies course must submit a proposal form, available from the Office of Field Programs, before the end of the semester prior to the one in which the student intends to commence the study. The proposal must be approved by the director of field programs prior to registration in the course. Field based studies courses may have a credit value of 2, 3, 4 or 5 semester hours depending upon the nature of the proposed project. Evaluation is based on a pass-withdraw system. Field based studies in curriculum development may not form a component of EDUC 404. These courses may form a component of an approved program of studies for the post baccalaureate diploma. Prerequisite: teaching certificate or permission of the director of field programs. Maximum of 10 credit hours of field based studies in curriculum development may be used towards a BEd degree.
EDPR 414-417-2,3,4,5 Field Based Studies in Educational Practice
These courses are intended for practising teachers who wish to upgrade their professional work in a specific area of instruction or educational service. The field work is completed by individuals or groups of teachers under the supervision of a faculty member or field studies supervisor designated by the faculty. Those wishing to undertake a field based studies course must submit a proposal form, available from the Office of Field Programs, before the end of the semester prior to the one in which the student intends to commence the study. The proposal must be approved by the director of field programs prior to registration in the course. Field based studies courses may have a credit value of 2, 3, 4 or 5 semester hours depending upon the nature of the project proposal. Evaluation is based on a pass/withdrawal system. Field based studies in educational practice may not form a component of EDUC 404. These courses may form a component of an approved program of studies for the post baccalaureate diploma. Prerequisites: teaching certificate or permission of the director of field programs. A maximum of 10 credit hours of field based studies in educational practice may be used towards a BEd degree.
EDPR 418-421-2,3,4,5 Group Field Studies in Selected Professional Topics
These courses are intended for small groups of practising educators who wish to investigate a specific syllabu in education through focused inquiry. Seminars, readings and related field work are directed by a faculty member or field studies supervisor designated by the Faculty of Education. The designated supervisor, on behalf of the group, must submit a proposal form, available from the Office of Field Programs, before the end of the semester prior to the one in which the students intend to commence the study. The proposal must be approved by the director of field programs prior to registration in the course. Field studies courses may have a credit value of 2, 3, 4 or 5 semester hours, depending upon the nature of the project proposal. Evaluation is based on a pass/withdraw system. Groups field studies in selected professional subjects may not form a component of EDUC 404. These courses may form a component of an approved program of studies for the post baccalaureate diploma. A maximum of 10 credit hours of group field studies in selected professional subjects may be used towards a BEd degree. Prerequisite: teaching certificate or permission of the director of field programs.
EDPR 490-499-2,3,4,5,6 Special Topics
These field based courses will explore issues of concern to experienced practising educators. Courses may be offered on a pass/withdrawal basis. Prerequisite: EDUC 405 or special permission of the instructor.

Engineering Science ENSC

Faculty of Applied Sciences

ENSC 100-3 Engineering Technology and Society
This course is designed to provide an introduction to the practice of engineering, surveying its history and its current state. The social and political aspects of engineering decisions will be illustrated by a number of case studies. (3-0-0)
ENSC 101-1 Writing Process, Persuasion and Presentations
This course provides a general introduction to the principles of effective communication with special emphasis on the writing process, persuasive writing, research papers, and oral presentations. In conjunction with ENSC 100-3, the course also explores current social and ethical issues in engineering. (1-0-0) Corequisite: ENSC 100.
ENSC 102-1 Form and Style in Professional Genres
The major focus of this course is on the style and format of technical writing with attention to laboratory reports and project documentation. This course also examines resumes, cover letters, interview skills and formal reports to help students prepare for their first internship semester. It also addresses listening skills and group dynamics in the context of the team projects undertaken for ENSC 151. (1-0-0) Corequisite: PHYS 131.
ENSC 150-3 Introduction to Computer Design
Digital design concepts are presented in such a way that students will learn how logic blocks can be designed and employed to construct a simple computer. subjects covered include: basic Von Neumann computer architecture; an introduction to assembly language; combinational logic design; and sequential logic design. An interactive logic simulation environment will be provided for assignments. Assembly language programming is introduced. (3-0-0) This course is identical to CMPT 150 and students cannot take both courses for credit. Students who have taken CMPT 290 cannot take this course for further credit.
ENSC 151-2 Digital and Computer Design Laboratory
The practical concepts of assembly language such as programming, digital device interfacing, and hardware/software interfacing will be introduced through a group project. subjects will include: assembler concepts; micro-controllers; the hardware/software interface. Laboratory techniques will also be introduced as needed. This is a project course with a few lectures, or laboratory tutorials. (0-0-4) Prerequisite: CMPT 150 or ENSC 150.
ENSC 194-0 Optional Job Practicum
This is an optional semester of work experience in the Co-operative Education Program available to first year engineering science students. This course will not be counted towards the three required co-operative education semesters; however, it will be recorded on the students' transcipts. Credit is awarded as in ENSC 195.
ENSC 195-0 Job Practicum I
This is the first semester of work experience in the Co-operative Education Program available to engineering students. Credit is given as pass/withdraw/fail (P/W/F) only, based on the employer's and co-operative education co-ordinator's evaluation of the student's work during the semester and on the evaluation of the work report submitted and the oral presentation at the end of the work session.
ENSC 196-0 Job Practicum II
This is the second semester of work experience in the Co-operative Education Program available to engineering students. Credit is awarded as in ENSC 195. ENSC 196 may or may not involve the same employer as ENSC 195. Prerequisite: ENSC 195.
ENSC 201-3 The Business of Engineering
This course covers the business, management and entrepreneurial concepts that are important to engineers who manage projects, run businesses, or need to decide on the most efficient method for accomplishing a task. The subjects to be covered include: financial accounting, rates of return, taxes, cost-benefit analyses, marketing, financing methods, and business plans. (3-0-0) Prerequisite: 45 credit hours. This course will be offered for the first time in 99-2.
ENSC 204-1 Graphical Communication for Engineering
This course provides an introduction to graphical communication with attention to manual drafting and computer-assisted design. The course involves the use of several CAD packages for circuit schematic entry, mechanical design and circuit board layout. (1-0-0)
ENSC 220-3 Electric Circuits I
This course will cover the following topics: fundamental electrical circuit quantities, and circuit elements; circuits laws such as Ohm law, Kirchoff's voltage and current laws, along with series and parallel circuits; operational amplifiers; network theorems; nodal and mesh methods; analysis of natural and step response of first (RC and RL), as well as second order (RLC) circuits; real, reactive and rms power concepts. In addition, the course will discuss the worker safety implications of both electricity and common laboratory practices such as soldering. (3-0-1) Prerequisite: PHYS 121 and 131, MATH 232 and 310. MATH 232 and/or 310 may be taken concurrently. Students with credit for ENSC 125 cannot take this course for further credit.
ENSC 225-4 Microelectronics I
This course teaches analog/digital electronics and basic device physics in the context of modern silicon integrated circuits technology. subjects include: qualitative device physics and terminal characteristics; implementations and models of basic semiconductor devices (diodes, BJTs and MOSFETs); circuit simulation via SPICE; basic diode circuits; transistors as amplifiers and switching elements; temperature effects and compensation; single-stage transistor amplifiers; biasing, current sources and mirrors. (3-0-2) Prerequisite: ENSC 150 or CMPT 150, and ENSC 220. Students with credit for ENSC 222 cannot take this course for further credit.
ENSC 230-4 Introduction to Mechanical Design
This course presents the elements and principles involved in design and analysis of basic mechanical structures and mechanisms. Mechanical elements such as gears, cams and bearings and fundamental relationships between the forces and corresponding motion or deflection are investigated through examples and experiments. This background can then be used in the design, analysis and development of computer controlled machines such as robotic devices. (3-0-2) Prerequisite: PHYS 120, MATH 310.
ENSC 250-3 Introduction to Computer Architecture
This course deals with the main concepts embodied in computer hardware architecture. In particular, the organization, design and limitations of the major building blocks in modern computers is covered in detail. subjects will include: processor organization; control logic design; memory systems; and architectural support for operating systems and programming languages. A hardware description language will be used as a tool to express and work with design concepts. (3-0-0) Prerequisite: CMPT 150 or ENSC 150. This course is identical to CMPT 250 and students cannot take both courses for credit. Students who have taken CMPT 390 may not take CMPT 250 for further credit.
ENSC 263-3 Special subjects in Engineering Science
Prerequisite: permission of the undergraduate curriculum chair.
ENSC 264-4 Special subjects in Engineering Science
Prerequisite: permission of the undergraduate curriculum chair.
ENSC 295-0 Job Practicum III
This is the third semester of work experience in the Co-operative Education Program available to engineering students. Credit is awarded as in ENSC 195. ENSC 295 may or may not involve the same employers as preceding practicum semesters. Prerequisite: ENSC 196.
ENSC 296-0 Job Practicum IV
This is the fourth semester of work experience in the Co-operative Education Program available to engineering students. Credit is awarded as in ENSC 195. ENSC 296 may or may not involve the same employers as preceding practicum semesters. Prerequisite: ENSC 295.
ENSC 300-3 Engineering Design and Management
An introduction and overview of modern concepts of engineering design, problem solving and management. Material is presented through lectures, seminars, case studies, and historical review. Studies involve the interrelationship of such factors as problem definition, feasibility studies, specification, constraints, analysis techniques, evaluation, production project management, conflict resolution, and techniques of supervision. Student participation is expected through presentations of independent readings, case analyses and group projects. (2-2-0)
ENSC 301-3 Engineering Economics
The engineer as business people and entrepreneurs. Preparation of a business plan. The economics of capital projects and production processes. Financial analysis: mortgages, loans, direct costs, depreciation, taxes, financial statements, financing alternatives. Estimation of sales, capital and operating costs of new processes and products. Cash flows. Market evaluation comparison of alternatives. Study is in part through independent practicing rather than formal lectures. (3-0-0) Prerequisite: completion of at least 60 credit hours. This course will be offered for the last time in 00-1.
ENSC 304-1 Human Factors and Usability Engineering
The user is often overlooked in the engineer's quest for a functional and efficient design. This course examines the factors that make designs more or less usable and how to integrate usability constraints and testing procedures into the design process. (1-0-0)
ENSC 305-1 Project Documentation and Group Dynamics
This course is integrated with an ENSC project course (either ENSC 340 or 440) that provides practical experience with the design process for development projects. subjects include project management, team writing, project documentation (proposals, functional and design specifications, progress reports, and users manuals), group dynamics and dispute resolution. (1-0-0) Corequisite: ENSC 340 or 440.
ENSC 306-1 Research Methods for Engineers
This course ensures that engineering students are familiar with library resources, database searches, patent searches, and industry standards. The course also covers strategies for formulating research questions and approaching the research task as well as literature surveys and bibliographic conventions. It also provides opportunities for students to explore the implications of technology and to lead group discussions of issues arising from their research.
ENSC 320-3 Electric Circuits II
This course is a second course on electric circuits and the subjects covered include: the use of Laplace transform in circuit analysis, including poles and zeros, the frequency response and impulse response; convolution as a method for computing circuit responses; resonant and bandpass circuits; magnetically coupled circuits; three-phase circuits; two port circuits; and filtering. (3-0-1) Prerequisite: ENSC 220. Students with credit for ENSC 125-5 cannot take this course for further credit. Corequisite: ENSC 380.
ENSC 325-4 Microelectronics II
This course introduces Students to analog integrated circuit design in the context of modern silicon integrated circuits technology. subjects included: integrated circuit technology and design tools; integrated component characteristics and limitations, differential amplifiers; multi stage amplifiers; feedback amplifiers; stability and frequency compensation; integrated operational amplifiers; bipolar and MOS digital circuits; analog aspects of digital electronics. (3-0-2) Prerequisite: ENSC 222 or 225.
ENSC 327-4 Communication Systems
This course represents and introduction to analog and digital communications systems. The main subjects are: a review of Fourier Transform; the representation of bandpass signals; random signals in communications, including stationarity, ergodicity, correlation, power spectra and noise; amplitude and frequency modulation; circuits and techniques for modulation and demodulation; frequency division multiplexing; baseband digital communication; time division and multiplexing; an introduction to basic digital modulation schemes such as BPSK, FSK and QPSK. Laboratory work is included in this course. (3-0-2) Prerequisite: ENSC 281 or 380 or 382, and STAT 270.
ENSC 330-4 Engineering Materials
An introductory course in materials science which covers materials - their structures, properties, and performance; crystal structures and instruments for structure determination; polymers, ceramics, composites; quality control and reliability. (3-0-2) Prerequisite: CHEM 121, PHYS 121.
ENSC 340-4 Engineering Science Project
This course is based around a group project that consists of researching, designing, building and testing the hardware implementation of a working system. The course also includes material on how to design for safety, engineering standards and human factors. (1-0-4) Prerequisite: ENSC 151, 225 and 351. Students with credit for ENSC 440 cannot take ENSC 340 for further credit. Corequisite: ENSC 305.
ENSC 350-3 Digital Systems Design
This course deals with advanced subjects in digital design such as advanced state machine concepts, asynchronous design, hardware description languages, bus interfacing and DSP architecture. It also covers both the architecture and programming of field programmable logic devices. Some laboratory work is expected. (3-0-1) Prerequisite: ENSC 151 and 250 or CMPT 250.
ENSC 351-4 Real Time and Embedded Systems
This course concentrates on the problems encountered when attempting to use computers in real time (RT) and embedded applications where the computer system must discern the state of the real world and react to it within stringent response time constraints. Both design methodology and practical implementation techniques for RT systems are presented. Although some hardware will be involved, it should be noted that this course concentrates on real time software. (2-0-4) Prerequisite: CMPT 101, 250 or ENSC 250 or CMPT 290. ENSC 151 is highly recommended. Students with credit for ENSC 385 cannot take this course for further credit.
ENSC 363-3 Special subjects in Engineering Science
Prerequisite: permission of the undergraduate curriculum chair.
ENSC 364-4 Special subjects in Engineering Science
Prerequisite: permission of the undergraduate curriculum chair.
ENSC 380-3 Linear Systems
The objectives of this course are to cover the modelling and analysis of continuous and discrete signals using linear techniques. subjects covered include: a review of Laplace transforms; methods for the basic modelling of physical systems; discrete and continuous convolution; impulse and step response; transfer functions and filtering; the continuous Fourier transform and its relationship to the Laplace transform; frequency response and Bode plots; sampling; the Z-transform. (3-0-1) Prerequisite: ENSC 125 or 220, and MATH 310. Students with credit for ENSC 281 or 382 cannot take this course for further credit. Corequisite: ENSC 320. This course will be taught for the first time in semester 00-1.
ENSC 383-4 Feedback Control Systems
This course is an introduction to the analysis, design, and applications of continuous time linear control systems. subjects include transfer function representation of open and closed loop systems, time domain specifications and steady state error, sensitivity analysis, time and frequency response, and stability criteria. It includes a treatment of methods for the analysis of control systems based on the root locus, Bode plots and Nyquist criterion, and their use in the design of PID, and lead-lag compensation. Lab work is included in this course. (3-0-2) Prerequisite: ENSC 281 or 380.
ENSC 387-4 Introduction to Electro-Mechanical Sensors and Actuators
This course provides an introduction to sensors and actuators for electromechanical, computer-controlled machines and devices. subjects include operating principles, design considerations, and applications of analog sensors, digital transducers, stepper motors, continuous-drive actuators, and drive system electronics. Component integration and design considerations are studied through examples selected from applications of machine tools, mechatronics, precision machines, robotics, aerospace systems, and ground and underwater vehicles. Laboratory exercises strengthen the understanding of component performance, system design and integration. (3-0-2) Prerequisite: ENSC 281 or 380 or 382.
ENSC 395-0 Job Practicum V
This is the fifth semester of work experience in the Co-operative Education Program available to engineering students. Credit is awarded as in ENSC 195. ENSC 395 may or may not involve the same employers as preceding practicum semesters. Ideally, students should enrol in ENSC 498 instead of ENSC 395. Prerequisite: ENSC 296 and permission of the undergraduate curriculum chair.
ENSC 396-0 Job Practicum VI
This is the sixth semester of work experience in the Co-operative Education Program available to engineering students. Credit is awarded as in ENSC 195. ENSC 396 may or may not involve the same employers as preceding practicum semester. Students should strongly consider enrolling in ENSC 498 instead of 396 at this time. Prerequisite: ENSC 395 and permission of the undergraduate curriculum chair.
ENSC 400-402-4 Directed Studies in Engineering Science
Directed practicing and research in a syllabu chosen in consultation with a supervisor. Admission requires agreement by a proposed faculty supervisor and submission of a proposal to the school at least one month prior to the start of the semester in which the course will be taken. Upon completion of a directed study course, the student must submit a copy of the `deliverables' to the chair of the undergraduate curriculum committee. (3-0-2) Prerequisite: permission of the undergraduate curriculum committee chair.
ENSC 406-2 Social Responsibility and Professional Practice
This course explores the social implications and/or environmental impacts of a technology relevant to the participants' field of study through research. This course also uses lectures, case studies and group discussions to increase awareness and understanding of the legal ethical responsibilities of professional engineers, including issues of worker and public safety. (2-0-0) Prerequisite: 100 credit hours or permission of the instructor.
ENSC 407-1 Engineering Law and Ethics
This course uses lectures, case studies and group discussions to increase awareness and understanding of the legal and ethical responsibilities of professional engineers. Students exercise their skills as critical thinkers and persuasive writers. (1-0-0)
ENSC 408-0 Writing for Publication
This course examines a range of issues related to the process of publishing articles in professional journals including audience analysis, the publication process, referencing and format conventions, and anonymous reviews. It also provides a focused review of the writing process as well as how style and form can impact upon the reader's comprehension of information.
ENSC 424-4 Multimedia Communications Engineering
This course covers the technical basis for multimedia communications systems. The main subjects are as follows: methods for audio and visual signal compression and processing; the communications requirements of multimedia systems, such as synchronization, quality of service and bandwidth; the architectures and protocols associated with multimedia communications networks. (3-0-2) Prerequisite: ENSC 281 or 380 or 382.
ENSC 425-4 Electronic System Design
Aspects of design using digital and analog integrated circuits as circuit blocks for the realization of required system functions are treated, with project activities in the laboratory. subjects include differential amplifiers; operational amplifiers - non-ideal aspects; slew rate, gain error, sensitivities. Active filter design. D/A and A/D conversion. MSI and LSI digital circuits, combinational and sequential: decoders, encoders, multiplexers, ROM's, counters, controllers. Communication circuits: AM and FM modulators and demodulators, multiplexers, pulse modulation. Laboratory work is included in this course. (2-0-4) Prerequisite: ENSC 222.
ENSC 426-4 High Frequency Electronics
Transmission lines and waveguides, microwave devices, travelling wave devices. An introduction to the theory of radiation, antennae and wave propagation, and microwave scattering theory. The design of complete communication systems incorporating microwave, optical and satellite channels. Laboratory work is included in this course. (3-0-2) Prerequisite: PHYS 324.
ENSC 427-4 Communication Networks
Quantitative performance analysis and design of data and integrated services networks. Re-transmission error recovery schemes, networks of queues, congestion control, routing strategies. Multiple access techniques in data networks, design for specified throughput and delay performance. Wireless networks, routing approaches in mobile networks. Analysis and design of broadband integrated services digital networks, asynchronous time division multiplexing. Laboratory work is included in this course. (3-0-2) Prerequisite: ENSC 327 or permission of instructor.
ENSC 428-4 Data Communications
This course will cover the physical-layer design issues in digital communication systems. The major subjects covered are: information measures and the notion of channel capacity; link budgets; digital modulation techniques, including the signal space concept and optimal detectors, error performance in noise, suboptimal detectors, pulse shaping, synchronization, and equalization; error control techniques such as block and conventional codes, as well as comparisons between FEC and ARQ. Laboratory work is included in this course. (3-0-2) Prerequisite: ENSC 327 and 351 or 385.
ENSC 429-4 Discrete Time Systems
Discrete time signals and systems, sampling and quantization. The Discrete Fourier Transform and fast transforms. Digital filters, IIR and FIR, design procedures and implementations. Quantization noise in digital filters and transforms. Random signals, the response to linear systems to random signals. Introduction to adaptive systems. Introduction to system architectures for digital signal processing. Laboratory work includes familiarization with digital signal processing software packages. (3-0-2) Prerequisite: ENSC 281 or 380 or 382, and 327.
ENSC 440-4 Capstone Engineering Science Project
This capstone design course is based around a group project that consists of researching, designing, building, and testing the hardware implementation of a working system. The course also includes material on how to design for safety, engineering standards, and human factors. (1-0-4) Prerequisite: ENSC 151, 225, 351, and any two courses from ENSC 325, 327, 383 and 387. Students with credit for ENSC 340 cannot take ENSC 440 for further credit. Corequisite: ENSC 305.
ENSC 450-4 VLSI Systems Design
This course provides an introduction to the design of Very Large Scale Integrated (VLSI) circuits and systems using mainly CMOS technology. It links computer architecture and design limitations with integrated circuit physical layout issues. subjects will include: CMOS technology and circuit layout rules; combination and sequential logic; logic simulation; systems design; design for verification and testability. Some consideration is given to the question of when to use off-the-shelf programmable logic or full custom VLSI (e.g. for DSP). (3-0-2) Prerequisite: ENSC 151, 222 or 225, and CMPT 250 or ENSC 250.
ENSC 460-462-4 Special subjects in Engineering Science
Studies in areas not included within the undergraduate course offerings of the engineering science program. (3-0-2) Prerequisite: permission of the director.
ENSC 481-4 Designing for Reliability
Aspects of quality control and reliability in manufacturing environments will be discussed, including stress and strain, failure modes, reliability testing, statistical and experimental methods, and destructive/non destructive testing. (2-0-4) Prerequisite: ENSC 330.
ENSC 483-4 Modern Control Systems
Analytical representation of the finite dimensional linear systems, analysis and design of linear feedback control systems based on the state space model, and state/output feedback. subjects include: review of the linear spaces and operators, mathematical modelling, state space representation and canonical forms, controllability, observability, realization of transfer function, and solution of the state equation. Applications include: stability concepts and definitions. Lyapunov's Direct Method, design of the state and output feedback control systems, eigenspectrum assignment, and state estimator design. (3-0-2) Prerequisite: ENSC 383.
ENSC 488-4 Introduction to Robotics
Fundamentals of robotics: mathematical representation of kinematics, dynamics and compliance. Planning and execution of robot trajectories. Feedback from the environment: use of sensors and machine vision. A brief introduction to robot languages. Different application domains for manipulator robots, e.g., assembly, manufacturing, etc. (3-0-2) Prerequisite: ENSC 383. Recommended: ENSC 230 is strongly recommended for Systems Option students.
ENSC 489-4 Computer Aided Design and Manufacturing
Survey of methods for computer aided design and manufacturing (CAD/CAM), including experience with basic systems in the laboratory component of the course. The student will be introduced to computer integrated manufacturing and flexible manufacturing systems concepts. The use of finite element modelling and analysis will be presented through examples from thermal studies as well as mechanical stress analysis. Issues in constructing and using integrated CAD/CAM in a production environment will be discussed. Emphasis will be on the use of such techniques in light industry, particularly related to electronics manufacturing. The Quick Chip facility will be available for student projects, as well as a manufacturing cell consisting of several robots and computer control systems. (3-0-2) Prerequisite: ENSC 281 or 380 or 382.
ENSC 491-1 Special Project Laboratory
This course is intended for students wishing to pursue laboratory research on a specific syllabu outside the standard course offerings. Each student must be sponsored by a faculty member who will oversee the project. A proposal of the student's special project must be submitted to the school at least one month prior to the start of the semester in which the course will be taken. The credit value of the project will be assessed during this review phase and the student will be directed to register in the appropriate course. Upon completion of a special project laboratory course, the student must submit a copy of the `deliverables' to the chair of the undergraduate curriculum committee. Prerequisite: permission of the undergraduate curriculum committee chair.
ENSC 492-2 Special Project Laboratory
This course is intended for students wishing to pursue laboratory research on a specific syllabu outside the standard course offerings. Each student must be sponsored by a faculty member who will oversee the project. A proposal of the student's special project must be submitted to the school at least one month prior to the start of the semester in which the course will be taken. The credit value of the project will be assessed during this review phase and the student will be directed to register in the appropriate course. Upon completion of a special project laboratory course, the student must submit a copy of the `deliverables' to the chair of the undergraduate curriculum committee. Prerequisite: permission of the undergraduate curriculum committee chair.
ENSC 493-3 Special Project Laboratory
This course is intended for students wishing to pursue laboratory research on a specific syllabu outside the standard course offerings. Each student must be sponsored by a faculty member who will oversee the project. A proposal of the student's special project must be submitted to the school at least one month prior to the start of the semester in which the course will be taken. The credit value of the project will be assessed during this review phase and the student will be directed to register in the appropriate course. Upon completion of a special project laboratory course, the student must submit a copy of the `deliverables' to the chair of the undergraduate curriculum committee. Prerequisite: permission of the undergraduate curriculum committee chair.
ENSC 494-4 Special Project Laboratory
This course is intended for students wishing to pursue laboratory research on a specific syllabu outside the standard course offerings. Each student must be sponsored by a faculty member who will oversee the project. A proposal of the student's special project must be submitted to the school at least one month prior to the start of the semester in which the course will be taken. The credit value of the project will be assessed during this review phase and the student will be directed to register in the appropriate course. Upon completion of a special project laboratory course, the student must submit a copy of the `deliverables' to the chair of the undergraduate curriculum committee. Prerequisite: permission of the undergraduate curriculum committee chair.
ENSC 495-4 Introduction to Microelectronic Fabrication
This provides an introduction to the practice and theory of semiconductor integrated circuit fabrication. The practical area will be covered in lectures and reinforced with laboratory experience where the students will manufacture diodes, transistors and small circuits. Major areas covered will be: clean room technology and economics, silicon wafer production, thermal oxidation, photolithography, thin film deposition (evaporation, sputtering, chemical vapor deposition, epitaxy), etching (wet, plasma, sputtering, reactive ion), diffusion, ion implantation, multi-layer conductor technology, packaging, device yields, plus examples in CMOS and bipolar IC's. This course is directed at any student with a basic background in transistor operation and is also an optional course for those in engineering physics. (2-0-4) Prerequisite: ENSC 222 or 225.
ENSC 498-3 Engineering Science Thesis Proposal
The student's time in this course is devoted to supervised study, research and development and work leading to a formal proposal for the project work in ENSC 499. This activity can be directly augmented by other course work and by directed study. The locale of the work may be external to the University or within a University laboratory, or may bridge the two locations. Supervision may be by the company sponsoring the internship or by faculty members, or through some combination. A plan for the student's ENSC 498 activities must be submitted to the school at least one month prior to the start of the semester in which the course will be taken. Preparation of the undergraduate thesis project proposal is the formal requirement of this course and the basis upon which it is graded. Grading will be on a pass/fail basis. Prerequisite: at least 115 credits or permission of the academic supervisor.
ENSC 499-9 Engineering Science Undergraduate Thesis
A thesis is based on the research, development and engineering project undertaken in the student's Co-operative Education Program. Registration for ENSC 499 takes place in the semester in which the thesis will be presented and defended. Formal approval of the syllabu by the School of Engineering Science is given by the granting of the grade of pass for ENSC 498. The locale of the work, supervision and other arrangements follow those for ENSC 498. Grading of the thesis will be on a pass/fail basis, but recognition will be given to outstanding work. Prerequisite: ENSC 498.

English ENGL

Faculty of Arts

Course outlines for all courses vary each semester. Check at the Department of English general office. ENGL 101, 102, 103 and 104 examine selected works of literature in order to develop a critical awareness of literary techniques and contexts in the representation of experience. Each course may include the comparative study of works in related literary and artistic genres, and will pay some attention to literature of the 20th century. Each course includes attention to writing skills.
ENGL 101-3 Introduction to Fiction
ENGL 102-3 Introduction to Poetry
ENGL 103-3 Introduction to Drama
ENGL 104-3 Introduction to Prose Genres
The literary study of a variety of prose genres, such as the essay, biography, autobiography, travel narrative, and journalistic writing. May include works which challenge the boundary between fiction and non-fiction.
ENGL 105-3 Introduction to Issues in Literature and Culture
An introduction to the study of literature within the wider cultural field, with a focus on contemporary issues across genres and media.
ENGL 199-3 Introduction to University Writing
An introduction to practicing and writing in the academic disciplines. Prerequisite: 12 university credit hours.
ENGL 204-3 Medieval and Renaissance Literature
The study of literary works from the Old English, Middle English and Renaissance periods. Prerequisite: two 100 division English courses.
ENGL 205-3 Seventeenth and Eighteenth Century Literatures in English
The study of literary works from the Jacobean, Commonwealth, Restoration and eighteenth century periods. May include some writing from North America. Prerequisite: two 100 division English courses.
ENGL 206-3 Nineteenth Century Literatures in English
The study of literary works from the Romantic period to the beginning of Modernism. May include some writing from North America. Prerequisite: two 100 division English courses.
ENGL 207-3 Twentieth Century Literatures in English
The study of literary works of the twentieth century. May include Canadian, British, American, and other literatures. Prerequisite: two 100 division English courses.
ENGL 210-3 Advanced University Writing
Advanced study of writing in the scholarly genres in a variety of academic disciplines. Prerequisite: 24 university credit hours; ENGL 199 or permission of the department.
ENGL 212-3 Introduction to the Study of Language
An introduction to grammatical, stylistic and discursive features of the English language. Prerequisite: two 100 division English courses.
ENGL 214-3 Introduction to the Study of Rhetoric
An introduction to the principles of rhetoric, with special attention to those germane to the study of practicing and writing. Prerequisite: two 100 division English courses.
ENGL 216-3 Introduction to Critical Approaches to Literature
An introduction to critical approaches to literature, with an emphasis on the application of theoretical perspectives to selected literary texts. Prerequisite: two 100 division English courses.
ENGL 300-4 Old English I: Introductory Old English
The study of the basics of the Old English language and the practicing of several texts of relative simplicity. Prerequisite: two 100 division English courses, and two 200 division English courses, one of which must be ENGL 204 or 205.
ENGL 301-4 Old English II: Advanced Old English
Intensive study of several Old English poems. Prerequisite: ENGL 300, and two 100 division English courses, and two 200 division English courses, one of which must be ENGL 204 or 205.
ENGL 304-4 Studies in Medieval Literature
Studies of medieval authors, genres or issues, from 500-1500. Texts will be studied in the original language or in translation. Prerequisite: two 100 division English courses, and two 200 division English courses, one of which must be ENGL 204 or 205.
ENGL 306-4 Chaucer
The intensive study of selected works by Geoffrey Chaucer, read in the language in which they were written and situated in the context of 14th century European culture. Some course time will be dedicated to the study of the Middle English language. Prerequisite: two 100 division English courses, and two 200 division English courses, one of which must be ENGL 204 or 205.
ENGL 308-4 Studies in Renaissance Non-Dramatic Literature
The study of selected works of Renaissance poetry and prose written in English, and situated in their cultural context. Prerequisite: two 100 division English courses, and two 200 division English courses, one of which must be ENGL 204 or 205.
ENGL 310-4 Studies in Drama to 1642
The study of selected dramatic works written in English prior to the closing of the theatres in 1642. May be organized by various critical approaches or issues. Prerequisite: two 100 division English courses, and two 200 division English courses, one of which must be ENGL 204 or 205.
ENGL 311-4 Early Shakespeare
An intensive study of the early works of William Shakespeare, particularly the history of comedy plays, situated in the context of Elizabethan culture. Prerequisite: two 100 division English courses, and two 200 division English courses, one of which must be ENGL 204 or 205. Students may take both ENGL 311 and 313 for credit towards the English major. Students with credit for ENGL 312 may not take this course for further credit without permission of the department.
ENGL 313-4 Late Shakespeare
An intensive study of the later works of William Shakespeare, particularly the tragedies and romances, situated in the context of Jacobean culture. Prerequisite: two 100 division English courses, and two 200 division English courses, one of which must be ENGL 204 or 205. Students may take both ENGL 311 and 313 for credit towards the English major. Students with credit for ENGL 312 may not take this course for further credit without permission of the department.
ENGL 314-4 Studies in Seventeenth Century Literature
The study of selected works of seventeenth century poetry and prose, situated in their cultural context. May include some writing from North America. Prerequisite: two 100 division English courses, and two 200 division English courses, one of which must be ENGL 204 or 205.
ENGL 316-4 Milton
The intensive study of selected works by John Milton, situated in their cultural context. Prerequisite: two 100 division English courses, and two 200 division English courses, one of which must be ENGL 204 or 205.
ENGL 320-4 Studies in Restoration and Eighteenth Century Literature
The study of selected works of late seventeenth century and eighteenth century literature, with an emphasis on genres other than the novel. May include some writing from outside Britain, and may be organized by various critical issues or approaches. Prerequisite: two 100 division English courses, and two 200 division English courses, one of which must be ENGL 204 or 205.
ENGL 322-4 Studies in the Eighteenth Century British Novel
The study of selected 18th century novels, situated in their cultural context. Prerequisite: two 100 division English courses, and two 200 division English courses, one of which must be ENGL 204 or 205.
ENGL 325-4 Romantic Poetry
The study of selected works by British Romantic poets. May be organized by various critical issues or approaches. Prerequisite: two 100 division English courses, and two 200 division English courses, one of which must be ENGL 204 or 205. Students with credit for ENGL 324 or 326 may not take this course for further credit.
ENGL 327-4 Studies in Romantic Literature
Address issues in Romantic literature in English. May include texts in a variety of genres and be organized according to various critical approaches. Prerequisite: two 100 division English courses, and two 200 division English courses, one of which must be ENGL 204 or 205.
ENGL 329-4 Studies in Nineteenth Century British Literature
The study of selected 19th century works written after the Romantic era, with an emphasis on genres other than the novel. May be organized by various critical issues or approaches. Prerequisite: two 100 division English courses, and two 200 division English courses, one of which must be ENGL 204 or 205.
ENGL 333-4 Studies in the Nineteenth Century British Novel
The study of selected 19th century novels. May be organized by various critical issues or approaches. Prerequisite: two 100 division English courses, and two 200 division English courses, one of which must be ENGL 204 or 205. Students with credit for ENGL 332 or 334 may not take this course for further credit.
ENGL 336-4 Literature of Transition from the Nineteenth to the Twentieth Century
Addresses changes in society, culture and literature from the late nineteenth century to the early 20th century, through a selection of texts organized by various critical issues or approaches. May include Canadian, British, American and other literatures. Prerequisite: two 100 division English courses, and two 200 division English courses, one of which must be ENGL 204 or 205.
ENGL 338-4 Studies in Modernism
Addresses issues in Modernism. May include Canadian, British, American and other literatures. Prerequisite: two 100 division English courses, and two 200 division English courses, one of which must be ENGL 204 or 205.
ENGL 340-4 Twentieth Century British Literature to 1945
The study of selected works of British literature written from 1900 to 1945. May be organized by various critical issues or approaches. Prerequisite: two 100 division English courses, and two 200 division English courses, one of which must be ENGL 204 or 205.
ENGL 342-4 British Literature Since 1945
The study of selected works of British literature written since 1945. May be organized by various critical issues and approaches. Prerequisite: two 100 division English courses, and two 200 division English courses, one of which must be ENGL 204 or 205.
ENGL 347-4 American Literature to 1900
The study of selected works of American literature written before 1900. This course may survey a particular era or topic, and may be organized by various critical issues or approaches. Prerequisite: two 100 division English courses, and two 200 division English courses, one of which must be ENGL 204 or 205. Students with credit for ENGL 344 or 348 may not take this course for further credit.
ENGL 349-4 Studies in American Literature
Addresses issues in American literature. May be organized by various critical issues or approaches. Prerequisite: two 100 division English courses and two 200 division English courses, one of which must be ENGL 204 or 205.
ENGL 350-4 Twentieth Century American Literature to 1945
The study of selected works of American literature written from 1900 to 1945. May be organized by various critical issues or approaches. Prerequisite: two 100 division English courses, and two 200 division English courses, one of which must be ENGL 204 or 205.
ENGL 352-4 American Literature since 1945
The study of selected works of American literature written after 1945. May be organized by various critical issues or approaches. Prerequisite: two 100 division English courses, and two 200 division English courses, one of which must be ENGL 204 or 205.
ENGL 354-4 Canadian Literature to 1920
The study of selected works of Canadian literature written before 1920. Prerequisite: two 100 division English courses, and two 200 division English courses, one of which must be ENGL 204 or 205.
ENGL 357-4 Canadian Literature since 1920
The study of selected works of Canadian literature written after 1920. Prerequisite: two 100 division English courses, and two 200 division English courses, one of which must be ENGL 204 or 205. Students with credit for ENGL 356 or 358 may not take this course for further credit.
ENGL 359-4 Literature of British Columbia
The study of selected works of British Columbian literature. Prerequisite: two 100 division English courses, and two 200 division English courses, one of which must be ENGL 204 or 205.
ENGL 360-4 Studies in Canadian Literature
Addresses issues in Canadian literature. May be organized by various critical issues or approaches. Prerequisite: two 100 division English courses, and two 200 division English courses, one of which must be ENGL 204 or 205.
ENGL 364-4 History and Principles of Literary Criticism
The study of selected works in the history of literary criticism, up to and including modern and contemporary movements in criticism. Prerequisite: two 100 division English courses, and two 200 division English courses, one of which must be ENGL 204 or 205.
ENGL 366-4 Studies in Critical Approaches to Literature
Addresses specific issues or movements in literary criticism, up to and including the current era. Prerequisite: two 100 division English courses, and two 200 division English courses, one of which must be ENGL 204 or 205.
ENGL 368-4 Studies in Drama
The literary study of selected dramatic works. May be organized by various eras, issues or critical approaches. Prerequisite: two 100 division English courses, and two 200 division English courses, one of which must be ENGL 204 or 205.
ENGL 369-4 Studies in Prose Genres
The study of selected texts in such genres as the essay, biography, autobiography, travel narrative and journalistic writing. May include works which challenge the boundary between fiction and non-fiction. Prerequisite: two 100 division English courses, and two 200 division English courses, one of which must be ENGL 204 or 205.
ENGL 370-4 Studies in Language
The study of linguistic, pragmatic and social theories of language. Prerequisite: two 100 division English courses, and two 200 division English courses, one of which must be ENGL 204 or 205.
ENGL 371-4 Writing: Theory and Practice
Students will engage in theoretically informed practice of writing in various non-academic genres. Emphasis will be placed on the kinds of writing that students are likely to use after graduation. Prerequisite: 60 university credit hours; ENGL 210 or permission of the department.
ENGL 375-4 History and Principles of Rhetoric
The advanced study of the history and theory of rhetoric. Prerequisite: two 100 division English courses, and two 200 division English courses, one of which must be ENGL 204 or 205. Recommended: ENGL 214.
ENGL 376-4 Special Studies A
Prerequisite: two 100 division English courses, and two 200 division English courses, one of which must be ENGL 204 or 205.
ENGL 377-4 Special Studies B
Prerequisite: two 100 division English courses, and two 200 division English courses, one of which must be ENGL 204 or 205.
ENGL 378-4 Special Studies C: Single Author
Prerequisite: two 100 division English courses, and two 200 division English courses, one of which must be ENGL 204 or 205.
ENGL 380-4 Literature in Translation
A study of selected texts across world literatures not originally written in English. May include the Bible; may be organized by themes, historical periods, countries of origin, authors, or texts; and may be approached as comparative literature. Prerequisite: two 100 division English courses, and two 200 division English courses, one of which must be ENGL 204 or 205.
ENGL 382-4 Cultural Studies
This course will investigate interconnections between literature and culture through the study of selected texts. May be organized according to particular theoretical approaches, issues or historical periods. Prerequisite: two 100 division English courses, and two 200 division English courses, one of which must be ENGL 204 or 205.
ENGL 383-4 Studies in Fantasy and Popular Literature
This course may concentrate on a genre of fantasy such as the Gothic novel or dystopian fiction, or on various genres associated with popular literature such as the detective novel, the novel of international intrigue, or romance. The works will be considered in relation to literary theory, and may be organized by various different critical issues and approaches. Prerequisite: two 100 division English courses, and two 200 division English courses, one of which must be ENGL 204 or 205. Students with credit for ENGL 363 may not take this course for further credit.
ENGL 387-4 Studies in Children's Literature
The study of selected works of children's literature from different periods and places. The works will be considered in relation to literary theory, and may be organized by different critical issues or approaches. Prerequisite: two 100 division English courses, and two 200 division English courses, one of which must be ENGL 204 or 205. Students with credit for ENGL 367 may not take this course for further credit.
ENGL 392-4 World Literature in English I: Designated by Geographical Region
The study of a selection of literary works in English, mainly from regions other than Canada, Britain and the United States. May include a variety of approaches but will organize texts on the basis of their relation to particular societies and their history. The course may focus on the literature of one or several regions. Prerequisite: two 100 division English courses, and two 200 division English courses, one of which must be ENGL 204 or 205.
ENGL 394-4 World Literature in English II: Designated by Topic
Addresses international literatures in English, selected and organized according to specific topics. As distinct from ENGL 392, this course may be wholly concerned with writing from Canada, Britain and the United States, although it will be distinguished from other courses by its primary focus on such issues as nationalism, post-colonialism and multiculturalism. Prerequisite: two 100 division English courses, and two 200 division English courses, one of which must be ENGL 204 or 205.
ENGL 441-4 Directed Studies A
Prerequisite: two 100 division English courses, and two 200 division English courses, one of which must be ENGL 204 or 205. Admission is by permission of the instructor and the department.
ENGL 442-2 Directed Studies B
Prerequisite: two 100 division English courses, and two 200 division English courses, one of which must be ENGL 204 or 205. Admission is by permission of the instructor and the department.
ENGL 443-4 Directed Studies C
Prerequisite: two 100 division English courses, and two 200 division English courses, one of which must be ENGL 204 or 205. Admission is by permission of the instructor and the department.
ENGL 444-2 Directed Studies D
Prerequisite: two 100 division English courses, and two 200 division English courses, one of which must be ENGL 204 or 205. Admission is by permission of the instructor and the department.
ENGL 445-4 Directed Studies E
Prerequisite: credit or standing in any two of ENGL 101, 102, 103, 104, 105, and 199, and two 200 division English courses, one of which must be ENGL 204 or 205. Admission is by permission of the instructor and the department.
ENGL 446-2 Directed Studies F
Prerequisite: two 100 division English courses, and two 200 division English courses, one of which must be ENGL 204 or 205. Admission is by permission of the instructor and the department.
ENGL 461-0 Practicum I
First semester of work experience in the English Co-operative Education Program. Prerequisite: normally 30 semester hours with a CGPA of 3.0; credit or standing in any two of ENGL 101, 102, 103, 104, 105, and 199, and two 200 division English courses, one of which must be ENGL 204 or 205. Students should apply to the Faculty of Arts co-operative education co-ordinator by the end of the third week of the semester preceding the employment semester.
ENGL 462-0 Practicum II
Second semester of work experience in the English Co-operative Education Program. Prerequisite: successful completion of ENGL 461 and normally 45 semester hours with CGPA of 3.0; credit or standing in any two of ENGL 101, 102, 103, 104, 105, and 199, and two 200 division English courses, one of which must be ENGL 204 or 205.Students should apply to the Faculty of Arts co-operative education co-ordinator by the end of the third week of the semester preceding the employment semester.
ENGL 463-0 Practicum III
Third semester of work experience in the English Co-operative Education Program. Prerequisite: successful completion of ENGL 462 and normally 60 semester hours with CGPA of 3.0; credit or standing in any two of ENGL 101, 102, 103, 104, 105, and 199, and two 200 division English courses, one of which must be ENGL 204 or 205. Students should apply to the Faculty of Arts co-operative education co-ordinator by the end of the third week of the semester preceding the employment semester.
ENGL 464-0 Practicum IV
Fourth semester of work experience in the English Co-operative Education Program. Prerequisite: successful completion of ENGL 463 and normally 75 hours with CGPA of 3.0; credit or standing in any two of ENGL 101, 102, 103, 104, 105, and 199, and two 200 division English courses, one of which must be ENGL 204 or 205. Students should apply to the Faculty of Arts co-operative education co-ordinator by the end of the third week of the semester preceding the employment semester.
ENGL 494-4 Research Seminar for the Honors Graduating Essay
This course is intended for the research and preparation of materials for the honors graduating essay. In addition to regular meetings with their supervisors, students will attend a scheduled research seminar. Prerequisite: two 100 division English courses, and two 200 division English courses, one of which must be ENGL 204 or 205. Open only to students who have been accepted into the honors program. The student must complete this course before taking ENGL 496. Admission is by permission of the instructor and the department.
ENGL 496-4 Honors Graduating Essay
In addition to regular meetings with their supervisors, students will attend a scheduled research seminar. Prerequisite: two 100 division English courses, and two 200 division English courses, one of which must be ENGL 204 or 205. Open only to students who have been accepted into the honors program. Admission is by permission of the instructor and the department.

Environmental Science EVSC

Faculty of Science

EVSC 200-3 Introduction to Environmental Science
Introduction to the multi-disciplinary subject of environmental science. The course is presented in two parts. Basic concepts and application of the scientific method to problems in environmental science are presented in part I. Case studies which highlight the basic concepts covered in part I are presented in part II. (3-1-0) Students with credit for ENPL 200 may not take EVSC 200 for further credit. Recommended: REM 100
EVSC 380-0 Practicum I
First semester of work experience in the Environmental Science Co-operative Education Program. Prerequisite: acceptance in the science co-operative education program.
EVSC 381-0 Practicum II
Second semester of work experience in the Environmental Science Co-operative Education Program. Prerequisite: EVSC 380 and readmission to the science co-operative education program.
EVSC 401-1 Current subjects in Environmental Science
This seminar course will expose students to a variety of speakers who will discuss a wide range of subjects in environmental science. This course is required by all students wishing to graduate with a major in Environmental Science. (2-0-0) Prerequisite: declared major in environmental science; completed third year course requirements of environmental science major.
EVSC 480-0 Practicum III
Third semester of work experience in the Environmental Science Co-operative Education Program. Prerequisite: EVSC 381 and readmission to the science co-operative education program.
EVSC 481-0 Practicum IV
Fourth semester of work experience in the Environmental Science Co-operative Education Program. Prerequisite: EVSC 480 and readmission to the science co-operative education program.
EVSC 482-0 Practicum V
Optional fifth semester of work experience in the Environmental Science Co-operative Education Program. Prerequisite: EVSC 481 and readmission to the science co-operative education program.
EVSC 491-3 Advanced Field Studies in Environmental Science
Apply the theories and methods of environmental science to evaluate quantitatively the environmental impact of an industry on a selected site. The site can vary from year to year. This laboratory course brings together students from all streams of the Environmental Science Program, and the field work will be conducted by small groups of students. (field study) Prerequisite: standing in the environmental science program, with at least 30 upper division credits, or with permission of the program director.

First Nations Studies FNST

Faculty of Arts

FNST 101-3 The Cultures, Languages and Origins of Canada's First Peoples
An introduction to the nature and goals of First Nations studies as an academic discipline; survey of prehistory, traditional cultures and aboriginal languages of Canada's First Nations. (lecture/seminar)
FNST 201-3 Canadian Aboriginal Peoples' Perspectives on History
An examination of fact and ideology in history and historic events involving contact between native and European peoples. The course will also address questions of research methodologies in studying Native/European relations, such as the evaluation of oral history and written ethnohistoric sources. An additional focus will be on gender as it influences perspectives. (lecture/seminar) Pre/corequisite: FNST 101.
FNST 301-3 Issues in Applied First Nations Studies Research
An examination of research strategies and issues involving contemporary First Nations communities. Besides the study of methodology and ethical issues involving research on native peoples, students will critically examine a number of case studies and carry out a small scale research project under the supervision of the instructor. (lecture/seminar) Prerequisite: FNST 101 and 201. Recommended: SA 255 or equivalent lower division research methods course.
FNST 322-3 Special subjects in First Nations Studies
(3-0-0) Prerequisite: will vary according to the topic.
FNST 332-3 Ethnobotany of British Columbia First Nations
This course is an introduction to the study of plant knowledge and use by First Nations peoples in British Columbia. It provides students with information about the role of plants in First Nations' cultures including such areas as foods, medicines, technology, ceremony, ecological indicators, and within First Nations' knowledge and classification systems. Special focus may be placed on the ethnobotany of one or more Aboriginal groups or culture areas. Prerequisite: FNST 101 or by permission of the department.
FNST 401-3 Aboriginal Rights and Government Relations
An examination of First Nations and aboriginal peoples' perspectives on political, social and legal issues involving their rights as first citizens of Canada and North America, and the practical and political relations with various levels of government. Issues examined include: aboriginal rights and title questions, self government models and concepts, constitutional matters, the impact of federal government policies, including their impact on women's lives, and native community and First Nations politics. (lecture/seminar) Prerequisite: FNST 101 and 201. Recommended: POL 221.
FNST 402-3 The Discourse of Native Peoples
Style and content of aboriginal people's discourse about their culture, world view, history and matters affecting their lives. Includes the analysis of selections from native oral literature, autobiography, expository writing, modern poetry and fiction. (lecture/seminar) Prerequisite: FNST 101 and 201.
FNST 403-3 Indigenous Knowledge in the Modern World
This course explores the subject of traditional indigenous knowledge and its contemporary implications for First Nations programs in such areas as economic development, ecotourism, spiritualism, language retention, biodiversity, ethnoscience, environmentalism, and heritage conservation. First Nations perspectives on patents, copyrights, and other creative products from traditional culture will also be examined through lecture, guest speakers and seminar presentation. (lecture/seminar) Prerequisite: FNST 201 or by permission of the department.
FNST 442-3 Directed Readings in First Nations Studies
Directed readings for upper level students in First Nations Studies who wish to study selected subjects in depth. (0-0-0) Prerequisite: nine credit hours in First Nations Studies. Corequisite: permission of an instructor and program chair.

French FREN

Faculty of Arts

FREN 120-3 French for Beginners
An introduction to basic vocabulary, grammatical structures, and speech patterns. Emphasis on oral expression and listening comprehension. Instruction in class and in lab. (0-4-1) Prerequisite: never studied or experienced French before. Students with credit for FREN 099 may not take this course for further credit.
FREN 121-3 Introductory French I
A comprehensive introduction to basic grammatical structures, vocabulary and pronunciation. Emphasis on oral communication skills. Instruction in class and in lab. (0-4-1) Prerequisite: FREN 099 or 120 or less than grade 11 French (or equivalent based on placement test). Students with credit for FREN 100 may not take this course for further credit.
FREN 122-3 Introductory French II
Continuation of FREN 121. Designed to Boost speaking and writing abilities by introducing more complex structures and vocabulary. Instruction in class and in lab. (0-4-1) Prerequisite: FREN 100 or 121 or grade 11 French (or equivalent based on placement test). Students with credit for FREN 101 may not take this course for further credit.
FREN 198-3 French for practicing Knowledge I
For students with little or no background in French who wish to acquire the ability to read periodicals, journals and basic literary and academic texts. May not be taken by students with French 12 or with FREN 151 or 210 or higher (or their equivalents).
FREN 199-3 Writing French I: Spelling and Grammar
An alternative to FREN 211 for francophone students who need practice in elementary grammar, composition and spelling. Offered as a correspondence course only. Prerequisite: fluency in French. Students will be accepted only after an interview (which may be by telephone) with a faculty member in the Department of French. Students may not get credit for both FREN 201 or 211 and 199.
FREN 210-3 Intermediate French I
Designed to consolidate and expand knowledge of the language. Strong emphasis on oral expression and listening comprehension to develop communicative skills. Instruction in class and in lab. (0-4-1) Prerequisite: FREN 101 or 122 or grade 12 French (or equivalent based on placement test). May not be taken by students from French immersion, programme cadre or IB students. Students with credit for FREN 151 may not take this course for further credit.
FREN 211-3 Intermediate French II
Designed to Boost listening and practicing comprehension. Emphasis on accuracy in oral and written communication. Instruction in class and in lab. (0-4-1) Prerequisite: grade 12 French with a grade of A or FREN 151 or 210 (or equivalent based on placement test). May not be taken by FREN 212 or 216 students. Students with credit for FREN 201 may not take this course for further credit.
FREN 212-3 French for Immersion Program Students
Designed for French immersion program students who wish to refine their oral and written language competence. Instruction in class and in lab. (0-4-1) Prerequisite: for French immersion program students or those who have studied in a Francophone milieu. Placement test required. Students with credit for FREN 201 or 211 or 216 may not take this course for further credit.
FREN 215-3 Intermediate French: Oral Practice
Designed to develop listening comprehension and oral expression. Instruction in class and in lab. (0-4-1) Prerequisite: FREN 201 or 211. May be taken concurrently with FREN 212. Students with credit for FREN 205, 300 or 330 may not take this course for further credit.
FREN 217-3 French Pronunciation
Designed to Boost pronunciation. Instruction in class and in lab. (0-4-1) Prerequisite: FREN 201 or 211. May be taken concurrently with FREN 212. Students with credit for FREN 312 may not take this course for further credit.
FREN 221-3 French Writing I
A practicing and writing course with emphasis on vocabulary and logical structure in written expression. Instruction in class, in lab and online. (0-4-1) Prerequisite: FREN 201 or 211, or FREN 212 or 216, or with a grade of A, FREN 151 or 210. In the latter case, FREN 211 and 221 may be taken concurrently. Students with credit for FREN 202 may not take this course for further credit.
FREN 222-3 French Writing II
Focusing on grammar and grammatical analysis, and the process of writing. Instruction in class, in lab and online. (0-4-1) Prerequisite: FREN 202 or 221, or, with a grade of A, FREN 201 or 211, or, with a grade of A, FREN 212 or 216. Students with credit for FREN 206 may not take this course for further credit.
FREN 225-3 subjects in French Language
The syllabu will vary: French for Business, French for Professional Purposes, Practice in Translation, or French and the Media. (0-3-0) Prerequisite: FREN 206 or 222 (or equivalent based on placement test). Students with credit for FREN 220 may not take this course for further credit.
FREN 230-3 Introduction to French-Canadian Literature
This will serve to introduce the student to French Canadian thought through literature and the arts. The course will be conducted in French. (lecture/tutorial) Prerequisite: any one of FREN 206, 222, 299 or 301.
FREN 240-3 Introduction to French Literature: Modern French Literature
This will serve to introduce the student to French contemporary thought through literature. This course will be conducted in French; the object is to acquire a practicing facility and a critical appreciation of modern French literature. (lecture/tutorial) Prerequisite: any one of FREN 206, 222, 299 or 301.
FREN 270-3 Introduction to French Linguistics I
An introduction to the phonetics of French and to the linguistic concepts upon which phonological and morphological descriptions of French are based. (lecture/tutorial) Prerequisite: FREN 206 or 222, or FREN 301.
FREN 299-3 Writing French II: Intermediate Composition
An intermediate composition course to help students with the techniques of writing essays in French, both at the grammar level and at the composition level. (distance education) Prerequisite: FREN 199 with C+ minimum or 202. May be taken concurrently with other French courses at the 200 or 300 level except by students who are taking or have completed FREN 301. Does not count towards the requirements for French minor, major, honors or certificate programs.
FREN 300-3 Advanced French: Oral Practice
Designed to develop ability in oral expression. Instruction in class and in lab. (0-3-1) Prerequisite: FREN 206 or 222 or, with a grade of A and permission of instructor, FREN 205 or 215.
FREN 301-3 Advanced French Composition
A writing course to Boost organization and argumentation, paragraph structures and lexical accuracy. Instruction in class and online. (lecture/tutorial) Prerequisite: FREN 206 or 222, or, with a grade of A, FREN 202 or 221.
FREN 304-3 Advanced French Grammar
Continuation of FREN 222, with emphasis on grammatical analysis. Instruction in class and online. (0-3-1) Prerequisite: FREN 206 or 222 (or equivalent based on placement test). Students with credit for FREN 302 may not take this course for further credit.
FREN 307-3 French Vocabulary
Designed to expand vocabulary and optimize the use of dictionaries and electronic language resources. Instruction in class and in lab. Prerequisite: FREN 206 or 222. Students with credit for FREN 311 may not take this course for further credit.
FREN 320-3 Field School: Special subjects in French I
Selected studies in French language, linguistics, literature or civilization. (1-2-4) Prerequisite: FREN 206 or 222, and FREN 230 or 240, and 270. May be taken only by field school participants. Corequisite: FREN 321, 322.
FREN 321-3 Field School: Special subjects in French II
Selected studies in French language, linguistics, literature or civilization. (3-0-4) Prerequisite: FREN 206 or 222, and FREN 230 or 240, and FREN 270. May be taken only by field school participants. Corequisite: FREN 320, 322
FREN 322-3 Field School: Special subjects in French III
Selected studies in French language, linguistics, literature or civilization. (3-0-4) Prerequisite: FREN 206 or 222, and FREN 230 or 240, and FREN 270. May be taken only by field school participants. Corequisite: FREN 320, 321.
FREN 330-3 Francophone World
A multidisciplinary analysis of socio-cultural aspects of French speaking countries, involving written work and oral participation. Prerequisite: FREN 206 or 222 or permission of instructor.
FREN 342-4 Literature in Translation from the Francophone World
A study of representative and significant works (from one or more French speaking countries) from literature and cinema originally produced in French in their socio-cultural context. (2-2-0) Prerequisite: knowledge of French is not required; two courses in literature. This course does not count towards the degree requirements for an extended minor, major or honors in French. With permission of the Department of English, may count towards the requirements of an English major or honors.
FREN 360-4 Intermediate French Literature
Introduction to critical analysis based on the study of texts from the Middle Ages to the 19th century. (0-4-0) Prerequisite: FREN 230 or 240.
FREN 370-4 Introduction to French Linguistics II
An introduction to the fundamental concepts and techniques used in the linguistic analysis of the morphosyntax, lexicology and semantics of French. (seminar) Prerequisite: FREN 270.
FREN 410-3 French Stylistics
Introduction to the application of linguistic concepts, pragmatics, discourse analysis, translation theory to the study of a variety of French texts. (seminar) Prerequisite: all of FREN 301, 360 and 370. Students with credit for FREN 406 may not take this course for further credit.
FREN 411-3 Aspects of French Morphology
Analysis of selected subjects of the morphological system of modern French. (seminar) Prerequisite: FREN 301 and 370.
FREN 412-3 Aspects of French Syntax
Analysis of selected grammatical problems in French syntax. (seminar) Prerequisite: FREN 301 and 370.
FREN 413-3 Aspects of French Phonetics and Phonology
Analysis of selected subjects of the sound system of modern French. (seminar) Prerequisite: FREN 301 and 370.
FREN 415-3 Aspects of French Semantics and Lexicology
Study of diachronic and synchronic organization of semantic and lexical fields. Formation and evolution of French vocabulary. (seminar) Prerequisite: FREN 301 and 370. Students with credit for FREN 420 may not take this course for further credit.
FREN 416-3 French Applied Linguistics
This course studies the applications of various branches of linguistics to the problem of second language acquisition and the teaching of French as a second language. (seminar) Prerequisite: FREN 301 and 370. Students with credit for FREN 310 may not take this course for further credit.
FREN 423-3 subjects in the History of French
Studies of selected subjects in French historical linguistics. Subject matter may include external history, history of sound changes, morphological and syntactic changes. (seminar) Prerequisite: FREN 301 and 370. Students with credit for FREN 407 and/or 408 may not take this course for further credit.
FREN 424-3 subjects in French Linguistics
The subject matter will vary according to faculty and student interests. Selected aspects of French linguistic theories as they apply to the study, teaching and/or learning of French. (seminar) Prerequisite: FREN 301 and 370. Students with credit for FREN 414 may not take this course for further credit.
FREN 425-3 subjects in the Varieties of French
Study of selected subjects in French dialectal variation. Subject matter may include, but is not limited to, French Dialects, Canadian French and French Creoles. (seminar) Prerequisite: FREN 301 and 370. Students with credit for FREN 421 and/or 422 may not take this course for further credit.
FREN 430-3 The French-Canadian Novel and Theatre
(seminar) Prerequisite: FREN 301 and 360.
FREN 461-3 French Medieval Literature
Medieval French literature with special emphasis on a genre, on an author, or on a region. (seminar) Prerequisite: FREN 301 and 360.
FREN 462-3 French Renaissance Literature
A study of French Renaissance works and literary genres in their historical and cultural contexts. (seminar) Prerequisite: FREN 301 and 360.
FREN 463-3 Literature of the Seventeenth Century
(seminar) Prerequisite: FREN 301 and 360.
FREN 465-3 Literature of the 18th Century
(seminar) Prerequisite: FREN 301 and 360.
FREN 467-3 Romanticism
(seminar) Prerequisite: FREN 301 and 360.
FREN 470-3 Realism to Naturalism
(seminar) Prerequisite: FREN 301 and 360.
FREN 472-3 The Contemporary Theatre
(seminar) Prerequisite: FREN 301 and 360.
FREN 474-3 French Poetry
(seminar) Prerequisite: FREN 301 and 360.
FREN 475-3 The Contemporary Novel
(seminar) Prerequisite: FREN 301 and 360.
FREN 476-3 Interdisciplinary Approaches in French Literature
A study of French and francophone literature from an interdisciplinary point of view. subjects will vary to include different disciplines: history, cultural studies, gender studies, psychology or the study of the relationships between literature and other media, i.e. cinema. (seminar) Prerequisite: FREN 301 and 360.
FREN 480-2 Seminar I
Study in depth of an area covered by a French literature or linguistics course in the 400 division. (tutorial) Prerequisite: FREN 230 or 240, and FREN 360; or FREN 301 and FREN 306 or 370, or by permission of the course chair. To be taken in conjunction with a 400 division course in French linguistics or literature.
FREN 491-3 Readings in French Linguistics and/or Literary Criticism
Guided readings in selected topics. May only be taken during the last semesters of study; required as a preparation for the honors essay but may be taken by other students with consent of the instructor. Students with credit for FREN 409 may not take this course for further credit.
FREN 492-3 Honors Essay
Candidates for honors will be required to submit a major paper on a syllabu of a comprehensive nature in literature or linguistics to be approved by the course chair. (seminar) Prerequisite: FREN 491 and at least nine 400 division courses in French literature and/or French linguistics.

Gender Studies GDST

Faculty of Arts

GDST 200-3 Thinking About Gender
An introduction to the major critical debates on gender from an interdisciplinary and cross-cultural perspective. subjects include the construction and regulation of gender and the relation between gender and ideologies of sexuality, race, class and nation.

General Studies GS

Faculty of Arts

GS 420-429-3,4,5 Selected subjects for Integrated Studies
These selected subjects are offered only through integrated studies programs within the Bachelor of General Studies degree. They explore fields of professional practice through interdisciplinary approaches not available in regular academic departments. Prerequisite: admission to an integrated studies program.

Geography GEOG

Faculty of Arts

GEOG 100-3 Human Geography
This course introduces the basic systematic approaches in the study of contemporary human geography including the distribution of population, spatial aspects of economic, cultural and political development, landscape and resource study. (lecture)
GEOG 102-3 World Problems in Geographic Perspective
Current world-scale problems are examined in their regional and global contexts, with emphasis being placed on the importance of dynamics of the natural environment in human affairs. (lecture/tutorial)
GEOG 111-3 Physical Geography
An introduction to landforms, climates, soils and vegetation; their origins, distributions, interrelationships and roles in the ecosystem. Laboratory work and field trips are included. (lecture/laboratory)
GEOG 162-3 Canada
The geographical character of Canada; the Canadian environment; regional differences in socio-economic growth. (lecture/tutorial)
GEOG 213-3 Geomorphology I
An examination of landforms, processes, laws, and theories of development; types and distributions. (lecture/laboratory) Prerequisite: GEOG 111 or EASC 101.
GEOG 214-3 Climatology I
A review of the basic principles and processes involved in physical and dynamic climatology, with particular emphasis on global distributions and change. (lecture/laboratory) Prerequisite: GEOG 111.
GEOG 215-3 Biogeography
An examination of the abiotic and biotic factors that control the distribution and development of plant communities, including climatic and geological change. (lecture/laboratory) Prerequisite: GEOG 111. Students granted credit for GEOG 215 may not be granted credit for BISC 204.
GEOG 221-3 Economic Geography
The basic concepts of economic geography, involving consideration of the spatial organization and development of economic and resource based systems. (lecture/tutorial) Prerequisite: GEOG 100.
GEOG 241-3 Social Geography
Systematic consideration of the spatial and environmental bases of societies, in historical and cultural perspective. (lecture/tutorial) Prerequisite: GEOG 100.
GEOG 250-3 Cartography I
An introduction to the interpretation of maps and air photographs. (lecture/laboratory) Prerequisite: GEOG 100 or 221 or 241; and 111.
GEOG 251-3 Quantitative Geography
An introduction to basic quantitative methods and software for the solution of geographic problems. subjects include spatial data measurements, central tendency measures, simple probability theory and distributions, inferential methods, and correlation analysis. (lecture/laboratory) Prerequisite: GEOG 100 or 221 or 241; and 111.
GEOG 253-3 Aerial Photographic Interpretation
Uses of aerial photography and air photo interpretation in geography. The course is divided into four sections: (1) technical background regarding aerial photography and photo interpretation; (2) air photo interpretation and mapping; (3) application of air photo interpretation; and (4) introduction to remote sensing. (lecture/laboratory) Prerequisite: GEOG 100 or 221 or 241; and 111.
GEOG 255-3 Geographic Information Science I
A basic overview of Geographical Information Systems and Science; GIS software, hardware, data structures and models; spatial data, operations and algorithms; practical applications and limitations. (lecture/laboratory) Prerequisite: GEOG 100 or 111 or permission of instructor. Students with credit for GEOG 354 may not take this course for further credit.
GEOG 261-3 Introduction to Urban Geography
This course will introduce basic concepts in the study of urban geography by systematically identifying and examining major components of urban structure. (lecture) Prerequisite: GEOG 100 or 102 or 30 credit hours.
GEOG 263-3 Selected Regions
A study of the geographical character of a major world region. (lecture/tutorial) Prerequisite: at least nine credit hours. This course may not be counted more than once toward a degree.
GEOG 264-3 Canadian Cities
This course will provide a systematic introduction to urbanization in Canada. subjects addressed will include Canadian urbanization as compared with other nations, especially the United States, metropolitan centres, resource towns, and the internal structure of cities. (lecture/tutorial) Prerequisite: GEOG 100 or 162 or permission of instructor.
GEOG 265-3 Geography of British Columbia
An examination of the physical landscape, the migration process, resource exploitation and the development of the settlement patterns. (lecture/tutorial) Prerequisite: at least nine credit hours.
GEOG 301-4 Geographic Ideas and Methodology
A study of contemporary geographical concepts in historical perspective. The course will examine traditional approaches to the subject matter of geography, giving particular attention to present day methodological debate and foci of interest. (lecture/seminar) Prerequisite: completion of 30 credit hours, including 15 in geography.
GEOG 302-0 Geography Practicum I
This is the first semester of work experience in a co-operative education program available to students who plan to pursue a career in geography or related areas. Prerequisite: completion of the requirements for acceptance into the Science and Environment co-operative education program. Students in the BA program and the BSc program should apply to the Science and Environment co-operative education program. Applications are due by the end of the third week of the preceding semester.
GEOG 303-0 Geography Practicum II
This is the second semester of work experience in the Geography Co-operative Education Program. Prerequisite: GEOG 302 and acceptance by the Science and Environment co-operative education program. Students should apply to a co-op co-ordinator in the Science and Environment co-op program by the end of the third week of the preceding semester.
GEOG 311-4 Hydrology I
Introduction to the hydrologic cycle, with an emphasis on the hydrology of British Columbia; description and analysis of the processes of water movement and storage; effects of climatic variations and land use on the hydrologic cycle. (lecture/laboratory) Prerequisite: GEOG 213 or 214; STAT 101 or 270 or 201 or GEOG 251; PHYS 100 or 101 or 120; or permission of the instructor.
GEOG 312-4 Geography of Natural Hazards
An introduction to the occurrence and origin of natural hazards such as volcanic eruptions, landslides, etc. Interaction between the relevant natural processes and society will be examined, as well as prediction of natural events and the amelioration of the effects of such events within different cultural contexts. (lecture/tutorial) Prerequisite: GEOG 111 or EASC 101. Students with credit for GEOG 212 may not take this course for further credit.
GEOG 313-4 Geomorphology II
Intermediate analysis in fluvial and coastal geomorphology with particular reference to British Columbia. (lecture/laboratory) Prerequisite: GEOG 213.
GEOG 314-4 Climatology II
An introduction to atmospheric science with emphasis on processes in the boundary layer; examination of the radiation, energy and water balances; description and analysis of heat and mass transfer. (lecture/laboratory) Prerequisite: GEOG 214 or permission of instructor. Recommended: MATH 151 and 152 or MATH 154 and 155 or MATH 157 and 158.
GEOG 315-4 Regional Ecosystems
Physical and biological characteristics of regional ecosystems; historical evolution of biomes, management of biotic resources. (lecture/seminar) Prerequisite: GEOG 215 or BISC 204.
GEOG 316-4 Ecosystem Biogeochemistry
Introduction to the cycling of essential chemical elements through ecosystems. Interactions among biological, hydrological, and geological controls on the structure and function of ecosystems and the spatial-temporal scales of elemental cycling are emphasized. Environmental problems resulting from disturbance to natural equilibria in the elemental cycles are examined. (lecture/laboratory) Prerequisite: GEOG 215 or BISC 204 or permission of the instructor.
GEOG 317-4 Soil Science I
An introduction to the study of soils: physical, chemical and biological properties of soils; soil formation, description, classification, survey and use. Field and laboratory techniques of soil analysis. (lecture/laboratory) Prerequisite: GEOG 111 and one of GEOG 213, 214, 215, CHEM 121.
GEOG 322-4 World Resources
An analysis of the use and development of natural resources from a geographic, economic and institutional perspective. (lecture/tutorial) Prerequisite: at least 30 credit hours including GEOG 221.
GEOG 323-4 The Dynamics of Industrial Location and Regional Development
An examination of the factors affecting industrial location and the geographic organization of production systems within and among firms from the perspectives of national, regional and urban development. (lecture/tutorial) Prerequisite: GEOG 221.
GEOG 324-4 Geography of Transportation
An empirical and theoretical examination of the geographical aspects of transportation systems. (lecture/tutorial) Prerequisite: GEOG 221 and 241.
GEOG 325-4 Geography of Service Activities
Central place theory, marketing and retail location, urban economic base, land use models, and tourism. (lecture/tutorial) Prerequisite: GEOG 221 or 261.
GEOG 327-4 Geography of Tourism and Outdoor Recreation
Factors underlying the changing geography of tourism and outdoor recreation. Issues of demand, supply and impact are examined. (lecture/tutorial) Prerequisite: GEOG 221 or 241, or permission of the instructor.
GEOG 351-4 Cartography and Visualization
Elements of cartographic analysis, design and visualization, with an emphasis on digital mapping, animation techniques, cartographic software and internet mapping. (lecture/laboratory) Prerequisite: GEOG 255.
GEOG 352-4 Spatial Analysis
Advanced quantitative techniques for spatial analysis of geographic data and patterns. subjects include geostatistics, spatial interpolation, autocorrelation, kriging, and their use in geographic problem solving with spatial analysis software. (lecture/laboratory) Prerequisite: GEOG 251 or STAT 270 or 201.
GEOG 353-4 Remote Sensing
Applied remote sensing and image analysis. subjects include air photo interpretation, multispectral and color photography, thermal imagery, multispectral scanners, microwave applications, satellite imagery. The relation of remote sensing information and Geographic Information Systems is discussed. Digital interpretation and photogrammetric analysis will be emphasized. (lecture/laboratory) Prerequisite: GEOG 253.
GEOG 355-4 Geographical Information Science II
An examination of technical components of GIS. subjects include spatial representations, generalization and data management; computational algebra and set theory; digital surfaces and terrain models. (lecture/laboratory) Prerequisite: GEOG 255.
GEOG 356-4 Cognitive Cartography
Analyses the map-user interface, the basic perceptual and cognitive processes used by the map reader, and the principles of design and presentation which lead to effective map use. (lecture/seminar) Prerequisite: GEOG 250 or 253.
GEOG 362-4 Geography of Urban Development
This course will apply the principles of urban geographical analysis to the study of urbanization as exemplified in the development of cities in Europe and North America. (lecture/tutorial) Prerequisite: at least 30 credit hours including either GEOG 241 or 261.
GEOG 369-4 Human Microgeography
An examination of human interaction with physical environment, focusing on the individual as the unit of analysis, with special emphasis upon designed environments. A series of field studies will be required of each student. (lecture/seminar) Prerequisite: GEOG 241.
GEOG 375-4 Historical Geography I
Geographical factors in the settlement of Canada and the United States; the role of the frontier; and geographic factors in the changing nature of the perception of resources. (lecture/seminar) Prerequisite: GEOG 241.
GEOG 381-4 Political Geography
Theoretical approaches to problems of the interactions of political decisions and power structures with territorial organization. (lecture/tutorial) Prerequisite: GEOG 241.
GEOG 382-4 Population Geography
A study of the application of theories of population growth and demographic techniques; a consideration of the implications of these on the distribution and evolution of population in selected areas. (lecture/tutorial) Prerequisite: GEOG 221.
GEOG 383-4 Regional Development and Planning I
Theories and concepts of regional development and planning in the advanced capitalist and third worlds; methods of spatial analysis. (lecture/tutorial) Prerequisite: GEOG 221 and 241.
GEOG 385-4 Agriculture and the Environment
An examination of the relationship between agricultural production systems and the biophysical environment, with emphasis on the origins of, and potential solutions to, agri-environmental degradation. (lecture/tutorial) Prerequisite: GEOG 221.
GEOG 386-4 Geography, Health and Health Care
An introduction to the study of health and health care issues from a geographic perspective covering: major spatial influences shaping the health status of populations, the distribution of disease, and the delivery of health care services. (lecture/tutorial) Prerequisite: GEOG 241 or GERO 300 or SA 218.
GEOG 387-4 Geography and Gender
An examination of how gender difference interacts with spatial and environmental factors including the natural and built environments and rural and urban landscapes. (lecture/tutorial) Prerequisite: GEOG 241.
GEOG 389-4 Human Ecology: Human Relations to Nature
An examination of concepts and theories relating to the way human populations are shaped by, and shape, their biophysical environments in subsistence, dualistic and capitalist societies. For the last focus, attention is directed to the origins of contemporary environmental degradation and the capacity of various `green' philosophies to amend current human-environment relations. (lecture/tutorial) Prerequisite: GEOG 221 or EVSC 200 (formerly ENPL 200).
GEOG 402-0 Geography Practicum III
This is the third semester of work experience in the Geography Co-operative Education Program. Prerequisite: GEOG 303 and acceptance by the Science and Environment co-operative education program. Students should apply to a co-op co-ordinator in the Science and Environment co-op program by the end of the third week of the preceding semester.
GEOG 403-0 Geography Practicum IV
This is the last semester of work experience in the Geography Co-operative Education Program. Prerequisite: GEOG 402 and acceptance by the Science and Environment co-operative education program. Students should apply to a co-op co-ordinator in the Science and Environment co-op program by the end of the third week of the preceding semester.
GEOG 404-2 Directed Readings
Designed for upper level geography major and honors students who wish to continue research started in conjunction with an earlier course. Prerequisite: permission to enter directed readings courses requires written consent of both the faculty member willing to supervise the research, and the chair of the department.
GEOG 405-4 Directed Readings
Designed for upper level geography major and honors students who wish to continue research started in conjunction with an earlier course. Prerequisite: permission to enter directed readings courses requires written consent of both the faculty member willing to supervise the research, and the chair of the department.
GEOG 409-0 Geography Practicum V
This is an optional semester of work experience in the Geography Co-operative Education Program. Prerequisite: GEOG 403 and acceptance by the Science and Environment co-operative education program. Students should apply to a co-op co-ordinator in the Science and Environment co-op program by the end of the third week of the preceding semester.
GEOG 411-4 Hydrology II
An examination of hydrologic processes via experimental and observational studies; measurement and analysis of hydrologic data; application of hydrologic models; latest research developments in selected sub-fields of hydrology. (lecture/laboratory) Prerequisite: one of GEOG 311, 313, or 314; one of GEOG 251, STAT 101, 102 or 203 (formerly 103).
GEOG 412-4 Glacial Processes and Environments
A critical evaluation of glacial processes and environments; application of field techniques. (Lecture/Field Work) Prerequisite: GEOG 313; EASC 201 recommended. Students who completed GEOG 412 prior to fall 1996 may also take this course for credit.
GEOG 413-4 Geomorphology III
Advanced treatment of subjects in glacial and fluvial geomorphology with emphasis on current research problems. (lecture/laboratory) Prerequisite: GEOG 313.
GEOG 414-4 Climatology III
An examination of latest advances in climatology and application of atmospheric process models. (lecture/laboratory) Prerequisite: GEOG 314.
GEOG 415-4 Advanced Biogeography
A survey of advanced biogeographic theory, and techniques of vegetation analysis. The application of these theories and techniques to biotic resources management is also examined. (lecture/seminar) Prerequisite: GEOG 315.
GEOG 416-4 Pleistocene Geography
An examination of the physical geomorphic, pedologic and biotic processes and evidence from human geography of the period will be studied as they affect landscape changes. (lecture/seminar) Prerequisite: one of GEOG 213, 214, 215, 317.
GEOG 417-4 Soil Science II
Advanced treatment of subjects in soil science: soil physics, soil chemistry, soil biology, soil classification and/or forest soils. (lecture/laboratory) Prerequisite: GEOG 317.
GEOG 420-4 Comparative Cultural Geography
A comparative study of selected world cultures and landscapes in the light of latest theoretical developments in geography. (lecture/seminar) Prerequisite: at least 60 credit hours including eight hours of upper division geography courses.
GEOG 422-4 Theories and Practices of Development
A geographic study of `development' and `underdevelopment' with particular references to selected lesser developed regions. (lecture/seminar) Prerequisite: at least 60 credit hours including GEOG 111, 221, and 241.
GEOG 424-4 Urban Transportation
An extension of the theoretical and conceptual approach to transportation (GEOG 324), but with application to urban areas. (lecture/seminar) Prerequisite: GEOG 324 and 362.
GEOG 426-4 Industrial Change and Local Development
Relationships between multinational corporations and local development with reference to resource based towns in British Columbia. An analysis of the implications of changes in employment, organization, technology and resource utilization for community economic development. (lecture/seminar) Prerequisite: at least 60 credit hours including GEOG 323 or 383.
GEOG 427-4 Selected subjects in the Geography of Tourism
Selected subjects in the geography of tourism. subjects emphasize policy, planning and management issues associated with tourism. (lecture/seminar) Prerequisite: GEOG 327, or permission of the instructor.
GEOG 441-4 Geography of Urban Regions
An evaluation of the nature of urbanization, having specific reference to theories of urban spatial structure and to comparisons of urbanization in Canada and abroad. (lecture/seminar) Prerequisite: at least 60 credit hours including GEOG 362.
GEOG 444-4 Regional Development and Planning II
The evaluation of regional development planning and practice; case study analysis of regional development programs with particular reference to Canadian experience. (lecture/seminar/laboratory) Prerequisite: 60 credit hours including GEOG 383.
GEOG 445-4 Resource Planning
This course introduces the student to the principles and practices of resource planning within a Canadian context. Special attention is paid to land-use planning as it relates to major resource sectors. (lecture/seminar) Prerequisite: GEOG 322 or 385.
GEOG 446-4 Geography of Contemporary Societies
This course explores sites of socio-cultural change in a global context. Particular emphasis is placed on regional and international migration and the territorial and geopolitical bases of conflict. (lecture/seminar) Prerequisite: 60 credit hours including eight hours of upper division geography.
GEOG 448-4 Public Policy, Theory and Human Geography
This course will outline and explore the contributions that a theoretically informed human geography can make to debates on urban policy and the urban landscape. As will be demonstrated, a geographic perspective can provide a number of critical insights into both empirical and theoretical arenas. (lecture/tutorial) Prerequisite: GEOG 301.
GEOG 449-4 Environmental Processes and Urban Development
An examination of environmental processes as they influence, and are influenced by, urban development, with attention to implications for urban policy and planning. (seminar) Prerequisite: at least 60 credit hours, including at least one of GEOG 351, 354 or 389, or enrolment in either the Post Baccalaureate Program in Community Economic Development or the Post Baccalaureate Program in Urban Studies.
GEOG 450-4 Environmental Workshop
This is an interdisciplinary course whose principal objective is to act as a round table and forum for in-depth analysis and resolution of important environmental issues as they relate to economy, technology, politics and culture. (seminar) Prerequisite: GEOG 389.
GEOG 451-4 Spatial Modelling
Spatial models for the representation and simulation of physical, human and environmental processes. GIS and spatial analysis software are used in the laboratory for model development, from problem definition and solution to visualization. Prerequisite: GEOG 255 and 352.
GEOG 453-4 Remote Sensing of Environment
Computational aspects of environmental remote sensing. subjects include digital image processing, image enhancement, sensor systems, statistical extraction, and environmental analysis. (lecture/laboratory) Prerequisite: GEOG 352 and 353.
GEOG 455-4 Theoretical and Applied GIS
A critical examination of advanced subjects in GIS, such as: boundary definition, expert systems and artificial intelligence, error and uncertainty, and scale in a digital context. Examines social applications and the roles of GIS in society. Students will design original projects, including data acquisition, analysis, and web site development. (lecture/laboratory) Prerequisite: GEOG 355 and pre- or co-requisite GEOG 352. Students with credit for GEOG 452 may not take this course for further credit.
GEOG 460-4 Selected Regions
A study of the geographical character of a major world region. (lecture/seminar) Prerequisite: at least 60 credit hours including eight hours of upper division geography courses.
GEOG 462-4 The Geography of the United States
Selected themes in the geography of the United States, addressing the biophysical environment, culture and landscape, resources and livelihood, population and settlement. (lecture/seminar) Prerequisite: at least 60 credit hours including eight hours of upper division geography courses.
GEOG 466-4 Latin American Regional Development
The course introduces students to a geographical analysis of patterns of Latin American development and planning. It is divided into two sections: geographical/historical development of selected countries; and analysis of common Latin American developmental models. A geographical perspective is used which stresses the interconnectedness of spatial and socio-economic structures. (lecture/seminar) Prerequisite: 60 credit hours including eight hours of upper division geography.
GEOG 469-4 The Canadian North and Middle North
Special attention will be given to resource appraisal and utilization, spatial organization, and the consideration of future development; comparisons will be made with experience of sub-arctic development in other parts of the world. (lecture/seminar) Prerequisite: at least 60 credit hours including eight hours of upper division geography courses.
GEOG 470-4 The Geography of Western Canada
A regional geographic interpretation of British Columbia and the Prairies. The physical environment, population, land tenure, regional resource problems, economic development and the settlement process will be examined to explain the geographic character of Western Canada. (lecture/seminar) Prerequisite: at least 60 credit hours including eight hours of upper division geography courses.
GEOG 489-490-4 Selected Topics
The subjects will vary from semester to semester depending on the interests of faculty and students. (lecture/tutorial) Prerequisite: 75 credit hours including 30 credit hours in geography.
GEOG 491-4 Honors Essay
All candidates for honors will be required to submit a major paper on a geographical syllabu to be selected in consultation with the department. Prerequisite: 105 credit hours and consent of supervisor. See a departmental academic advisor for details.
GEOG 497-5 International Field Study
A fieldwork based study of a selected region conducted in an international setting. Emphasis is placed on how to understand landscapes by relating concepts and models with direct observation, inference and collection of field evidence, as well as published literature on the selected region. Prerequisite: at least 60 credit hours including 12 hours of upper division geography courses.

German GERM

Faculty of Arts

Department of Linguistics

Language Training Institute

GERM 102-4 Introductory German I
Emphasis on the acquisition of spoken fluency, correct pronunciation, and practicing facility. This course will be for all students who have not taken BC grade 12 German or its equivalent. (lecture/tutorial/laboratory)
GERM 103-4 Introductory German II
Continuation of the work of GERM 102 (formerly GERM 100-3); it should be taken wherever possible, in the semester immediately following GERM 102-4. (lecture/tutorial/laboratory) Prerequisite: GERM 102 (formerly 100), or the consent of instructor.
GERM 104-3 German for practicing Knowledge I
This is a first year German course intended for absolute beginners who want to acquire some rudimentary practicing knowledge of German. Prerequisite: no knowledge of German is required.
GERM 201-3 Intermediate German I
Emphasis on oral command, accurate and idiomatic expression; practicing of intermediate texts. (lecture/tutorial) Prerequisite: GERM 102 (formerly 100) and 103 (formerly 101) or consent of instructor.
GERM 202-3 Intermediate German II
This course continues the work of GERM 201. Considerable emphasis will be placed on practicing facility as well as oral and written command of the language. (lecture/tutorial) Prerequisite: GERM 201 or consent of instructor.

Gerontology GERO

Faculty of Arts

GERO 300-3 Introduction to Gerontology
Examination of the aging process from a multi-disciplinary perspective. Physical and health factors in aging, economic and vocational factors in aging, family and community relations of older people, social policy and politics of aging. Throughout the course, emphasis will be placed on normal aging. (lecture/seminar) Prerequisite: 60 semester hours credit.
GERO 301-3 Research Methods in Gerontology
This course examines research methodology applied to the field of gerontology. Key areas covered include: operationalizing gerontological concepts; sampling older populations; longitudinal designs; outcome and process evaluation of seniors' programs; and elementary data analyses. (lecture/seminar) Prerequisite: 60 credit hours. Recommended: STAT 203 (or equivalent).
GERO 302-3 Health Promotion and Aging
This course includes an examination of the development of contemporary understanding and practice of health promotion. Students will be given the opportunity to explore theories and models designed to explain health related behaviors and the determinants of health. Strategies for behavioral change and development of socio-environmental approaches will be discussed in the context of an aging Canadian population. (lecture/seminar) Prerequisite: 60 semester hours. Recommended: GERO 300.
GERO 400-4 Seminar in Applied Gerontology
Discussion of current issues in applied gerontology. Interdisciplinary orientation, drawing upon resource persons from within the University and practitioners in the community. Course requirements include participation in a group research project. (seminar) Prerequisite: 60 credit hours. GERO 300, 301 and two of PSYC 357, SA 420 or KIN 461.
GERO 401-3 Aging and the Built Environment
Impact of the macro- and microenvironment as it affects the aged. Discussion of planned housing and institutional living arrangements, territoriality and the need for privacy, home range and use of space, urban planning, responsive design of housing and care facilities, effects of relocation and institutionalization. (lecture) Prerequisite: 60 semester hours credit. Recommended: GERO 300.
GERO 402-3 Drug Issues in Gerontology
Considers pharmacological issues as they apply to older people; uses and abuses of commonly prescribed and non-prescribed medication; medication reviews; government subsidy programs. (lecture/seminar) Prerequisite: 60 credit hours. GERO 300.
GERO 403-3 Counselling with Older Adults
An examination of the ways of adapting counselling theory and practice to meet the needs of older adults and their families. Emphasis will be placed on counselling techniques and outcomes appropriate to the needs of persons living independently, with their families, or in institutional settings. (lecture/seminar) Prerequisite: GERO 300 and PSYC 357 or SA 420. This course is restricted to students in the Gerontology diploma program.
GERO 404-3 Health and Illness in Later Life
An examination of issues related to health and illness among older adults, drawing upon theories and concepts from biological, social and public health sciences. An introduction to assessment and intervention skills useful to persons working with older adults in a broad range of practice settings. (lecture/seminar) Prerequisite: 60 credit hours. GERO 300.
GERO 406-3 Death and Dying
The focus of this course is to provide the student with an in-depth understanding of the process of dying. By examining the process of dying, one's personal response to death as well as society's reaction and responsibilities toward dying, the student will gain new insights in caring for the dying person. (lecture/seminar) Prerequisite: 60 semester hours credit. Recommended: GERO 300.
GERO 407-3 Nutrition and Aging
This course examines specific nutritional conditions and concerns of the aging population. It does so by exploring the nutrient needs of the elderly as determined by physiological changes of aging, metabolic effects of common diseases, and biochemical interactions of medications. The course includes a broad investigation of the psychological, sociological, and physical factors which influence food choice and ultimately nutritional status in aging. (lecture/seminar) Prerequisite: 60 semester hours credit Recommended: GERO 300.
GERO 408-4 Families and Aging
This course entails a comprehensive interdisciplinary study of families and aging. In addition to providing an overview of theory and research on this topic, a variety of substantive issues will be critically examined, including: families in mid life, sibling relationships, divorce and remarriage, dating in later life, care giving, poverty, elder abuse, and policy development. Prerequisite: 60 semester hours. Recommended: GERO 300.
GERO 410-3 Special subjects in Gerontology I
Selected psychological, sociological, economic, biological and practical aspects of the aging of individuals and populations. (lecture/seminar) Prerequisite: 60 semester hours credit. Recommended: GERO 300.
GERO 411-3 Special subjects in Gerontology II
Selected psychological, sociological, economic, biological and practical aspects of the aging of individuals and populations. (lecture/seminar) Prerequisite: 60 semester hours credit. Recommended: GERO 300.
GERO 412-3 Special subjects in Gerontology III
Selected psychological, sociological, economic, biological and practical aspects of the aging of individuals and populations. (lecture/seminar) Prerequisite: 60 semester hours credit. Recommended: GERO 300.
GERO 414-4 Special subjects in Gerontology IV
Selected psychological, sociological, economic, biological and practical aspects of the aging of individuals and populations (lecture/seminar) Prerequisite: 60 credit hours. Recommended: GERO 300.
GERO 420-4 Sociology of Aging
The structural and behavioral implications of aging. subjects include demographic aspects of aging; the relationship of aging to political, economic, familial and other social institutions; the psychological significance of aging. (2-2-0) Prerequisite: 60 credit hours. Recommended: GERO 300. This course is identical to SA 420 and students cannot take both courses for credit.
GERO 435-3 Adult Guardianship Law
A comprehensive exploration of the law affecting adult guardianship, substitute decision-making, and adult protection in Canada, including a detailed examination of the form, content and philosophical underpinnings of the relevant legislation in British Columbia. subjects include assessing mental incapability, powers of attorney, living wills and health care directives, end of life decision-making, the law affecting consent to health care, and court-ordered guardianship for adults. (0-3-0) Prerequisite: 60 credit hours. Recommended: GERO 300. This course is identical to CRIM 435 and students cannot take both courses for credit. Students who have taken CRIM 418 or GERO 410 may not take this course for further credit.

History HIST

Faculty of Arts

HIST 101-3 Canada to Confederation
A survey of Canadian history to 1867. (lecture/tutorial)
HIST 102-3 Canada Since Confederation
A survey of Canadian history since 1867. (lecture/tutorial)
HIST 105-3 Western Civilization from the Ancient World to the Reformation Era
An introduction to the Greek and Roman origins of Western Civilization, and its development to the 16th century. (lecture/tutorial)
HIST 106-3 Western Civilization from the Reformation Era to the 20th Century
A sequel to HIST 105 covering the expansion and modernization of the European world. (lecture/tutorial)
HIST 146-3 Africa in latest History
Colonialism, independence and nation building. (lecture/tutorial)
HIST 151-3 The Modern Middle East
An introductory survey of the changing societies of the Middle East since 1800. Emphasis will be placed on familiarizing students with the basic aspects of Islamic society, the influence of European imperialism, the modernization of traditional societies, the origins of the Arab-Israeli conflict, and the social and political ferment in the period since the Second World War. (lecture/tutorial)
HIST 201-3 The History of Western Canada
A history of the prairies and British Columbia dealing with the aboriginal cultures, the fur trade, the evolution of transportation and links with metropolitan areas, settlement and economic development, political evolution, evolving rural and urban systems, and intellectual and cultural identities. (lecture/tutorial)
HIST 204-3 The Social History of Canada
A survey of major themes in Canadian social history from the arrival of Europeans to the present day. Particular attention will be paid to the effects of gender, race and class on the experience of Canadians over time. (lecture/tutorial) Recommended: HIST 101 and 102.
HIST 205-3 Premodern Japan
A survey of Japanese history from antiquity until the late nineteenth century or early modern period. (2-1-0) Prerequisite: students with credit for HIST 206 offered prior to 2002-2 cannot take this course for further credit.
HIST 206-3 Modern Japan
A survey of Japanese history from 1868 until 1952 which will examine, among other topics, the establishment of the Japanese colonial empire, the wars with Russia, China and the United States, and the post-war Allied Occupation. (2-1-0) Recommended: HIST 205.
HIST 208-3 Latin America: The Colonial Period
A study of the process and institutions of Spanish colonial administration with emphasis on the clash of European and Amerindian cultures. (lecture/tutorial) Recommended: HIST 104.
HIST 209-3 Latin America: The National Period
A survey of Latin American history from Independence (1808-24) to the present: post-Independence political collapse and reconsolidation; Latin America in the world trade system and the changing conditions of economic dependency; nationalist reform (Mexico) and socialist revolution (Cuba), liberalism, populism, and the rise of modernizing military. Treatment by subjects and broad historical period rather than country by country. (lecture/tutorial) Recommended: HIST 208.
HIST 212-3 The United States to 1877
The emergence and development of American civilization from the establishment of the colonies through the Civil War and Reconstruction. (lecture/tutorial) Recommended: HIST 104.
HIST 213-3 The United States since 1877
An analysis of the transformation of American culture from post-Civil War to modern forms. subjects to be discussed will include industrialization, urbanization, foreign policy, cultural and political antagonisms. (lecture/tutorial) Recommended: HIST 212.
HIST 215-3 The Making of the British Isles
A broad survey of some of the central developments that have shaped the history of the British Isles from Roman antiquity to the present.
HIST 216-3 The Ancient World
Aspects of the ancient history of the Near East, Greece and Rome. (lecture/tutorial) Recommended: HIST 105 and 106.
HIST 219-3 The Early Middle Ages
An examination of Eastern and Western Christendom from the late antiquity to the Renaissance of the 12th century emphasizing religious developments, political and social changes. (lecture/tutorial)
HIST 220-3 The Later Middle Ages
This course will examine European history from the high middle ages to the beginning of the Reformation. Attention will be given to both material and cultural dimensions of medieval European civilization. (lecture/tutorial)
HIST 223-3 Early Modern Europe, 1500-1789
A survey of early modern European history which will examine, among other topics, the wars of religion, the 17th century revolutions, 16th and 17th century economic development, the scientific revolution, the enlightenment and the political and social character of the old regime. (lecture/tutorial)
HIST 224-3 Europe from the French Revolution to the First World War
A survey of European history emphasizing the French Revolution, and Napoleonic Europe and first Industrial Revolution, liberalism and its opponents, agrarian conservatism, liberalism and conservatism, the Revolutions of 1848, the struggles for political unification, the second Industrial Revolution and the origins of the First World War. (lecture/tutorial)
HIST 225-3 20th Century Europe
A survey of European history from the First World War emphasizing the origins and effects of the World Wars, the emergence of the Soviet Union and of fascism. (lecture/tutorial)
HIST 231-3 The Origins of Modern Africa: Conquest, Resistance and Resurgence
Continuity and change in sub-Saharan Africa from the era of the slave trade until World War II. (lecture/tutorial)
HIST 249-3 Classical Islamic Civilization
This course offers a broad survey of the development of classical Islamic civilization. It begins with an examination of the origins of Islam in seventh century Arabia and concludes with the break-up of the Abbasid Caliphate of Baghdad in the 13th century. Emphasis will be place on gaining an understanding of the doctrines of Islam, the significance of the rise and fall of the early Arab-Islamic empires, and the role of Islam in world history. (lecture/tutorial)
HIST 251-3 The Western Imperial Presence in the Middle East and North Africa
A general history of British and French colonialism and imperialism in the Middle East with an examination of the different patterns of political, economic, military, educational, and administrative control established by these two powers, particularly in the period of European supremacy after World War I. An examination, also, of imperial rivalries and the process of decolonization culminating in the Suez crisis of 1956 and the involvement of the superpowers. (lecture/tutorial) Recommended: HIST 151.
HIST 252-3 Islamic India
A survey of the cultural patterns, social and political forces, and historical contexts that have shaped the Islamic period of Indian history. Special attention will be directed toward the Mughal empire and its decline. (lecture/tutorial)
HIST 254-3 China to 1800
This course offers a broad survey of the history of China from antiquity to the eve of its modern transformations at the turn of the nineteenth century. It aims to challenge the perception of an unchanging China and to encourage students to develop a critical understanding of the forces integrating and dividing this geo-cultural unit. (lecture/tutorial)
HIST 255-3 China Since 1800
A survey of the history of China from the end of the eighteenth century, when traditional Chinese society was arguably at its height of development, to the end of the twentieth century when the social revolutions promised by the Communist regime have clearly failed to materialize. The main objectives are to provide students with vocabularies and tools to understand and interpret the political, social and cultural transformations in modern China and to initiate them in the art and techniques of historical analysis. (lecture/tutorial)
HIST 299-3 Problems in History
This course is designed to allow students to pursue in greater depth a particular historical problem. It will be offered either as an individual practicing course or in small seminars, depending upon student and faculty interest. Admission only by prior consent of instructor. Students may not take this course more than once or after they have completed 60 hours of course work. (seminar) Recommended: at least four university level courses in history.
HIST 300-4 Approaches to History
An examination of the conceptual problems involved in the historian's attempt to apprehend the past and its relationship to the present and future. Particular attention will be paid to the nature of historical knowledge and explanation, and to the broad systems and patterns in which history has been conceived. (lecture/tutorial) Prerequisite: 45 credit hours including 9 hours of lower division history credit.
HIST 303-4 Museums Methods and Use
The course will introduce students to the social functions and the techniques of museum work. Specific subjects for discussion will include the history and purposes of museums collections, collection cataloguing and management, conservation techniques, gallery design, educational programming, the organization, management, design and funding of museums and their relationships to museums organizations and governments, the roles and functions of museum professionals. (lecture/tutorial) Prerequisite: 45 credit hours including 9 hours of lower division history credit. This course is primarily designed for students in the public history program. Other students will only be admitted with permission of the department.
HIST 305-2 Honors Tutorial
Open only to honors students, this tutorial will be taken in conjunction with HIST 300. Readings in the philosophy of history and historiography will be discussed. (tutorial) Prerequisite: 45 credit hours including 9 hours of lower division history credit; admission to the honors program in history.
HIST 309-4 Early Modern Greek History: 1453-1821
Examines the development out of the legacy of the cosmopolitan Byzantine Empire of the distinct social, political and economic elements that led to the Modern Greek State and the Hellenic Diaspora, and the culture, religion and social structure of the Greek world. Prerequisite: nine hours of lower division history credit.
HIST 310-4 Women and the Family in Modern Europe
An introduction to the history of women and the family in Western Europe (mainly Britain and France) from about 1700 to the end of the British struggle for women's suffrage. Readings will include latest studies as well as primary sources. Attention will be given to methodological problems and conflicting interpretations. (lecture/tutorial) Prerequisite: 45 credit hours including 9 hours of lower division history credit.
HIST 311-4 Education and Childhood in European History
A survey of changing perceptions of school and childhood in Europe since the 17th century. Some main themes are: child labor; education for gentlemen; technology and education; social mobility through education; and mass culture, the family, and the school. (lecture/tutorial) Prerequisite: 45 credit hours including 9 hours of lower division history credit.
HIST 312-4 Poverty, Crime, and Madness: Society and the Outcast
An examination of changing attitudes toward poverty, vagrancy, insanity, crime, and disease in Europe since the 16th century. The influence of religion, philanthropy, medicine, and the social sciences in defining outcast groups and in formulating policies for dealing with them. Conflicting interpretations of the origins and functions of the welfare state. (lecture/tutorial) Prerequisite: 45 credit hours including 9 hours of lower division history credit.
HIST 315-4 Politics and Society in England, 1500-1707
This course provides a general overview of the social and political history of Tudor and Stuart England. (lecture/tutorial) Prerequisite: 45 credit hours including 9 hours of lower division history credit.
HIST 316-4 English Society since the Mid 18th Century
A study of English society, culture and politics from the accession of George III to the present. (lecture/tutorial) Prerequisite: 45 credit hours including 9 hours of lower division history credit.
HIST 318-4 Early Modern France
An examination of the development of France from the religious wars of the sixteenth century through the French revolution. Particular attention will also be given to the Bourbon monarchy and to the enlightenment. (lecture/tutorial) Prerequisite: 45 credit hours including 9 hours of lower division history credits.
HIST 319-4 France Since 1800
An examination of the political, social, economic and intellectual development of France from Napoleon to the Fifth Republic. (lecture/tutorial) Prerequisite: 45 credit hours including 9 hours of lower division history credit.
HIST 324-4 Slavery in the Americas
An examination of slavery in the United States, Latin America, and Caribbean with reference to plantation systems, economic conditions, and cultural factors. (lecture/tutorial) Prerequisite: 45 credit hours including 9 hours of lower division history credit.
HIST 325-4 History of Aboriginal Peoples of North America to 1850
This course examines selected themes in the history of Aboriginal peoples of North America from first contact with Europeans to the mid-nineteenth century. Contact along a range of colonial frontiers including British, French, Spanish and Russian will be considered. subjects include the fur trade, disease, missionaries, intermarriage, and imperial politics. (3-1-0) Prerequisite: 45 credit hours including 9 hours of lower division history credit.
HIST 326-4 History of Aboriginal Peoples of North America Since 1850
An examination of selected themes in the history of Aboriginal peoples of North America in the nineteenth and twentieth centuries. subjects include the fur trade, missionaries, intermarriage, the Metis, government policies, wage labour, education, treaty making, oral narratives and political activism. (lecture/tutorial) Prerequisite: 45 credit hours including 9 hours of lower division history credit.
HIST 327-4 Canadian Labor and Working Class History
An examination of the history of labor, primarily in English Canada, during the 19th and 20th centuries. The evolution of trade unions and labor-political movements will be examined together with the impact of industrialization, the rise of mass production, changing patterns of immigration and other contexts of working-class culture and material life. Special attention will be paid to British Columbia as a case study. Historically the course examines `working class history' as a particular way of studying the past. What is the concept of `the working class'? (lecture/tutorial) Prerequisite: 45 credit hours including 9 hours of lower division history credit. Recommended: HIST 101, 102 and 204.
HIST 328-4 The Province of Quebec from Confederation
The economic, social, political and cultural history of Quebec. (lecture/tutorial) Prerequisite: HIST 102 plus 45 credit hours including 9 hours of lower division history credit. Recommended: HIST 101.
HIST 329-4 Canadian Family History
A detailed examination of the changing Canadian family, and its relationship to the state, since the eighteenth century. (lecture/tutorial) Prerequisite: 45 credit hours including 9 hours of lower division history credit.
HIST 331-4 Germany from the Reformation to 1815.
An examination of the principal themes in German social, political, economic and intellectual history from the reformation to the defeat of Napoleon. (lecture/tutorial) Prerequisite: 45 credit hours including 9 hours of lower division history credit.
HIST 332-4 Germany Since 1815
An examination of the principal themes in German political, social, economics and intellectual history from the defeat of Napoleon in 1815 to the reunification in 1990. (lecture/tutorial) Prerequisite: 45 credit hours including 9 hours of lower division history credit.
HIST 335-4 Twentieth Century Russia
An in-depth study of the social, economic, and political history of the Soviet Union, examining its revolutionary origins, rapid modernization, and emergence as a super power. (lecture/tutorial) Prerequisite: 45 credit hours including 9 hours of lower division history credit.
HIST 336-4 Absolutism and Enlightenment in Europe
An examination of the economic, social, political and intellectual developments in 17th and 18th century continental Europe, with emphasis either on the period of Absolutism or on the Enlightenment. Students will read excerpts from important contemporary sources, such as Locke, Voltaire, Rousseau, and Kant. (lecture/tutorial) Prerequisite: 45 credit hours including 9 hours of lower division history credit. Recommended: HIST 223 or 224.
HIST 337-4 The Balance of Power in Europe
An examination of the shift of power among competing European states from the late 19th century until the mid-20th century. Attention will be given to the origins and consequences of the two great European wars and to the policies of Britain, France, Germany, and Russia which brought about the significant changes in the balances of power. Study will be based primarily upon documents from the Chanceries. (lecture/tutorial) Prerequisite: 45 credit hours including 9 hours of lower division history credit. Recommended: HIST 225.
HIST 338-4 World War II
An introduction to the history of the origins and course of the second world war. (distance education) Prerequisite: 45 credit hours including 9 hours of lower division history credit. Recommended: HIST 225.
HIST 339-4 The British Empire and Commonwealth
This course provides an outline history of the British Empire, its rise and decline, and discusses the origin and significance of the Commonwealth. In addition there is a detailed account of the `Westminster Model' of parliamentary democracy, on which the political institutions of many Commonwealth nations are based. (distance education) Prerequisite: 45 credit hours including 9 hours of lower division history credit.
HIST 343-4 Africa and the Slave Trade
An examination of the trade in slaves from Africa and the rise of slavery within that continent. (lecture/tutorial) Prerequisite: 45 credit hours including 9 hours of lower division history credit. Students with credit for HIST 478 may not enroll in HIST 343. Recommended: HIST 146 or 231.
HIST 344-4 East Africa
A regional study from the Arab and European penetration in the 19th century to the emergence of Kenya, Uganda, and Tanzania as independent states with emphasis on the patterns of economic, political, social and religious change. (lecture/tutorial) Prerequisite: 45 credit hours including 9 hours of lower division history credit.
HIST 348-4 A History of 20th Century South Africa
An examination of the economic, social and political history of 20th century South Africa. Particular attention will be paid to the factors which led to the rise of apartheid. (lecture/tutorial) Prerequisite: 45 credit hours including 9 hours of lower division history credit. Recommended: at least one of HIST 146, 231.
HIST 350-4 The Ottoman Empire and Turkey
A study of Ottoman society and the impact of Ottoman rule in the Middle East from the conquest of Constantinople to the death of Ataturk, the founder of the Turkish Republic. Emphasis will be on the conflict between preservation and reform in the nineteenth century and on the significance of the Ottoman legacy for twentieth century Turkey and the Arab world. (lecture/tutorial) Prerequisite: 45 credit hours including 9 hours of lower division history credit. Recommended: one of HIST 151, 249, 251.
HIST 352-4 Religion and Politics in Modern Iran
The intellectual and social history of greater Iran from the Safavids to the twentieth century. Emphasis will be on the relationship between religion and politics. (lecture/tutorial) Prerequisite: 45 credit hours including 9 hours of lower division history credit. Recommended: one of HIST 151, 249, 251.
HIST 355-4 The Arab Middle East in the Twentieth Century
An examination of this century's major themes in the history of Syria, Lebanon, Iraq, Jordan and Saudi Arabia, as well as other states of the Arabian peninsula. subjects to be investigated include the origins of Arab nationalism and Islamic reformism; the origins and development of the Lebanese question; the emergence of the politics of the military in Iraq and Syria, and the special role of the Jordanian and Arabian monarchies. (lecture/tutorial) Prerequisite: nine hours of lower division history credit. Recommended: one of HIST 151, 249, 251.
HIST 360-4 The History of Science: 1100-1725
subjects in medieval and renaissance science including Aristotelian/Ptolemaic cosmology, alchemy, physics and the human sciences. The rejection of medieval ideas during the scientific revolution will be studied through the work of Copernicus, Vesalius, Paracelsus, Brahe, Kepler, Galileo, Harvey and Newton. (lecture/tutorial) Prerequisite: 45 credit hours including 9 hours of lower division history or science credit.
HIST 361-4 The History of Science: The 18th Century to the Present
subjects in the history of science and technology to be selected from the 18th/19th century chemistry, the history of the idea of evolution and of Darwinian science, physics to 1914, or 19th century industrial science. (lecture/tutorial) Prerequisite: 45 credit hours including 9 hours of lower division history or science credit.
HIST 365-4 Self and Society in Imperial China
An in-depth examination of selected aspects of Chinese society and culture in the imperial period, particularly the relationships between self, family and society. This course seeks to challenge the perception of a static Chinese culture and demonstrate that a critical understanding of the imperial period remains a key to our comprehension of contemporary Chinese society. Prerequisite: 45 credit hours including 9 hours of lower division history credit including HIST 254 or permission of the department.
HIST 370-0 Practicum I
This is the first semester of work experience in co-operative education. It is meant to be exploratory in nature. Prerequisite: normally 60 semester hours with a minimum CGPA of 2.75. Students should apply to the co-op co-ordinator one semester in advance.
HIST 371-4 The Asia-Pacific War in Modern Japanese History
Covers the period in Japan from the 1930s to the 1950s and will introduce students to subjects such as wartime atrocities, the dropping of the atomic bombs and the prosecution of war criminals. It will also attempt to explain why so much controversy surrounds interpretations of events arising from Japan's last war, the Asia-Pacific War. Prerequisite: 45 credit hours including nine hours of lower division history credit. Recommended: at least one course on modern Japan.
HIST 375-0 Practicum II
This is the second semester of the Co-operative Education Program. Building on the experience of the first employment semester, this semester will provide a work experience that integrates and builds on the research and writing skills associated with the discipline of history. Prerequisite: normally 75 semester hours (including HIST 370) with a minimum CGPA of 2.75. Students should apply to the co-op co-ordinator one semester in advance.
HIST 379-4 The Transformation of American Culture1830-1900
In 1830 most Americans lived on farms or in small towns, worked on the land, and dreamt of salvation. By 1900 cities, industry, the railroad, electricity, consumerism had transformed material lives. Ideals and fears had also shifted. This course discusses elements of this change, particularly in popular ideology, everyday life, and literary, political and artistic movements. (seminar) Prerequisite: 45 credit hours including 9 hours of lower division history credit. Recommended: HIST 212 or 213.
HIST 382-4 African-American History, since 1865
Examines black history from the end of the American Civil War. The course focuses on the external and internal forces which shaped black communities across the nation. Special attention will be paid to these communities' struggles against the forces which sought to confine black people to an inferior place in society. Prerequisite: 45 credit hours including 9 hours of lower division history credit.
HIST 384-4 North American Urban History
This course examines the development of North American cities and the social, political and economic forces which have shaped them. Emphasis will be placed on the lives of city dwellers and the distinctive urban cultures they have created. Prerequisite: 45 credit hours including 9 hours o lower division history credit.
HIST 386-4 The Material History of North America, 1500-1850
Examines North American material history from the time of contact through the settlements of the Dutch, English, French, and Spanish, through the collapse of empires and the rise of independent states, addressing issues such as utility, class difference, ideology, aesthetics and taste, and consumerism. The influence of the African diaspora in the New World will also be examined. (0-4-0) Prerequisite: 45 credit hours including 9 hours of lower division history credit. Students with credit for HIST 391 in 2000-3 cannot take this course for further credit. Recommended: HIST 212.
HIST 387-4 The Material History of North America, 1851-Present
Examines North American material history in the latter 19th and 20th centuries, considering stylistic revivals, technological innovation, the class-based nature of taste and role of consumption as ideology. Household objects, furniture, domestic spaces and architecture will be used to explore the ways in which changes in North American culture signify changes in social, economic and political life. (0-4-0) Prerequisite: 45 credit hours including 9 hours of lower division history credit. Recommended: HIST 212 and 386.
HIST 390-4 Studies in History I
Special topics. (lecture/tutorial) Prerequisite: 45 credit hours including 9 hours of lower division history credit.
HIST 391-4 Studies in History II
Special topics. (lecture/tutorial) Prerequisite: 45 credit hours including 9 hours of lower division history credit.
HIST 400-4 Seminar in Historical Methods
A study of methodology, including such subjects as principles of historical criticism, annotation and transcription of source material, generalization, and the techniques of history and the social sciences. Examples will be drawn from all areas in which the department teaches. (seminar) Prerequisite: 45 credit hours including 9 hours of lower division history credit.
HIST 402-4 Renaissance Italy
An assessment of the principal themes in the history of the Italian Renaissance, and of the role of Renaissance Italy in shaping the character of Early Modern Europe. In certain semesters the experience of one or more Italian cities will serve to elucidate these themes. (seminar) Prerequisite: 45 credit hours including 9 hours of lower division history. Recommended: HIST 220.
HIST 403-4 The European Reformation
An advanced examination of the complex history and patterns of the Religious Reformation in sixteenth century Europe. Emphasis will be placed on the religious thought of the period, and on its social and political context. (seminar) Prerequisite: 45 credit hours including 9 hours of lower division history credit including HIST 220 or 223 or permission of the department.
HIST 404-4 Religion, Society and Politics in England 1530-1640
From the Reformation to the outbreak of the Civil War, this research seminar will examine the origins, development and impact of Protestantism within English society. (seminar) Prerequisite: 45 credit hours including 9 hours of lower division history credit and one of HIST 215, 219, 220, 223, 315 or 316, or permission of the department.
HIST 405-4 Early Modern English Society
This research seminar will examine select themes in the social history of early modern England. Foundational subjects will be the social order, agriculture, industry, demography, family formation, religion and poverty. Optional themes include: crime and the law, literacy and education, women, urban life, perception and uses of the past, parish communities, government regulation of economic and social life and London. (seminar) Prerequisite: 45 credit hours including 9 hours of lower division history credit and one of HIST 215, 219, 220, 223, 315 or 316, or permission of the department.
HIST 407-4 Popular Culture in Great Britain and Europe
This course will study culture in Great Britain and Europe since 1500. Themes may include the sixteenth century separation between popular and elite culture, Carnival, the witch craze, popular ballads, the institution of `rational recreation' during the Industrial Revolution, the late Victorian Music Hall, the cultural emancipation of women, and the effects on working class culture of economic depression and world war. (seminar) Prerequisite: 45 credit hours including 9 hours of lower division history credit. Recommended: HIST 105 or 106.
HIST 409-4 Disease and Society
A seminar devoted to problems in the social history of medicine, which is a field concerned with health, disease, and medicine - in particular social, political, and cultural contexts. Particular attention will be given to the history of epidemic diseases since the eighteenth century. Prerequisite: 45 credit hours including 9 hours of lower division history credit.
HIST 413-4 Britain and Europe in the Twentieth Century
An examination, by means of a series of case studies, of the ways in which Britain's ambiguous relationships with Europe, the Empire/Commonwealth and the United States have shaped its identity in the Twentieth Century. Prerequisite: HIST 225 plus 45 credit hours including 9 hours of lower division History credit. Recommended: HIST 337.
HIST 414-4 The Impact of the Great War
A brief look at the political, social, and territorial changes of the Versailles settlement, followed by an examination of the impact of the war upon Europe, particularly through the examples of fascism in Italy, national socialism in Germany and the general breakdown of the liberal order during the 1930's. In certain semesters additional attention may be given to the Soviet Union. (seminar) Prerequisite: HIST 225 plus 45 credit hours including 9 hours of lower division history credit. Recommended: HIST 337.
HIST 415-4 Victorian Britain
A study of major developments and controversies - social, cultural, political, religious, economic - during the period of the rise of industrial and class society. (seminar) Prerequisite: 45 credit hours including 9 hours of lower division history credit. Recommended: one or more of HIST 224, 315, 316.
HIST 416-4 The French Revolution
An analysis of the origins of the Revolution, of its changing nature, and of its impact on society. The Revolution will be examined in its European context. (seminar) Prerequisite: 45 credit hours including 9 hours of lower division history credit. Recommended: HIST 223, 224.
HIST 417-4 Modern French Social History
An examination of a principal aspect of, or period in, the history of French society since the Revolution. For example, attention may be given to the 19th century French Revolution Tradition, or to society and culture in the Third, Fourth, and Fifth Republics, or to social thought from the French Revolution to L'Action Française. (seminar) Prerequisite: 45 credit hours including 9 hours of lower division history credit. Recommended: HIST 224 or 225.
HIST 419-4 Late Imperial and Revolutionary Russia
A detailed examination of the impact of modernization in late Imperial and early Soviet Russia. (seminar) Prerequisite: 45 credit hours including 9 hours of lower division history credit. Recommended: HIST 224 or 225.
HIST 420-4 The History of Russian Foreign Policy from Catherine the Great to Stalin
A detailed study of the conduct of Russian foreign policy from the late 18th century to the middle of the 20th century. (seminar) Prerequisite: 45 credit hours including 9 hours of lower division history credit.
HIST 421-4 Modern Greece, 1864-1925
Greece and Greek society will serve as a case study of a Balkan country that underwent several political and social transformations. Prerequisite: 45 credit hours including 9 hours of lower division history credit.
HIST 422-4 Greece, 1935-1944: Occupation and Resistance
Examines the cycle of violence that followed the Axis occupation of Greece and created a political schism that lasted until the 1980s. The course will focus on Greek resistance, foreign relations and relations with the British intelligence services. Prerequisite: 45 credit hours including 9 hours of lower division history credit.
HIST 424-4 Problems in the Cultural History of Canada
Selected problems in Canadian ideas and attitudes on such subjects as the arts, religion, education, minority and native cultures, nationalism, and Canadian historiography. (seminar) Prerequisite: 45 credit hours including 9 hours of lower division history credit. Recommended: HIST 101, 102.
HIST 425-4 Gender and History
This course will study historical changes in masculinity and femininity. It will examine the ways in which gender identities of women and men are formed and changed, and it will consider the influences of gender relationships upon politics, society and the economy. (seminar) Prerequisite: 45 credit hours including 9 hours of lower division history credit.
HIST 426-4 State Power and Social Regulation in North America
An examination of the growth and evolution of the relationship between state and society in North America. It will examine the myriad direct and indirect ways in which the state has regulated the lives of North Americans and the equally diverse ways in which North Americans have sought to influence and shape state policy. (seminar) Prerequisite: 45 credit hours including 9 hours of lower division history. Recommended: PHIL 120 or 220.
HIST 427-4 Problems in the History of Aboriginal Peoples
Examination of selected themes in the history of Aboriginal peoples (0-4-0) Prerequisite: 45 credit hours including 9 hours of lower division history credit.
HIST 428-4 Problems in the Social and Economic History of Canada
Selected problems in the history of Canadian agriculture and industrial development, migration and settlement, labor, native policy and class structure. (seminar) Prerequisite: 45 credit hours including 9 hours of lower division history credit. Recommended: HIST 101, 102.
HIST 430-4 New France
Social, cultural, intellectual, economic, military, and administrative aspects of New France. (seminar) Prerequisite: HIST 101 plus 45 credit hours including 9 hours of lower division history credit. Recommended: HIST 102.
HIST 431-4 Problems in the History of British North America, 1760-1850
The social and cultural life of British North America: religion, education, economic pursuits, social and humanitarian attitudes, politics, and English-French relations. (seminar) Prerequisite: 45 credit hours including 9 hours of lower division history credit. Recommended: HIST 101.
HIST 432-4 Problems in Environmental History
An investigation into the major themes and arguments in the environmental histories of North America, emphasizing how different individuals and groups have used, perceived, and managed their environments over time. (0-4-0) Prerequisite: 45 credit hours including 9 hours of lower division history credit. Students with credit for HIST 485 in 2001-3 cannot take this course for further credit.
HIST 434-4 Things and Stuff: Problems in Material History
Through the use of case studies, this course considers how historians can effectively and powerfully use furniture, architecture and objects as evidence. Issues to be addressed include `text' and `context' and the methodology of practicing of material evidence. (0-4-0) Prerequisite: 45 credit hours including 9 hours of lower division history credit. Students with credit for HIST 486 in 2000-1 or HIST 488 in 2001-3 may not take this course for further credit. Recommended: HIST 386 and/or 387.
HIST 435-4 Problems in the History of the North American West
This course examines selected problems in the social, economic, political and cultural history of the Canadian and/or American West. (seminar) Prerequisite: 45 credit hours including 9 hours of lower division history credit. Recommended: HIST 101 and 102.
HIST 436-4 British Columbia
Selected problems in the social, cultural, economic and political development of British Columbia. (seminar) Prerequisite: 45 credit hours including 9 hours of lower division history credit. Recommended: HIST 101 and 102.
HIST 446-4 American Revolution and the Making of the Constitution
Selected subjects may include the Revolutionary War Era; the American Enlightenment; the New Nation; American Diplomacy in the Formative Period. (seminar) Prerequisite: 45 credit hours including 9 hours of lower division history credit. Recommended: HIST 212.
HIST 450-4 The Era of the American Civil War
Examining the political, social, economic, and cultural elements that led to the break up of the American republic, the Civil War, and the problems involved in reconstructing the union. (seminar) Prerequisite: 45 credit hours including 9 hours of lower division history credit. Students with credit for HIST 447 under the same syllabu may not take HIST 450 for further credit. Recommended: HIST 212 or 213.
HIST 453-4 The United States in Depression and War
An examination of the impact of the Great Depression and the Second World War in shaping modern American society. subjects covered will include the development of the welfare state, the rise of industrial unions, the evolution of Keynesian economic policy, and the battles over race, class and gender in the 1930s and on the wartime homefront. (seminar) Prerequisite: nine hours of lower division history credit including HIST 213 or permission of the department. Students with credit for HIST 448 under the same syllabu may not take HIST 453 for further credit. Recommended: HIST 212 or 213.
HIST 454-4 Gender and Sexuality in US History
This course will explore changing constructions of gender roles and sexuality in United States history. It will examine how prescribed norms have shaped definitions of acceptable and respectable behavior, and how these norms have been regulated over time. We shall also explore how gender and sexual relations have created and reflected power relations between men and women. Special emphasis will be placed on the 19th and 20th centuries. (seminar) Prerequisite: 45 credit hours including 9 hours of lower division history credit.
HIST 458-4 Problems in Latin American Regional History
Advanced concepts and methodology applied to the study of one or more Latin American regions. Examples are: pre-Columbian and colonial Middle America; revolutionary Mexico 1910-1970, Brazil from Slavery to Militarism, frontier society to hyper-urbanism in the La Plata countries. (seminar) Prerequisite: 45 credit hours including 9 hours of lower division history credit. Recommended: one of HIST 104, 208, 209, LAS 200.
HIST 459-4 Problems in the Political and Social History of Latin America
Advanced concepts and methodology applied to the study of traditional and contemporary institutions (the church, the great estate, the peasantry, elite structures) and/or political movements (agrarian revolution, populism, the modernizing military). Emphasis placed on changing historiographical interpretations. (seminar) Prerequisite: 45 credit hours including 9 hours of lower division history credit. Recommended: one of HIST 104, 208, 209, LAS 200.
HIST 465-4 The Palestinian-Israeli Conflict
A discussion of the modern history of nation-building in the context of the Arab-Israeli conflict. The subjects discussed include Zionism, the British Mandate in Palestine, the creation of the state of Israel, the rise of modern Palestinian nationalism, and the role of the Palestinian-Israeli dispute in regional and international affairs. (seminar) Prerequisite: 45 credit hours including 9 hours of lower division history credit and one of HIST 151, 249, 251, 350, 354, 355 or permission of the department.
HIST 467-4 Modern Egypt
An interpretive discussion of the course of modern Egyptian history. This may range from the advent to power of Muhammed Ali Pasha until latest times, or may focus on specific periods of revolutionary change. (seminar) Prerequisite: 45 credit hours including 9 hours of lower division history credit and one of HIST 151, 249, 251, 350, 354, 355 or permission of the department.
HIST 469-4 Islamic Social and Intellectual History
Advanced analysis of specific problems in Islamic social and intellectual history, with an emphasis on traditional patterns and on their transformation in the modern world. (seminar) Prerequisite: 45 credit hours including 9 hours of lower division history credit. Recommended: one of HIST 249 or 352.
HIST 470-0 Practicum III
This is the third semester of the Co-operative Education Program. The work experience will be focused in a specialized area of the student's choice. Prerequisite: normally 90 semester hours (including HIST 370 and 375) with a minimum CGPA of 2.75. Students should apply to the co-op co-ordinator one semester in advance. Students entering 400 division seminars should have an appropriate background in 100 and 200 division and/or 300 division History. Normally, students should have completed 45 credit hours (or the equivalent) prior to enrollment in any upper division history course.
HIST 471-4 Women in Modern Japanese History
The history of Japan from 1600 to the mid 20th century with a focus on the economic, social, cultural and political contributions of women. (0-4-0 Prerequisite: 45 credit hours including 9 hour of lower division history credit. Students with credit for HIST 485 in 2001-1 or HIST 488 in 2002-1 may not take this course for further credit.
HIST 473-4 The Making of South African Society
An examination of the way in which South African society evolved in the 19th and 20th centuries. Particular attention will be paid to the problem of race relations. (seminar) Prerequisite: 45 credit hours including 9 hours of lower division history credit. Recommended: HIST 231, 348.
HIST 474-4 Modern Chinese Identities
This seminar offers an opportunity for upper level undergraduates to explore in-depth the historicity and constructed-ness of identities, especially in relation to the vast and diverse population known as `Chinese.' syllabu to be discussed include Orientalism, nationalism, race, ethnicity and gender. The course aims to encourage students to develop a critical understanding of the political, social and cultural assumptions that are often behind the creation and perpetuation of identities. Attention will also be given to the history of Chinese diaspora (particularly in North America) and its significance to the project of reinterpreting `Chinese-ness' in the modern world. (seminar) Prerequisite: 45 credit hours including 9 hours of lower division history credit including HIST 255 or permission of the department.
HIST 475-0 Practicum IV
This is the fourth semester of the Co-operative Education Program. The work experience will require a high level of expertise in research and writing skills as well as an ability to exercise independent judgement. Prerequisite: normally 105 semester hours (including HIST 370, 375 and 470) with a minimum CGPA of 2.75. Students should apply to the co-op co-ordinator one semester in advance. Students entering 400 division seminars should have an appropriate background in 100 and 200 division and/or 300 division history. Normally, students should have completed 45 credit hours (or the equivalent) prior to enrollment in any upper division history course.
HIST 481-4 British India
An examination of the British community in India set against the background of British attitudes to India since the late 18th century. (seminar) Prerequisite: 45 credit hours including 9 hours of lower division history credit and HIST 339 or permission of the department.
HIST 483-4 The Struggle for Identity in Sub-Saharan Africa
Selected subjects in the history of an African state. (seminar) Prerequisite: 45 credit hours including 9 hours of lower division history credit.
HIST 485-4 Studies in History I
Special topics. (seminar) Prerequisite: 45 credit hours including 9 hours of lower division history credit.
HIST 486-4 Studies in History II
Special topics. (seminar) Prerequisite: 45 credit hours including 9 hours of lower division history credit.
HIST 489-4 Studies in History
Allows students to pursue in greater depth a particular historical problem. It will be offered either as an individual practicing course or as small seminars, depending upon student and faculty interest. (seminar) Prerequisite: 45 credit hours including 9 hours of lower division history credit. Recommended: at least three upper division courses in history.
HIST 490-4 Studies in History
Allows students to pursue in greater depth a particular historical problem. It will be offered either as an individual practicing course or as a small seminars, depending upon student and faculty interest. Admission only by consent of instructor. (seminar) Prerequisite: 45 credit hours including 9 hours of lower division history credit. Recommended: at least three upper division courses in history.
HIST 498-8 Honors Essay
Written under the direction of an individual faculty member, the honors essay will reflect a familiarity with the events and literature of a particular area of study. Prerequisite: 45 credit hours including 9 hours of lower division history credit. Students entering 400 division seminars should have an appropriate background in 100 and 200 division and/or 300 division history. Normally, students should have completed 45 credit hours (or the equivalent) prior to enrollment in any upper division history course.

Humanities HUM

Faculty of Arts

HUM 101-3 Introduction to the Humanities
An introduction to issues and concepts central to the study of the Humanities. Through exposure to primary materials drawn from different periods and disciplines, students will become acquainted with a range of subjects and ideas relating to the study of human values and human experience.
HUM 102-3 Classical Mythology
An introduction to the central myths of the Greeks and Romans. The course will investigate the nature, function, and meaning of myths in the classical world and their considerable influence on western civilization. (lecture/tutorial)
HUM 151-3 Ancient Greek I
An introduction to the classical Greek language. (tutorial) Students who have taken GRE 100 cannot take this course for further credit.
HUM 152-3 Ancient Greek II
The continuation of Ancient Greek I. (tutorial) Prerequisite: HUM 151, or permission of the instructor. Students who have taken GRE 101 cannot take this course for further credit.
HUM 161-3 Latin I
An introduction to the Latin language. (tutorial) Students who have taken LATN 100 cannot take this course for further credit.
HUM 162-3 Latin II
The continuation of Latin I. (tutorial) Prerequisite: HUM 161 or permission of the instructor. Students who have taken LATN 101 cannot take this course for further credit.
HUM 201-3 Great Texts in the Humanities I
An intensive study of some of the major works which have had a formative influence on the structure and development of western thought. practicing and discussion of primary texts and the major themes which emerge from them will introduce students to essential philosophical, literary, social, and religious themes of western civilization. Texts for this course will be drawn from the Ancient World, Middle Ages and the Renaissance. (lecture/tutorial) Prerequisite: HIST 105 or PHIL 150 or 30 credit hours.
HUM 202-3 Great Texts in the Humanities II
An intensive study of some of the major works which have had a formative influence on the structure and development of western thought. practicing and discussion of primary texts and the major themes which emerge from them will introduce students to essential philosophical, literary, social and religious themes of western civilization. Texts for this course will be drawn from the 17th century through to the modern period. (lecture/tutorial) Prerequisite: HIST 106 or PHIL 151 or 30 credit hours.
HUM 203-3 Great Texts in the Humanities III
An introduction to classic texts which have endured as monuments of Asian thought and literature. Readings and discussions of primary texts and their central ideas will introduce students to philosophical, literary and religious themes in a selected, major Asian tradition. (lecture/tutorial) Prerequisite: 30 credit hours.
HUM 227-3 Introduction to the Study of the Future
An introduction to the study of the future as a field of inquiry, its methodology, issues, and the problems that arise when we attempt to understand or control what will happen. (lecture/tutorial) Students who have taken GS 227 cannot take this course for further credit.
HUM 230-3 Introduction to Religious Studies
The exploration of religion as expressed in a number of major traditions including an investigation of primary textual sources. (lecture/tutorial)
HUM 240-3 Studies in European Cultures
An interdisciplinary approach to European cultures through the examination of historical, literary, philosophical and aesthetic materials related to a specific period and place in the development of Western civilization. (lecture/tutorial) Prerequisite: 30 credit hours. Students with credit for GS 240 or 242 cannot take this course for further credit.
HUM 302-4 The Golden Age of Greece: An Integrated Society
The study of Athenian society in the 5th century BC, a period unique in the record of human achievement during which virtually all the major humanistic fields were either initiated or received significant new impetus. Integrates the remarkable achievements of this `Golden Age' in an interdisciplinary examination of its art, architecture and writings. (seminar) Prerequisite: 45 credit hours.
HUM 303-4 The Latin Humanist Tradition
Studies in the writings of various Latin authors. (seminar) Prerequisite: 45 credit hours.
HUM 305-4 Medieval Studies
A detailed interdisciplinary analysis of a selected topic, issue, or personality in the Middle Ages. (seminar) Prerequisite: 45 credit hours.
HUM 307-4 Carolingian Civilization
A focused interdisciplinary study of the Carolingian civilization achieved in early medieval Europe under Charlemagne and his family. (seminar) Prerequisite: 45 credit hours.
HUM 311-4 Italian Renaissance Humanism
A study of the major writings, cultural milieu, and influence of the humanist movement of the Italian Renaissance. (seminar) Prerequisite: 45 credit hours.
HUM 312-4 Renaissance Studies
A detailed interdisciplinary analysis of a selected topic, issue, or personality from the Italian and/or Northern Renaissance. (seminar) Prerequisite: 45 credit hours.
HUM 320-4 The Humanities and Philosophy
An exploration of the characteristic ways in which the humanities, with its emphasis on expression, belief and tradition, presents the important philosophical concepts of western civilization. Based upon an interdisciplinary selection of texts drawn from history, philosophy, literature and the arts. (seminar) Prerequisite: 45 credit hours. Students who have taken this course as HUM 306 cannot take this course for further credit.
HUM 321-4 The Humanities and Critical Thinking
A study of the counter-traditions within western civilization. Compares and contrasts diverse traditions within western culture that critique its central value systems. It will focus on the attempts of great artists and thinkers to break with tradition, and the subsequent creation of new ideas and forms of experience and expression. (seminar) Prerequisite: 45 credit hours. Students who have taken HUM 308 cannot take this course for further credit.
HUM 325-4 The Humanities and the Natural World
A study of the humanistic, scientific, political, and ideological discourses deriving from concern with the natural environment. Using classic and contemporary sources, this course examines the interaction of humans with the non-human world, and includes such subjects as human communities and nature, the immersion of the individual in nature, nature and the human habitat. (seminar) Prerequisite: 45 credit hours.
HUM 327-4 Critical Issues in the Study of the Future
An exploration of central controversies and issues in the study of the future. (seminar) Prerequisite: 45 credit hours. Students who have taken this course as GS 427 cannot take this course for further credit. Recommended: HUM 227 is strongly advised.
HUM 330-4 Religion in Context
An in-depth investigation of a specific case of religious history and tradition. Religion will be studied through the cultural and historical contexts that pervade and structure religious meaning and expression. (seminar) Prerequisite: 45 credit hours. Students who have taken this course as HUM 304 cannot take this course for further credit.
HUM 332-4 Mythology in Context
A detailed interdisciplinary study of the role of mythology within a particular culture or tradition. (seminar) Prerequisite: 45 credit hours. Recommended: HUM 102.
HUM 340-4 Great Cities in Their Time
An exploration of the cultural and intellectual accomplishments of a specific city that achieved prominence in a particular time period, and had substantial impact and influence on human civilization. Examines the political, social, religious, and cultural factors that help to explain a city's significance and investigates the achievements of its citizens. (seminar) Prerequisite: 45 credit hours.
HUM 350-4 Great Figures in the Humanistic Tradition
An interdisciplinary study of the life and works of a man or woman who has made a lasting contribution to the humanistic tradition in more than one field of endeavor (e.g. philosophy, politics, literature, economics, religion). (seminar) Prerequisite: 45 credit hours. Students who have taken this syllabu under another Humanities course number cannot take this course for further credit.
HUM 375-4 The Woodsworth Seminar
A special syllabu in the humanities to be offered by the Woodsworth chair. (seminar) Prerequisite: 45 credit hours.
HUM 381-4 Selected subjects in the Humanities I
(seminar) Prerequisite: 45 credit hours.
HUM 382-4 Selected subjects in the Humanities II
(seminar) Prerequisite: 45 credit hours.
HUM 383-4 Selected subjects in the Humanities III
(seminar) Prerequisite: 45 credit hours.
HUM 390-4 Directed Studies in Humanities
Prerequisite: two of any 300 level humanities courses or permission of the co-ordinator plus permission of instructor. This course may be used only once for credit towards a degree.
HUM 400-5 Humanities Study Project
A substantial research and writing project culminating in the completion of an essay on a humanities topic. Prerequisite: completion of 75 credit hours which should include at least two 300 level humanities courses; the signature of a faculty member who is willing to supervise the project; approval of the humanities co-ordinator. This course may be used only once for credit towards a degree.
HUM 471-0 Practicum I
First semester of work experience in the Humanities Co-operative Education Program. Students should apply to the faculty of Arts Co-op Education co-ordinator one semester in advance. Prerequisite: a minimum of 30 credit hours with nine credit hours in Humanities courses and a minimum CGPA of 2.75
HUM 472-0 Practicum II
Second semester of work experience in the Humanities Co-operative Education Program. Students should apply to the Faculty of Arts Co-op Education co-ordinator one semester in advance. Prerequisite: successful completion of HUM 471, a minimum of 45 credit hours with nine credit hours in Humanities courses plus a minimum CGPA of 2.75.
HUM 473-0 Practicum III
Third semester of work experience in the Humanities Co-operative Education Program. Students should apply to the Faculty of Arts Co-op Education co-ordinator one semester in advance. Prerequisite: successful completion of HUM 472, a minimum of 60 credit hours with nine credit hours in Humanities courses plus a minimum CGPA of 2.75.
HUM 474-0 Practicum IV
Fourth semester of work experience in the Humanities Co-operative Education Program. Students should apply to the Faculty of Arts Co-op Education co-ordinator one semester in advance. Prerequisite: successful completion of HUM 473, a minimum of 75 credit hours with nine credit hours in Humanities courses plus a minimum CGPA of 2.75.

Italian ITAL

Faculty of Arts

Department of French

Students with a competence in the language beyond the level of the course in which they are registered will be required to withdraw. Students who are not sure of their language level are responsible for seeing that their level of proficiency is assessed prior to registration in the course. Arrangements for proficiency assessment in each language will be announced before the commencement of each semester. Consult the registration handbook or inquire at the Department of French general office for the procedure to be followed.
ITAL 100-3 Introductory Italian I
This course is designed to provide the student with the means of acquiring basic spoken fluency and practicing facility. (tutorial/laboratory)
ITAL 101-3 Introductory Italian II
This course continues the work of ITAL 100. Considerable emphasis will be placed on oral and practicing facility as well as basic writing skills. (tutorial/laboratory) Prerequisite: ITAL 100.
ITAL 200-3 Intermediate Italian I
An intermediate Italian course continuing the work of ITAL 101. In addition to consolidation of oral practice, grammar, practicing and composition skills, a cultural component is included as well as selected readings from Italian authors. Prerequisite: ITAL 101.
ITAL 201-3 Intermediate Italian II
ITAL 201 continues the work of ITAL 200. Oral and written competence in Italian are extended through grammar review, oral practice, cultural studies, selected readings from Italian authors and multimedia activities. Prerequisite: ITAL 200.

Japanese JAPN

Faculty of Arts

Department of Linguistics

Language Training Institute

JAPN 100-3 Introduction to Japanese I
A comprehensive introduction to the Japanese language including the three writing systems. (tutorial) Prerequisite: students with any prior knowledge or experience in Japanese beyond the level of this course may not register in this course. Students with some previous knowledge of Japanese should consult with the instructor for course placement.
JAPN 101-3 Introduction to Japanese II
Continuation of JAPN 100. (tutorial) Prerequisite: JAPN 100 or permission of the department.
JAPN 200-3 Advanced Beginners' Japanese I
Continuation of JAPN 101. (tutorial) Prerequisite: JAPN 101 or permission of the department.
JAPN 201-3 Advanced Beginners' Japanese II
Continuation of JAPN 200. (tutorial) Prerequisite: JAPN 200 or permission of the department.
JAPN 250-3 Conversation and Composition
Conversation and composition on selected subjects in advanced beginners' level. (tutorial) Prerequisite: JAPN 101 or permission of the department.

Kinesiology KIN

Faculty of Applied Sciences

Students wishing to register for kinesiology courses must have obtained a grade of C- or better in prerequisite courses.
KIN 105-3 Fundaments of Human Structure and Function
This course will provide students with basic physiology of the nervous system, and muscle, endocrine system, cardiorespiratory system, kidney and gastrointestinal system. (distance education) Kinesiology majors and honors students may not receive credit for KIN 105. Recommended: grade 11 biology, chemistry and physics.
KIN 110-3 Human Nutrition: Current Issues
An introduction of the principles of human nutrition with an emphasis on subjects of current interest. The material is presented in a Canadian context to focus on nutrition practices and problems in this country. Students will gain an understanding of factors affecting food selection and the role of nutrition in maintaining good health. Students will develop the ability to discriminate between reliable and unreliable information on the subject of food and nutrition. (lecture/tutorial)
KIN 111-3 Food and Food Safety
This course includes basic information on food, the safety of the food supply and current issues around the production, storage and distribution of food. Students will gain an understanding of basic food components, the physical foundations of food science, and the elements of food processing and preservation. Food-borne disease, biotechnology, irradiation of food, contaminants and additives in food, Canadian food labelling and advertising regulations, and food consumption trends will be examined. Nutritional biochemistry concepts will be interfaced with practical questions of food choice and eating practices. Recommended: grade 11 chemistry.
KIN 140-3 Contemporary Health Issues
Explores health from a holistic perspective, in which health is viewed as physical, psychological, and social well-being. Considers genetics, environment, personal health behaviors (such as diet, exercise, stress management, and drug use), socioeconomic status, health care delivery systems, and aging with the intent to Boost students' abilities to evaluate health information. (lecture/tutorial)
KIN 142-3 Introduction to Kinesiology
Basic procedures for the assessment of the status and performance of the individual according to the principles of anthropometry, functional anatomy, biomechanics, exercise physiology, and motor learning. (lecture/laboratory) Recommended: grade 11 biology, chemistry and physics.
KIN 143-3 Exercise Management
Introduces the student to exercise physiology. Focuses on personal exercise prescription to Boost aerobic capacity, muscular strength and endurance, and flexibility. Also discusses athletic conditioning, e.g. speed and power training. The effects of nutritional and environmental factors on exercise and the role of exercise in weight control and stress management are considered. (lecture/laboratory) Recommended: medical clearance from a personal physician.
KIN 201-3 Biomechanics
This course will cover the application of basic mechanics to human movement. It will provide students with a basic understanding of how forces act on body segments and how movements are produced. The subject matter of this course is relevant to quantifying all forms of physical activity, from activities of daily living, physically challenged movement patterns, to elite athletic performance. It also has applications in medical settings, including rehabilitation and sports medicine. (lecture/tutorial) Prerequisite: MATH 152 or 155, PHYS 101 or 120, PHYS 102 or 121, PHYS 130 or 131, KIN 142.
KIN 205-3 Introduction to Human Physiology
An introductory survey of human physiology with an emphasis on mechanisms of regulation and integration. Anatomy of structures will be detailed only when it is critical to a functional understanding. Although this is intended as a survey course, some subjects will be covered in reasonable detail in order to provide insight into mechanisms of function. (lecture/tutorial) Prerequisite: MBB 221 (or BICH 221), PHYS 101 (or 120), and PHYS 102 (or 121). Kinesiology majors and honors students who have taken KIN 105 must also take KIN 205. For students taking both of these courses, credit will only be given for KIN 205.
KIN 207-3 Information Processing in Human Motor Systems
Students are introduced to human motor systems from psychological, physiological and computational approaches. Although a behavioral (information processing) approach to understanding voluntary goal-directed movement is stressed, research from a variety of distinct areas is integrated in an attempt to provide a coherent picture of our understanding of human motor systems. (lecture/tutorial) Prerequisite: KIN 142 or permission of instructor.
KIN 212-3 Food and Society
This course deals with the cultural, social, agricultural and economic factors which influence food selection and nutrition. Students will explore traditional diets of various ethnic groups, and diet modification as immigrants adjust to life in a new country or to an urban setting. The course will also examine domestic and global food security, hunger in the developing and developed world, and sustainable methods of meeting the increasing world food demand. Prerequisite: KIN 110.
KIN 221-3 Special subjects in Kinesiology
Selected subjects in areas not currently offered within the undergraduate course offerings in the School of Kinesiology. Prerequisite: to be announced in the Course Timetable and exam Schedule.
KIN 241-3 Sports Injuries - Prevention and Rehabilitation
Includes delineation of the role of the sports therapist and will study the structural and functional characteristics of the body with regard to the prevention of injury in sport. A first aid approach to athletic injuries will be developed with practical experience in routine treatments. (lecture/laboratory) Prerequisite: KIN 142.
KIN 301-3 Biomechanics Laboratory
This laboratory course covers the quantitative biomechanical evaluation of human movement. Analysis techniques for quantifying motion of body segments in athletes, normal populations and special populations will be included. Experiments will measure force production in whole body activities such as walking and jumping. Experiments will also look at the nature of muscular force generation and the mechanical properties of the musculoskeletal system. Prerequisite: PHYS 130 or 131, KIN 201.
KIN 303-3 Kinanthropometry
A study of human size, shape, proportion, composition, maturation and gross function related to basic concepts of growth, exercise, performance and nutrition. (lecture/tutorial/laboratory) Prerequisite: KIN 142 and STAT 201.
KIN 304-3 Inquiry and Measurement in Kinesiology
This course covers the evaluation of measurement quality, test construction and assessment, and computer techniques for data capture and signal processing relevant to issues in Kinesiology. Prerequisite statistical knowledge will be put into practice when discussing typical research designs, modeling and hypothesis testing in Kinesiology. (3-1-0) Prerequisite: KIN 142, 201, 205, 207, and STAT 201.
KIN 305-3 Human Physiology I
Deals with the physiology and pathophysiology of the cardiovascular, respiratory, and renal systems in detail. (lecture/tutorial) Prerequisite: KIN 201, 205, CHEM 281 (or 150 and 155), PHYS 102 (or 121), MATH 155 (or 152). Students other than kinesiology majors require KIN 205 or BISC 305 plus permission of the instructor.
KIN 306-3 Human Physiology II (Principles of Physiological Regulation)
Examines the regulation of body functions with an emphasis on the endocrine, gastrointestinal and neuronal systems. The course focuses on integration of physiological mechanisms at the cellular and organ levels. Examples of abnormal human physiology are used to illustrate important principles. (lecture/tutorial) Prerequisite: KIN 201, 205, 207, CHEM 281 (or 150 and 155), PHYS 102 (or 121), MATH 155 (or 152). Students other than kinesiology majors require KIN 205 or BISC 305 plus permission of the instructor.
KIN 310-3 Exercise/Work Physiology
The study of human physiological responses and adaptations to acute and chronic exercise/work. Cardiorespiratory, cellular and metabolic adaptations will be studied and discussed in detail. (lecture/seminar) Prerequisite: KIN 205. Recommended: KIN 201 and 207.
KIN 311-3 Applied Human Nutrition
The principles of nutritional biochemistry are applied to nutrition in life cycle - pregnancy, lactation, infancy, childhood, adolescence and aging. The second part of the course deals with common disease conditions where nutrition plays an important role in prevention or treatment or both. The course is presented in the Canadian context featuring sources of help on Canadian practice, standards and regulations. Prerequisite: KIN 105 or 205 and 110. Students with credit for KIN 220 may not take KIN 311 for further credit.
KIN 312-3 Nutrition for Fitness and Sport
This course examines the theory and application of nutrition for fitness and sport. Students will study issues around dietary practices commonly promoted for performance enhancement, including mechanisms, effectiveness, risks and regulations. Students will learn skills for critical evaluation of nutrition research and nutrition claims, and will employ these in several small group projects investigating specific nutrition issues and products. Prerequisite: KIN 105 (or 205), and 110.
KIN 325-3 Basic Human Anatomy
An introductory course for students interested in physical education, health science professions and liberal arts. Brief discussions on applied anatomy, aging, common dysfunctions and diseases enable students to appreciate the relationship between structure and function. (distance education) Prerequisite: KIN 142 and 205 (or KIN 105 with a grade of C or higher). Available only through correspondence, this course will not be counted as an upper level optional course for a major in kinesiology. Students with credit for KIN 326 may not take KIN 325 for further credit.
KIN 326-4 Functional Anatomy
Pursues a systematic study of human anatomy with emphasis on functional applications. A comparative study of organs and body systems using laboratory dissections to provide an understanding of the three dimensional organization of the human body. Participation in all labs is required. (lecture/laboratory) Prerequisite: KIN 142, 201, 205 and at least 60 hours of undergraduate course credit. Students with credit for KIN 325 may not take KIN 326 for further credit.
KIN 336-3 Microscopic Anatomy (Histology)
Light and electron microscopic study of mammalian tissues and organs with emphasis on human systems. (lecture/laboratory) Prerequisite: KIN 326 or permission of the instructor.
KIN 340-3 Active Health: Behavior and Promotion
This course examines the relationships among health, physical activity, and other health associated behaviors. Background information is provided concerning the influence of fitness on various disease states as well as the epidemiology of health and exercise behaviors. The course examines the theories and models of health behavior in the context of intervention and promotion strategies. (3-0-0) Prerequisite: KIN 105, 140, 143; or KIN 205. Recommended: 60 credit hours.
KIN 342-3 Active Health
An extension of KIN 143, Exercise Management, this course parallels the on-campus course KIN 343. This course is designed for students completing the Health and Fitness Certificate and/or a Kinesiology minor. The goal of the course is to provide students with an opportunity to appreciate principles of exercise leadership, assess individual fitness needs, design programs and monitor effects of prescribed exercise. This course is available only through distance education. Prerequisite: Kin 105 (or 205), 142 and 143. Kinesiology majors and honors students may not receive credit for KIN 342.
KIN 343-3 Active Health: Assessment and Programming
An extension of KIN 143, Exercise Management, designed to provide students with an opportunity to appreciate principles of exercise leadership, assess individual fitness needs, design programs and monitor effects of prescribed exercise. The course includes a 34 hour practicum. (lecture/laboratory) Prerequisite: KIN 142, 143 and 205; STAT 201 or an equivalent statistics course. Students with credit for KIN 342 may not take KIN 343 for further credit.
KIN 351-0 Practicum I
The first semester of work experience. It is available only to kinesiology co-operative education students. Prerequisite: students must apply to the kinesiology co-op co-ordinator at least one semester in advance.
KIN 352-0 Practicum II
The second semester of work experience. It is available only to kinesiology co-operative education students. Prerequisite: students must apply to the kinesiology co-op co-ordinator at least one semester in advance. They will normally be required to have completed KIN 351.
KIN 367-3 Psychology of Motor Skill Acquisition
An examination of phases of skill acquisition, transfer of training, training principles, retention of motor skills, and the influence of motivation, personality and social factors on the acquisition of skill. (lecture/tutorial/laboratory) Prerequisite: KIN 207.
KIN 375-3 Human Growth and Development
The fundamentals of physiological growth and development from conception to maturity. subjects included form a strong foundation for those interested in designing appropriate activity programs for children of all ages. (lecture/tutorial) Prerequisite: KIN 105 or 205, and 142.
KIN 380-3 Occupational Biomechanics
This course will teach the principles of biomechanical analysis and their application in the workplace. subjects will include techniques for measurement and analysis of movement; analysis of forces and accelerations in three dimensions; work and power; simple biomechanical and biodynamic models; standards for lifting and carrying, their application and limitations. Prerequisite: KIN 201, 205 and 326 which may be taken concurrently.
KIN 381-3 Psychology of Work
The application of psychological principles and methods to the study of human performance at work. A systems approach will be taken to study the interactions among the individual worker, his/her task, groups of workers, and the management structure of the organization. Prerequisite: PSYC 210 or both of KIN 207 and STAT 201. Corequisite: STAT 201 may be taken concurrently.
KIN 382-3 Physical Hazards in the Workplace
The focus of this course will be the study of the physical environment and its effects on the health, safety and performance of the worker. Physical problems associated with noise, vibration, lighting, radiation, dust and ventilation will be examined together with methods of recognition, treatment, protection and prevention. Prerequisite: KIN 142, 201, 205, PHYS 130 or 131.
KIN 383-3 Human-Machine and Human-Computer Interaction
Human information processing and motor control factors are considered as factors relevant to effective, usable human-machine interfaces. A user-centred approach deals with task analysis, context of use, information processing demands, the interface, and the design, assessment and usability of tools, machines and computers. (lecture/tutorial) Prerequisite: KIN 201 and 207.
KIN 402-3 Mechanical Behavior of Tissues
An extension of KIN 201, designed to provide students with an understanding of tissue structure-function relations in health and disease, from a biomechanical perspective. subjects include the effect of disease (and aging) on tissue properties, the mechanics and prevention of tissue injury, and the design of implants and prostheses. While the focus will be primarily on analysis of the musculoskeletal system at the tissue and whole-body levels, we will also consider biomechanical models of the cardiovascular and respiratory systems. (lecture/tutorial) Prerequisite: KIN 201.
KIN 407-3 Human Physiology Laboratory
Experiments dealing with the nervous, muscular, cardiovascular, respiratory, and renal systems are covered. (laboratory) Prerequisite: PHYS 130 (or 131), KIN 305 and 306.
KIN 412-3 Molecular and Cellular Cardiology
This course entails a detailed analysis of the molecular and cellular basis of cardiac function. The material will be derived from myriad disciplines including: anatomy (histology and ultrastructure), biomechanics, physiology, electrophysiology, biochemistry and molecular biology. A particular emphasis will be placed on the mechanisms by which the heart responds to stresses such as ischemia and exercise. (lecture/tutorial) Prerequisite: KIN 305.
KIN 415-3 Neural Control of Movement
An in depth treatment of neurophysiology. Synaptic inputs and cell interactions in the spinal cord are used to illustrate the general principles of interaction in the nervous system. Other subjects include central and peripheral motor control, the vestibular system and the visual system. (lecture/tutorial) Prerequisite: KIN 306 or BISC 305 and KIN 326.
KIN 416-3 Control of Limb Mechanics
Control of the human musculoskeletal system examined from the perspective of mechanical impedance. Mechanics of individual muscles, single joints spanned by multiple muscles and multi-joint limb segments are discussed in the context of physical interaction with the environment. Prerequisite: KIN 201 and 306.
KIN 418-3 Electrophysiological Techniques Lab
This laboratory course allows students to explore basic biophysical and electrophysiological properties of excitable tissues in a realistic research environment and to develop practical laboratory skills for the neurosciences. Prerequisite: KIN 306. Recommended: KIN 415.
KIN 420-3 Selected subjects in Kinesiology I
Selected subjects in areas not currently offered as formal courses within the undergraduate course offerings in the School of Kinesiology. The subjects in this course will vary from semester to semester, depending on faculty availability and student interest. Prerequisite: to be announced in the Course Timetable and exam Schedule.
KIN 421-3 Selected subjects in Kinesiology II
Selected subjects in areas not currently offered as formal courses within the undergraduate course offerings in the School of Kinesiology. The subjects in this course will vary from semester to semester, depending on faculty availability and student interest. Prerequisite: to be announced in the Course Timetable and exam Schedule.
KIN 422-3 Selected subjects in Kinesiology III
Selected subjects in areas not currently offered as formal courses within the undergraduate course offerings in the School of Kinesiology. The subjects in this course will vary from semester to semester, depending on faculty availability and student interest. Prerequisite: to be announced in the Course Timetable and exam Schedule.
KIN 423-3 Selected subjects in Kinesiology IV
Selected subjects in areas not currently offered as formal courses within the undergraduate course offerings in the School of Kinesiology. The subjects in this course will vary from semester to semester, depending on faculty availability and student interest. (lecture/tutorial) Prerequisite: to be announced in the Course Timetable and exam Schedule.
KIN 424-3 Selected subjects in Kinesiology V
Selected subjects in areas not currently offered as formal courses within the undergraduate course offerings in the School of Kinesiology. The subjects in this course will vary from semester to semester, depending on faculty availability and student interest. (lecture/tutorial) Prerequisite: to be announced in the Course Timetable and exam Schedule.
KIN 426-3 Neuromuscular Anatomy
This course explores human neuromuscular anatomy using a lecture format supplemented by course readings, an anatomy atlas and tutorials which are presented in an interactive fashion via the Macintosh Computer Laboratory on campus. A strong grounding will be given in neuroanatomy with additional emphasis on the limb musculature and its innervation. Prerequisite: KIN 326.
KIN 430-3 Human Energy Metabolism
Pathways of energy flow in animals and man, and the relationship of biological energy transduction to the needs of the whole animal. Quantitative aspects of bioenergetics and adaptation to changes in energy supply and demand. Measuring techniques applied to adaptations to muscle activity and variations in food intake. (lecture/tutorial) Prerequisite: KIN 306 or 310 or MBB 321 (or BICH 321).
KIN 431-3 Environmental Carcinogenesis
An introduction to core concepts in the field of environmental carcinogenesis. Emphasis will be on the complex interactions of lifestyle factors, carcinogen exposure, genetic susceptibility and dietary habits as determinants of cancer risk. Class work will include discussions of new techniques to monitor exposure to environmental carcinogens and of regulatory aspects of governmental agencies towards carcinogenic agents, as well as approaches being used by such agencies in risk assessment. (lecture/tutorial) Prerequisite: MBB 221 and at least 90 credit hours.
KIN 442-3 Biomedical Systems
Concepts and tools of systems analysis will be introduced. Since these involve a philosophy of problem-solving rather than a catalogue of techniques, they will be applied to a number of very different problems in biomedicine and kinesiology. (lecture/tutorial) Prerequisite: MATH 155 (or 152), PHYS 130 (or 131), KIN 305, 306.
KIN 444-3 Cardiac Disease: Prevention and Rehabilitation
The goal of this course is to provide the student with both basic and practical knowledge of cardiac rehabilitation. Through this course, the student will be better prepared to participate in community or hospital based cardiac rehabilitation programs. This knowledge base in conjunction with KIN 445 is intended to adequately prepare the student to successfully complete the requirements for certification through the American College of Sports Medicine as an exercise specialist. Prerequisite: KIN 305. Recommended: KIN 110, 306, 310 and 343.
KIN 445-3 Advanced Cardiac Rehabilitation
This course will provide students with experience in practical aspects of assessing cardiac performance and techniques of cardiac rehabilitation. It will also introduce students to relevant research questions in cardiac rehabilitation and provide a basis for understanding of how this field will expand and evolve. Along with KIN 444 and time spent working in a cardiac rehabilitation program, this course will help prepare students for certification through the ACSM as an exercise specialist. Prerequisite: KIN 444.
KIN 446-3 Neurobiology of Disease
Examines neural and neuromuscular diseases, including Alzheimer's disease, amyotrophic lateral sclerosis, multiple sclerosis, stroke, and myasthenia gravis. Emphasizes currently favoured hypotheses, underlying evidence and pathogenic mechanisms. (3-0-0) Prerequisite: KIN 306. Recommended: KIN 336 and/or KIN 415.
KIN 448-3 Rehabilitation of Movement Control
This course is aimed at students interested in neuromuscular rehabilitation. Students will learn about the pathological origins of movement disorders associated with impaired function of sensory and motor systems. The course will be focused on the stages and strategies for recovery of voluntary control of essential functions. The range of rehabilitation interventions available to assist recovery and restore voluntary control will be explored, with special emphasis on advanced techniques to restore control of movement and bodily functions in paralyzed people. (3-0-0) Prerequisite: KIN 201, 207, 306.
KIN 451-0 Practicum III
The third semester of work experience. It is available only to kinesiology co-operative education students. Prerequisite: students must apply to the kinesiology co-op co-ordinator at least one semester in advance. They will normally be required to have completed KIN 352.
KIN 452-0 Practicum IV
The fourth semester of work experience. It is available only to kinesiology co-operative education students. Prerequisite: students must apply to the kinesiology co-op co-ordinator at least one semester in advance. They will normally be required to have completed KIN 451.
KIN 453-0 Practicum V
The fifth semester of work experience. It is available only to kinesiology co-operative education students. Prerequisite: students must apply to the kinesiology co-op co-ordinator at least one semester in advance, and normally must have completed KIN 452.
KIN 461-3 Physiological Aspects of Aging
Designed for those who require a serious but fairly broad discussion of specific physiological aspects of aging. The overall emphasis is on humans and other mammalian species and the varieties of aging changes they manifest. (lecture/tutorial) Prerequisite: KIN 105 or 205, 142 and 90 credit hours.
KIN 467-3 Human Motor Control
The advanced study of human motor control, primarily from a behavioral perspective. Course content will include sections on: Bernstein's approach to the problem of co-ordination and action, theories of action, studies of relatively latest empirical work in support of the theories. (lecture/tutorial/laboratory) Prerequisite: KIN 205 and 207 or permission of instructor.
KIN 481-3 Activity-Generated Musculoskeletal Disorders
This is a kinesiological approach to understanding the causes and prevention of musculoskeletal disorders caused by activity (work and sport). Particular attention will be paid to injuries to the back, neck, hand and arm. (lecture/tutorial/laboratory) Prerequisite: KIN 201 and 326.
KIN 484-3 Altitude & Aerospace Physiology
The theme of this course is human physiology in environments of decreased atmospheric pressure, high G-force, and weightlessness. The course will deal with acute and chronic adaptations to these environments as well as life support systems and "countermeasures" developed to expand the envelope of human performance. Developments of breathing apparatus and G-suits for high performance aircraft will be examined as they relate to solving the physiological problems of exposure to these environments. Effects of short and extended periods of weightlessness on cardiovascular, cerebrovascular, musculo-skeletal, neural, hormonal and vestibular systems will be explored. (3-0-3) Prerequisite: KIN 305, 306. Recommended: KIN 407.
KIN 485-4 Human Factors in the Underwater Environment
The physiological effects of pressure on the human body and interfacing of humans and machine underwater are considered. subjects include the history of diving, decompression theory, decompression disorders, pulmonary function, underwater work, underwater breathing apparatus, narcosis, saturation diving, high pressure nervous syndrome, and atmospheric diving suits. (lecture/tutorial/laboratory) Prerequisite: KIN 305, 306, MATH 155 (or 152).
KIN 486-3 Human Factors in Industrial Design
The objective of the course is to learn the rudiments of design layout. In an industrial context, a well designed human-machine system must have more than just good display and control components. The essence of industrial design is to arrange system components so as to minimize production inefficiencies and quality control and safety compromises. Industrial examples will be presented to illustrate how human-factors input can Boost the production process and help to control some of the extreme hazards that arise in industrial environments. Prerequisite: KIN 304, 380 and 383.
KIN 496-3 Directed Study I
Directed practicing and literature research on subjects selected in consultation with the supervising instructor. This course may not be repeated for additional credit. A student who has completed KIN 499 may not receive credit for KIN 496. A short proposal of the project, approved by the course supervisor, must be submitted for approval to the chair of the undergraduate program committee by the end of the first week of classes of the semester. Prerequisite: permission from the chair of the undergraduate program committee. Usually, upper level standing with at least 75 semester hours in the kinesiology program will be required.
KIN 497-3 Kinesiology Undergraduate Honors Thesis Proposal
Supervised directed study and research leading to the development of a formal undergraduate thesis proposal for work to be conducted in KIN 499. The activity in KIN 497 may be augmented by other course work and a pilot study. In cases where an industrial/community partner is involved in the development of a project, the work need not be conducted at Simon Fraser University and may be completed external to SFU. Supervision of KIN 497 will be conducted by a suitable faculty member, but may be co-supervised by an industrial/community partner. Supervisor(s) must be approved by the undergraduate program committee. The plan of activities for each KIN 497 should be submitted to the chair of the undergraduate program committee for approval one month prior to the semester in which the course will be taken. Prerequisite: only students in the honors program may register for KIN 497; 90 credit hours, STAT 201, and permission of the chair of the undergraduate program committee.
KIN 498-3 Directed Study II
Directed study and research selected in consultation with the supervising instructor. A short proposal of the project approved by the course supervisor, must be submitted for approval to the chair of the undergraduate program committee by the end of the first week of classes of the semester. Prerequisite: STAT 201 and permission from the chair of the undergraduate program committee. Usually, upper level standing with at least 75 semester hours in the kinesiology program will be required. Students with credit for KIN 497 may not take KIN 498 for further credit. Honors students may not take KIN 498 for credit.
KIN 499-12 Kinesiology Undergraduate Honors Thesis
A thesis based on research previously proposed in KIN 497. Formal approval of the research syllabu is given by attaining a minimum grade of B in KIN 497. Regulations regarding the locale of the work, supervision and other arrangements, follow those for KIN 497. The written thesis should be submitted to the chair of the undergraduate program committee by the last day of exams of the semester. The thesis will also be presented orally as a seminar in an open forum at the end of the semester. Prerequisite: KIN 497. Only students in the honors program may register for KIN 499. A student may register for one other course concurrently with KIN 499 with permission from the faculty supervisor for KIN 499.

Labor Studies LBST

Faculty of Arts

Department of History

LBST 101-3 Introducing Labor Studies
Introduction to key concepts necessary for understanding the character and organization of work in contemporary society. The discussion of such issues as how our society decides who works, what the work will be, and under what conditions people work, will be situated in the context of current debates, trend and issues. (2-1-0)
LBST 301-3 Labor Movements: Contemporary Issues and Images
This course will provide students a comprehensive understanding of the contemporary structure, issues, and perceptions of labor unions and other forms of working-class organization. It will focus on external and internal problems that the labor movement faces, such as labor law and state policy, employer strategies, bureaucracy, racism and sexism. The treatment of labor in the media and popular culture will provide an understanding of how labor is viewed in society, how labor views itself, and how working-class culture informs and is informed by the larger culture. (seminar) Recommended: LBST 101.

Language LANG

Faculty of Arts

Department of Linguistics

Language Training Institute

LANG 100-149-1,2,3,4,5 Introduction to a World Language I
The acquisition of introductory language skills in a world language not separately designated in the Calendar. The specific course number and credit hours assigned will vary with the language studied as well as the focus and method of instruction.
LANG 150-199-1,2,3,4,5 Introduction to a World Language II
The acquisition of basic proficiency in language skills in a world language not separately designated in the Calendar. The specific course number and credit hours assigned will vary with the language studied as well as the focus and method of instruction. Prerequisite: LANG 100-149 in the same language, or placement on the basis of prior knowledge. Please inquire at the Language Training Institute for information on placement.
LANG 200-249-1,2,3,4,5 Intermediate Language Study I
The development of fluent language skills in a world language not separately designated in the Calendar. The specific course number and credit hours assigned will vary with the language studied as well as the focus and method of instruction. Prerequisite: LANG 150-199 in the same language, or placement on the basis of prior knowledge. Please inquire at the Language Training Institute for information on placement.
LANG 250-299-1,2,3,4,5 Intermediate Language Study II
Further development of the skills of reading, writing and speaking in a world language not separately designated in the Calendar. The specific course number and credit hours assigned will vary with the language studied as well as the focus and method of instruction. Prerequisite: LANG 200-249 in the same language, or placement on the basis of prior knowledge. Please inquire at the Language Training Institute for information on placement.

Latin American Studies LAS

Faculty of Arts

LAS 100-3 Images of Latin America
A multimedia introduction to Latin American Studies. Film screenings and media analysis sessions will complement a series of introductory lectures on various relevant contemporary issues such as ethnicity and race, gender, the ecology, and current social and political events. This is a course of general interest open to all students. (lecture/tutorial)
LAS 140-3 Cultural Heritage of Latin America
A multi-disciplinary introduction to contemporary Latin American culture through the examination of pre-Columbian, Iberian, and African civilizations. (lecture/tutorial) Students with credit for SPAN 140 may not take LAS 140 for further credit.
LAS 200-3 Introduction to Latin American Issues
A multidisciplinary introduction to contemporary Latin America. The course is organized in three modules: people and the land, the human condition, and the political alternatives, each of which will be examined from the varying perspectives of history, geography, politics, the arts, etc. (lecture/tutorial) Prerequisite: LAS 100 or 140 or permission of the instructor.
LAS 300-3 Latin American Literature
A study in English of significant contributions to Latin American literature. (lecture/tutorial)
LAS 309-3 Special Topics: Regional Studies
An interdisciplinary study of a specific Latin American region, e.g. Central America, the Andes, the Southern Cone, Amazonia, etc. One region will be examined from a multidisciplinary perspective: history, literature, politics, economy, etc. (seminar) Prerequisite: LAS 200.
LAS 312-3 Special Topics: Latin American Cultural Topics
A cross-disciplinary focus on specific elements of contemporary Latin American culture. subjects such as indigenism, Afro-Latin culture, religion, literature, and folklore will be studied. (lecture/tutorial) Prerequisite: LAS 140 or 200.
LAS 320-3 Canada and Latin America
An analysis of Canada's multi-faceted relations with Latin America. subjects include: the history of Canada's foreign policy towards Latin America, trade and investment, official development assistance and the role of non-governmental organizations, human rights, immigration and refugee policy, and participation in multilateral institutions (e.g. the OAS). (lecture/seminar) Prerequisite: LAS 200 or permission of instructor.
LAS 323-3 Women in Latin American Literature and Society
This course will examine how women writers and artists from Latin America have represented themselves as gendered social, historical and philosophical subjects. (lecture/tutorial) Prerequisite: LAS 200.
LAS 337-4 Government and Politics: Selected Latin American Nations I
An examination of the political systems of selected Latin American nations, including an analysis of political culture, political economy, political institutions, interest groups and both formal and informal political processes. (lecture/seminar) Prerequisite: POL 231 or LAS 200. Students taking LAS 337 may not take POL 337 for further credit.
LAS 380-0 Practicum I
First semester of work experience in the Latin American Studies Co-operative Education Program. Prerequisite: 30 semester hours with a minimum CGPA of 2.75, including recommended courses LAS 100, 140, 200 and SPAN 102. Students should apply to the Faculty of Arts co-op co-ordinator by the end of the second week of the semester preceding the employment semester.
LAS 390-0 Practicum II
Second semester of work experience in the Latin American Studies Co-operative Education Program. Prerequisite: completion of LAS 380 and 45 semester hours with a minimum CGPA of 2.75. Students should apply to the Faculty of Arts co-op co-ordinator by the end of the second week of the semester preceding the employment semester.
LAS 392-4 Latin America
An introduction to the peoples and institutions of Latin America in historical and contemporary perspective, emphasizing macro-level patterns of similarity and diversity. (seminar) Prerequisite: SA 101 and one of SA 201, 263, 286, 293; or LAS 200. Students with credit for SA 391 or 392 may not take this course for further credit.
LAS 402-5 Field Study
A multidisciplinary study of a selected country or region. This course will normally be part of the LAS Field School in Latin America, and will be conducted in co-operation with local lecturers from the host country. (seminar/field study) Prerequisite: LAS 200
LAS 403-4 Special Topics: Latin American Economy and Society
This seminar will be taught co-operatively by LAS associated faculty or by a visiting professor. A syllabu will be chosen which can be examined profitably from a multidisciplinary perspective. (seminar) Prerequisite: LAS 200. This course is identical to SA 403 and students cannot take both courses for credit.
LAS 404-3 Special Topics: Field School I
This course will be part of the LAS field school in Latin America. The selected region will be examined on site from a multidisciplinary perspective. (seminar) Prerequisite: LAS 200 or permission of the department.
LAS 405-3 Special Topics: Field School II
This course will be part of the LAS field school in Latin America. A syllabu will be chosen which can be examined profitably from a multidisciplinary perspective. (seminar) Prerequisite: LAS 200 or permission of the department.
LAS 410-4 Andean History and Culture
An interdisciplinary study of the history and culture of the Andean region from the Inka period to the present. The first half of the course examines the Andean response to colonialism and the nation-state; the second half focuses on issues and problems that Andean peoples confront today. (seminar) Prerequisite: LAS 140 and 200 or permission of the instructor.
LAS 411-4 Special Topics: Latin American International Relations
A multidisciplinary study of bilateral issues between Latin America and a specific country or region, e.g. US and Latin America, the Pacific Rim. Historical, economic, and ideological perspectives as well as subjects related to business, foreign aid, and immigration will be emphasized. (lecture/tutorial) Prerequisite: LAS 200. This course is identical to LAS 311, POL 340 and 440, and students cannot take more than one of these courses for credit.
LAS 428-4 Political Economy of Latin American Development
This is a survey course which introduces students to the various theoretical approaches which have been used since the 1950's to understand the political economy of Latin American development. It deals with some of the classic theories of modernization, dependency, world systems, and modes of production analysis. The last unit of the course is devoted to the most contemporary issues of Latin American development, such as the agrarian question, women and development, problems of urbanization and the informal sector. (lecture/seminar) Prerequisite: LAS 200 and either ECON 102 or 105 or permission of the instructor. This course is identical to LAS 318, SA 328, SA 428, POL 383 and 483, and students cannot take more than one of these courses for credit.
LAS 480-0 Practicum III
Third semester of work experience in the Latin American Studies Co-operative Education Program. Prerequisite: completion of LAS 390 and 60 semester hours with a minimum CGPA of 2.75. Students should apply to the Faculty of Arts co-op co-ordinator by the end of the second week of the semester preceding the employment semester.
LAS 490-0 Practicum IV
Fourth semester of work experience in the Latin American Studies Co-operative Education Program. Prerequisite: completion of LAS 480 and 75 semester hours with a minimum CGPA of 2.75. Students should apply to the Faculty of Arts co-op co-ordinator by the end of the second week of the semester preceding the employment semester.
LAS 498-5 Independent Study Project
Independent practicing and research on a cross-disciplinary project under the supervision of a faculty member. A term paper will be required. Prerequisite: 90 credit hours, including LAS 200, and permission of the department.

Liberal Arts LBRL

Faculty of Arts

LBRL 101-0 Practicum I
First semester of work experience in the Liberal Arts Co-operative Education Program. Prerequisite: at least 30 semester hours with a minimum CGPA of 3.0, including ENGL 099 and PHIL 001. Students should apply to the Faculty of Arts co-op co-ordinator by the end of the third week of the semester preceding the employment semester.
LBRL 201-0 Practicum II
Second semester of work experience in the Liberal Arts Co-operative Education Program. Prerequisite: successful completion of Liberal Arts 101 and at least 45 semester hours with a minimum CGPA of 3.0. Students should apply to the Faculty of Arts co-op co-ordinator by the end of the third week of the semester preceding the employment semester.
LBRL 301-0 Practicum III
Third semester of work experience in the Liberal Arts Co-operative Education Program. Prerequisite: successful completion of LBRL 201 and at least 60 semester hours with a minimum CGPA of 3.0. Students should apply to the Faculty of Arts co-op co-ordinator by the end of the third week of the semester preceding the employment semester.
LBRL 401-0 Practicum IV
Fourth semester of work experience in the Liberal Arts co-operative Education Program. Prerequisite: successful completion of Liberal Arts 301 and at least 75 semester hours with a minimum CGPA of 3.0. Students should apply to the Faculty of Arts co-op co-ordinator by the end of the third week of the semester preceding the employment semester.
LBRL 402-0 Practicum V
Optional fifth semester of work experience in the Liberal Arts Co-operative Education Program. Prerequisite: successful completion of LBRL 401 and at least 90 semester hours with a minimum CGPA of 3.0. Students should apply to the Faculty of Arts co-op co-ordinators by the end of the third week of the semester preceding the employment semester.
LBRL 750-0 Practicum I
First semester of work experience in the Co-operative Education Program. (0-0-0)
LBRL 751-0 Practicum II
Second semester of work experience in the Co-operative Education Program. (0-0-0)
LBRL 752-0 Practicum III
Third (optional) semester of work experience in the Co-operative Education Program. (0-0-0)

Linguistics LING

Faculty of Arts

LING 100-3 Communication and Language
A non-theoretical approach to the study of language using examples from a variety of languages. (lecture)
LING 110-3 The Wonder of Words
Study of the structure of words, the change of meaning of words, the change in form of words. Examples from English, French and other languages. A general interest course open to all students. (lecture)
LING 130-3 Practical Phonetics
Practical training in the description of sounds used in language. (seminar) Students in the First Nations Studies program should take LING 231 before LING 130.
LING 200-3 Introduction to the Description of English Grammar
A practical overview of English grammar based on linguistic principles, for those designing basic knowledge of language structure, grammatical categories and grammatical analysis. This course is particularly suited for students interested in the teaching of English as a second language. (lecture)
LING 220-3 Introduction to Linguistics
An introduction to linguistic analysis. (lecture/tutorial) Students with credit for LING 240 may not take this course for further credit.
LING 221-3 Introduction to Phonology
The principles of phonological analysis. (lecture) Prerequisite: LING 130, 220.
LING 222-3 Introduction to Syntax
The principles of syntactic analysis. (lecture) Prerequisite: LING 220.
LING 231-3 Introduction to a First Nations Language I
An introductory course in the structure of a native language of the Americas, including phonetics, vocabulary, word formation, and grammatical constructions. The course will be based on a designated language to be named each time it is taught, and will usually be chosen from the Northwest Coast area. (tutorial) Students who have taken LING 431 in semester 90-3 may not take this course for further credit. Recommended: students in the First Nations Studies program should take LING 231 before LING 130.
LING 232-3 Introduction to a First Nations Language II
A continuation of the introductory course in a native language, including phonetics, vocabulary, word formation, and grammatical constructions. The course will be based on a designated language to be named each time it is taught, and will usually be chosen from the Northwest Coast area. (tutorial) Prerequisite: LING 231 in the same language. Students who have taken LING 432 in semester 91-1 may not take this course for further credit.
LING 241-3 Languages of the World
A survey of the languages of the world. An examination of the linguistic structure of selected languages. (lecture) Prerequisite: LING 220.
LING 260-3 Language, Culture, and Society
An introduction to language in its social and cultural dimensions. (lecture/tutorial)
LING 310-6 Intensive Survey of Linguistic Analysis
An in-depth examination of core areas of linguistic analysis, including extensive practice with representative linguistic data from a variety of languages. (lecture/tutorial) This course may not be taken for credit toward a major, extended minor, minor or honors program in Linguistics. Students with credit for LING 220 may not take LING 310 for further credit.
LING 321-3 Phonology
An overview of theoretical principles in phonology. (lecture/tutorial) Prerequisite: LING 221 or 310.
LING 322-3 Syntax
The study of sentence structure in language through a survey of constructions found in natural language data together with a consideration of syntactic theory. (lecture/tutorial) Prerequisite: LING 222 or 310.
LING 323-3 Morphology
Word structure in natural languages and its relationship to phonological and syntactic levels of grammar. (lecture) Prerequisite: LING 221, 222; or 310.
LING 324-3 Semantics
The basics of word meaning, including: sense and reference, componential analysis, color and kinship terminology, semantic universals, synonymy and antonymy, one and two term predicates, lexical decomposition, presupposition, and selection restrictions. (lecture/tutorial) Prerequisite: LING 222 or 310.
LING 330-3 Phonetics
A survey of methods of speech sound description and transcription. (lecture/tutorial) Prerequisite: LING 221 or 310.
LING 331-3 Description and Analysis of a First Nations Language I
An intermediate course in the structure of a native language of the Americas, including writing systems, texts and examination of the general linguistic properties of the language and the language family in which it is situated. The course will be based on a designated language to be named each time it is taught, and will usually be chosen from the Northwest Coast area. (tutorial) Prerequisite: LING 232 or equivalent credit in the same language.
LING 332-3 Description and Analysis of a First Nations Language II
A continuation of the intermediate course in a native language of the Americas, including writing systems, texts, and examination of the general linguistic properties of the language and the language family in which it is situated. The course will be based on a designated language to be named each time it is taught, and will usually be chosen from the Northwest Coast area. (tutorial) Prerequisite: LING 331 or equivalent credit in the same language.
LING 335-3 subjects in First Nations Language I
Course content varies as required by First Nations language communities or learners. It will usually focus on having students gain insights into intermediate to advanced level subjects on structural aspects of a particular First Nations language, with further emphasis on how those structural features of the languages can best be learned and taught in the classroom. (0-3-0) Prerequisite: LING 130, 231, 332 or permission of instructor. Recommended: LING 360.
LING 350-3 First Language Acquisition
Introduction to the study of language acquisition from the point of view of linguistic structure. (lecture/tutorial) Prerequisite: LING 130, 220; or LING 310. Students who have taken LING 250 may not take this course for further credit.
LING 360-3 Linguistics and Language Teaching
Theoretical and practical aspects of second language learning. (lecture/tutorial) Prerequisite: LING 130, 220; or 310.
LING 362-3 English as a Second Language: Theory
Application of linguistic principles to the teaching of English as a second language. (lecture/tutorial) Prerequisite: LING 130, 220; or 310.
LING 363-3 English as a Second Language: Practice
Implementation of linguistic principles in the teaching of English as a second language, including a practical experience with learners of English. (lecture/laboratory) Prerequisite: LING 360, 362. This course is graded on a pass/fail basis.
LING 370-0 Linguistics Practicum I
First semester of work experience in the Linguistics Co-operative Education Program. Prerequisite: normally 30 credit hours, including LING 130 and 220 and three other courses in Linguistics, with a minimum CGPA of 2.75.
LING 371-0 Linguistics Practicum II
Second semester of work experience in the Linguistics Co-operative Education Program. Prerequisite: successful completion of LING 370 and 45 credit hours with a minimum CGPA of 2.75.
LING 400-3 Formal Linguistics
Formal systems and their relation to linguistic methods and theory. subjects include the mathematical properties of natural languages, and rigorously defined frameworks for linguistic analysis and their formal properties. (lecture/tutorial) Prerequisite: LING 322. Recommended: PHIL 210
LING 401-3 Advanced Phonetics
Advanced training in speech sound description and analysis in the impressionistic and instrumental modes. (lecture/tutorial/laboratory) Prerequisite: LING 330.
LING 405-3 Advanced Syntax
In-depth investigation of theoretical frameworks for syntactic description of natural languages. (lecture/tutorial) Prerequisite: LING 322.
LING 406-3 Advanced Semantics
This course will examine aspects of sentence meaning, including: truth conditions and their derivation from lexical and syntactic information; meaning-changing transformations; quantifier interchange; specificity and its relation to quantifier scope; opaque contexts; the role of meaning postulates; pragmatic aspects of meaning; performative sentences. (lecture) Prerequisite: LING 322, 324. Recommended: PHIL 210.
LING 407-3 Historical Linguistics
The development of languages and language families through time; genetic grouping, the comparative method, reconstruction, etymology, universals and language change. (lecture) Prerequisite: LING 321, 322 and 323.
LING 408-3 Field Linguistics
The investigation and description of an unfamiliar language. (lecture/seminar) Prerequisite: LING 221 and 222; or 310.
LING 409-3 Sociolinguistics
A systematic approach to the study of linguistic variation in different areal, social, and cultural settings. (lecture) Prerequisite: LING 220 or 310. Recommended: LING 260.
LING 430-3 Native American Languages
Structural and genetic characteristics of Native languages of America, with special emphasis on languages of the Northwest. Detailed examination of one language or language family. (seminar) Prerequisite: 12 upper division linguistics credits. Recommended: LING 241 and 323.
LING 431-3 Language Structures I
Detailed examination of the structure of a selected language. (seminar) Prerequisite: LING 221 and 222; or 310.
LING 432-3 Language Structures II
Detailed examination of the structure of a selected language. (seminar) Prerequisite: LING 221 and 222; or 310.
LING 433-3 First Nations Language Mentoring I
Intended for advanced learners of a particular First Nations language. It will enable them to get advanced vocabulary and/or grammatical skills in the First Nations language through individualized practice with fluent speakers (usually elders) of that language. Enrollment in this course requires the prior approval of the Department of Linguistics and the local First Nations community. Students will be evaluated on the basis of the individualized goals and objects set at the beginning of the course. (0-3-0) Prerequisite: LING 332 or permission of course supervisor. This course is graded on a pass/fail basis.
LING 434-3 First Nations Language Mentoring II
A follow up to LING 433. It will involve students, on an individualized basis, carrying out 39 hours of learning with a mentor, who is a fluent speaker (usually First Nations elder) or a particular First Nations language. (0-3-0) Prerequisite: LING 433 or permission of course supervisor. This course is graded on a pass/fail basis. Recommended: LING 431 and 432.
LING 435-3 subjects in First Nations Language II
Course content varies as required by First Nations language communities or learners. It will usually focus on having students gain insights into intermediate to advanced level subjects on structural aspects of a particular First Nations language, with further emphasis on how those structural features of the languages can best be learned and taught in the classroom. (0-3-0) Prerequisite: LING 220, 332 or permission of instructor. Recommended: LING 360, 431 and 432.
LING 441-3 Linguistic Universals and Typology
A survey of the main language types found in the world with reference to their structural properties; the categorization of language types as a consequence of linguistic universals. (lecture) Prerequisite: LING 221 and 222; or 310.
LING 470-0 Linguistics Practicum III
Third semester of work experience in the Linguistics Co-operative Education Program. Prerequisite: successful completion of LING 371 and 60 credit hours with a minimum CGPA of 2.75.
LING 471-0 Linguistics Practicum IV
Fourth semester of work experience in the Linguistics Co-operative Education Program. Prerequisite: successful completion of LING 470 and 75 credit hours with a minimum CGPA of 2.75.
LING 480-3 subjects in Linguistics I
Investigation of a selected area of linguistic research. (seminar) Prerequisite: 12 credit hours of upper division linguistics courses.
LING 481-3 subjects in Linguistics II
Investigation of a selected area of linguistic research. (seminar) Prerequisite: 12 credit hours of upper division linguistics courses. Note: may be taken without LING 480.
LING 490-3 Honors Essay
syllabu of a specific nature to be agreed upon by the student and a particular faculty member. (seminar) Prerequisite: a minimum of 35 hours of upper division linguistic courses counting toward the honors degree.

Management and Systems Science MSSC

Faculty of Science

See also courses listed under Economics (ECON) (page 251), Business Administration (BUS) (page 227), Computing Science (CMPT) (page 237) and Mathematics (MATH) (page 281) and Statistics (STAT) (page 298).
MSSC 480-1 Undergraduate Seminar in Management and Systems Science
A seminar for students undertaking a major or an honors program in management and systems science. (seminar) Prerequisite: completion of all required lower division courses and at least 15 upper division credits required in the program.
MSSC 481-1 Undergraduate Seminar in Management and Systems Science
A seminar for students undertaking a major or an honors program in management and systems science. (seminar) Prerequisite: completion of all required lower division courses and at least 15 upper division credits required in the program.

Marine Science MASC

Faculty of Science

See also courses listed under Biological Sciences (BISC) (page 225). Note: These courses are generally offered at the Bamfield Marine Station, located on Vancouver Island, during the summer and fall. See "Department of Biological Sciences" on page 194 for further information. In addition to the MASC courses listed below, the Bamfield Marine Station biennially offers a suite of Marine oriented courses at the station, Vancouver Island. Students interested in this offering should contact the Department of Biological Sciences for details of the next proposed offering. Offerings of the MASC courses may vary from summer to summer because instructors are drawn from different universities. For that reason, prerequisites may vary slightly. In general, upper division standing in biology is required, and admission is usually competitive. Students are encouraged to consult the brochure published each fall by the Bamfield Marine Station for full and specific details. The brochure will be available from the Department of Biological Sciences.

Minimum Grade Requirement

A grade of C- or better is required on all prerequisite BISC and MBB courses.
MASC 400-6 Directed Studies
A course of directed studies under the supervision of a member of faculty. The study will involve a research project approved by the supervisor in the field of interest of the student, and will be designed to take maximum advantage of the laboratory and/or field opportunities offered by the Bamfield Marine Station.
MASC 401-3 Directed Studies in Marine Science
A course of directed studies under the supervision of a member of faculty. The study will involve a research project approved by the supervisor in the field of interest of the student, and will be designed to take maximum advantage of the laboratory and field opportunities offered by the Marine Station. Prerequisite: Offerings of the MASC courses may vary from summer to summer because instructors are drawn from different universities. For that reason, prerequisites may vary slightly. In general, upper division standing in biology is required, and admission is usually competitive. Students are encouraged to consult the brochure published each fall by the Bamfield Marine Station for full and specific details. The brochure will be available from the Department of Biological Sciences.
MASC 410-6 Marine Invertebrate Zoology
A survey of the marine phyla, with emphasis on the benthic fauna in the vicinity of the Bamfield Marine Station. The course includes lectures, laboratory periods, field collection, identification, and observation. Emphasis is placed on the study of living specimens in the laboratory and in the field. Prerequisite: Offerings of the MASC courses may vary from summer to summer because instructors are drawn from different universities. For that reason, prerequisites may vary slightly. In general, upper division standing in biology is required, and admission is usually competitive. Students are encouraged to consult the brochure published each fall by the Bamfield Marine Station for full and specific details. The brochure will be available from the Department of Biological Sciences.
MASC 411-6 Comparative Embryology of Marine Invertebrates
A comprehensive study of development of marine invertebrates available at the Bamfield Marine Station including all major phyla and most of the minor phyla. Lectures will cover gametogenesis, fertilization, regeneration, cell lineage, mosaic and regulated development, larval development and metamorphosis of the different groups. Laboratory work will include methods and techniques of obtaining and handling gametes, preparation and maintenance of larval cultures and observation of development up to metamorphosis if possible. Some selected and clearly defined classical experiments will be performed. Efforts will also be made to study various pelagic larvae. Prerequisite: Offerings of the MASC courses may vary from summer to summer because instructors are drawn from different universities. For that reason, prerequisites may vary slightly. In general, upper division standing in biology is required, and admission is usually competitive. Students are encouraged to consult the brochure published each fall by the Bamfield Marine Station for full and specific details. The brochure will be available from the Department of Biological Sciences.
MASC 412-6 Biology of Fishes
Classification, physiology, ecology, behavior and zoogeography of fishes with particular emphasis on those in the marine environment of the British Columbia coast. Local collections from a variety of habitats will be used for experimental studies. Prerequisite: Offerings of the MASC courses may vary from summer to summer because instructors are drawn from different universities. For that reason, prerequisites may vary slightly. In general, upper division standing in biology is required, and admission is usually competitive. Students are encouraged to consult the brochure published each fall by the Bamfield Marine Station for full and specific details. The brochure will be available from the Department of Biological Sciences.
MASC 413-3 Biology of Marine Molluscs
An advanced course of selected subjects emphasizing functional morphology, ecology and evolution of this diverse phylum. Field trips will be undertaken to survey the representative molluscs of the Bamfield region. Students will be expected to complete an independent field or laboratory study of selected molluscs. Prerequisite: Offerings of the MASC courses may vary from summer to summer because instructors are drawn from different universities. For that reason, prerequisites may vary slightly. In general, upper division standing in biology is required, and admission is usually competitive. Students are encouraged to consult the brochure published each fall by the Bamfield Marine Station for full and specific details. The brochure will be available from the Department of Biological Sciences.
MASC 415-3 Structure and Function in Animals
The course will focus on the structure of marine animals and their adaptations to the marine environment. Neurobiology, developmental biology, functional morphology and other subjects will be covered. Prerequisite: Offerings of the MASC courses may vary from summer to summer because instructors are drawn from different universities. For that reason, prerequisites may vary slightly. In general, upper division standing in biology is required, and admission is usually competitive. Students are encouraged to consult the brochure published each fall by the Bamfield Marine Station for full and specific details. The brochure will be available from the Department of Biological Sciences.
MASC 425-3 Ecological Adaptations of Seaweeds
The course will explore morphological physiological, genetic and reproductive adaptations of seaweeds to their natural and man-altered environments. Prerequisite: Offerings of the MASC courses may vary from summer to summer because instructors are drawn from different universities. For that reason, prerequisites may vary slightly. In general, upper division standing in biology is required, and admission is usually competitive. Students are encouraged to consult the brochure published each fall by the Bamfield Marine Station for full and specific details. The brochure will be available from the Department of Biological Sciences.
MASC 430-6 Marine Ecology
An analytical approach to biotic associations in the marine environment. Opportunities will be provided for study of the intertidal realm in exposed and protected areas and of beaches and estuaries in the vicinity of the Bamfield Marine Station; plankton studies and investigations of the sub-tidal and benthic environments by diving and dredging are envisaged. Prerequisite: Offerings of the MASC courses may vary from summer to summer because instructors are drawn from different universities. For that reason, prerequisites may vary slightly. In general, upper division standing in biology is required, and admission is usually competitive. Students are encouraged to consult the brochure published each fall by the Bamfield Marine Station for full and specific details. The brochure will be available from the Department of Biological Sciences.
MASC 437-3 Marine Population Ecology and Dynamics
An analytical approach to the study of marine ecology and marine populations. Intertidal and subtidal communities will be examined, with emphasis on the biota of the Barkley Sound region. Prerequisite: Offerings of the MASC courses may vary from summer to summer because instructors are drawn from different universities. For that reason, prerequisites may vary slightly. In general, upper division standing in biology is required, and admission is usually competitive. Students are encouraged to consult the brochure published each fall by the Bamfield Marine Station for full and specific details. The brochure will be available from the Department of Biological Sciences.
MASC 440-6 Biology of Marine Birds
The interrelationship of birds and the marine environment. Lectures will emphasize the systematics and ecological relationships, behavior, life histories, movements and conservation of marine birds. Census techniques and methods of studying marine birds in the field will be stressed during field trips in the Barkley Sound region. Seabird identification, classification, morphology, plumages and molt will be examined in the laboratory. Prerequisite: Offerings of the MASC courses may vary from summer to summer because instructors are drawn from different universities. For that reason, prerequisites may vary slightly. In general, upper division standing in biology is required, and admission is usually competitive. Students are encouraged to consult the brochure published each fall by the Bamfield Marine Station for full and specific details. The brochure will be available from the Department of Biological Sciences.
MASC 445-6 Biology of Marine Mammals
A survey course covering systematics and distribution of marine mammals, their sensory capabilities and physiology, with special emphasis on the cetacea. The course includes lectures, laboratory periods and numerous field trips in the Barkley Sound region. The course will involve an independent field study. Prerequisite: Offerings of the MASC courses may vary from summer to summer because instructors are drawn from different universities. For that reason, prerequisites may vary slightly. In general, upper division standing in biology is required, and admission is usually competitive. Students are encouraged to consult the brochure published each fall by the Bamfield Marine Station for full and specific details. The brochure will be available from the Department of Biological Sciences.
MASC 446-6 Comparative Ethology
A comparative study of marine animals (vertebrate and invertebrate) emphasizing behavioral description, underlying physiological mechanisms, the biological significance of behavior and behavioral evolution. The course will include independent laboratory and field studies. Prerequisite: Offerings of the MASC courses may vary from summer to summer because instructors are drawn from different universities. For that reason, prerequisites may vary slightly. In general, upper division standing in biology is required, and admission is usually competitive. Students are encouraged to consult the brochure published each fall by the Bamfield Marine Station for full and specific details. The brochure will be available from the Department of Biological Sciences.
MASC 470-479-3,6 Special subjects in Marine Biology
Offered, as opportunities arise, by visiting scientists who are working at the Bamfield Marine Station and are prepared to offer a course of either three or six weeks. Courses will be of a specialized nature. Prerequisite: will vary and will be announced in advance of the course offering.
MASC 480-3 Seminars and Papers in Marine Science
A series of weekly seminars covering current subjects of interest in the Marine Sciences. Seminars will be presented Bamfield Marine Station researchers, graduate students and visiting scientists as well as by the students themselves. Prerequisite: Offerings of the MASC courses may vary from summer to summer because instructors are drawn from different universities. For that reason, prerequisites may vary slightly. In general, upper division standing in biology is required, and admission is usually competitive. Students are encouraged to consult the brochure published each fall by the Bamfield Marine Station for full and specific details. The brochure will be available from the Department of Biological Sciences.

Mathematics MATH

Faculty of Science

See also courses listed under Mathematics and Computing Science (MACM) (page 283), Statistics (STAT) (page 298), and Actuarial Mathematics (ACMA) (page 223).

Open Workshops for MATH Courses

(see courses marked with ** below) Some introductory and service courses are organized through the department's open workshops. In addition to regularly scheduled lectures, students registered in these courses are encouraged to come to the workshops for assistance any time during posted working hours. At the workshop students will have the opportunity to meet with the co-ordinator, the teaching assistants and other students, and work together to understand mathematics in a friendly and helpful environment.
Algebra Workshop
MATH 100, 190, 232, MACM 201 - AQ 4135
Calculus Workshop
MATH 151,152, 251 - AQ 4110
Applied Calculus Workshop
MATH 154,155,157,158 - K 9503

Beginning Level Requirements in Mathematics

Students who do not have the appropriate prerequisites as listed below must successfully complete a mathematics assessment test in order to register in a mathematics course. Entering students who are without the appropriate prerequisites and seeking to register in a mathematics course from outside the Lower Mainland of Vancouver may, with permission of the department, be given a temporary clearance to register. However, by the end of the first week of classes, the student must show proof of successful completion of the mathematics assessment test or the student will be dropped from the course. Mature students who are unsure of their level of preparation are strongly encouraged to take the mathematics assessment test. The test is delivered at the main campus and at Harbour Centre. Contact the general office at the Department of Mathematics 778.782.3331/3332 for information. Students considering registering in a mathematics course who do not have BC principles of mathematics 11 (or equivalent) with at least a grade of C may take the non-credit course, basic algebra, offered by the Department of Mathematics. The prerequisites for the first mathematics courses are as follows.
MATH 100,110,113,190
BC principles of mathematics 11 (or equivalent) with a grade of at least C or permission of the department or the non-credit course, basic algebra
MATH 157
BC principles of mathematics 12 (or equivalent) with a grade of at least B; or MATH 110 with a grade of at least C-; or (with permission of the department) MATH 100 with a grade of at least C-
MATH 151,154
BC principles of mathematics 12 (or equivalent) with a grade of at least B or MATH 100 with a grade of at least C- Students who are unsure of their level of preparation are strongly encouraged to take the free math assessment test at the algebra workshop, AQ 4135 or SFU at Harbour Centre. Students should make certain that they discuss the test results with the appropriate student advisor.

Minimum Grade Requirement in Prerequisites for Later MATH Courses

Students enrolled in courses offered by the Department of Mathematics must have obtained grades of C- or better in prerequisite courses. Some experience with a high level programming language is recommended by the beginning of the second year. Courses marked with an asterisk (*) are intended to be particularly accessible to students who are not specializing in mathematics. No student may take, for further credit, any course offered by the Department of Mathematics which is a prerequisite to a course for which the student has already received credit.
MATH* 100-3 Precalculus**
Algebraic, exponential, logarithmic and trigonometric functions and their graphs. Conic sections, applications. (3-0-1) Prerequisite: BC principles of mathematics 11 (or equivalent) with a grade of at least C or permission of the department or the non-credit course, basic algebra. Students entering Simon Fraser University directly from high school who take BC MATH 12 or equivalent, with a grade of at least B, may not take this course for credit at Simon Fraser University. Students may not count more than one of MATH 100 or 110 for credit. MATH 100 may not be counted towards the mathematics minor, major or honors degree requirements.
MATH* 110-3 Introductory Mathematics for the Social and Management Sciences**
Linear and quadratic functions, sequences and sums, compound interest, exponential and logarithmic functions, counting techniques, probability. (3-0-1) Prerequisite: BC principles of mathematics 11 (or equivalent) with a grade of at least C or permission of the department or the non-credit course, basic algebra. Students entering Simon Fraser University directly from high school who have BC principles of mathematics 12 or equivalent, with a grade of at least B, may not take this course for credit at Simon Fraser University. Students may not count more than one of MATH 100 or 110 for credit. MATH 110 may not be counted towards the mathematics minor, major or honors degree requirements.
MATH* 113-3 Euclidean Geometry
Plane Euclidean geometry, congruence and similarity. Theory of parallels. Polygonal areas. Pythagorean theorem. Geometrical constructions. (3-1-0) Prerequisite: BC principles of mathematics 11 (or equivalent) with a grade of at least C or permission of the department or the non-credit course, basic algebra.
MATH 151-3 Calculus I**
Functions and graphs, conic sections, limits and continuity, derivatives, techniques and applications of differentiation, trigonometric functions, logarithms and exponentials, extrema, the mean value theorem and polar co-ordinates. (3-0-1) Prerequisite: BC principles of mathematics 12 (or equivalent) with a grade of at least B, or MATH 100 with a grade of at least C-. Students with credit for either MATH 154 or 157 may not take MATH 151 for further credit.
MATH 152-3 Calculus II**
Integrals, techniques and applications of integration, approximations, sequences and series, area and arc length in polar co-ordinates. (3-0-1) Prerequisite: MATH 151 or 154. Students may also use MATH 157 with a grade of A or B. Students with credit for MATH 155 or 158 may not take MATH 152 for further credit.
MATH* 154-3 Calculus I for the Biological Sciences**
This course is designed for students specializing in the biological and medical sciences. subjects include: limits, growth rate and the derivative; logarithmic, exponential and trigonometric functions and their applications in population study; optimization and approximation methods. (3-0-1) Prerequisite: BC principles of mathematics 12 (or equivalent) with a grade of at least B, or MATH 100 with a grade of at least C-. Students with credit for either MATH 151 or 157 may not take MATH 154 for further credit.
MATH* 155-3 Calculus II for the Biological Sciences**
The integral and its applications, partial derivatives, differential equations and their applications in ecology, mathematical models of biological processes. (3-0-1) Prerequisite: MATH 151 or 154; or MATH 157 with a grade of A or B. Students with credit for MATH 152 or 158 may not take MATH 155 for further credit.
MATH* 157-3 Calculus for the Social Sciences I**
This course is designed for students specializing in business or the social sciences. subjects include: limits, growth rate and the derivative; logarithmic and exponential functions and their application to business, economics, optimization and approximation methods; functions of several variables. (3-0-1) Prerequisite: BC principles of mathematics 12 (or equivalent) with a grade of at least B; or MATH 110 with a grade of at least C-; or (with permission of the department) MATH 100 with a grade of at least C-. Students with credit for either MATH 151 or 154 may not take MATH 157 for further credit.
MATH* 158-3 Calculus for the Social Sciences II**
Theory of integration and its applications; introduction to differential equations with emphasis on some special first-order equations and their applications to economics and social sciences; algebraic operations with matrices, systems of linear equations, determinants, introduction to linear programming. (3-0-1) Prerequisite: MATH 151 or 154 or 157. Students with credit for MATH 152 or 155 may not take MATH 158 for further credit.
MATH 161-0 Honors Supplement for Calculus I
The class meets one hour each week. Students will spend most of the time working on challenging problems relating to the material of MATH 151, Calculus I but will also have the opportunity to investigate many different areas of mathematics. (0-1-0) Prerequisite: a grade of A or better in mathematics 12 (or equivalent) or a grade of A or better in MATH 151 or permission of the department. This course will be graded on a pass/no entry basis.
MATH 162-0 Honors Supplement for Calculus II
The class meets one hour each week. Students will spend most of the time working on challenging problems relating to the material of MATH 152 Calculus II, but will also have the opportunity to investigate many different areas of mathematics. (0-1-0) Prerequisite: a grade of A or better in MATH 151 or its equivalent and a grade of pass in MATH 161 or permission of the instructor. This course will be graded on a pass/no entry basis.
MATH 171-1 Computer Explorations in Calculus I
This supplement to MATH 151/154/157 gives students the opportunity to explore and investigate the underlying principles of differential calculus using leading edge computer software currently used in mathematical and scientific research and industry. Previous experience with computers would be beneficial, but it is not required. (1-0-2) Prerequisite: BC mathematics 12 (or equivalent) with a grade of at least B or MATH 100 with a grade of at least C. Corequisite: MATH 151, 154 or 157. Other students may register with special permission.
MATH 172-1 Computer Explorations in Calculus II
This supplement to MATH 152/155/158 gives students the opportunity to explore and investigate the underlying principles of integral calculus using leading edge computer software currently used in mathematical and scientific research and industry. Previous experience with computers would be beneficial, but it is not required. (1-0-2) Prerequisite: MATH 151, 154 or 157. Corequisite: MATH 152, 155, or 158. Other students may register with special permission.
MATH* 190-4 Principles of Mathematics for Teachers**
Mathematical ideas involved in number systems and geometry in the elementary school curriculum. Whole number, fractional number, and rational number systems. Plane geometry, solid geometry, metric geometry, and motion geometry. (4-0-1) Prerequisite: BC principles of mathematics 11 (or equivalent) with a grade of at least C or permission of the department or the non-credit course, basic algebra. This course may not be counted toward the Mathematics minor, major or honors degree requirements. Students who have taken, have received transfer credit for, or are currently taking MATH 151, 154 or 157 may not take MATH 190 for credit without permission from the Department of Mathematics.
MATH 198-4 Selected subjects in Mathematics
subjects in areas of mathematics and statistics not covered in the regular undergraduate curriculum of the department. (4-1-0) Prerequisite: dependent on the syllabu covered.
MATH 232-3 Elementary Linear Algebra**
Matrix arithmetic, linear equations, and determinants. Real vector spaces and linear transformations. Inner products and orthogonality. Eigenvalues and eigenvectors. (3-0-1) Prerequisite: MATH 151(or equivalent) or MACM 101.
MATH 242-3 Introduction to Analysis
Mathematical induction. Limits of real sequences and real functions. Continuity and its consequences. The mean value theorem. The fundamental theorem of calculus. Series. (3-1-0) Prerequisite: MATH 152 or 155.
MATH 251-3 Calculus III
Vectors, solid analytic geometry, differential calculus of several variables, multiple integrals, cylindrical and spherical coordinates, line integrals. (3-1-0) Prerequisite: MATH 152 or 155; or MATH 158 with a grade of A or B. Recommended: It is recommended that MATH 232 be taken before or concurrently with MATH 251.
MATH 252-3 Vector Calculus
Vector functions of a single variable, space curves, scalar and vector fields, conservative fields, surface and volume integrals, and theorems of Gauss, Green and Stokes. (3-1-0) Prerequisite: MATH 232 and 251. Students with credit for MATH 312 may not take MATH 252 for further credit.
MATH 291-2 Selected subjects in Mathematics
The subjects included in these courses will vary from semester to semester, depending on faculty availability and student interest. (2-1-0) Prerequisites will be specified according to the particular syllabu or subjects offered. Each course may not count more than once toward degree requirements.
MATH 292-3 Selected subjects in Mathematics
The subjects included in these courses will vary from semester to semester, depending on faculty availability and student interest. (3-1-0) Prerequisites will be specified according to the particular syllabu or subjects offered. Each course may not count more than once toward degree requirements.
MATH* 308-3 Linear Programming
Theory and applications of linear programming, geometric and computational considerations, networks, applications of duality. (3-1-0) Prerequisite: MATH 232. Recommended: MACM 201.
MATH 309-3 Continuous Optimization
Theoretical and computational methods for investigating the minimum of a function of several real variables with and without inequality constraints. Applications to operations research, model fitting, and economic theory. (3-1-0) Prerequisite: MATH 232 and 251. Recommended: MATH 308.
MATH 310-3 Introduction to Ordinary Differential Equations
First-order differential equations, second- and higher-order linear equations, series solutions, introduction to Laplace transform, systems and numerical methods, applications in the physical, biological and social sciences. (3-1-0) Prerequisite: MATH 152 or 155 (or MATH 158 with a grade of A or B) and MATH 232.
MATH 313-3 Differential Geometry
Curvature and torsion for space curves, Frenet formulae, tangents and normals to surfaces, curvatures of a surface, special points and curves on surfaces, calculus on surfaces. (3-1-0) Prerequisite: MATH 252.
MATH 314-3 Boundary Value Problems
Separation of variables for the conduction equation, the wave equations and Laplace's equation. Sturm-Liouville problems. Separation in polar co-ordinates. Laplace transforms. (3-1-0) Prerequisite: MATH 252 (or 253) and 310.
MATH 320-3 Advanced Calculus of One Variable
Sequences and series of functions; uniform convergence; consequences of uniform convergence; improper integrals; additional applications of convergence. (3-1-0) Prerequisite: MATH 242 and 251.
MATH 322-3 Complex Variables
Functions of a complex variable, differentiability, contour integrals, Cauchy's theorem, Taylor and Laurent expansions, method of residues. (3-1-0) Prerequisite: MATH 251. Students with credit for MATH 422 may not take MATH 322 for further credit.
MATH 332-3 Introduction to Applied Algebraic Systems
An introduction to groups, rings and fields with applications to cryptography, codes and counting techniques based on permutation groups. (3-1-0) Prerequisite: MATH 232.
MATH 336-0 Job Practicum I
This is the first semester of work experience in a co-operative education program available to mathematics students. Interested students should contact departmental advisors as early in their careers as possible, for proper counselling. (0-0-0) Prerequisite: students must apply to and receive permission from the co-op co-ordinator at least one, preferably two, semesters in advance. They will normally be required to have completed 45 credit hours with a GPA of 2.5. This course will be graded on a pass/withdraw basis. A course fee is required.
MATH 337-0 Job Practicum II
This is the second semester of work experience in a co-operative education program available to mathematics students. (0-0-0) Prerequisite: MATH 336 and permission of the co-op co-ordinator; students must apply at least one semester in advance. This course will be graded on a pass/withdraw basis. A course fee is required.
MATH 339-3 Groups and Symmetry
Symmetries, groups, subgroups and generators, isomorphisms, dihedral groups, matrix groups, products, Cayley's Theorem, Lagrange's Theorem and Cauchy's Theorem. (3-1-0) Prerequisite: MATH 232.
MATH 342-3 Elementary Number Theory
Divisibility of primes, congruences, arithmetic functions and related topics. (3-0-0) Prerequisite: any 200 level MATH or MACM course.
MATH 343-3 Applied Discrete Mathematics
Discrete modelling, generation of combinatorial objects, matching theory, scheduling, applications of graphs. (3-1-0) Prerequisite: MATH 243 or MACM 201. Recommended: a computing language.
MATH* 380-3 History of Mathematics
An account of the history of mathematics from ancient times through the development of calculus and the origins of modern algebra in the nineteenth century. Emphasis will be on developments which shaped the mathematics studied in high school and the first two years of university. (3-1-0) Prerequisite: MATH 151, 232 and one of 152 or 113. Students who have taken MATH 180 may not take MATH 380 for additional credit.
MATH 398-3 Selected subjects in Mathematics
subjects in areas of mathematics and statistics not covered in the regular undergraduate curriculum of the department. (3-1-0) Prerequisite: dependent on the syllabu covered.
MATH 408-3 Discrete Optimization
Modelling techniques, integer programming, network flows, dynamic programming, and combinatorial max-min relations. Computational aspect of the preceding. (3-1-0) Prerequisite: MATH 308 and 343.
MATH 415-3 Ordinary Differential Equations
Existence and uniqueness theorems, Green's functions for second order equations, plane autonomous systems, stability, expansions about ordinary and singular points. (3-0-0) Prerequisite: MATH 310. Recommended: MATH 314 and 322.
MATH 418-3 Partial Differential Equations
First-order linear equations, the method of characteristics. The wave equation. Harmonic functions, the maximum principle, Green's functions. The heat equation. Distributions and transforms. Higher dimensional eigenvalue problems. An introduction to nonlinear equations. Burgers' equation and shock waves. (3-0-0) Prerequisite: MATH 314 (or PHYS 384) or permission of the department. Recommended: MATH 242 and 320.
MATH 419-3 Linear Analysis
Convergence in Euclidean spaces, Fourier series and their convergence, Legendre polynomials, Hermite and Laguerre polynomials. (3-0-0) Prerequisite: MATH 232, 320 or permission of the instructor. Recommended: MATH 252 and 320.
MATH 424-3 Applications of Complex Analysis
Conformal mapping, application to boundary value problems, Schwarz-Christoffel transformation, integral formulas, analytic continuation, argument principle. (3-0-0) Prerequisite: MATH 322.
MATH 425-3 Introduction to Metric Spaces
Metric spaces, convergence in metric spaces, continuity, compactness, connectedness and completeness, contraction mapping principle, and other useful theorems. (3-0-0) Prerequisite: MATH 320.
MATH 436-0 Job Practicum III
This is the third semester of work experience in a co-operative education program available to mathematics students. (0-0-0) Prerequisite: MATH 337 and permission of the co-op co-ordinator; students must apply at least one semester in advance. This course will be graded on a pass/withdraw basis. A course fee is required.
MATH 437-0 Job Practicum IV
This is the fourth semester of work experience in a co-operative education program available to mathematics students. (0-0-0) Prerequisite: MATH 436 and permission of the co-op co-ordinator; students must apply at least one semester in advance. This course will be graded on a pass/withdraw basis. A course fee is required.
MATH 438-3 Linear Algebra
Linear Algebra. Vector space and matrix theory. (3-1-0) Prerequisite: MATH 332 or 339 or permission of the instructor.
MATH 439-3 Algebraic Systems
Algebraic systems including, for example, groups, rings. Polynomial theory. (3-0-0) Prerequisite: MATH 332.
MATH 440-3 Galois Theory
An introduction to the theory of fields, with emphasis on Galois theory. (3-0-0) Prerequisite: MATH 332.
MATH 443-3 Combinatorial Theory
Design theory: Steiner triple systems, balanced incomplete block designs, latin squares, finite geometries. Enumeration: generating functions. Burnside's Lemma, Polya counting. (3-0-0) Prerequisite: MATH 232 and MACM 201.
MATH 445-3 Graph Theory
Connectivity, Eulerian graphs, Hamiltonian graphs, planar graphs, matchings, vertex coloring, and applications of graphs. (3-0-0) Prerequisite: MACM 201.
MATH 447-4 Coding Theory
An introduction to the theory and practice of error-correcting codes. subjects will include finite fields, polynomial rings, linear and non-linear codes, BCH codes, convolutional codes, majority logic decoding, weight distribution of codes, and bounds on the size of codes. (4-0-0) Prerequisite: MATH 232. Recommended: MATH 332.
MATH 461-3 Mechanics of Deformable Media
Analysis of deformation and stress and an introduction to constitutive equations for different materials. Solution of boundary value problems for elastic solids and viscous fluids. (3-1-0) Prerequisite: MATH 314 or permission of the instructor. Students with credit for MATH 361 may not take MATH 461 for further credit.
MATH 462-3 Fluid Dynamics
Incompressible fluid flow phenomena: kinematics and equations of motion, viscous flow and boundary layer theory, potential flow, water waves. Aerodynamics. (3-0-0) Prerequisite: MATH 314 or PHYS 384, MATH 322.
MATH 467-3 Dynamical Systems
Stability and bifurcation in vector fields and discrete maps. Centre manifold theory and applications of normal forms. Introduction to chaos, Lyapunov exponents, and normal hyperbolicity. (3-0-0) Prerequisite: MATH 310. Recommended: MATH 320.
MATH 470-3 Variational Calculus
Procedures of Euler, Lagrange and Hamilton. Extremum problems, stationary values of integrals. Canonical equations of motion, phase space, Lagrangian and Poisson brackets. (3-1-0) Prerequisite: MATH 310 and either MATH 262 or PHYS 211. MATH 313 or PHYS 384 should precede or be taken concurrently.
MATH 486-0 Job Practicum V
This is an optional fifth semester of work experience in a co-operative education program available to mathematics and statistics students. (0-0-0) Prerequisite: MATH 437 and permission of the co-op co-ordinator. Students must apply at least one semester in advance.
MATH 491-2 Honors Essay
Selected topics. Prerequisite: written permission of the department undergraduate studies committee.
MATH 492-494-4 Directed Studies
Independent practicing or research in subjects selected in consultation with the supervising instructor. Prerequisite: written permission of the department undergraduate studies committee.
MATH 495-3 Selected subjects in Applied Mathematics
The subjects included in these courses will vary from semester to semester depending on faculty availability and student interest. (3-0-0) Prerequisite: will be specified according to the particular syllabu or subjects offered under these course numbers.
MATH 496-4 Selected subjects in Mathematics
The subjects included in these courses will vary from semester to semester depending on faculty availability and student interest. (4-1-0) Prerequisite: will be specified according to the particular syllabu or subjects offered under these course numbers.
MATH 497-3 Directed Studies
Independent practicing or research in subjects selected in consultation with the supervising instructor. Prerequisite: written permission of the department undergraduate studies committee.
MATH 498-3 Selected subjects in Mathematics
The subjects included in these courses will vary from semester to semester depending on faculty availability and student interest. (3-1-0) Prerequisite: will be specified according to the particular syllabu or subjects offered under these course numbers.

Mathematics and Computing Science MACM

Faculties of Applied Sciences and Science

See also courses listed under Mathematics (MATH) (page 281), Computing Science (CMPT) (page 237), and Statistics (STAT) (page 298).
Minimum Grade Requirements
Students wishing to register for Mathematics/Computing Science courses must have obtained grades of C- or better, in prerequisite courses. Students will not normally be permitted to enrol in any MACM course for which a D grade or lower was obtained in any prerequisite. No student may take, for further credit, any course offered by the Department of Mathematics which is a prerequisite for a course the student has already completed with a grade of C- or higher, without permission of the department.
MACM 101-3 Discrete Mathematics I
Introduction to counting, induction, automata theory, formal reasoning, modular arithmetic. (lecture) Prerequisite: BC high school mathematics 12. Entry into this course is obtained through the School of Computing Science.
MACM 201-3 Discrete Mathematics II
A continuation of MACM 101. subjects covered include graph theory, trees, relations, asymptotics, generating functions and recurrence relations. Prerequisite: MACM 101.
MACM 202-4 Mathematical Modeling and Computation
A variety of continuous and discrete models including difference equations, differential equations, automata and networks are introduced. Students will learn to model physical phenomena and analyse the mathematical model. A mathematical software package, such as Maple, will be extensively used in a laboratory setting. Prerequisite: MATH 152, CMPT 101 (or equivalent) and one of MACM 101 or MATH 232.
MACM 300-3 Introduction to Formal Languages and Automata with Applications
Languages, grammars, automata and their applications. Turing machines. Computability and undecidability. Complexity theory. (lecture/tutorial) Prerequisite: MACM 201.
MACM 316-3 Numerical Analysis I
A presentation of the problems commonly arising in numerical analysis and scientific computing and the basic methods for their solutions. (lecture/tutorial) Prerequisite: MATH 152 or 155 or 158, and 232 and knowledge of a high level computer language such as FORTRAN, C, PASCAL or MODULA 2. Students with credit for MATH 406 or MATH 316 may not receive further credit for MACM 316.
MACM 401-3 Introduction to Computer Algebra
A first course in computer algebra - also called symbolic computation. It covers data-structures and algorithms for mathematical objects, including polynomials, general mathematical formulae, long integer arithmetic, polynomial greatest common divisors, the Risch integration algorithm. Other subjects include symbolic differentiation, simplification of formulae, and polynomial factorization. Students will learn Maple for use on assignments. Prerequisite: CMPT 307 or MATH 332.
MACM 416-3 Numerical Analysis II
The numerical solution of ordinary differential equations and elliptic, hyperbolic and parabolic partial differential equations will be considered. (3-0-0) Prerequisite: MATH 310 (or 352) and MACM 316. Students with credit for MATH 416 may not take MACM 416 for further credit.

Molecular Biology and Biochemistry MBB

Faculty of Science

For a course to be accepted as fulfilling a prerequisite for a molecular biology and biochemistry course, a student must have obtained a minimum grade of C- (C minus).
MBB 151-0 Practicum I
First semester of work experience in the Molecular Biology and Biochemistry Co-operative Education Program. (0-0-0) Prerequisite: Acceptance in the Science Co-operative Education Program.
MBB 221-3 Cellular Biology and Biochemistry
A study of the molecular processes which underlie cell structure and function, integrating ultrastructural, physiological and biochemical approaches. Modern techniques used in the analysis of organelle and cell function are integral parts of the courses. (3-1-0) Prerequisite: BISC 101. Corequisite: CHEM 281 (or 150). Recommended: CHEM 281 precede MBB 221. Students with credit for BICH 221 may not take MBB 221 for further credit.
MBB 222-3 Molecular Biology and Biochemistry
An introduction to DNA replication and recombination, RNA transcription and protein synthesis in the context of their locations within the cell and their timing in the cell cycle. The relationship between structure and function of proteins and nucleic acids will be addressed. (3-1-0) Prerequisite: MBB 221 (or BICH 221). Corequisite: CHEM 282 (or 250). Recommended: CHEM 282 precede MBB 222. Students with credit for BICH 222 may not take MBB 222 for further credit.
MBB 251-0 Practicum II
Second semester of work experience in the Molecular Biology and Biochemistry Co-operative Education Program. (0-0-0) Prerequisite: Acceptance in the Science Co-operative Education Program.
MBB 300-1 Special subjects in Biotechnology and Business
A survey of the legal, economic and social aspects of technology transfer in the areas of molecular biology, biochemistry, and biotechnology presented by a series of local experts. subjects will include patents, contracts, intellectual property, capitalization and others. The format will be a formal lecture followed by a workshop. (1-1-0) Prerequisite: completion of the second year in the Molecular Biology and Biochemistry and Business Administration joint major or equivalent experience.
MBB 308-3 Molecular Biology and Biochemistry Laboratory I
Modern molecular biological and recombinant DNA methods such as DNA isolation, plasmid preparation, restriction enzyme digestion, Southern blots, cloning and polymerase chain reaction. (1-0-4) Prerequisite: MBB 222 (or BICH 222), CHEM 281. Students with credit for BISC 431, BICH 311 or MBB 311 may not take MBB 308 for further credit.
MBB 309-3 Molecular Biology and Biochemistry Laboratory II
Contemporary techniques in biochemistry including protein purification, immunochemical methods, and lipid characterization. (1-0-4) Prerequisite: CHEM 282, 286, MBB 222. Students with credit for MBB 312 or BICH 312 may not take MBB 309 for further credit.
MBB 321-3 Intermediary Metabolism
Major catabolic and anabolic pathways and their regulation. Particular emphasis is placed on bioenergetics and experimental methods encountered in biochemical research. (3-1-0) Prerequisite: MBB 222 (or BICH 222) and CHEM 282 (or 250). Students with credit for BICH 321 may not take MBB 321 for further credit.
MBB 322-3 Molecular Physiology
Cellular and biochemical aspects of immunology, muscle contraction, cell motility, neural transmission, the action of hormones. The course will also explore the cellular and molecular bases of cancer. (3-1-0) Prerequisite: MBB 222 (or BICH 222) and CHEM 282 (or 250). Recommended: MBB 321 (or BICH 321). Students with credit for BICH 322 may not take MBB 322 for further credit.
MBB 323-3 Introduction to Physical Biochemistry
Introduction to physical biochemistry including rigorous treatment of thermodynamics and molecular transport and interactions with specific emphasis on biochemical and molecular biological processes. CHEM 360 may be substituted as an alternative to this requirement for MBB majors. (3-1-0) Prerequisite: MATH 152 (or 155), PHYS 121 (or 102), CHEM 122 (or 102), MBB 222.
MBB 331-3 Molecular Biology
The study of DNA and RNA in relation to gene structure and expression: DNA replication and the regulation of gene expression in bacteria and higher organisms. Introduction to recombinant DNA and cloning theory; natural vector structures and recombinant vector construction. (3-1-0) Prerequisite: MBB 222, BISC 202. Students with credit for BISC 331 may not take this course for credit.
MBB 351-0 Practicum III
Third semester of work experience in the Molecular Biology and Biochemistry Co-operative Education Program. (0-0-0) Prerequisite: Acceptance in the Science Co-operative Education Program.
MBB 402-3 Molecular Genetics
Advanced problems concerning the nature and function of genetic material. (3-1-0) Prerequisite: BISC 302 and MBB 331 (or BISC 331). Students with credit for BISC 402 may not take this course for credit.
MBB 403-3 Physical Biochemistry
The physical properties of biomacromolecules and their use in determining molecular weight and conformation; modern physical methods applied to biomolecules; properties and analysis of membrane systems. (3-1-0) Prerequisite: MBB 321 (or BICH 321) and MBB 323 or CHEM 360 (or 261). Recommended: MBB 413 (or BICH 413) should be taken concurrently. Students with credit for BICH 403 may not take MBB 403 for further credit.
MBB 412-4 Enzymology
Enzyme isolation and assay procedures: energy of activation; enzyme kinetics and inhibition; mechanisms of enzymic reactions; allosteric enzymes. (2-1-4) Prerequisite: MBB 321 (or BICH 321), CHEM 360 (or 261) and one of MBB 309, 311 or 312 (or BICH 311 or 312). Students with credit for BICH 412 may not take MBB 412 for further credit.
MBB 413-2 Physical Biochemistry Laboratory
The measurement of physical properties of macromolecules; studies with bio-membranes. (0-0-4) Prerequisite: MBB 311, 309 (or 312) and 321 (or BICH 311, 312 and 321). Corequisite: MBB 403 (or BICH 403). Students with credit for BICH 413 may not take MBB 413 for further credit.
MBB 420-3 Selected subjects in Contemporary Biochemistry
The subjects in this course will vary from semester to semester, depending on faculty availability and student interest. (3-1-0) Prerequisite: will be announced before the start of the semester and will depend upon the nature of the syllabu offered.
MBB 421-3 Nucleic Acids
latest literature is examined for insights into the structure and properties of DNA and RNA, drawing on a variety of biochemical, chemical and molecular biological perspectives. (3-1-0) Prerequisite: MBB 331 (or BISC 331). Students with credit for BICH 421 may not take MBB 421 for further credit.
MBB 422-3 Biomembranes
A review of latest research on the structure, dynamics, function and biosynthesis of membranes, membrane lipids and proteins. (3-1-0) Prerequisite: MBB 321 and 322 (or BICH 321 and 322). Recommended: MBB 403 (or BICH 403.). Students with credit for BICH 422 may not take MBB 422 for further credit.
MBB 423-3 Protein Structure and Function
latest research in transition state theory; specificity in enzyme catalyzed reactions, the use of recombinant DNA techniques to describe and modify enzyme catalysis, the function of enzymes in organic solvents, and the development of new catalytic activities through monoclonal antibody techniques. (3-1-0) Prerequisite: MBB 331 (or BISC 331) and either MBB 321 (or BICH 321) or MBB 322 (or BICH 322). Students with credit for BICH 423 may not take MBB 423 for further credit.
MBB 426-3 Immunology
This course aims at covering the field of immunology, with emphasis on the human immune system. The first half of the course covers subjects explaining how immune recognition occurs, whereas the second half of the course covers subjects involving disease states and the role the immune system plays in them (i.e. immune responses to infection, immunodeficiency, hypersensitivity reactions, autoimmunity and transplantation). (3-1-0) Prerequisite: MBB 322 (or BICH 322) or consent of instructor. Students with credit for BICH 426 may not take MBB 426 for further credit.
MBB 432-3 Advanced Molecular Biology Techniques
Laboratory with accompanying lectures designed to provide practical experience in advanced contemporary molecular biology techniques. Lab exercises will include site-directed mutagenesis, preparation and characterization of GST-fusion proteins, construction of transgenes and their expression in transgenic organisms, and the use of the yeast two-hybrid assay to study protein-protein interactions. (2-0-4) Prerequisite: MBB 308, 331 (or BISC 331).
MBB 435-3 Genomic Analysis
The analysis of entire genomes of organisms has only been possible since 1995. This new area of study will be examined in detail with emphasis on current research. (3-1-0) Prerequisite: MBB 331 (or BISC 331). Students with credit for BICH 435 may not take MBB 435 for further credit.
MBB 438-3 Human Molecular Genetics
The course will describe latest advances in human molecular genetics. subjects will include genome analysis, gene therapy, genetic testing, and studies of genetic disorders. (3-1-0) Prerequisite: MBB 331 (or BISC 331).
MBB 440-3 Selected subjects in Contemporary Molecular Biology
The subjects in this course will vary from semester to semester, depending on faculty availability and student interest. (3-1-0) Prerequisite: will depend upon the nature of the syllabu offered. Corequisite: will depend upon the nature of the syllabu offered.
MBB 441-3 Bioinformatics
Lectures and hands-on instruction at the computer in the use of, and theory behind, bioinformatic software and algorithms for the analysis of macromolecular data. (2-0-2) Prerequisite: MBB 331 (or BISC 331), and an introductory computer science course (e.g. CMPT 101, 102, 104, or 110), or equivalent.
MBB 442-3 Proteomics
Proteomics concerns the analysis of the entire complement of proteins expressed by an organism. This course will consider protein sequence alignment, sequence database scanning, classification of protein structures, prediction of protein structure and function, and evolution of protein function. (3-1-0) Prerequisite: MBB 321 (or BICH 321) and MBB 322 (or BICH 322); one introductory computer course (e.g. CMPT 101, 102, 104 or 110).
MBB 443-3 Protein Biogenesis and Degradation
A consideration of protein biogenesis (folding, assembly, and targeting to cellular compartments), modification, and degradation, and their roles in protein and cellular function. (3-1-0) Prerequisite: MBB 321 (or BICH 321) and MBB 322 (or BICH 322); or permission of the instructor.
MBB 451-0 Practicum IV
Fourth semester of work experience in the Molecular Biology and Biochemistry Co-operative Education Program. (0-0-0) Prerequisite: Acceptance in the Science Co-operative Education Program.
MBB 452-0 Practicum V
Fifth semester of work experience in the Molecular Biology and Biochemistry Co-operative Education Program. (0-0-0) Prerequisite: Acceptance in the Science Co-operative Education Program.
MBB 490-3 Directed Study in Advanced subjects of Biochemistry
Directed practicing in a syllabu of molecular biology or biochemistry chosen in consultation with a supervisor. Before seeking approval for registration in this course, the student should have already obtained the agreement of a faculty member that he/she is willing to supervise the project, and have prepared a written proposal (of approximately one page) stating the nature of the directed practicing topic. The course will include the preparation of a written term paper on the syllabu chosen. Prerequisite: MBB 222 (or BICH 222) and permission of the molecular biology and biochemistry department. Usually, upper level standing with at least 60 semester hours in a Biochemistry major, minor or honors program will be required. Students with credit for BICH 490 may not take MBB 490 for further credit.
MBB 491-5 Undergraduate Research
Part time laboratory research in an area of molecular biology or biochemistry for preparation of a thesis in molecular biology and biochemistry. Before seeking approval for registration in this course, the student should already have obtained the agreement of a Simon Fraser University faculty member that he/she is willing to supervise the project, and have prepared a written proposal (of approximately 1-2 pages) stating the nature of the research project. The course will include the preparation of a written research report on the results of the project, and may also, at the discretion of the supervisor, include an oral presentation of the results. Prerequisite: MBB 222 (or BICH 222) and permission of the molecular biology and biochemistry department. Usually, upper level standing with at least 60 semester hours in a molecular biology and biochemistry major, minor or honors program (attaining a minimum of 3.00 in both the CGPA and upper division GPA) will be required. Students with credit for BICH 491 may not take MBB 491 for further credit.
MBB 492-10 Individual Study Semester (Option A)
Full time laboratory research in an area of molecular biology or biochemistry for preparation of a thesis for the honors degree in molecular biology and biochemistry. This course is available to honors students who have already taken MBB 491 (or BICH 491-5), or who plan to break an individual studies project into two semesters (see below). The course will include the preparation of a comprehensive written research report on the results of the project, and may also, at the discretion of the supervisor, include an oral presentation of the results. Prerequisite: permission of the department. Students with credit for BICH 492 may not take MBB 492 for further credit.
MBB 493-15 Individual Study Semester (Option B)
Full time laboratory research in an area of molecular biology or biochemistry for preparation of a thesis for the honors degree in molecular biology and biochemistry. This course is available to honors students who have not yet taken an undergraduate research course and wish to complete an individual studies project in one semester. The course will include the preparation of a comprehensive written research report on the results of the project, and may also, at the discretion of the supervisor, include an oral presentation of the results. Prerequisite: permission of the molecular biology and biochemistry department. Students with credit for BICH 493 may not take MBB 493 for further credit.

Nuclear Science NUSC

Faculty of Science

Requirements for the nuclear science minor program are listed in the Department of Chemistry (page 199). See also courses listed under Chemistry (CHEM) (page 231) and Physics (PHYS) (page 287).
NUSC 341-3 Introduction to Radiochemistry
Brief description of the nucleus and its decays and reactions; interaction of radiation with matter; nuclear instrumentation; radioisotopes in chemistry; activation analysis and related analytical techniques; other applications of nuclear techniques; nuclear reactors and nuclear fusion. (3-1-0) Prerequisite: completion of 60 credit hours in a science program, including first year calculus, chemistry and physics.
NUSC 342-3 Introduction to Nuclear Science
Review of nuclear properties and systematics. Properties of the nuclear force; shell model and structure of complex nuclei, nuclear decay via particle emission and spontaneous fission; experimental description of nuclear reactions; nucleon-nucleus and heavy ion reactions. (3-1-0) Prerequisite: NUSC 341 or permission of the department. Recommended: MATH 251
NUSC 344-3 Nucleosynthesis and Distribution of the Elements
Formation and distribution of the chemical elements in the early universe, in present stellar environments and in the solar system; elemental abundances and isotopic ratios; and radiometric chronology techniques. (3-1-0) Prerequisite: completion of 60 credit hours in a science program, including first year calculus, chemistry and physics.
NUSC 346-2 Radiochemistry Laboratory
Introduction to the techniques of radiochemistry; proportional and Geiger counters; trial preparations and half-life measurement; synthesis and separation of labelled compounds; beta and gamma-ray spectroscopy. (0-0-4) Prerequisite: NUSC 341.
NUSC 444-3 Special subjects in Nuclear Science
Advanced subjects in nuclear science. (3-1-0) Prerequisite: NUSC 342 or 442, or permission of the department.
NUSC 485-3 Particle Physics
Physics of elementary particles. Symmetries, strong interactions, electromagnetic interactions, weak interaction. (3-1-0) Prerequisite: PHYS 385 or CHEM 361 or permission of the department. Recommended: PHYS 380.

Philosophy PHIL

Faculty of Arts

PHIL 001-3 Critical Thinking
An introduction to the evaluation of arguments as they are encountered in everyday life. The central aim will be to sharpen skills of reasoning and argumentation by understanding how arguments work and learning to distinguish those which actually prove what they set out to show from those which do not. Open to all students. (lecture/tutorial)
PHIL 100-3 Knowledge and Reality
An introduction to some of the central problems of philosophy. subjects to be discussed include the different theories of reality; the nature and sources of knowledge, truth, evidence, and reason; the justification of belief and knowledge about the universe. These subjects and problems will be considered as they arise in the context of issues such as: relativism versus absolutism; the existence of God; personal identity; the nature of the mind and its relation to the body; free-will and determinism; the possibility of moral knowledge. Open to all students. (lecture/tutorial)
PHIL 110-3 Introduction to Logic and Reasoning
The aim of this course is to familiarize students with fundamental techniques of correct reasoning. Special attention is given to the methods of logic in particular, and to their role in the discovery of truth not only within science and philosophy but within all forms of rational enquiry. Open to all students. (lecture/tutorial)
PHIL 120-3 Introduction to Moral Philosophy
An introduction to the central problems of ethics: for example, the nature of right and wrong, the objectivity or subjectivity of moral judgments, the relativity or absolutism of values, the nature of human freedom and responsibility. The course will also consider general moral views such as utilitarianism, theories or rights and specific obligations, and the ethics of virtue. These theories will be applied to particular moral problems such as abortion, punishment, distributive justice, freedom of speech, and racial and sexual equality. Sometimes the course will also focus on important historical figures such as Plato, Aristotle, Kant and Mill. Open to all students. (lecture/tutorial)
PHIL 150-3 History of Philosophy I
A survey of philosophic thought from late antiquity to the Renaissance. Special attention will be given to the works of Socrates, Plato, Aristotle, Augustine, and Aquinas. The views of these great thinkers have helped to shape the ways in which we see the world. This course is therefore recommended to everyone with an interest in our intellectual heritage. Open to all students. (lecture)
PHIL 151-3 History of Philosophy II
A survey of philosophic thought from the Renaissance to the 20th Century. Special attention will be given to the works of Descartes, Leibniz, Spinoza, Locke, Berkeley, Hume, Kant, Hegel and Mill. The views of these great thinkers have helped to shape the ways in which we see the world. This course is therefore recommended to everyone with an interest in our intellectual heritage. Open to all students. (lecture)
PHIL 203-3 Metaphysics
An examination of central problems of metaphysics such as space and time, universals and particulars, substance, identity and individuation and personal identity. (lecture/tutorial) Prerequisite: one of PHIL 100, 150, 151.
PHIL 210-4 Natural Deductive Logic
This course studies a natural deductive system of propositional and quantificational logic, the first-order theory of identity and the first-order theory of relations. subjects include the metatheory of propositional logic and the application of formal theory to the assessment of natural language arguments. (lecture/tutorial)
PHIL 214-3 Axiomatic Logic
This course studies the metatheory of axiomatic propositional and quantificational logic. subjects include proof theory, the metatheory of propositional logic, the proof theory of first-order logic, first-order models, soundness and completeness. (lecture/tutorial) Prerequisite: one of PHIL 210, MACM 101, MATH 144, CMPT 205.
PHIL 220-3 Introduction to Social and Political Philosophy
An introduction to central problems of political and social philosophy: for example, the basis of political obligation, the proper limits of state power, the appropriate scope of individual liberty, and the nature of social justice. Sometimes the course will focus on the views of historically important political philosophers such as Plato, Aristotle, Hobbes, Locke, Rousseau, Burke, Bentham, Mill and Marx. (lecture/tutorial)
PHIL 231-232-3 Selected Topics
A specific topic, philosopher or philosophical work to be dealt with as occasion and demand warrant. (lecture/tutorial)
PHIL 240-3 Philosophy of Religion
A critical analysis of classic and contemporary arguments concerning the rationality of belief in God, and related issues. (lecture/tutorial)
PHIL 241-3 Philosophy in Literature
Philosophical themes in the writings of such authors as Voltaire, Turgenev, Dostoevski, Sartre, Camus, Conrad and Golding. (lecture/tutorial)
PHIL 242-3 Philosophy of Art
An examination of issues concerning the nature of works of art. The course will include a consideration of rival theories of art such as: art as expression, art as representation, and art as significant form. Theories of aesthetic criticism will be studied in relation to taste, personal experience, and truth. (lecture/tutorial)
PHIL 244-3 Introduction to the Philosophy of Natural and Social Science
An introduction to philosophical issues concerning the nature of science. subjects to be discussed include the distinction between science and pseudo-science, the nature of scientific method, the nature of explanation in the natural and social sciences, the phenomenon of scientific change, the relationship between scientific theory and observation, and the objectivity of social science. (lecture/tutorial)
PHIL 280-3 Introduction to Existentialism
A study of existentialist philosophers such as Kierkegaard, Nietzsche, Heidegger, Sartre, and Camus and a survey of precursors such as Kant and Hegel. (lecture/tutorial)
PHIL 300-3 Introduction to Philosophy
An introductory course specifically intended for students in other departments who have at least 60 semester hours credit. This course is more advanced than 100 and 200 division courses and is of interest to students not only in the humanities, but also in the natural and social sciences. (lecture/tutorial) Prerequisite: at least 60 semester hours credit. Normally, students with credit for PHIL 100 may not take this course for further credit. This course does not count towards the upper division requirements for a student pursuing a minor, major, or honors program in philosophy.
PHIL 301-3 Epistemology
An examination of central theories of knowledge such as realism, idealism, pragmatism, phenomenalism, rationalism, empiricism, and causal theories of knowledge. Other subjects to be discussed may include, for example, the Gettier problem, scepticism, the nature of belief, reason, and sensation, the problem of induction, and foundationalism. (seminar) Prerequisite: one of PHIL 100, 150, 151; PHIL 203.
PHIL 310-3 Modal Logic and its Applications
(seminar) Recommended: PHIL 210, 214, or an otherwise suitable background.
PHIL 314-3 subjects in Logic I
An examination of one or more subjects such as: philosophical logic; deontic logic; the logic of knowledge and belief; the logic of preference; tense logics; foundations of set theory; recursive functions; the history of logic. (seminar) Recommended: PHIL 210, 214, or an otherwise suitable background.
PHIL 320-3 Social and Political Philosophy
An examination of an issue or selection of issues in social and political philosophy. Contemporary or historical readings or a mixture of these will be used. Possible subjects include: justice, the law and legal systems, sovereignty, power and authority, democracy, liberty and equality. Sometimes the course will focus on the views of historically important political philosophers, such as Plato, Aristotle, Hobbes, Locke, Rousseau, Burke, Bentham, Mill and Marx. (seminar) Prerequisite: PHIL 120 or 220.
PHIL 321-3 Moral Issues and Theories
An advanced investigation of central issues and theories in moral philosophy. In any given term, the course may focus on a general theory or concept or concern, for example meta-ethics, utilitarianism, or theories of rights. Sometimes it will focus on a particular problem or problems, such as medical ethics, moral personhood, or free will and moral responsibility. (seminar) Prerequisite: PHIL 120.
PHIL 331-333-3 Selected Topics
(lecture) Prerequisite: as stated by department at time of offering.
PHIL 341-3 Philosophy of Science
A study of the nature of scientific enquiry, classificatory systems, laws and theories, the role of observation in science, the demarcation between science and non-science, causality, the status of theoretical constructs, and teleological explanation. (seminar) Prerequisite: PHIL 100 and 203, or COGS 200; PHIL 210 or 214.
PHIL 343-3 Philosophy of Mind
A study of theories of the mind, consciousness, and human action. (seminar) Prerequisite: PHIL 100 and 203, or COGS 200.
PHIL 344-3 Philosophy of Language I
An introduction to the major philosophic theories of language. subjects to be considered include the relationship between language and mind, language and the world, language and society. (seminar) Prerequisite: PHIL 100 and 203, or COGS 200.
PHIL 350-3 Ancient Philosophy
(seminar) Prerequisite: PHIL 100 or 150.
PHIL 353-3 Locke and Berkeley
(seminar) Prerequisite: PHIL 100 or 151.
PHIL 354-3 Descartes and Rationalism
(seminar) Prerequisite: PHIL 100 or 151.
PHIL 355-3 Hume and Empiricism
(seminar) Prerequisite: PHIL 100 or 151.
PHIL 360-4 Seminar I
(seminar) Prerequisite: as stated by department at time of offering.
PHIL 421-4 Ethical Theories
A highly focussed, advanced examination of a selection of subjects in normative or meta-ethics. (seminar) Prerequisite: one of PHIL 120, 320, or 321.
PHIL 435-4 Selected Topics
A specific topic, philosopher or philosophical work to be dealt with as occasion and demand warrant. (lecture/tutorial) Prerequisite: two 300 level Philosophy courses.
PHIL 444-4 Philosophy of Language II
Advanced subjects in latest work in philosophy of language, such as meaning, reference, speech acts, and language and thought. (seminar) Prerequisite: PHIL 210 or 214.
PHIL 451-4 Kant
(seminar) Prerequisite: at least one of PHIL 353, 354, 355.
PHIL 455-4 Contemporary Issues in Epistemology and Metaphysics
(seminar) Prerequisite: two 300 level PHIL courses.
PHIL 467-4 Seminar II
(seminar) Prerequisite: two 300 level PHIL courses.
PHIL 477-5 Honors Tutorial I
(seminar) Prerequisite: PHIL 477 is a requisite for all honors students, and must be taken in one of the last two semesters of the student's philosophy program. It must be taken concurrently with or prior to PHIL 478. At least eight weeks prior to the semester in which they wish to enrol in PHIL 477, honors students should obtain departmental approval of a proposed syllabus and arrange for faculty supervision of the course. Open only to honors students.
PHIL 478-5 Honors Tutorial II
(seminar) Prerequisite: PHIL 478 is a requisite for all honors students, and must be taken in one of the last two semesters of the student's philosophy program. It must be taken concurrently with or consecutively to PHIL 477. At least eight weeks prior to the semester in which they wish to enrol in PHIL 478, honors students should obtain departmental approval of a proposed syllabus and arrange for faculty supervision of the course. Open only to honors students.

Physics PHYS

Faculty of Science

See also courses listed under Nuclear Science (NUSC) (page 285). For courses marked with an asterisk (*), tutorials will be held in the open workshop format, i.e. unstructured periods each week when teaching assistants are available to answer questions and help with problem assignments.

Minimum Grade Requirement

Students wishing to register for Physics courses must have obtained a grade of C- or better in prerequisite courses.
PHYS* 100-3 Introduction to Physics
A course for students with relatively weak backgrounds in physics. Kinematics and dynamics; waves; optics; electricity and magnetism. (3-0-1) Prerequisite: BC high school algebra 12 (or equivalent) or MATH 100 (may be taken concurrently). Students who have obtained a grade of C+ or better in BC high school Physics 12 (or its equivalent) or who have taken any further physics course normally may not take PHYS 100 for credit.
PHYS* 101-3 General Physics I
A general survey course for life science students. Kinematics and dynamics, including rotational motion; fluids, properties of matter and thermal physics. (3-0-1) Prerequisite: BC Principles of Physics 12 or PHYS 100 or equivalent. This prerequisite may be waived, at the discretion of the department, as determined by the student's performance on a regularly scheduled PHYS 100 final exam. Please consult the physics advisor for further details. Corequisite: MATH 151, 154 or 157 must precede or be taken concurrently. Students with credit for PHYS 120 may not take PHYS 101 for further credit.
PHYS* 102-3 General Physics II
A general survey course for life science students. Waves and optics; electricity and magnetism; modern physics emphasizing radioactivity. (3-0-1) Prerequisite: PHYS 101. Students with credit for PHYS 121 may not take PHYS 102 for further credit. Recommended corequisite: MATH152, 155 or 158 should precede or be taken concurrently. Students are encouraged to take PHYS 130 at the same time as PHYS 102.
PHYS* 120-3 Modern Physics and Mechanics
A general survey course for students in the physical sciences. A survey of physical phenomena from quarks to galaxies, statics and dynamics, special relativity, rotational motion, elementary quantum ideas. (3-0-1) Prerequisite: BC Principles of Physics 12 or PHYS 100 or equivalent. This prerequisite may be waived, at the discretion of the department, as determined by the student's performance on a regularly scheduled PHYS 100 final exam. Please consult the physics advisor for further details. Corequisite: MATH 151 or 154 must precede or be taken concurrently.
PHYS* 121-3 Optics, Electricity and Magnetism
A general survey course for students in the physical sciences. Light, geometrical optics, electricity, simple circuits, magnetism, applied physics. (3-0-1) Prerequisite: PHYS 120 (or PHYS 101 with a grade of A or B). Students with credit for PHYS 102 may not take PHYS 121 for further credit. Corequisite: MATH 152 or 155 must precede or be taken concurrently.
PHYS 130-2 General Physics Laboratory
Elementary experiments in optics, electricity, mechanics and heat that are designed to augment the general survey course. (0-0-4) Prerequisite: PHYS 102 should be taken concurrently or may precede; or by permission of the department. Students may not count more than one PHYS 130 or 131 for credit.
PHYS 131-2 Physics Laboratory I
Elementary experiments in optics, electricity, and mechanics that are designed to augment the general survey courses. (0-0-4) Students may not count more than one of PHYS 130 or 131 for credit. Corequisite: PHYS 121 should be taken concurrently or may precede; or by permission of the department.
PHYS 181-3 Introduction to Physical Science in Archaeology
A course in basic physical ideas and how they are applied in archaeology. subjects included are: the structure of matter, radioactive decay, electromagnetic radiation and magnetism, and how they are used in radiocarbon dating, thermoluminescence dating, magnetic dating, X-ray fluorescence analysis and magnetometer surveying. (3-1-0) Prerequisite: BC high school algebra 12 (or equivalent) and physics 11.
PHYS 190-3 Introduction to Astronomy
Historical astronomy, telescopes, the sun and the solar system, stellar evolution, galaxies, cosmology. (3-1-0)
PHYS 197-3 Periphysical subjects II
Selected subjects from sciences closely allied with physics. (3-1-0) Prerequisite: BC high school physics 11 or equivalent, and algebra 12 (or equivalent).
PHYS 211-3 Intermediate Mechanics
An intermediate mechanics course covering kinematics, dynamics, free, forced and damped oscillations, non-inertial reference frames, central forces and orbits, rigid body motion. (3-1-0) Prerequisite: PHYS 121; or PHYS 101 and PHYS 102 with a grade of B or better. Students may not count both PHYS 211 and MATH 263 for credit. Corequisite: MATH 251 must precede or be taken concurrently.
PHYS 221-3 Intermediate Electricity and Magnetism
Electrostatics, magnetostatics, capacitance, inductance, DC and AC circuits, concepts of electric and magnetic fields, Maxwell's equations. (3-1-0) Prerequisite: PHYS 121 or 102. Corequisite: MATH 251. Recommended corequisite: MATH 252
PHYS 233-2 Physics Laboratory II
Experiments chosen from among mechanics, heat, optics, electricity, magnetism, properties of matter, atomic and nuclear physics. Engineering Science students will do a selected set of experiments. (0-0-3) Prerequisite: PHYS 131 or 130.
PHYS 234-3 Computers in Physics Laboratory
Introductory physics laboratory with experiments chosen from mechanics, heat, optics, electricity, magnetism, properties of matter, atomic and nuclear physics, along with lectures on the use of computers for data acquisition and data analysis in the physics laboratory. (1-0-3) Prerequisite: PHYS 233 or permission of the instructor.
PHYS 285-3 Introduction to Relativity and Quantum Mechanics
Special relativity, including relativistic kinematics and dynamics; tests of relativity; matter waves and early quantum models; wave mechanics and its application to molecular, atomic and subatomic systems. (3-1-0) Prerequisite: PHYS 121, MATH 152.
PHYS 324-3 Electromagnetics
Electromagnetics, magnetostatics, electromagnetic waves, transmission lines, waveguides, antennas and radiating systems. (3-1-0) Prerequisite: PHYS 221, MATH 252.
PHYS 326-3 Electronics and Instrumentation
Circuits and circuit theory, passive and active devices, amplifiers, feedback, modern measurement techniques and instrumentation. (3-1-0) Prerequisite: PHYS 221. Corequisite: PHYS 331 laboratory must be taken concurrently.
PHYS 331-3 Electronics Laboratory
Experiments in electronics, including AC circuits, filters, resonance, diodes, transistors, amplifiers, feedback, oscillators, operational amplifiers, integrated circuits, analogue circuits, digital circuits. (0-0-4) Prerequisite: PHYS 234. Corequisite: PHYS 326.
PHYS 332-3 Optics Laboratory
Experiments in optics and modern physics, including diffraction, interference, spectroscopy, lasers and holography. Engineering Science students will do a selected set of experiments. (0-0-4) Prerequisite: PHYS 233 or 234. Corequisite: PHYS 355 must precede or be taken concurrently.
PHYS 335-0 Practicum I
This is the first semester of work experience in a co-operative education program available to students who are studying physics or related areas, such as biophysics, chemical physics or mathematical physics. Prerequisite: completion of 30 hours credit, with a minimum GPA of 2.75 in the physics program. Students should apply to the department at least one semester in advance. A course fee is required. This course is evaluated on a pass/withdraw basis.
PHYS 336-0 Practicum II
This is the second semester of work experience in a co-operative education program available to students who are studying physics or related areas, such as biophysics, chemical physics or mathematical physics. Prerequisite: PHYS 335 followed by 12 hours of credit. A minimum cumulative GPA of 2.75. Students should apply to the department at least one semester in advance. A course fee is required. This course is evaluated on a pass/withdraw basis.
PHYS 344-3 Thermal Physics
Heat, temperature, heat transfer, kinetic theory, laws of thermodynamics, entropy, heat engines, applications of thermodynamics to special systems, phase transitions. (3-1-0) Prerequisite: PHYS 121 and MATH 251.
PHYS 346-3 Energy and the Environment
The physical principles and limitations of renewable energy source utilization and energy conversion. A quantitative introduction to energy conversion and storage systems, including solar power and heating; wind, tidal, geothermal, hydroelectric and nuclear power, hydrogen technology, electrical and mechanical energy storage. (3-1-0) Prerequisite: CHEM 120 or 121, PHYS 102 (or 121), MATH 155 (or 152).
PHYS 355-3 Optics
Geometrical and physical optics, interference, diffraction, polarization, coherence, spectra, optical instruments. (3-1-0) Prerequisite: PHYS 221 and MATH 252.
PHYS 365-3 Semiconductor Device Physics
Structure and properties of semiconductors, semiconductor theory, theory and operation of semiconductor devices, semiconductor device technology. (3-1-0) Prerequisite: PHYS 221. Recommended: PHYS 285.
PHYS 380-3 Introduction to Subatomic Physics
Comprehensive overview of nuclear and particle physics with emphasis on concepts: the constituents of matter and the fundamental forces; properties and structure of nuclei and the nucleon; the Standard Model; experimental techniques. (3-1-0) Prerequisite: PHYS 285 or CHEM 260 or NUSC 341.
PHYS 384-3 Methods of Theoretical Physics I
Applications of mathematical methods in physics, differential equations of physics, eigenvalue problems, solutions to wave equations. (3-1-0) Prerequisite: PHYS 211 (or MATH 263), PHYS 221, MATH 252, MATH 310.
PHYS 385-3 Quantum Physics
Postulates of quantum theory, atomic models, waves and particles, Schroedinger equation, free and bound states, the hydrogen atom, atomic structure, spectra and applications. (3-1-0) Prerequisite: PHYS 211, 221, 285, MATH 252; PHYS 285 may be waived by permission of the department. Engineering science students are exempt from the PHYS 285 prerequisite. Corequisite: MATH 310 must precede or be taken concurrently.
PHYS 390-3 Introduction to Astrophysics
Characteristics of stars and their evolution, thermodynamics of stellar interior, origin of the elements, galaxies, cosmology, origin of the planets. (3-1-0) Prerequisite: PHYS 211 and either CHEM 120 or 121.
PHYS 395-3 Computational Physics
Computer based approaches to the solution of complex physical problems. A partial list of subjects includes: Monte-Carlo and molecular dynamics techniques applied to thermal properties of materials; dynamical behavior of conservative and dissipative systems, including chaotic motion; methods for ground state determination and optimization, including Newton-Raphson, simulated annealing, neural nets, and genetic algorithms; the analysis of numerical data; and the use of relevant numerical libraries. (2-0-2) Prerequisite: MATH 310, PHYS 211, CMPT 101 or 102. Recommended: PHYS 344 (or PHYS 244) or equivalent
PHYS 413-3 Advanced Mechanics
Central forces, rigid body motion, small oscillations. Lagrangian and Hamiltonian formulations of mechanics. (3-1-0) Prerequisite: PHYS 384 or permission of the department. Non-physics majors may enter with MATH 252, 310 and either PHYS 211 or MATH 263.
PHYS 415-3 Quantum Mechanics
Foundations of quantum mechanics, Schroedinger equation, perturbation theory, angular momentum, applications. (3-1-0) Prerequisite: PHYS 385 and either PHYS 384 or MATH 314 and 419.
PHYS 425-3 Electromagnetic Theory
Electrostatics and boundary value problems, magnetic fields, Maxwell equations and their relativistic formulation, radiation and propagation of electromagnetic waves. (3-1-0) Prerequisite: PHYS 285, 384 (or PHYS 221 and MATH 314).
PHYS 430-5 Digital Electronics and Interfacing
Digital logic design with particular apparatus. Construction and use of interface devices for various laboratory experiments. Computer data reduction. (2-0-4) Prerequisite: PHYS 326 and 331; or permission of the instructor.
PHYS 431-4 Advanced Physics Laboratory I
Advanced experiments in Physics. May include special projects. (0-0-6) Prerequisite: PHYS 331 and 385. Recommended: PHYS 332
PHYS 432-5 Undergraduate Honors Thesis
Undergraduate research and preparation of an honors thesis. The research project may be in experimental or theoretical physics. Prospective students must obtain agreement of a faculty member willing to supervise the project, and submit the project to the physics department for approval at least two months prior to registering for the course. The research must be done during the semester in which the student is registered for the course, and may not be part of a co-op practicum. The course will be graded on the basis of the honors thesis, which must be submitted before the end of the semester. (0-0-10) Prerequisite: all students interested in taking this course must consult with their faculty supervisor regarding prerequisites; normally requires PHYS 431.
PHYS 435-0 Practicum III
This is the third semester of work experience in a co-operative education program available to students who are studying physics or related areas, such as biophysics, chemical physics or mathematical physics. Prerequisite: PHYS 336 and 60 hours of credit with a minimum cumulative GPA of 2.75. Students should apply to the department at least one semester in advance. A course fee is required. This course is evaluated on a P/W basis.
PHYS 436-0 Practicum IV
This is the fourth semester of work experience in a co-operative education program available to students who are studying physics or related areas, such as biophysics, chemical physics or mathematical physics. Prerequisite: PHYS 435 followed by 12 hours of credit. A minimum cumulative GPA of 2.75. Students should apply to the department at least one semester in advance. A course fee is required. This course is evaluated on a P/W basis.
PHYS 437-0 Practicum V
This is an optional fifth semester of work experience in a co-operative education program available to students who are studying physics or related areas such as biophysics, chemical physics or mathematical physics. Prerequisite: PHYS 436 and a minimum cumulative GPA of 2.75. Students should apply to the department at least one semester in advance. A course fee is required. This course is evaluated on a pass/withdrawal basis.
PHYS 445-3 Statistical Physics
Postulates of statistical mechanics, partition functions, applications to gases, paramagnetism and equilibrium. Quantum statistics and applications. (3-1-0) Prerequisite: PHYS 344 or CHEM 360. Recommended: PHYS 385.
PHYS 455-3 Applied Optics
Interaction between light and matter, population inversion, stimulated emission, optical resonators, temporal and spatial coherence, gain and power output of laser oscillators. Selected subjects in applied optics such as crystal optics, light modulation, fibre optics, non-linear optics and opto-electronic devices and components. Applications of lasers. (3-1-0) Prerequisite: PHYS 355 and 385.
PHYS 465-3 Solid State Physics
Crystal structure, lattice vibrations and thermal properties of solids, free electron model, band theory, applications. (3-1-0) Prerequisite: PHYS 385.
PHYS 484-3 Nonlinear Physics
Nonlinear mechanics, nonlinear lattice dynamics, competition phenomena, applications in optics and chemistry, forced oscillations, chaos. (3-1-0) Prerequisite: PHYS 384 or permission of the department.
PHYS 490-3 General Relativity and Gravitation
Gravity and space-time, Einstein's equations and their solution, tests of relativity, black holes, stellar equilibrium and collapse, cosmological models. (3-1-0) Prerequisite: PHYS 285 or MATH 471; PHYS 384.
PHYS 492-3 Special subjects in Physics
Studies in areas not included within the undergraduate course offerings of the Department of Physics. (2-0-0) Prerequisite: permission of the department.
PHYS 493-3 Special subjects in Physics
Studies in areas not included within the undergraduate course offerings of the Department of Physics. (3-0-0) Prerequisite: permission of the department.

Political Science POL

Faculty of Arts

POL 100-3 Introduction to Politics and Government
A comprehensive introduction to the study of politics and government for both political science majors and students specializing in other disciplines. The course will explore the major concepts, methods, approaches and issues in political science, as well as the primary components of government structure and the political process. (lecture/tutorial)
POL 151-3 The Administration of Justice
The development of laws and their application to the citizen and social groups. Special consideration will be given to civil liberties. (lecture/tutorial)
POL 201-3 Research Methods in Political Science
An introduction to quantitative research techniques in political science. (lecture/tutorial) Prerequisite: POL 100 or 151 or permission of department. Students with credit for POL 213 or SA 255 may not take POL 201 for further credit.
POL 210-3 Introduction to Political Philosophy
An examination of concepts presented by the major political thinkers of the western world. The course surveys those ideas which remain at the root of our political institutions, practices and ideals against a background of the periods in which they were expressed. (lecture/tutorial) Prerequisite: POL 100 or permission of department.
POL 211-3 Politics and Ethics
An examination of selected contemporary political controversies that raise fundamental ethical issues. Discussion will be informed by contending perspectives in modern political philosophy. (lecture/tutorial) Prerequisite: POL 100 or permission of department.
POL 221-3 Introduction to Canadian Government
An introduction to the institutional order and political structure of the Canadian state. The course will include subjects such as the constitution, parliament, cabinet, judiciary, public service and federal-provincial relations. (lecture/tutorial) Prerequisite: POL 100 or 151 or permission of department.
POL 222-3 Introduction to Canadian Politics
An introduction to the social and participatory basis of Canadian politics, covering subjects such as political culture, regionalism and other political divisions, political parties, elections, interest groups and new social movements. (lecture/tutorial) Prerequisite: POL 100 or 151 or permission of department.
POL 223-3 Canadian Political Economy
An introductory study of Canada's political economy, stressing the interrelated nature of Canada's economic and political life. The course focuses on current economic problems and policies, taking into account the geographical, historical and political environments. subjects include the resource and industrial structures, research and development, the public sector, fiscal and monetary policy, the role of the state, trade and foreign ownership, energy, regional disparity, corporate concentration and the political economy of federalism. This course is identical to CNS 280 and students cannot take both courses for credit. Recommended: POL 100.
POL 231-3 Introduction to Comparative Government and Politics
An introduction to political processes and structures in comparative perspective. (lecture/tutorial) Prerequisite: POL 100 or permission of department.
POL 232-3 US Politics
An examination of the American political system, including the presidency, the congress, the courts, the bureaucracy and the party system. (lecture/tutorial) Prerequisite: POL 100 or permission of the department. Students who have credit for POL 332 may not take POL 232 for further credit.
POL 241-3 Introduction to International Politics
Theory and practice of international politics, diplomacy, hot war, cold war, alliances and the role of leaders. (lecture/tutorial) Prerequisite: POL 100 or permission of department.
POL 251-3 Introduction to Canadian Public Administration
An introduction to the basic elements of public administration in the government of Canada, including the organization of the public service, planning and financial administration, personnel administration, collective bargaining and administrative regulation. (lecture/tutorial) Prerequisite: POL 100 or 151 or permission of department.
POL 252-3 Local Democracy and Governance
The political process in the urban municipality from a comparative perspective. (lecture/tutorial) Prerequisite: POL 100 or 151 or permission of department.
POL 290-0 Political Science Practicum I
First semester of work experience in the Political Science Co-operative Education program. Students should apply to the Faculty of Arts co-op co-ordinator by the end of the third week of the preceding semester. Prerequisite: 30 credit hours with a CGPA of 3.0. Transfer students must complete at least 15 credit hours at Simon Fraser University.
POL 291-0 Political Science Practicum II
Second semester of work experience in the Political Science Co-operative Education Program. Students should apply to the Faculty of Arts co-op co-ordinator by the end of the third week of the preceding semester. Prerequisite: POL 290; 45 credit hours with a CGPA of 3.0.
POL 301-0 Political Science Practicum III
Third semester of work experience in the Political Science Co-operative Education program. Students should apply to the Faculty of Arts co-op co-ordinator by the end of the third week of the preceding semester. Prerequisite: POL 291, 60 credit hours, and a minimum CGPA of 3.0.
POL 312-4 History of Political Thought II
Political thought from the French revolution to the Chinese revolution. (lecture/seminar) Prerequisite: six lower division credits in political science or permission of the department.
POL 313-4 Political Ideologies
A discussion of the major political ideologies which provide support for and legitimation for regimes and movements in the contemporary world. Liberalism, Socialism, Communism, Fascism, Anarchism, participatory democracy, Third World ideologies, etc., are emphasized. (seminar) Prerequisite: six lower division credits in political science or permission of the department.
POL 314-4 Theory and Explanation in Political Science
A discussion of issues in the philosophy of the social sciences which are relevant to the study of politics and a critical evaluation of contemporary approaches to political inquiry, including empirical theory, rational choice theory and hermeneutics. (lecture/seminar) Prerequisite: six lower division credits in political science or permission of the department.
POL 315-4 Quantitative Methods in Political Science
An examination of the principal methods of empirical research in political science. This course is equivalent to SA 355. (lecture/tutorial) Prerequisite: six lower division credits in political science or permission of the department.
POL 319-4 Selected subjects in Political Theory
(lecture) Prerequisite: six lower division credits in political science or permission of the department.
POL 321-4 The Canadian Federal System
Development of the federal system including subjects such as the division of powers, parties, federal-provincial relations and theories of federalism. (lecture/seminar/lab) Prerequisite: six lower division credits in political science or permission of the department.
POL 322-4 Canadian Political Parties
Development of the Canadian party system. Party ideologies, organization, campaigns and elections. (lecture/seminar) Prerequisite: six lower division credits in political science or permission of the department.
POL 323-4 Provincial Government and Politics
An examination of the historical development of the provinces and the role they have played in Confederation. The course surveys the evolution of provincial economies, societies and governments in order to understand the contemporary issues and problems faced by Canada's provincial states. (seminar) Prerequisite: six lower division credits in political science or permission of the department.
POL 324-4 The Canadian Constitution
An analysis of the Canadian constitution from a theoretical and comparative perspective. Amendment, entrenchment, civil rights. (lecture/seminar/lab) Prerequisite: six lower division credits in political science or permission of the department.
POL 327-4 Globalization and the Canadian State
In an era of globalization, what scope remains for national politics? Does globalization lead to a deficit of democracy? This course examines the challenge that globalization poses for the Canadian political system. Emphasis is placed on globalization's impact on the organization, activities and role of Canadian State. (lecture/seminar) Prerequisite: six lower division credits in political science or permission of the department.
POL 329-4 Selected subjects in Canadian Government and Politics
(lecture) Prerequisite: six lower division credits in political science or permission of the department.
POL 333-4 Soviet and Post-Soviet Political Systems
A comprehensive introduction to the evolution of the Soviet political system and the post-Soviet successor states. subjects examined will include the factors responsible for the disintegration of the USSR, the structure and dynamics of the Russian political system and the problems of post-Communism through the Eurasian region. (lecture/seminar) Prerequisite: six lower division credits in political science or permission of the department.
POL 334-4 East European Political Systems
A comprehensive introduction to the political organization and political dynamics of the east European states including an examination of the various contemporary issues and problems which have influenced the political development of those countries. (lecture/seminar) Prerequisite: six lower division credits in political science or permission of the department.
POL 335-4 Government and Politics: People's Republic of China I
An examination of the political development of China in modern times with special emphasis on political culture and its relationship to political institutions, political processes and political behavior. (lecture/seminar/lab) Prerequisite: six lower division credits in political science or permission of the department.
POL 336-4 Government and Politics: People's Republic of China II
An analysis of China's current constitutional structure, modernization program, post cultural revolution period, and development in both domestic and international affairs. Emphasis will be placed on explanations of political change and perspectives for future development. (lecture/seminar/lab) Prerequisite: six lower division credits in political science or permission of the department.
POL 337-4 Government and Politics: Selected Latin American Nations I
An examination of the political systems of selected Latin American nations, including an analysis of political culture, political economy, political institutions, interest groups and both formal and informal political processes. (lecture/seminar) Prerequisite: six lower division credits in political science or permission of the department. This course is identical to LAS 337 and students cannot take both courses for credit.
POL 339-4 Selected subjects in Comparative Government and Politics
(lecture) Prerequisite: six lower division credits in political science or permission of the department.
POL 341-4 International Integration and Regional Association
Theories of integration, and the empirical analysis of selected regional associations, historical and contemporary. Imperialism, federation, association. (lecture/seminar/lab) Prerequisite: six lower division credits in political science or permission of the department.
POL 342-4 Relations Between Developed and Developing Nations
Problems arising from the disparities in power and wealth between the highly industrialized countries of Europe and North America, and the under-industrialized countries of Asia, Africa and Latin America. (lecture/seminar) Prerequisite: six lower division credits in political science or permission of the department.
POL 343-4 Global Political Economy
An introduction to the study of the international political economy, with an emphasis on the interaction between the state and markets, and the basic political-institutional relationships of trade, money and finance, international investment, foreign debt and foreign aid. (lecture/seminar/lab) Prerequisite: six lower division credits in political science or permission of the department.
POL 345-4 The Nation-State and the Multinational Corporation
A study of relations between multinational enterprise and national interests in developed and developing countries. (lecture/seminar) Prerequisite: six lower division credits in political science or permission of the department.
POL 346-4 International Organizations
An examination of the structures and processes and the main substantive decisions of the United Nations and related international organizations. Based upon in-depth study of the UN Charter, the Security Council, General Assembly, Secretary-general and Secretariat and their constitutional and political interactions since 1945, with special attention to the theory and practice of international organization advanced by the principal Western countries, the Soviet Union and Soviet bloc, the People's Republic of China and leading Third World countries. (lecture/seminar) Prerequisite: six lower division credits in political science or permission of the department.
POL 347-4 Introduction to Canadian Foreign Policy
An overview of Canadian foreign policy post World War II. Various perspectives are discussed including realism, economic nationalism, liberal internationalism and political economy/dependency analysis. A variety of analytical perspectives are used to examine issue-areas such as foreign trade including the role of NAFTA, defence policy and alliance relations, foreign investment, foreign aid, immigration policy, energy policy and the role of domestic political factors in foreign policy decision-making. (lecture/seminar/lab) Prerequisite: six lower division credits in political science or permission of the department.
POL 348-4 International Conflict Resolution
The course concentrates on negotiation, preventive diplomacy, crisis management and conflict termination. Methods of peaceful and coercive diplomatic resolution of international conflicts will be explored, with emphasis on investigation of the various contributions that have been made by United Nations peacekeeping, peacemaking and peace enforcement operations. Course simulation work, when used, will focus on problems of containing the proliferation of weapons of mass destruction. (lecture/seminar/lab) Prerequisite: six lower division credits in political science or permission of the department.
POL 349-4 Selected subjects in International Relations
(lecture) Prerequisite: six lower division credits in political science or permission of the department.
POL 351-4 The Public Policy Process
Combines a practical analysis of the structures and processes surrounding contemporary policy issues and a theoretical analysis of alternative approaches to the study of public issues and a theoretical analysis of alternative approaches to the study of public policy-making. (lecture) Prerequisite: six lower division credits in political science or permission of the department.
POL 352-4 Urban and Local Governance in Canada
A comparative study of local government in Vancouver, Winnipeg and Toronto. The non partisan tradition and interest groups. Relations with other levels of government. (seminar) Prerequisite: six lower division credits in political science or permission of the department.
POL 353-4 Public Sector Management
A detailed analysis of administrative planning in the public sector, particularly as it relates to the Canadian government. The significance of financial management and personnel management to the overall planning will be emphasized. (seminar) Prerequisite: six lower division credits in political science or permission of the department.
POL 354-4 Comparative Metropolitan Governance
A comparative analysis of regional metropolitan governance in Canada and selected other jurisdictions (such as the USA, UK, etc.). The course involves an examination of major policy dilemmas in urban development, and of the local, regional and senior intergovernmental relations within which much of the public policy making in metropolitan settings takes place. (seminar) Prerequisite: six lower division credits in political science or permission of the department.
POL 355-4 Governing Instruments
Examines and compares the various means at the disposal of government for implementing policy options, including regulation, the creation or privatization of public enterprises, the delivery or contracting out of services, taxation and tax expenditures, and any other administrative or legislative processes that governments in Canada and/or in similar countries have used to manage the economy or effect social change. (seminar) Prerequisite: six lower division credits in political science or permission of the department.
POL 356-4 The Political Economy of Labor
Examines the ways in which economic and political forces are constantly changing the nature of work. The focus will be on both paid and unpaid labor; the problems of inequality; and the ways in which workers have organized to protect their interests. The course material will deal mainly, although not exclusively, with the political economy of labor in contemporary Canada. (0-4-0) Prerequisite: six lower division credits in political science or permission of the department.
POL 359-4 Selected subjects in Governance
(lecture) Prerequisite: six lower division credits in political science or permission of the department.
POL 381-4 Politics and Government of Japan I
The political system of Japan, including an analysis of political culture, political institutions, political behavior and both formal and informal political processes. Emphasis will be placed on the pre-World War II political development of Japan. (lecture/seminar) Prerequisite: six lower division credits in political science or permission of the department.
POL 401-0 Political Science Practicum IV
Fourth semester of work experience in the Political Science Co-operative Education Program. Students should apply to the Faculty of Arts co-op co-ordinator by the end of the third week of the preceding semester. Prerequisite: POL 301, 75 credit hours, and a minimum CGPA of 3.0.
POL 411-4 Normative Political Theory
An examination of the major political norms which have oriented public conduct and provided the standards for evaluating the quality of public life; liberty, justice, equality, participation, privacy, public interest, accountability, obedience, dissent and resistance. (seminar) Prerequisite: POL 312 or 313 (or 212) or PHIL 320.
POL 414-4 Theories of Political Development
An examination of theories of the social and economic forces which challenge the adequacy of political institutions and political skills. The ideas of B. Moore, Jr., Huntington, Apter, Friedrich and Gurr. (seminar) Prerequisite: eight upper division credits in political science or permission of the department.
POL 415-4 The Liberal Tradition
A critical examination of the development of liberalism from classical liberalism (e.g. John Locke) to contemporary conflict between revisionist and neo-classical or libertarian currents. (seminar) Prerequisite: eight upper division credits in political science or permission of the department.
POL 416-4 Feminist Social and Political Thought
This course will examine the works of major feminist thinkers and the problems of developing feminist theory. (seminar) Prerequisite: eight upper division credits in political science or permission of the department.
POL 417-4 Human Rights Theories
This course introduces students to the problems involved in the assertion of universal moral standards across political and cultural divides. These issues will be explored at a theoretical level, and in the context of specific human rights controversies. (seminar) Prerequisite: eight upper division credits in political science or permission of the department. Recommended: PHIL 220 or 320.
POL 418-4 Selected subjects in Political Theory I
(seminar) Prerequisite: eight upper division credits in political science or permission of the department.
POL 419-4 Selected subjects in Political Theory II
(seminar) Prerequisite: eight upper division credits in political science or permission of the department.
POL 422-4 Canadian International Security Relations
The course traces the evolution of Canadian thinking on national international security issues through an examination of pre-World War II isolationism, elite attitudes during the Cold War, the formative period of NATO, as well as Canadian involvement in the Korean and Indochina conflicts. More latest policies concerning ALCM testings, NORAD, and nuclear non-proliferation will also be explored in detail. (seminar/lab) Prerequisite: eight upper division credits in political science or permission of the department.
POL 423-4 BC Government and Politics
The legislature, political parties, pressure groups, relations with other governments, and other aspects of the policy process. (seminar) Prerequisite: eight upper division credits in political science or permission of the department.
POL 424-4 Quebec Government and Politics
An examination of the political culture and institutions in the province of Quebec with particular emphasis on the period since 1960. (seminar) Prerequisite: eight upper division credits in political science or permission of the department.
POL 426-4 Canadian Political Behavior
The study of political attitudes and behavior in Canada. subjects will include political culture, public opinion, elections and voting behavior. (seminar/lab) Prerequisite: eight upper division credits in political science or permission of the department.
POL 428-4 Selected subjects in Canadian Government and Politics I
(seminar) Prerequisite: eight upper division credits in political science or permission of the department.
POL 429-4 Selected subjects in Canadian Government and Politics II
(seminar) Prerequisite: eight upper division credits in political science or permission of the department.
POL 431-4 Comparative Western European Systems
An advanced examination of the political life of Western European democratic systems, with special attention to issues of comparative and theoretical import, such as the causes and consequences of various types of party systems and the determinants of democratic stability. (seminar/lab) Prerequisite: eight upper division credits in political science or permission of the department.
POL 432-4 Comparative Communist and Post-Communist Political Systems
A comparative examination of the emergence and development of communist political systems and also the impact of that experience on the various post-communist successor states undergoing the process of regime transition in Eurasia and eastern Europe. The course will focus on theoretical issues pertaining to the subjects considered, and case studies of specific countries. (seminar) Prerequisite: eight upper division credits in political science or permission of the department.
POL 433-4 Comparative Developing Systems
A survey of political problems in selected Third World countries. subjects covered will include: the preconditions for democracy, the role of military governments, possibilities of revolution, and the meaning of economic dependency influences on the political systems of developing nations. (seminar) Prerequisite: eight upper division credits in political science or permission of the department.
POL 435-4 Comparative Federal Systems
Comparative analysis of federations such as the Canadian, American, West German, Yugoslavian, Soviet, Indian and Swiss. (seminar/lab) Prerequisite: eight upper division credits in political science or permission of the department.
POL 436-4 Elections, Parties and Governments in Comparative Perspective
An examination of the processes by which governments are created, maintained, and destroyed in democratic systems. The effects of different regime types, electoral arrangements, and party systems will be highlighted. (lecture/seminar) Prerequisite: eight upper division credits in political science or permission of the department.
POL 438-4 Selected subjects in Comparative Government and Politics I
(seminar) Prerequisite: eight upper division credits in political science or permission of the department.
POL 439-4 Selected subjects in Comparative Government and Politics II
(seminar) Prerequisite: eight upper division credits in political science or permission of the department.
POL 440-4 Latin American International Relations
A multidisciplinary study of bilateral issues between Latin America and a specific country or region, e.g. US and Latin America, the Pacific Rim. Historical, economic, and ideological perspectives as well as subjects related to business, foreign aid, and immigration will be emphasized. Prerequisite: eight upper division credits in political science or LAS 200 or permission of department. This course (POL 440) is identical to POL 340, LAS 311 and 411, and students cannot take more than one of these courses for credit.
POL 441-4 Comparative Foreign Relations: Selected Political Systems
A comparison of the foreign policies of selected political systems. Subjects treated include the domestic and foreign determinants of foreign policy decisions, the mobilization and application of resources to influence international politics, and the consequences of foreign policy decisions and strategies. (seminar/lab) Prerequisite: eight upper division credits in political science or permission of the department.
POL 442-4 The Politics of International Trade
Focuses on the political economy of international trade relations. Subjects of interest may include the evolution of the global trade regime from the GATT to the WTO, regional trade groupings such as the European union and NAFTA, the special trade problems of less developed countries and transition economies, and the growing role of civil society in international trade. (0-4-0) Prerequisite: eight upper division credit hours in political science or permission of the department.
POL 443-4 Nuclear Strategy, Arms Control and International Security
Provides an overview of the evolution of US and Soviet strategic policies since World War II. The political and doctrinal bases of national strategic debates are closely examined, as are the various obstacles to a more stable international arms control regime for nuclear weapons. (lecture/seminar/lab) Prerequisite: eight upper division credits in political science or permission of the department.
POL 444-4 Politics and Foreign Policy of the European Union
This course offers a comparative foreign policy analysis of EEC members, as well as an introduction to European political co-operation. Focuses on institutions of the EEC, including the Commission, Council of Ministers, European Council and European Parliament. Provides an analysis of both internal EC issues such as Common Agricultural Policy and European Monetary Union and external issues such as trade and security relations. (seminar/lab) Prerequisite: eight upper division credits in political science or permission of the department.
POL 445-4 American Foreign Policy: Processes, Issues
Examines US foreign policy in the post World War II era. subjects to be covered will include the formation of foreign policy, 20th century American security issues, alliance relations, crisis management and international economic relations. (seminar/lab) Prerequisite: eight upper division credits in political science or permission of the department.
POL 446-4 International Relations of East Asia
An overview and analysis of international relations in East Asia. (seminar/lab) Prerequisite: eight upper division credits in political science or permission of the department.
POL 447-4 Theories of International Political Economy
An examination of the major theories of international political economy, and their application to such issues as the politics of trade, aid, monetary relations, and transnational corporations. Prerequisite: eight upper division credits in political science or permission of the department.
POL 448-4 Selected subjects in International Relations I
(seminar) Prerequisite: eight upper division credits in political science or permission of the department.
POL 449-4 Selected subjects in International Relations II
(seminar) Prerequisite: eight upper division credits in political science or permission of the department.
POL 451-4 Public Policy Analysis
Examines the conceptual, philosophical and practical aspects of public policy analysis as it is conducted in government, universities, interest groups and policy research institutes. Specific attention is paid to the question of the role of policy research in the process of public policy making and the design of government programs and services. (seminar) Prerequisite: eight upper division credits in political science or permission of the department.
POL 454-4 Urban Public Policy Making
This course will link differing theoretical perspectives and concepts currently used in public policy studies to an understanding of public policy making in urban governance. (seminar) Prerequisite: eight upper division credits in political science or permission of the department.
POL 455-4 Issues in Economic and Social Policy
A practical analysis of the evaluation and the adjustment of public policies and programs designed and implemented to address long-standing social and economic concerns. The course will look at governmental and non-governmental actors involved in the processes of policy evaluation. (seminar) Prerequisite: eight upper division credits in political science or permission of the department.
POL 457-4 Controversies in Policy Innovation and Design
This course is intended to offer students an opportunity to reflect upon the challenges posed by the development of new technologies, the emergence of new movements and the uncertainties attendant to social and political conflicts associated with policy issues about which experts differ in significant ways. (seminar) Prerequisite: eight upper division credits in political science or permission of the department.
POL 458-4 Selected subjects in Local and Urban Governance
(seminar) Prerequisite: eight upper division credits in political science or permission of the department.
POL 459-4 Selected subjects in Governance
(seminar) Prerequisite: eight upper division credits in political science or permission of the department.
POL 481-4 Ethnic Politics and National Identity: Comparative Perspectives
Examines the impact of ethnicity on the dynamics and organization of political systems, including the impact of ethnic diversity on modes of political representation, the formation of public policy, and the quest for political stability and national identity. (seminar) Prerequisite: eight upper division credits in political science or permission of the department.
POL 483-4 Political Economy of Latin American Development
This is a survey course which introduces students to the various theoretical approaches which have been used since the 1950s to understand the political economy of Latin American development. It deals with some of the classic theories of modernization, dependency, world systems, and modes of production analysis. The last unit of the course is devoted to the most contemporary issues of Latin American development, such as the agrarian question, women and development, problems of urbanization and the informal sector. Prerequisite: eight upper division credits in political science or LAS 200 or permission of the department. This course (POL 483) is identical to POL 383, LAS 318, 428, SA 328 and 428, and students cannot take more than one of these courses for further credit.
POL 498-4 Directed Readings in Political Science
Directed readings in a selected field of study under the direction of a single faculty member. A paper will be required. Students registering in this course must have their program of readings approved (by the supervising instructor and the undergraduate studies committee) prior to registration. Prerequisite: permission of the department. Students may count only one readings course as credit towards their upper division political science requirements.
POL 499-5 Honors Essay
Prerequisite: permission of the department (see regulations listed in the Department of Political Science section).

Psychology PSYC

Faculty of Arts

PSYC 100-3 Introduction to Psychology I
Acquaints the student with the major issues in contemporary psychology and considers the historical antecedents. Special attention is given to questions of methodology and research design in psychology. subjects in physiological psychology, perception, learning and motivation are considered. (lecture/laboratory) Students with credit for PSYC 101 may not take PSYC 100 for further credit.
PSYC 102-3 Introduction to Psychology II
Acquaints the student with major issues in contemporary psychology and considers their historical antecedents. subjects in learning, cognition, social psychology and abnormal psychology are considered. (lecture/laboratory) Prerequisite: PSYC 100. Students with credit for PSYC 101 may not take PSYC 102 for further credit.
PSYC 106-3 Psychological Issues in Contemporary Society
Relates contemporary knowledge from psychology to current social problems. Provides relevant information from studies pertaining to problems such as attitude development, prejudice, race relations, addiction, behavior technology, and family pathology. (lecture/tutorial)
PSYC 201-4 Introduction to Research Methods in Psychology
An introduction to the procedures used in psychological research, and to the logic underlying them. subjects include the strengths and weaknesses of different approaches to research, the formulation of testable questions, the control of extraneous influences, the measurement of effects, and the drawing of valid conclusions from empirical evidence. Provides a background for senior psychology courses since it offers a basis for the critical evaluation and conduct of research. (lecture/laboratory) Prerequisite: PSYC 100 and 102, (or PSYC 101). See the Letters of Permission section within the undergraduate Department of Psychology.
PSYC 206-3 Introduction to Psychological Assessment
A survey of selected techniques for assessment of individual and group differences in aptitudes, abilities, achievement, attitudes, interests, and personality. Emphasis is placed on evaluating the effectiveness of various techniques, including performance tests, self-report questionnaires, inventories and projective approaches. This course provides a suitable introduction for students considering graduate training in clinical psychology. (lecture/tutorial) Prerequisite: PSYC 201 and one of PSYC 241 (or 340) or 270 (or 370). Students with credit for PSYC 306 may not take PSYC 206 for further credit.
PSYC 207-3 Introduction to the History of Psychology
Examines the development of modern psychology from the founding of the first laboratories in the late 19th century to the present. The development and revisions of the major theoretical systems of psychology are examined from a comparative and critical perspective. (lecture/tutorial) Prerequisite: PSYC 102. Students with credit for PSYC 308 may not take PSYC 207 for further credit.
PSYC 210-4 Introduction to Data Analysis in Psychology
Covers basic descriptive and inferential techniques most appropriately applied to the various forms of data from psychological research. Should be completed by majors and honors before the end of semester 4. (lecture/laboratory) Prerequisite: PSYC 201 and BC high school math 12 or MATH 100 or MATH 110 or equivalent. Students without BC high school math 12 should enrol in MATH 110, rather than MATH 100. See the Letters of Permission section within the undergraduate Department of Psychology.
PSYC 221-3 Introduction to Cognitive Psychology
Introduction to the study of cognitive and perceptual processes. subjects include memory, perception, attention, language, mental imagery, creativity, judgement and decision-making, and an introduction to cognitive disorders such as Alzheimer's disease, dyslexia, aphasia and attention-deficit disorder. (lecture/laboratory) Prerequisite: PSYC 100 and 102 (or PSYC 101). Students with credit for PSYC 320 may not take PSYC 221 for further credit.
PSYC 241-3 Introduction to Abnormal Psychology
Introduces students to the area of abnormal psychology. subjects include the definition and classification of pathological behavior, factors involved in the development of pathology, and evaluation of therapy outcome. (lecture/tutorial) Prerequisite: PSYC 100 and 102 (or PSYC 101). Students with credit for PSYC 340 may not take PSYC 241 for further credit.
PSYC 250-3 Introduction to Developmental Psychology
Considers the psychological and physical aspects of human development from conception through middle childhood. subjects include social, emotional, language, cognitive, perceptual and physical development. (lecture/tutorial) Prerequisite: PSYC 100 and 102 (or PSYC 101). Students with credit for PSYC 350 or 351 may not take PSYC 250 for further credit.
PSYC 260-3 Introduction to Social Psychology
Examines methodology and content in social psychology. subjects include: attitudes and values; social perception and cognition; group behavior; social includence; prejudice, discrimination, and sexism; aggression; altruism, interpersonal attraction and interpersonal relationships. (lecture/tutorial) Prerequisite: PSYC 100 and 102 (or PSYC 101). Students with credit for PSYC 360 may not take PSYC 260 for further credit.
PSYC 270-3 Introduction to Theories of Personality
Introduces students to classic and contemporary theories, conceptual debates, and empirical research in the area of personality. (lecture/tutorial) Prerequisite: PSYC 100 and 102 (or PSYC 101).
PSYC 280-3 Introduction to Biological Psychology
Surveys the major areas in biological psychology. subjects include the basics of neuroanatomy and nerve cell function, the behavioral and physiological effects of drugs and hormones in the nervous system, evolutionary perspectives on the brain and behavior, and the biopsychology of vision, the chemical senses, hearing, movement, biological rhythms, sex, and cognitive processes. (lecture/laboratory) Prerequisite: PSYC 100 and 102 (or PSYC 101). Recommended: BISC 101.
PSYC 301-4 Intermediate Research Methods and Data Analysis
A continuation of PSYC 201 and 210. Provides extensions of the basic theory and methods of research design and data analysis. Includes discussions of the analysis of substantive problems, the choice of appropriate research designs, and special problems that arise in the analysis of psychological data. (lecture/laboratory) Prerequisite: PSYC 201 and 210. See the Letters of Permission section within the undergraduate Department of Psychology.
PSYC 303-4 Perception
An introduction to the study of perceptual processes with an emphasis on seeing and hearing. subjects include the perception of features, objects, motion, depth, time, visual illusions, and individual differences in perceptual ability. (lecture/laboratory) Prerequisite: PSYC 201 and one of 221 (or 320) or 335.
PSYC 307-3 History of Psychology in Western Scholarship
Examines the development of psychological thought through theories of ontology, epistemology and ethics that laid the foundations for modern psychology. Provides a background for psychology courses by analysing how various viewpoints on the mind-body relationship, empiricism, rationalism and the nature of science contributed to the development of modern psychology. (lecture/tutorial) Prerequisite: PSYC 201 and 207.
PSYC 311-4 Psychological Measurement
Deals with basic problems in the development of psychological measures. Treatment of the concepts of reliability and validity and the application of these concepts in experimental and observational research. Implications of measurement principles for the design of experiments and studies. Introduction to classical and contemporary methods in different content areas. (lecture/laboratory) Prerequisite: PSYC 201, 206 (or 306) and 301.
PSYC 321-3 Individual Differences in Cognitive Abilities
Surveys theoretical models and applied research on the nature of individual differences in cognitive abilities. subjects will include measurement, the biological and psychosocial origins of cognitive abilities, the relations between cognitive abilities and other behavior, and the social implications of different models of cognitive abilities. (lecture/tutorial) Prerequisite: PSYC 201 and 221 (or 320).
PSYC 325-4 Memory and Mind
Examination of the phenomena of memory and the retention and reproduction of information. Considers the conditions and principles of retention and recall in short- and long-term memory. (lecture/laboratory) Prerequisite: PSYC 201, and 221 (or 320).
PSYC 330-4 Attention
Survey the different aspects of paying attention. subjects include the effects of selective and divided attention on perceptual and cognitive function; the role of attention in human performance; attentional dysfunction and attention-deficit disorder; and the development of attentional capacity across the life span from newborns to the elderly. (lecture/laboratory) Prerequisite: PSYC 201 and 221 (or 320).
PSYC 335-3 Sensation
Examines the properties of the visual, auditory, olfactory, gustatory, and kinesthetic systems and receptor mechanisms with a strong emphasis on physiology. subjects include psychophysical measurement of sensations, cross-modal organization and computational modeling of sensory processes, and the interface between sensory and perceptual processes. (lecture/tutorial) Prerequisite: PSYC 201 and one of 280 or 303.
PSYC 342-0 Practicum I
First semester of work experience in the Psychology Co-operative Education program. Prerequisite: PSYC 201 and 210. Students should apply to the co-op co-ordinator one semester in advance.
PSYC 343-0 Practicum II
Second semester of work experience in the Psychology Co-operative Education program. Prerequisite: successful completion of PSYC 342-0 and 45 credit hours with a minimum CGPA of 3.0.
PSYC 354-3 Development of Children's Thinking
Examines research and theory concerning the origins and development of cognition in humans. Traces the development of language and children's thinking about the physical and social world from birth to adulthood, with a focus on infancy and childhood. Prerequisite: PSYC 201 and 250 (or 350 or 351).
PSYC 355-3 Adolescent Development
Considers human development from the end of childhood to the beginning of the adult stage, from a bio-social point of view. Included among the subjects are psychological effects of sexual maturation, choice of vocation and marriage partner, effects of participation in the gang and youth organization, cultural variations in the patterns of growth. (lecture/tutorial) Prerequisite: PSYC 201 and 250 (or 350 or 351).
PSYC 356-3 Developmental Psychopathology
Examines theoretical approaches, research findings, and treatment outlooks concerning problems and disorders in childhood development. (lecture/tutorial) Prerequisite: PSYC 201, 241 (or 340), and 250 (or 350 or 351).
PSYC 357-3 Adulthood and Aging
Considers human development from young adulthood to old age. Included are theories of adult development and aging; environmental and biological factors in aging; and the effects of aging on sensation, perception, learning, cognition, personality, psychopathology, and social relations. (lecture/tutorial) Prerequisite: PSYC 201 and 250 (or 350 or 351) or acceptance into the diploma program in gerontology.
PSYC 361-3 Social Cognition
Reviews theory and research on the cognitive basis of interpersonal perception and behavior, with an underlying focus on basic processes of attention, memory and inference. subjects include architecture of memory, heuristics and biases, automaticity, probabilistic reasoning, co-variation detection, causal inference, trait inference. Such processes are used to understand self-perception, emotions, goal directed behavior, impression formation, stereotyping and prejudice, and cultural differences. Prerequisite: PSYC 201 and 260 (or 360).
PSYC 362-3 Interpersonal Relations
Reviews theory and research on the psychology of interpersonal relations, with particular attention to personal relationships. subjects include theoretical perspectives on relationships; interpersonal attraction; dating, marriage, and friendship; social networks; cognitive processes and communication dynamics within relationships; and power and aggression within relationships. Prerequisite: PSYC 201 and 260 (or 360).
PSYC 365-3 Health Psychology
Explores applications of psychological principles to health and health care. The development of the field of health psychology is traced and major subjects introduced. subjects include health promotion, the hospital experience, communication in medical settings, coping with serious illness, psychoneuroimmunology, and field-specific methodology. Prerequisite: PSYC 201 and 260 (or 360).
PSYC 369-3 Law and Psychology
Introduces students to the area of law and psychology. The role of psychology in the legal system will be discussed. subjects include: social; psychology and law, developmental psychology and law, juvenile justice, experimental psychology and law, mental disability and law, and the influence of psychology in the legal system. (lecture/tutorial) Prerequisite: PSYC 201.
PSYC 371-3 Intervention: Process and Outcome
Reviews the major approaches to psychological intervention in terms of theory, practice and outcome evaluation. The course will examine both the scientific and practitioner components of intervention. Prerequisite: PSYC 201 and two of 206 (or 306), 241 (or 340), or 270 (or 370). Students with credit for PSYC 375 may not take PSYC 371 for further credit.
PSYC 381-3 Behavioral Endocrinology
Examines the ways in which hormones influence the nervous system, regulating essential behaviors such as eating, drinking, sex, parenting, sleep, emotional behavior and cognitive processes. (lecture/tutorial) Prerequisite: PSYC 201 and 280.
PSYC 382-3 Cognitive Neuroscience
Examines the neurophysiological bases of cognitive and perceptual phenomena such as memory, attention, language, thinking, imagery, vision, audition, and sensory processes. The study of human cognitive performance with measurement techniques such as ERP, PET, and MRI is also discussed. (lecture/tutorial) Prerequisite: PSYC 201 and 280.
PSYC 383-3 Psychopharmacology
A survey of how psychoactive drugs affect brain function to alter consciousness and behavior. subjects will include cellular effects of drugs that affect the central nervous system and discussions of the psychological and social effects of those drug-induced changes in the brain. Research on drug abuse and addictions and means of treating them will be covered. Historical, social and legal aspects of non-medical drug use will be discussed, as will the use of medications for the treatment of anxiety, depression, schizophrenia, dementias and other psychological disorders. (lecture/tutorial) Prerequisite: PSYC 201 and 280. Students with credit for PSYC 483 may not take PSYC 383 for further credit.
PSYC 384-3 Developmental Psychobiology
A survey of research on normal and abnormal brain development and its behavioral consequences, covering the fetal period through old age. Genetic, prenatal, nutritional, and experiential effects on brain and behavior will be discussed. subjects to include: bio-developmental aspects of sensory-motor, social, linguistic, intellectual, and sexual behavior. Effects of head trauma, disease, abnormal environments, and aging will also be covered. (lecture/tutorial) Prerequisite: PSYC 201 and 280. Recommended: PSYC 250.
PSYC 385-3 Evolutionary Psychology
subjects such as altruism, parental care, mate choice, sex differences in behavior, aggression, dominance and territoriality are considered from an evolutionary perspective. The role of heredity and environment in the development of these behaviors is also discussed. (lecture/tutorial) Prerequisite: PSYC 201.
PSYC 386-4 Laboratory in Behavioral Neuroscience
An overview of techniques used for studying the biological basis of behavior in humans and animals. Examines the logic and limitations of specific research methods. Provides an opportunity to master a set of techniques and to conduct supervised research projects in the laboratory. (lecture/lab) Prerequisite: PSYC 201 and 280. Students with credit for PSYC 481 may not take PSYC 386 for further credit.
PSYC 387-3 Human Neuropsychology
Examines the neural processes that underlie cognitive functioning and behavior. subjects include neuroanatomy, neuropathology, brain damage, neurological diseases (e.g., schizophrenia, Alzheimer's, Parkinson's), and problems in spatial ability, memory, language, mood and anxiety. Prerequisite: PSYC 201 and 280.
PSYC 388-3 Biological Rhythms and Sleep
Behavior and physiology are regulated by biological clocks, which function to synchronize the organism optimally with its environment. In this course we examine the adaptive role of clocks in animal behavior, the neural and endocrine mechanisms of daily, monthly and yearly rhythms, and the relevance of clocks, rhythms and sleep to human performance and psychopathology. We will also consider the mechanisms and functions of sleep states. (lecture/tutorial) Prerequisite: PSYC 201 and 280. Students with credit for PSYC 488 may not take PSYC 388 for further credit.
PSYC 402-4 Selected subjects in History and Theoretical Psychology
Examines the basic ideas concerning the relationship between mind and body and the empirical and rational foundations of scientific thought as applied to modern psychology. Students will be expected to analyse either the historical development of contemporary approaches or theoretical issues that are relevant to their area of interest in psychology. (4-0-0) Prerequisite: PSYC 201, and one of 207 (or 308) or 307 and 60 hours of credit and a CGPA of 3.0 or 90 hours of credit and a CGPA of 2.5.
PSYC 410-4 Research Design I
Reviews the basic logic of controlled experimentation, and focuses on analysis of variance designs commonly used in psychological research. Particular emphasis is given to the relative merits of the several designs when there are multiple research questions to be answered. (4-0-0) Prerequisite: PSYC 201, 210, 301 and 60 hours of credit with a CGPA of 3.0 or 90 hours of credit with a CGPA of 2.5.
PSYC 411-4 Research Design II
Focuses on multivariate regression and correlation models. Deals with ways of answering questions when direct experimental manipulation is not feasible, and demonstrates the utility of the principles involved for solving problems other than those for which they were first proposed. (4-0-0) Prerequisite: PSYC 201, 210, 301, and 60 hours of credit with a CGPA of 3.0 or 90 hours of credit with a CGPA of 2.5. Recommended: PSYC 410.
PSYC 415-4 Selected subjects in Measurement
An intensive exposure to selected subjects in measurement theory and psychometrics including, e.g., advanced classical test theory, modern test theory, and factor analysis. The content will vary, offering to offering. (4-0-0) Prerequisite: PSYC 301, 311 and 60 hours of credit and a CGPA of 3.0 or 90 hours of credit and a CGPA of 2.5. Recommended: PSYC 410 and 411.
PSYC 430-4 Selected subjects in Cognition I
(4-0-0) Prerequisite: PSYC 201, 210, 221 (or 320), and 60 hours of credit and a CGPA of 3.0 or 90 hours of credit and a CGPA of 2.5.
PSYC 432-4 Selected subjects in Cognition II
(4-0-0) Prerequisite: PSYC 201, 210, 221 (or 320) and 60 hours of credit and a CGPA of 3.0 or 90 hours of credit and a CGPA of 2.5.
PSYC 441-4 Selected subjects in Clinical Psychology
An intensive examination of a selected syllabu in clinical psychology, varying to include offerings such as psychopathology (adult or child), individual differences in cognitive abilities, behavioral approaches to intervention, addiction, and other special topics. (4-0-0) Prerequisite: PSYC 201, 210, 371 (or 375) and 60 hours of credit and a GPA of 3.0, or 90 hours of credit and a GPA of 2.5. Students with credit for PSYC 444 may not take PSYC 441 for further credit if similar subjects are covered. See department for further information.
PSYC 442-0 Practicum III
Third semester of work experience in the Psychology Co-operative Education program. Prerequisite: successful completion of PSYC 342 and 343 and 60 semester hours with a minimum CGPA of 3.0.
PSYC 443-0 Practicum IV
Fourth semester of work experience in the Psychology Co-operative Education program. Prerequisite: successful completion of PSYC 442 and 75 semester hours with a minimum CGPA of 3.0.
PSYC 450-4 Selected subjects in Developmental Psychology I
(4-0-0) Prerequisite: PSYC 201, 210, 250 (or 350 or 351) and 60 hours of credit and a CGPA of 3.0 or 90 hours of credit and a CGPA of 2.5.
PSYC 451-4 Selected subjects in Developmental Psychology II
(4-0-0) Prerequisite: PSYC 201, 210, 250 (or 350 or 351) and 60 hours of credit and a CGPA of 3.0 or 90 hours of credit and a CGPA of 2.5.
PSYC 452-4 Selected subjects in Developmental Psychology III
(4-0-0) Prerequisite: PSYC 201, 210, 250 (or 350 or 351) and 60 hours of credit and a CGPA of 3.0 or 90 hours of credit and a CGPA of 2.5.
PSYC 461-4 Selected subjects in Social Cognition
(4-0-0) Prerequisite: PSYC 201, 210, 260 (or 360), 361 and 60 hours of credit and a CGPA of 3.0 or 90 hours of credit and a CGPA of 2.5.
PSYC 462-4 Selected subjects in Interpersonal Relations
(4-0-0) Prerequisite: PSYC 201, 210, 260 (or 360), 362 and 60 hours of credit and a CGPA of 3.0 or 90 hours of credit and a CGPA of 2.5.
PSYC 469-4 Selected subjects in Psycholegal Issues
(4-0-0) Prerequisite: PSYC 201, 210, 241 (or 340), 260 (or 360), 369 and 60 hours of credit and a CGPA of 3.0 or 90 hours of credit and a CGPA of 2.5.
PSYC 480-4 Selected subjects in Biological Psychology I
(4-0-0) Prerequisite: PSYC 201, 210, 280, and 60 hours of credit and a CGPA of 3.0 or 90 hours of credit and a CGPA of 2.5.
PSYC 482-4 Selected subjects in Biological Psychology II
(4-0-0) Prerequisite: PSYC 201, 210, 280 and 60 hours of credit and a CGPA of 3.0 or 90 hours of credit and a CGPA of 2.5.
PSYC 490-4 Honors Project
An in-depth investigation of a syllabu in psychology, culminating in a critical literature review and the formulation of a research proposal. (4-0-0) Prerequisite: PSYC 301 with a minimum grade of C.
PSYC 491-3 Selected subjects in Psychology
(seminar) Prerequisite: permission of the department.
PSYC 492-5 Selected subjects in Psychology
(seminar) Prerequisite: permission of the department.
PSYC 493-495-3 Directed Studies
Independent practicing or research in subjects selected in consultation with the supervising instructor. Prerequisite: Permission of the department. See the Directed Studies Courses section within the undergraduate Department of Psychology section.
PSYC 496-498-5 Directed Studies
Independent practicing or research in subjects selected in consultation with the supervising instructor. Prerequisite: Permission of the department. See the Directed Studies Courses section within the undergraduate Department of Psychology section.
PSYC 499-6 Honors Project
The research proposed in PSYC 490 is executed and the results are written up in thesis format. (6-0-0) Prerequisite: PSYC 490.

Resource and Environmental Management REM

Faculty of Applied Sciences

REM 100-3 Global Change
This course provides students with an overview of global environmental change and its causes from a social science perspective, historically and at the present time. Population growth, an increasing ecological footprint and changes in ideology, social organization, economy and technology will be critically reviewed. New ways of thinking in natural and social science will be considered in relation to specific issues such as land, soil and food; energy, raw materials and solid waste; air pollution and transportation; water, oceans and fisheries; climate change; forestry and biodiversity; urbanization, and alternative futures. (lecture/tutorial)
REM 311-3 Applied Ecology and Sustainable Environments
Students will learn to apply the ecological concepts introduced in prerequisite courses to applied ecological problems at the population, community, and ecosystem levels of organization. Emphasis will be placed on processes which drive ecological dynamics, on recognizing those processes and dynamics in applied contexts, and on interpreting ecological data. (lecture/tutorial-computer lab) Prerequisite: REM 100 or EVSC 200, BISC 204 or GEOG 215, STAT 101 or GEOG 251 or equivalent.
REM 356-3 Institutional Arrangements for Sustainable Environmental Management
This course provides an overview of some basic legislation, agencies, and policies which currently are in use to regulate the natural environment at the international, nation, provincial, regional, and local levels. Its purpose is to present a basic set of evaluative questions which can be used to address the effectiveness and efficiency of the environmental regulatory and management systems currently in use. (lecture/tutorial) Prerequisite: REM 100.
REM 412-3 Environmental Modeling
Students receive hands-on experience in the construction and analysis of computer simulation models of environmental and ecological systems and problems. (lecture/tutorial) Prerequisite: BISC 204, REM 100 or EVSC 200, MATH 151 or 154 or 157, MATH 152 or 155, STAT 101 or 103 or 301 or equivalent.
REM 445-3 Environmental Risk Assessment and Management of Hazardous Substances
Students receive theory and practical experience in the control and management of hazardous substances in the environment. This includes the application of techniques used to assess toxicological, ecological and human health risks of contaminants within the current regulatory framework. (lecture) Prerequisite: CHEM 102, 115, REM 100, EVSC 200, MATH 151 or 154 or 157, STAT 101 or 103 or 301.
REM 471-3 Forest Ecosystem Management
In this course students will examine the problems of managing forest ecosystems for a variety of societal goals and objectives. The course will start with an examination of the ecological characteristics of forest ecosystems and their dynamics. The second section will focus on the objectives and tools of forest management in an ecological context. The final section of the course will focus on the institutions, economics and policies of forest management, with a focus on British Columbia's historical and current management issues. This course will involve lectures, group discussions, field trips and exercises, and computer labs. (lecture, tutorial, computer lab) Prerequisite: EVSC 200, 311 and 356.

Science SCI

Faculty of Science

SCI 010-1,2,3 Contemporary subjects in Natural Sciences
Members of all departments of the Faculty of Science discuss subjects to provide students an insight into modern science.
SCI 300-3 Science and its Impact on Society
The impact of science in our society. This course introduces upper level university students to all facets of science and their resulting technologies. Governmental policies often involve far-reaching scientific/technological decisions and this course attempts to provide a scientific perspective to help achieve rational and effective policies. (lecture/tutorial) Prerequisite: 60 credit hours. Not open to students in the Faculty of Science or the Schools of Computing Science, Engineering Science and Kinesiology.

Sociology and Anthropology SA

Faculty of Arts

Note: To assist the student in planning an interdisciplinary program, the discipline designates are listed as follows. (S) sociology; (A) anthropology. An (SA) course, therefore, counts as either sociology or anthropology.
SA 100-4 Perspectives on Canadian Society (SA)
An examination of Canadian society from the perspective of the social sciences - an introduction both to the nature of Canadian society and to the use of sociological and anthropological concepts applied to the analysis of modern societies in general. This course is meant to appeal to those who specifically wish to expand their knowledge of Canadian Society, and also to those who may be considering further work in sociology and anthropology. subjects to be considered include class structure, the nature of Canada's population, regional variation, gender relations, multiculturalism, native issues. (lecture/tutorial)
SA 101-4 Introduction to Anthropology (A)
An introduction to the study of human social and cultural life from an anthropological perspective. The course will explore the scope and nature of the discipline of anthropology through study of selected cases drawn from both technologically simple communities and complex modern industrial societies. (lecture/tutorial) Students with credit for SA 170 may not take SA 101 for further credit.
SA 141-0 Sociology and Anthropology Practicum (SA)
This is the first semester of work experience in the Co-operative Education Program in sociology and anthropology. It is meant to be exploratory in nature. Prerequisite: 29 semester credit hours with a minimum cumulative GPA of 2.75 including SA 101 or 150 and SA 255. Students should apply to the Faculty of Arts co-op co-ordinator by the end of the third week of the semester preceding the employment semester.
SA 150-4 Introduction to Sociology (S)
The study of basic concerns of sociology, such as social order, social change, social conflict and social inequality. (lecture/tutorial)
SA 201-4 Anthropology of Contemporary Life (A)
An introduction to the anthropological perspective as applied to contemporary social and cultural issues and settings. subjects may include: urban anthropology; work and leisure; belief systems; medical anthropology; and problems of policy relevant research. (lecture/tutorial) Students with credit for SA 291 may not take SA 201 for further credit. Recommended: SA 101.
SA 202-4 Post-Industrial Society (S)
An analysis of the social implications of the transformation from classical industrial production to computer-aided design, manufacturing, processing and retailing. The course will examine changing labor processes and the new division of labor, the challenge to trade unions, the decline of the welfare state, the post modern condition and the globalization of economic life. (lecture/tutorial) Prerequisite: SA 150.
SA 203-4 Comparative Ethnic Relations (SA)
A comparative study of racial and ethnic relations. The course will deal with a variety of beliefs about others and different patterns of discrimination in a number of societies. The inevitability of such beliefs and practices and the means of altering them may also be examined. (lecture/tutorial) Prerequisite: SA 150.
SA 216-4 Sociology of Leisure (S)
An examination of the changing nature and significance of leisure in contemporary society. Various forms of leisure are discussed in relation to other social institutions and processes, such as religion, politics, family and work. Issues raised by the commercialization and commoditization of mass leisure are explored. (lecture/tutorial) Prerequisite: SA 150. Students with credit for SA 315 (when offered as Tourism) may not take SA 216 for further credit.
SA 218-4 Illness, Culture and Society (SA)
The study of socio-cultural factors related to health and illness. Focus will be on patterns of health seeking activity, systems of health care, causal and symbolic factors involved in physical and mental illness, and the medicalization of life in contemporary society. The disciplinary focus of the course will vary from semester to semester. (lecture/tutorial) Prerequisite: SA 101 or 201 or 150. Students with credit SA 460 when offered as Medical Anthropology may not take SA 218 for further credit.
SA 231-4 Sociology of Families (S)
An examination of families and households in social, cultural, political and economic context. This course focuses on the diversity of family forms in contemporary societies (particularly Canada) in relation to various social institutions and processes, including demographic trends, ideology, the economy, the state and social policies. (lecture) Prerequisite: SA 150.
SA 241-0 Sociology and Anthropology Practicum II (SA)
This is the second semester of work experience in the Co-operative Education Program in sociology and anthropology. Building on the experiences of the first employment semester, this semester will provide a work experience that integrates theory and practice of the social sciences. Prerequisite: successful completion of SA 141 and normally the completion of at least 45 semester credit hours with a minimum cumulative GPA of 2.75. Students should apply to the Faculty of Arts co-op co-ordinator by the end of the third week of the semester preceding the employment semester
SA 245-4 Cultures and Images (A)
This course introduces students to the principles and practices of visual anthropology through exploring the creation, circulation, and consumption of images among and between members of diverse cultures in the contemporary world. subjects to be covered include the use of photographs, film and video as a tool in ethnographic research; the use and implications of new information technologies; the `reading' of photographs, film and video from an anthropological perspective; the emergence and development of non-Western visual media. (lecture/tutorial) Prerequisite: SA 101.
SA 250-4 Introduction to Sociological Theory (S)
An account of sociological theory, outlining the main ideas and concepts of the principal schools of thought. (lecture/tutorial) Prerequisite: SA 150.
SA 255-4 Introduction to Social Research (SA)
An introduction to the conduct of sociological and anthropological research. subjects covered include: the relationship between theory and research, concept formation, operationalization, exploratory studies, hypothesis generation and testing, data collection techniques within both sociology and anthropology, the assessment of causality, the critical evaluation of research on both theoretical and methodological grounds, the definition of research problems, and ethical issues in social research. (lecture/tutorial) Prerequisite: SA 101 or 150. Students with credit for POL 213 may not take SA 255 for further credit.
SA 260-4 Individual and Society (S)
An examination of how self and identity (e.g. race, class, gender, sexual orientation) are socially derived within contemporary western culture, and of the ways that individuals shape their social environment. (lecture/tutorial) Prerequisite: SA 150.
SA 263-4 Peasants, Proletarians and the Global Economy (A)
An introduction to the anthropology of peoples in agrarian and newly industrializing societies. subjects may include: relations between peasants and others in agrarian societies, transformation of peasants into urban proletarians; sources of social differentiation and increasing poverty and unrest. (lecture/tutorial) Students with credit for SA 280 may not take SA 263 for further credit. Recommended: SA 101.
SA 275-4 Asian Societies (SA)
An introduction to the societies of a selected region of Asia. The course will regularly be offered with a focus on Southeast Asia, but from time to time during other semesters will also be offered with a focus on East Asia or South Asia. (seminar) Prerequisite: SA 101 or 150.
SA 286-4 Aboriginal Peoples and British Columbia: Introduction (A)
Investigates contemporary social organization, cultural expression, and political representation among Aboriginal peoples in the province of British Columbia within an ethnohistorical framework. subjects may include: land rights, law, gender relations, inter-cultural relations; policy studies in education, health, justice, social and economic development; indigenous knowledge; Aboriginal art, media and performance. Emphasis may differ from semester to semester. (lecture/tutorial) Students with credit for SA 140 may not take SA 286 for further credit. Recommended: SA 101.
SA 292-4 Special subjects in Sociology (S)
An introduction to the discipline and perspective of sociology through analysis of an issue, process or problem with topical interest or general relevance. (lecture/tutorial)
SA 293-4 Special subjects in Anthropology (A)
An introduction to the discipline and perspective of anthropology through analysis of an issue, process or problem with topical interest or general relevance. (lecture/tutorial) Recommended: SA 101.
SA 294-4 Special subjects in Sociology and Anthropology (SA)
Topical exploration of interdisciplinary issues in sociology and anthropology. (lecture/tutorial)
SA 300-4 Canadian Social Structure (SA)
An analysis of the social institutions and structure of Canadian society. The focus of the course will vary from semester to semester, but typically it will examine different theoretical approaches to the study of Canada and, from these, develop a framework for the analysis of Canadian social institutions and class structure. (seminar) Prerequisite: SA 150 and one second year sociology (S) or sociology/anthropology (SA) course. Recommended: SA 100.
SA 301-4 Contemporary Ethnography (A)
A consideration of key themes in contemporary anthropology. This course addresses theoretical and methodological questions by examining the work of contemporary anthropologists conducting research in diverse locations around the world. (seminar) Prerequisite: SA 101 and one of SA 201, 263, 286 or 293. Students with credit for SA 370 may not take SA 301 for further credit.
SA 303-4 Ethnic Conflicts (SA)
An analysis of the origins, expression and attempted solutions of conflicts in ethnically divided societies. Depending upon the area of focus, such contentious issues as education, political representation, religious divisions, labor policies, and formal and informal mechanisms of segregation will be considered. (seminar) Prerequisite: SA 150 and one second year sociology (S) or sociology/anthropology (SA) course. Recommended: SA 203.
SA 304-4 Social Control (S)
This course examines how the organization of control (formal and informal) affects both individuals and society. It will investigate how control takes form, how it functions, the ideologies supporting it, and the resistance it produces. We will ask the following questions: who are the agents of social control; who or what do they control; and how do they control? (seminar) Prerequisite: SA 150 and one second year sociology (S) or sociology/anthropology (SA) course.
SA 315-4 New information Technology and Society
Explores the new social spaces and social practices fostered by new information technology. Special attention will be paid to who is making decisions about what technologies to adopt and how, what social changes are resulting, and who benefits and who loses. A significant portion of activity in this course will involve direct engagement with new information technology. (seminar) Recommended: SA 150.
SA 316-4 Tourism and Social Policy (SA)
An examination of tourism from the perspectives of sociology and anthropology, focusing primarily upon the social and cultural impacts of tourism and the social policy implications of tourism development in different societies. (seminar) Prerequisite: SA 150 and one second year sociology (S) or sociology/anthropology (SA) course.
SA 318-4 The Anthropology of Medicine (A)
An examination from a cross-cultural perspective of the social and ideological organization of health and healing. The role of medicine as a mediator between society and the body will be considered through an examination of the socio-cultural underpinnings of both biomedicine in the West and alternative medical systems. subjects may include: cultural variation in definitions of illness; medical pluralism in complex societies; medical authority and social control; the relation between health and gender, age, class, and ethnic identity. (seminar) Prerequisite: SA 101. Recommended: SA 218 is highly recommenced.
SA 319-4 Culture, Ethnicity and Aging (SA)
An examination of the effects of culture and ethnicity on the aging process and the treatment of the aged. Although the orientation of the course is cross-cultural and comparative, particular emphasis will be placed on the social aspects of aging among various ethnic groups in contemporary Canada. (lecture/seminar) Prerequisite: SA 101 or 150 and either one second year sociology (S) or sociology/anthropology (SA) course, or acceptance into the gerontology diploma program.
SA 320-4 Population and Society (SA)
A study of the reciprocal influence of population and social structure and demographic attempts to use population variables in social explanation; a discussion of cultural and institutional influences on human populations with respect to fertility, mortality and migration. (lecture/seminar) Prerequisite: SA 150 and one second year sociology (S) or sociology/anthropology (SA) course.
SA 321-4 Social Movements (S)
A study of the sources, development and effects of social movements in transitional and modernized societies. Specific types of movements will be analysed. (seminar) Prerequisite: SA 150 and one second year sociology (S) or sociology/anthropology (SA) course.
SA 322-4 Sociology of Religion (S)
An examination of the development and social impact of religious institutions in modern industrial societies. Consideration will be given to the classical theoretical approaches to the sociology of religion, and further subjects which may be considered include: denominational religion in Britain and North America; the secularization thesis; the relationship between science and religion, and the organization, structure and social appeal of sectarian groups in contemporary society. (seminar) Prerequisite: SA 150 and one second year sociology (S) or sociology/anthropology (SA) course.
SA 323-4 Symbol, Myth and Meaning (A)
An examination of myth, symbolism, ritual and cosmological systems. Anthropological theories of magic, possession, witchcraft, healing and religious movements analysed in ethnographic context. (seminar) Prerequisite: SA 101 and one of SA 201, 263, 286 or 293.
SA 325-4 Political Sociology (S)
An examination of the relations of power and authority. This course will analyse the interrelations of family, church, class, interest groups, etc., particularly as they influence and are influenced by the state. The relations of law and ideology to the structures of government will form the context for this analysis. The course may also focus on broad theoretical questions of contemporary political interest. (seminar) Prerequisite: SA 150 and one second year sociology (S) or sociology/anthropology (SA) course.
SA 326-4 Ecology and Social Thought (S)
An examination of latest social thought that is concerned with environmental and ecological themes. It will address a selection from the following themes: technology evaluation; technology and science as ideology; ecology and social inequality; the concepts of ecosystem, environment and wilderness; the self-world relationship; politics of environmental uses; environment and the economy. (seminar) Prerequisite: SA 250 or equivalent second year course in a cognate discipline.
SA 327-4 Sociology of Knowledge (S)
An examination of sociological theories concerning the interaction of social structures, and meaning and belief systems. (seminar) Prerequisite: SA 150 and one second year sociology (S) or sociology/anthropology (SA) course. Recommended: SA 250
SA 331-4 Politics of the Family (S)
A sociological examination of the contested nature of contemporary domestic and intimate relations. The course will focus on debates arising from equality movement politics (e.g. gender, sexuality, race). (seminar) Prerequisite: SA 150 and one second year sociology (S) or sociology/anthropology (SA) course.
SA 332-4 The Anthropology of Childhood (A)
A cross-cultural examination of the social and cultural relations that shape childhood in different settings. subjects to be considered could include: the social definition of childhood and child rearing; the institutional arrangements established for children and youth and the impact that these have on children, families, and society; the social construction of child and youth cultures. (seminar) Prerequisite: SA 101 and one of SA 201, 263, 286 or 293.
SA 333-4 Schooling and Society (S)
A sociological analysis of the nature of the education system and its relationship to major social institutions in Western industrial societies, in particular Canada. Aspects studied may include: the classroom, teachers, student culture, bureaucratization, inequality, employment, and social policy. (seminar) Prerequisite: SA 150 and one second year sociology (S) or sociology/anthropology (SA) course.
SA 335-4 Gender Relations and Social Issues (S)
A sociological study of the position of women and men in major social institutions in western industrial societies, in particular Canada. Social institutions that may be examined include: the family, education, the economy, the polity, law, and the mass media. Particular attention will be paid to social policy issues. (seminar) Prerequisite: SA 150 and one second year sociology (S) or sociology/anthropology (SA) course. Students with credit for SA 292 (when offered as gender relations) or WS 308 may not take SA 335 for further credit. Recommended: WS 203.
SA 340-4 Social Issues and Social Policy Analysis (SA)
An examination of how sociological and anthropological theories and methods can be applied to the examination of social problems and issues which become the object of social policy. A central concern of the course is the question of how social issues are defined as problematic. Particular attention will be given to gender, ethnicity, class and generation. Substantive examples of social policy issues will be selected from a number of fields. (seminar) Prerequisite: SA 150 and either SA 101 or one other lower division (A) course.
SA 341-0 Sociology and Anthropology Practicum III (SA)
This is the third semester of work experience in the Co-operative Education Program in sociology and anthropology. The work experience will be focused in a specialized area of the student's choice. Prerequisite: successful completion of SA 241 and normally the completion of at least 61 semester hours with a minimum cumulative GPA of 2.75. Students should apply to the Faculty of Arts co-op co-ordinator by the end of the third week of the semester preceding the employment semester.
SA 345-4 Issues in Canadian Ethnic Relations (SA)
A survey of current issues in ethnic and intercultural relations in Canada, considered in the context of demographic trends and policy development. (seminar) Prerequisite: any two of the following: SA 101, 150, 201.
SA 350-4 Classical Sociological Thought (S)
An examination of aspects of the work of one or more of the nineteenth or early twentieth century sociological theorists. (seminar) Prerequisite: SA 250.
SA 351-4 Classical Marxist Thought (SA)
A detailed study of classical Marxist social thought. (seminar) Prerequisite: SA 250.
SA 352-4 Games, Sports and Cultures (A)
An anthropological examination of games and sports in cross-cultural perspective. Particular attention will be given to the social construction of games and athletic activities as well as the cultural, political and aesthetic meanings attached to these. subjects that may be examined include: the embodiment of culture in sporting activities; the impact of inter-cultural contact and globalization on games and sport; the shaping of gender, class and ethnic identities through sport involvement; appropriate methodologies for producing sport ethnographies. (seminar) Prerequisite: one of SA 101, 150, 201 or consent of instructor.
SA 355-4 Quantitative Methods (SA)
An examination of measurement issues within sociological and anthropological research, focusing on the logical and conceptual construction and interpretation of tables, and an examination of the uses and abuses of statistics. Through an introduction to `hands on' use of the computer, this course emphasizes the applications, rather than the mathematics, of statistics. (seminar) Prerequisite: STAT 203 or equivalent and SA 255 or POL 213. Students with credit for SA 355 may not take POL 315 for further credit.
SA 356-4 Ethnography and Qualitative Methods (SA)
An examination of qualitative field methods, including participant observation, interviewing, archival research, cross-cultural research, life histories, network analysis, mapping, and ethical problems of fieldwork. (seminar) Prerequisite: SA 255 and 101 or 201.
SA 358-4 The Philosophy of the Social Sciences (SA)
An analysis of the nature of explanation in the social sciences: `mind' and action, positivist and interpretive modes of explanation, sociological and historical explanation, objectivity, forms of relativism, the concept of rationality. (seminar) Prerequisite: SA 150 and one second year sociology (S) or sociology/anthropology (SA) course. Recommended: SA 250 and 255.
SA 360-4 Special subjects in Sociology and Anthropology (SA)
A seminar exploring a syllabu not regularly offered by the department. The disciplinary designation will change to reflect specific topics; refer to each semester's course outline. (seminar) Prerequisite: SA 101 and 150, plus one second year sociology (S), anthropology (A) or sociology/anthropology (SA) course.
SA 362-4 Society and the Changing Global Division of Labor (S)
An examination of the social and political implications of the global economy. subjects to be considered include the influence of neo-liberal economics, the decline of the national welfare state, transnational political agencies and public policy, the internationalization of culture, the global labor market, the `world city' hypothesis, ethnic resurgence and alternatives to these developments. (seminar) Prerequisite: SA 150 and one second year sociology (S) or sociology/anthropology (SA) course. Recommended: SA 202.
SA 363-4 Processes of Development and Underdevelopment (SA)
An examination of sociological and anthropological theories of development and underdevelopment as applied to the Third World. The nature and consequences of world system linkages; colonialism and decolonization; patterns of social change in selected societies and regions. (seminar) Prerequisite: SA 250 or 101 and one of SA 201, 263, 286 or 293. Recommended: SA 263.
SA 364-4 Urban Communities and Cultures (SA)
Anthropological approaches to urbanization, the nature of the city as a social system, and urban cultures and lifestyles. (seminar) Prerequisite: SA 101 and one of SA 201, 263, 286 or 293. Students with credit for SA 464 may not take SA 364 for further credit.
SA 365-4 Selected Regional Areas (SA)
An examination of selected aspects of the social structure, culture and the processes of social change in varying regional areas. The focus will vary from semester to semester. (seminar) Prerequisite: SA 101 and an appropriate second year course or consent of the instructor.
SA 371-4 The Environment and Society (SA)
An examination of environmental issues in their social context. Environmental issues are on the leading edge of contemporary public concern and public policy debates. This course will examine such issues as the relationship between social organization and mode of subsistence, the politics of hunger, and the way in which human societies in their particular social, historical, and cultural contexts view and interact with the natural world. Content may differ from semester to semester. (seminar) Prerequisite: SA 150 and one 200 level sociology (S) or sociology and anthropology (SA) course.
SA 374-4 South Africa: Socio-Political Development (SA)
An exploration of the socio-political transformation of South Africa and the legacy of apartheid. Inter-ethnic relations and nation-building are compared with nationalist conflicts in other divided societies; constitutional experiments with power sharing and corporatism are assessed. (seminar) Prerequisite: SA 101 or 150 and one second year sociology (S) or anthropology (A) course, or permission of instructor. Students with credit for SA 477 may not take SA 374 for further credit.
SA 386-4 Native Peoples and Public Policy (SA)
An examination of relations between Natives and non-Natives, indigenous peoples and governments in Canada. The consequences of these relations for the lives of Native peoples. (seminar) Prerequisite: SA 101 and one of SA 201, 263, 286 and 293.
SA 387-4 Canadian Native Peoples (SA)
The study of traditional and contemporary Canadian Native peoples. The focus of the course will vary from semester to semester. (seminar) Prerequisite: SA 101 and one of SA 201, 263, 286 or 293.
SA 388-4 Comparative Studies of Minority Indigenous Peoples (SA)
The social and cultural patterns of aboriginal populations within various modern nation-states. Their relations with majority societies and with other indigenous groups across the world. (seminar) Prerequisite: SA 101 and one of SA 201, 263, 286 or 293.
SA 392-4 Latin America (SA)
An introduction to the peoples and institutions of Latin America in historical and contemporary perspective, emphasizing macro-level patterns of similarity and diversity. (seminar) Prerequisite: SA 101 and one of SA 201, 263, 286 or 293. Students with credit for SA 391 may not take this course for further credit. This course is identical to LAS 392 and students cannot take both courses for credit.
SA 396-4 Selected Regional Areas (SA)
An examination of selected aspects of social structure, culture and processes of social change in a specific regional area. The focus will vary from semester to semester. (seminar) Prerequisite: SA 101 and one of SA 201, 263, 286 or 293.
SA 400-4 Canadian Ethnic Minorities (SA)
An analysis of specific Canadian ethnic minorities. The groups will be studied in the context of the wider literature of race relations and ethnicity. (seminar) Prerequisite: SA 150 and one second year sociology (S) or sociology/anthropology (SA) course. Students with credit for SA 401 prior to the Fall of 1987 may not take this course for further credit. Recommended: SA 203 and 300
SA 402-4 The Practice of Anthropology (A)
An examination of the ways in which anthropology and ethnography may be used to affect action in the world. subjects may include: advocacy anthropology; the development and practice of applied anthropology; the emergence of anthropology and ethnography and the arts. (seminar) Prerequisite: SA 101 and one of SA 201, 263, 286 or 293. Recommended: at least two upper division courses in anthropology.
SA 403-4 Special Topics: Latin American Economy and Society
This seminar will be taught co-operatively by LAS associated faculty or by a visiting professor. A syllabu will be chosen which can be examined profitably from a multidisciplinary perspective. (seminar) Prerequisite: LAS 200. This course is identical to LAS 403 and students cannot take both courses for credit.
SA 416-4 Sociology of Art Forms (S)
This course may focus variously on one or all of the following: the social origins and functions of art, sociological theories of aesthetics, and contemporary issues in art, such as the fate of art in modern society, popular culture, mass media, ideology in art. (seminar) Prerequisite: SA 150 and one second year sociology (S) or sociology/anthropology (SA) course.
SA 420-4 Sociology of Aging (SA)
The structural and behavioral implications of aging. subjects included will be: demographic aspects of aging; the relationship of aging to political, economic, familial and other social institutions; the psychological significance of aging. (lecture/seminar) Prerequisite: SA 150 and one second year sociology (S) or sociology/anthropology (SA) course, or acceptance into the diploma program in gerontology.
SA 428-4 Political Economy of Latin American Development
This is a survey course which introduces students to the various theoretical approaches which have been used since the 1950's to understand the political economy of Latin American development. It deals with some of the classic theories of modernization, dependency, world systems, and modes of production analysis. The last unit of the course is devoted to the most contemporary issues of Latin American development, such as the agrarian question, women and development, problems of urbanization and the informal sector. (lecture/seminar) Prerequisite: LAS 200 and either ECON 102 or 105 or permission of the instructor. This course is identical to SA 328, LAS 318 and LAS 428, POL 383 and 483, and students cannot take more than one of these courses for credit.
SA 435-4 Gender, Colonialism, Post-colonialism (SA)
An ethnographically grounded study of the social and cultural construction of gender, and the ways in which it is experienced and embodied in the colonial and post-colonial world. The socio-historical conjunctures affecting women and men across the world will be explored at multiple sites: health, economy, media, law, development, policy, among others. Central to these concerns is the understanding of gender as a process and identity formulated at intersecting fields of knowledge and power. Prerequisite: SA 101, 250, and one of SA 201, 263, 286 or 293. Students who have taken SA 463 prior to 1999 may not take SA 435 for further credit. Recommended: SA 363.
SA 441-0 Sociology and Anthropology Practicum IV (SA)
This is the last semester of work experience in the Co-operative Education Program in sociology and anthropology. The work experience will require a high level of expertise in both theoretical conceptions and practical endeavors. Prerequisite: successful completion of SA 341 and normally the completion of at least 77 semester credit hours with a minimum cumulative GPA of 2.75. Students should apply to the Faculty of Arts co-op co-ordinator by the end of the third week of the semester preceding the employment semester.
SA 447-4 Selected Issues in Social Policy Analysis (SA)
An advanced seminar devoted to an in-depth examination of an issue or syllabu in the field of social policy analysis which is not regularly offered by the department. (seminar) Prerequisite: SA 150 and one second year sociology (S) or sociology/anthropology (SA) course (or permission of the instructor). Recommended: SA 340.
SA 450-4 Advanced Sociological Theory (S)
A senior seminar on current perspectives in sociological theory. Emphasis will differ from semester to semester. (seminar) Prerequisite: SA 350, 90 credit hours, a GPA of at least 3.25 and consent of the instructor.
SA 451-4 Issues in Anthropological Theory (A)
A senior seminar on current perspectives in anthropological theory. Emphasis will differ from semester to semester. (seminar) Prerequisite: SA 301, 90 credit hours, a GPA of at least 3.25 and consent of the instructor.
SA 455-4 Special subjects in Applied Social Research (SA)
An advanced seminar devoted to special subjects in applied social research. (seminar) Prerequisite: SA 255 and SA 355 or 356.
SA 460-4 Special subjects in Sociology and Anthropology I (SA)
An advanced seminar devoted to an in-depth examination of a syllabu not regularly offered by the department. The disciplinary designation will change to reflect specific topics; refer to each semester's course outline. (seminar) Recommended: at least two upper division courses in sociology and/or anthropology.
SA 463-4 Special subjects in Development Studies (SA)
An examination of processes of social change in selected Third World societies. subjects will change from semester to semester, but may include: liberation movements and colonialism, the comparative study of post-revolutionary societies; the persistence, transformation and disappearance of contemporary pleasantries; directed change programs. (seminar) Prerequisite: SA 250 or 101 and one of SA 201, 263, 286 or 293. Recommended: SA 363.
SA 472-4 Anthropology and the Past (A)
Anthropologists frequently turn to historical documents (traveller's reports, missionary archives, etc.) in order to reconstruct the nature of past societies; likewise, every society has a sense of its own past and represents it in its own way. This course examines the relation between history and anthropology. Content may include: the use of historical material in anthropological research; construction of traditional knowledge as a cultural process; history and the politics of culture; the relation between individual and collective memory. (seminar) Prerequisite: SA 301 or 350, or consent of the instructor.
SA 486-4 Aboriginal Peoples and British Columbia: Advanced Seminar (A)
An opportunity for senior undergraduates to participate in a seminar concentrating on particular subjects of interest in the fields of social and cultural research among Aboriginal peoples in British Columbia. The course will focus on special subjects that will differ from semester to semester. This may include: historical ethnography; policy issues and debates; economic and social development; political and legal relations; gender and generational relations; health and healing; ethnographic film; arts, literature and popular culture; cultural performance; oral tradition; exhibition and representation; cultural property. (seminar) Prerequisite: SA 101 and one of SA 201, 263, 286 or 293. Recommended: SA 286.
SA 496-4 Directed Readings in Anthropology (A)
Directed readings in a selected field of study under the direction of a single faculty member. A paper will be required. Prerequisite: SA 101 and one of SA 201, 263, 286 or 293. Students with credit for SA 497 may not take SA 496 for further credit.
SA 497-4 Directed Readings in Sociology (S)
Directed readings in a selected field of study under the direction of a single faculty member. A paper will be required. Prerequisite: SA 150 and one second year sociology (S) or sociology/anthropology (SA) course. Students with credit for SA 496 may not take SA 497 for further credit.
SA 498-8 Field Study in Sociology and/or Anthropology
Advanced field project in a research setting. Admission dependent on availability of appropriate field placements and departmental supervisory capacity. Prerequisite: completion of all major course requirements with the exception of SA 301 for anthropology majors and SA 350 for sociology majors, which may be taken concurrently.
SA 499-8 Honors Essay (SA)
An honors essay to be written under the direction of a member of faculty, a copy of which is to be permanently lodged with the department. On completion, the essay is to be defended orally in a departmental seminar.

Spanish SPAN

Faculty of Arts

Department of Linguistics

Language Training Institute

SPAN 102-3 Introductory Spanish I
Acquisition of spoken fluency and elementary practicing facility. This course is for all students who have not previously taken Spanish and for those whose proficiency in Spanish is not judged adequate for more advanced courses. (tutorial/laboratory)
SPAN 103-3 Introductory Spanish II
Continuation of the work of SPAN 102; it should be taken, wherever possible, in the semester immediately following SPAN 102. (tutorial/laboratory) Prerequisite: SPAN 102 or equivalent.
SPAN 201-3 Intermediate Spanish I
Emphasis on oral command, and accurate and idiomatic expression. (lecture/tutorial) Prerequisite: SPAN 103 or equivalent.
SPAN 202-3 Intermediate Spanish II
Continues the work of SPAN 201 with emphasis on oral command and writing skills. practicing of selected texts will be introduced to expose the students to Hispanic culture. (lecture/tutorial) Prerequisite: SPAN 201.
SPAN 303-3 Spanish Conversation and Composition
Conversation and composition on selected subjects with emphasis on correct spelling, sentence and paragraph structures. (lecture/tutorial) Prerequisite: SPAN 202 or equivalent.
SPAN 304-3 Advanced Spanish Conversation and Composition
Continues the work of SPAN 303 with emphasis on style. practicing and analysis of selected texts will serve as the basis for further practice in oral and written expression. (lecture/tutorial) Prerequisite: SPAN 303 or equivalent.
SPAN 305-3 Spanish for Business
This course will provide advanced level students and professionals with the specialized and technical vocabulary needed to function in the business world. Cultural aspects involved in dealing with business in Spanish America will also be studied. (0-3-0) Prerequisite: SPAN 202.

Statistics STAT

Faculty of Science

See also courses listed under Actuarial Mathematics (ACMA) (page 223), Mathematics and Computing Science (MACM (page 283) and Mathematics (MATH) (page 281).
Open Workshop for STAT Courses
(see courses marked with ** below) Some introductory and service courses are organized through the department's open workshops. In addition to regularly scheduled lectures, students registered in these courses are encouraged to come to the workshops for assistance with problems and questions any time during posted working hours. At the workshop students will have the opportunity to meet with the co-ordinator, the teaching assistants and other students, and work together to understand statistics in a friendly and helpful environment. Statistics Workshop
STAT 101, 203, 270, 201, 302 K9516 Shrum Science Centre (inside K9510) Mr. R. Insley
Beginning Level Requirements in Statistics
Students considering registering in a statistics course who do not have BC high school mathematics 11 (or equivalent) must see the co-ordinator of the basic math workshop (as described under Mathematics in the Undergraduate Courses section). These students may take the non-credit basic math course, basic algebra, offered through the Department of Mathematics and Statistics. Students who are unsure of their level of preparation are strongly encouraged to take the free math assessment test at the Basic Math Workshop, K9505 or Simon Fraser University at Harbour Centre. Students should make certain that they discuss the test results with the lab instructor in the Basic Math Workshop, or her designate.
Minimum Grade Requirement in Prerequisites for STAT Courses
Students enrolled in courses offered by the Department of Statistics and Actuarial Science must have obtained a grade of C- or better in prerequisite courses. Some experience with a high level programming language is recommended by the beginning of the second year. No student may take, for further credit, any course offered by the Department of Statistics and Actuarial Science which is a prerequisite. Courses marked with an asterisk (*) are intended to be particularly accessible to students who are not specializing in Statistics.
STAT* 100-3 Chance and Data Analysis**
An introduction to chance phenomena and data analysis through simulation and examination of real world contexts including sports, investment, lotteries and environmental issues. (3-0-1) Students may not receive credit for both STAT 100 and STAT 101. Recommended: This course should not be taken by students who have 60 or more credits.
STAT* 101-3 Introduction to Statistics**
An introductory course in the collection, description, analysis and summary of data, including the concepts of frequency distribution, parameter estimation and hypothesis testing. (3-0-1) Students with credit for ARCH 376, BUEC 232 (formerly 332) or STAT 270 (formerly MATH 272 and 371) may not subsequently receive credit for STAT 101-3. Students with credit for STAT 102, 203 (formerly STAT 103), 301, MATH 101 or 102 may not take STAT 101 for further credit.
STAT* 201-3 Statistics for the Life Sciences**
An introductory course in research methodology and associated statistical analysis techniques for students with training in the life sciences. (3-0-1) Prerequisite:30 credit hours. Students with credit for STAT 101, 102, 203 (formerly 103), 270 (formerly MATH 272) or 301 may not take STAT 201 for further credit.
*STAT 203-3 Introduction to Statistics for the Social Sciences**
An introductory course in descriptive and inferential statistics aimed at students in the social sciences. Scales of measurement. Descriptive statistics. Measures of association. Hypothesis tests and confidence intervals. (3-0-1) Students in Sociology and Anthropology are expected to take SA 255 before this course. Students with credit for ARCH 376, BUEC 232 (formerly 332), or STAT 270 may not subsequently receive credit for this course. Students with credit for any of STAT 101, 102, or 103 may not take this course for further credit. Recommended: a research methods course such as SA 255, CRIM 120, POL 213 or equivalent is recommended.
STAT 270-3 Introduction to Probability and Statistics**
Basic laws of probability, trial distributions. Introduction to statistical applications. (3-0-1) Prerequisite: MATH 152 or 155 or 158 must precede or be taken concurrently. Students wishing an intuitive appreciation of a broad range of statistical strategies may wish to take STAT 100 first.
STAT 285-3 Intermediate Probability and Statistics
This course is a continuation of STAT 270. Review of probability models. Procedures for statistical inference from survey results and experimental data. Statistical model building. Elementary design of experiments and regression methods. Introduction to lifetime analysis. Introduction to time series. Introduction to stochastic processes. (3-1-0) Prerequisite: STAT 270. Prerequisite or corequisite: MATH 232. This course may not be taken for credit by students who have credit for STAT 330 prior to the Fall 03-3 semester.
STAT 290-3 Selected subjects in Probability and Statistics
subjects in areas of probability and statistics not covered in the regular undergraduate curriculum of the department. Prerequisite: dependent on the syllabu covered.
STAT* 302-3 Analysis of Experimental and Observational Data**
The standard techniques of multiple regression analysis, analysis of variance, and analysis of covariance, and their role in experimental research. (3-0-1) Prerequisite: any course in the statistics, of at least three credits, offered at SFU. Statistics major and honors students may not use this course to satisfy the required number of semester hours of upper division statistics. However, they may include the course to satisfy the total number of required hours of upper division credit.
STAT 330-3 Introduction to Mathematical Statistics
Review of probability and distributions. Multivariate distributions. Distributions of functions of random variables. Limiting distributions. Inference. Sufficient statistics for the exponential family. Maximum likelihood. Bayes estimation, Fisher information, limited distributions of MLEs. Likelihood ratio tests. (3-1-0) Prerequisite: STAT 285.
STAT 336-0 Job Practicum
This is the first semester of work experience in a co-operative education program available to statistics students. Interested students should contact their departmental advisors as early in their career as possible for proper counselling. (0-0-0) Prerequisite: students must apply and receive permission from the co-op co-ordinator at least one but preferably two semesters in advance. They will normally be required to have completed 45 hours of credit with a GPA of 2.5 before they may take this practicum course. The course will be graded on a pass/withdraw basis. A course fee is required.
STAT 337-0 Job Practicum II
This is the second semester of work experience in a co-operative education program available to statistics students. (0-0-0) Prerequisite: STAT 336 or Job Practicum I from another department. Students must apply and receive permission from the co-op co-ordinator at least one semester in advance. The course will be graded on a pass/withdraw basis. A course fee is required.
STAT 350-3 Linear Models in Applied Statistics
Theory and application of linear regression. Normal distribution theory. Hypothesis tests and confidence intervals. Model selection. Model diagnostics. Introduction to weighted least squares and generalized linear models. (3-1-0) Prerequisite: STAT 330 and MATH 251.
STAT 380-3 Introduction to Stochastic Processes
Review of discrete and continuous probability models and relationships between them. Exploration of conditioning and conditional expectation. Markov chains. Random walks. Continuous time processes. Poisson process. Markov processes. Gaussian processes. (3-1-0) Prerequisite: STAT 285 and MATH 251 or consent of instructor.
STAT 390-3 Selected subjects in Probability and Statistics
subjects in areas of probability and statistics not covered in the regular undergraduate curriculum of the department. (3-1-0) Prerequisite: dependent on the syllabu covered.
STAT 400-3 Data Analysis
A problem-based course emphasizing the exploratory aspects of statistical analysis with emphasis on modern computer-oriented methods. (3-1-0) Prerequisite: STAT 350.
STAT 402-3 Generalized Linear and Nonlinear Modelling
A skills oriented unified approach to a broad array of non-linear regression modelling methods including classical regression, logistic regression, probit analysis, dilution assay, frequency count analysis, ordinal-type responses, and survival data. (3-1-0) Prerequisite: STAT 302 or STAT 350.
STAT* 403-3 Intermediate Sampling and Experimental Design
A practical introduction to useful sampling techniques and intermediate level experimental designs. (3-0-2) Prerequisite: STAT 302 or 350. Students with credit for STAT 410 or 430 may not take STAT 403 for further credit. Statistics minor, major and honors students may not use this course to satisfy the required number of semester hours of upper division Statistics. However, they may include the course to satisfy the total number of required hours of upper division credit.
STAT 410-3 Statistical Analysis of trial Surveys
An introduction to the major trial survey designs and their mathematical justification. Associated statistical analyses. (3-0-0) Prerequisite: STAT 350.
STAT 430-3 Statistical Design and Analysis of Experiments
An extension of the designs discussed in STAT 330 to include more than one blocking variable, incomplete block designs, fractional factorial designs, and response surface methods. (3-1-0) Prerequisite: STAT 350 (or MATH 372). Students with credit for MATH 404 may not take STAT 430 for further credit.
STAT 436-0 Job Practicum III
This is the third semester of work experience in a co-operative education program available to statistics students. (0-0-0) Prerequisite: STAT 337 or Job Practicum II from another department. Students must apply and receive permission from the co-op co-ordinator at least one semester in advance. The course will be graded on a pass/withdraw basis. A course fee is required.
STAT 437-0 Job Practicum IV
This is the fourth semester of work experience in a co-operative education program available to statistics students. (0-0-0) Prerequisite: STAT 436 or Job Practicum III from another department. Students must apply and receive permission from the co-op co-ordinator at least one semester in advance. The course will be graded on a pass-withdraw basis. A course fee is required.
STAT 438-0 Job Practicum V
This is an optional fifth semester of work experience in a co-operative education program available to statistics students. (0-0-0) Prerequisite: STAT 437 or Job Practicum IV from another department. Students must apply and receive permission from the co-op co-ordinator at least one semester in advance. The course will be graded on a pass/withdraw basis. A course fee is required.
STAT 450-3 Statistical Theory
Distribution theory, methods for constructing tests, estimators, and confidence intervals with special attention to likelihood methods. Properties of the procedures including large trial theory. (3-1-0) Prerequisite: STAT 330.
STAT 460-3 Bayesian Statistics
The Bayesian approach to statistics is an alternative and increasingly popular way of quantifying uncertainty in the presence of data. This course considers comparative statistical inference, prior distributions, Bayesian computation, and applications. (3-1-0) Prerequisite: STAT 330 and 350.
STAT 490-3 Selected subjects in Probability and Statistics
subjects in areas of probability and statistics not covered in the regular undergraduate curriculum of the department. (3-1-0) Prerequisite: dependent on the syllabu covered.
STAT 495-3 Directed Studies in Probability and Statistics
Independent practicing or research on consultation with the supervising instructor. Prerequisite: written permission of the department undergraduate studies committee.

Women's Studies WS

Faculty of Arts

WS 101-3 Introduction to Women's Issues in Canada
An interdisciplinary study of current issues related to women's experiences in Canada. The focus will be on women's interaction with social structures and public policy and how these differ for different women's circumstances. (lecture/tutorial) Students who have taken WS 100 at SFU may not take WS 101 for further credit.
WS 102-3 Introduction to Western Feminisms
An historical and comparative survey of feminisms in Western Europe and North America. (lecture/tutorial) Students who have taken WS 100 at SFU may not take WS 102 for further credit.
WS 200-3 Women in Cross-Cultural Perspective
The focus will be on the situation of women in cross-cultural perspective using literary, historical, anthropological and other appropriate sources. (lecture/tutorial) Prerequisite: WS 101 or 102 (may be taken concurrently).
WS 201-3 Women in Canada 1600-1920
Examines the changing nature of female experience from the days of New France to the First World War through the lives of both famous and anonymous women. The diaries, memoirs, letters and literary works of Canadian women will be a major interest. (lecture/tutorial) Prerequisite: WS 101 or 102 (may be taken concurrently).
WS 202-3 Women in Canada 1920 to the Present
Examines the range of experience open to Canadian women in the 20th century. The strengths and limitations of women's roles will be analysed from a historical perspective, using demographic evidence, autobiographies, literature, government documents and monographs. (lecture/tutorial) Prerequisite: WS 101 or 102 (may be taken concurrently).
WS 203-3 Female Roles in Contemporary Society
An interdisciplinary study of definitions of self/other as derived from sexual roles and the psychological mechanisms by which such definitions are acquired and maintained. (lecture/tutorial) Prerequisite: WS 101 or 102 (may be taken concurrently).
WS 204-3 Women, Science and Technology
This course examines some of the social, political and economic consequences for women of the development of a global system of science and technology. A survey of feminist critiques of this system will focus on such subjects as the place of science in education, the evaluation of the appropriateness of technologies, the nature of evidence, and strategies for empowerment in relation to research and development. (lecture/tutorial) Prerequisite: WS 101 or 102 (may be taken concurrently); or six credit hours in sciences or applied sciences.
WS 205-3 Women and Popular Culture
A study of images of women as revealed through the analysis of a variety of media. (lecture/tutorial) Prerequisite: WS 101 or 102 (may be taken concurrently).
WS 206-3 Issues in Women's Health and Health Care
A critical examination of women's relation to the health care system in Canada as practitioners, users, researchers and objects of medical treatment and research. Among the subjects discussed will be the medical model, the privatization of health care, the medicalization of daily life including reproduction, and feminist alternatives to the medical system. (lecture/tutorial) Prerequisite: one of WS 101 or 102 (may be taken concurrently). Students who have taken WS 001 may not take WS 206 for further credit.
WS 207-3 Introduction to Feminist Theory
A study of concepts, controversies and processes of feminist social theory. (lecture/tutorial) Prerequisite: WS 101 or 102 (may be taken concurrently).
WS 208-3 Researching Women's Issues: How Do We Do What We Do?
Introduces students to the researching of women's issues while exploring a wide range of feminist and non-feminist methodologies. In addition, the course will explain how feminist research methods differ from traditional research methods in the social and natural sciences. (lecture/tutorial) Prerequisite: WS 101 or 102 (may be taken concurrently).
WS 301-303-4 Special subjects in Women's Studies
A specific syllabu within the field of women's studies, not otherwise covered in depth in regularly scheduled courses, will be dealt with as occasion and demand warrant. (lecture/seminar) Prerequisite: six credits in women's studies including WS 101 and/or 102.
WS 304-4 Women and Religion
This course examines critical issues of women's relationships to theology and religious practice in major religious traditions. (lecture/seminar) Prerequisite: six credits in women's studies including WS 101 and/or 102.
WS 305-4 Women and Utopias
This course focuses upon various visions of a better world for women. Using historical and fictional sources, it examines proposals to reorganize societies, giving special attention to utopian ideas about creating equality among all members of the community. (lecture/seminar) Prerequisite: six credits in women's studies including WS 101 and/or 102.
WS 306-4 Women's Autobiographies, Memoirs and Journals
An examination of women's autobiographical writings, focusing on self images, self presentations and world views. (lecture/seminar) Prerequisite: six credits in women's studies including WS 101 and/or 102.
WS 307-4 Women in British Columbia
Selected subjects in the history of women's experience in British Columbia, with particular attention to women's work, political action, family life and education. (lecture/seminar) Prerequisite: six credits in women's studies including WS 101 and/or 102.
WS 308-4 Women and Work
This course explores the nature and conditions of women's paid and unpaid work. It will include an examination of theories which explain labour market discrimination; the effect of public policies on work; and the international relationships which affect women's work. (lecture/seminar) Prerequisite: six credits in women's studies including WS 101 and/or 102. Students who have taken SA 335 and/or WS 310 under the title Women and Work may not take this course for further credit.
WS 309-4 Gender and Development
Explores the relationship and the contrast between women and men in the development process and provides an analysis of gender policies and planning practices - local, national and international. (lecture/seminar) Prerequisite: six credit hours in women's studies including WS 101 and/or 102. Students who have taken WS 301 Special Topic: Women and Development or WS 301 Special Topic: Gender and Development may not take this course for further credit.
WS 310-4 Special subjects in Women's Studies
A specific syllabu within the field of women's studies, not otherwise covered in depth in regularly scheduled courses, will be dealt with as occasion and demand warrant. (lecture/seminar) Prerequisite: 60 credit hours.
WS 313-4 Women and the Environment
Examines women's participation in environmentalism. Among the subjects discussed will be the nature/nurture debate, the roots of environmentalism, ecofeminism and reproductive rights. (lecture/seminar) Prerequisite: six credits of women's studies including WS 101 and/or WS 102. Students who have taken this course as a women's studies special subjects course may not register for WS 313.
WS 314-4 Race, Class, and Gender Relations
An examination of feminist, Marxist and anti-racist theories pertaining to the historical development, social construction, and interactive nature of race, class and gender relations. (lecture/seminar) Prerequisite: six credits in Women's Studies, including WS 101 and/or 102. Students who have taken either WS 301 or 310 as Special Topics: Race, Class and Gender may not take this course for credit.
WS 320-4 Special subjects in Women's Studies
A specific syllabu within the field of women's studies, not otherwise covered in depth in regularly scheduled courses, will be dealt with as occasion and demand warrant. (lecture/seminar) Prerequisite: 60 credit hours.
WS 400-4 Methodological Issues in Women's Studies
A study and critique of the assumptions of existing disciplines as they refer to the study of women. This course is designed as corrective and supplemental to the various disciplines as they are currently taught. (seminar) Prerequisite: 60 credit hours including two women's studies courses, one of which must WS 101 or 102.
WS 401-5 Research Project
Individual or small group studies of community problems. The students will submit a prospectus for the project at least two months before the study is undertaken. The project will be directed by one of the faculty members of the program. (individual research) Prerequisite: nine credits in women's studies including WS 101 and/or 102; permission of instructor; approval of course proposal by department.
WS 402-2 Directed Readings
Provides opportunities for individual tuition at an advanced level. (individual tuition) Prerequisite: nine credits in women's studies including WS 101 and/or 102; permission of instructor; approval of course proposal by department.
WS 403-3 Directed Readings
Provides opportunities for individual tuition at an advanced level. (individual tuition) Prerequisite: nine credits in women's studies including WS 101 and/or 102; permission of instructor; approval of course proposal by department.
WS 405-4 Theoretical Issues in Women's Studies
A study and critique of feminist theories as they apply to the study of women. Each offering of the course will focus on a particular subset of feminist theories and applications. (seminar) Prerequisite: 60 credit hours including two Women's Studies courses, one of which must be WS 101 or 102. Students who have taken WS 311 or 411 may not take this course for further credit when it is subtitled Feminist Psychoanalytic Theories.
WS 412-5 Women and Film
An examination of film theory and practice from a feminist perspective. (seminar) Prerequisite: 60 credit hours including two women's studies courses, one of which must be WS 101 or 102. Students who have taken WS 312 may not take this course for further credit.
WS 421-0 Practicum I
First semester of work experience in the Women's Studies Co-operative Education Program. Prerequisite: 30 credit hours with a CGPA of 3.0; WS 101, 102 and two 200 division women's studies courses. Students should apply to the Faculty of Arts co-operative education co-ordinator by the end of the third week of the semester preceding the employment semester.
WS 422-2 Practicum 2
Second semester of work experience in the Women's Studies Co-operative Education Program. Prerequisite: 45 credit hours with a CGPA of 3.0; WS 101, 102 and two 200 division women's studies courses. Students should apply to the Faculty of Arts co-operative education co-ordinator by the end of the third week of the semester preceding the employment semester.
WS 423-3 Practicum 3
Third semester of work experience in the Women's Studies Co-operative Education Program. Prerequisite: 60 credit hours with a CGPA of 3.0; WS 101, 102 and two 200 division women's studies courses. Students should apply to the Faculty of Arts co-operative education co-ordinator by the end of the third week of the semester preceding the employment semester.
WS 424-4 Practicum 4
Fourth semester of work experience in the Women's Studies Co-operative Education Program. Prerequisite: 90 credit hours with a CGPA of 3.0; WS 101, 102 and two 200 division women's studies courses. Students should apply to the Faculty of Arts co-operative education co-ordinator by the end of the third week of the semester preceding the employment semester.

Wed, 20 Jul 2022 17:13:00 -0500 text/html https://www.sfu.ca/students/calendar_archive/03.04%20calendar/Undergraduate%20Courses.html
Killexams : Lawmakers far outpace most Americans in pensions, health benefits

WASHINGTON – Members of Congress occasionally lose elections, but they never lose retirement and health benefits that most Americans can only envy.A lawmaker who retires at 60 after just 12 years in office can count on receiving an immediate pension of $25,000 a year and lifetime benefits that could total more than $800,000.That doesn’t include 401(k) benefits. And any member who lasts five years in office also can get taxpayer-subsidized health care until he or she reaches Medicare age.Congressional pensions tend to be far more generous than those offered in the private sector. Benefits start earlier and – unlike most private pension plans promising a fixed monthly payment based on years worked and pay – come with annual cost-of-living increases. They also accrue a third faster than the average plan offered by private companies.Any member of Congress with five years of service is eligible for full benefits at 62. Those with 20 years in office can get full benefits at 50, younger than most workers.Cost-of-living adjustments, a shield against inflation, “haven’t been slightly common since the 1980s” in the private sector, said John Ehrhardt, an expert in corporate retirement programs at the Seattle-based consulting and actuarial firm Milliman. He said COLAs could add 25 percent to the value of a congressional plan over its lifetime.It doesn’t matter what a lawmaker does before or after leaving office. Former Rep. Randy “Duke” Cunningham, R-Calif., who was sentenced to eight years and four months in jail after pleading guilty to bribery charges this year, is still entitled to an annual pension of about $36,000 for his 15 years in the House. That doesn’t include his military pension or 401(k) benefits.Former House Majority Leader Tom DeLay, R-Texas, who is resigning after 22 years, will qualify for an initial pension of $56,000. DeLay could get pension payments of nearly $2 million over his expected lifetime, according to the National Taxpayers Union, which tracks congressional pension issues.Lawmakers also have the peace of mind of knowing their federally backed plan will be there when they retire.”I don’t think that many people in Congress would be quite so indifferent to the demise of the defined-benefit plan if they didn’t have such a robust plan themselves,” said James Klein, president of the American Benefits Council, which represents companies with pension plans.Congress is now working on pension legislation aimed at shoring up the defined-benefit plans available to some 44 million employees and retirees, but there’s no stopping the trend of companies shrinking their plans or not letting new hires join them.Employers also are switching to less costly cash balance plans, under which employees generally receive one lump-sum payment when they retire or leave the company.Rep. Bernard Sanders of I-Vt., is a critic of the cash balance plans that the House bill would encourage. In 2003 he asked the Congressional Research Service to see what would happen to lawmakers’ benefits under such an approach.”The result would have been huge cutbacks for some members,” Sanders said in a latest interview.For example, say a representative retired at 56 at the end of 2002 with 18 years of service. At 62 he or she would have a defined benefit plan worth $608,000. A comparable cash balance plan would be worth $251,000.Under current rules, lawmakers who serve 30 years will receive a yearly pension of 44 percent of their annual pay, which this year is $165,200. That doesn’t include their Social Security benefits and what they get back from their 401(k) plans. Like other federal workers in the Thrift Savings Plan, the government’s equivalent of a 401(k), lawmakers may invest up to $15,000 yearly, more if they’re over 50, and receive a contribution from the government equal to 5 percent of their pay.Older lawmakers, who were in office before the rules were changed two decades ago, can receive even higher pensions, though their Social Security is less.Rep. Henry Hyde, R-Ill., who is retiring at the end of this session after three decades in the House, will receive a pension of $119,000 a year, according to the National Taxpayers Union, an interest group that keeps track. Ted Stevens, R-Alaska, a senator for 38 years, would be eligible for $125,000 if he retired at the end of his current term. He has a higher salary as the Senate’s President Pro Tem.Senate Majority Leader Bill Frist, R-Tenn., a multimillionaire physician who is stepping down after 12 years, can expect an initial pension of $23,000 in 2007. With his thrift plan investments, Frist’s estimated lifetime benefits will be around $1 million, the NTU says.Former presidents, for comparison, receive a taxable pension equal to the base pay of Cabinet secretaries, currently $183,500.The Congressional Research Service, in a study of member retirement benefits updated last year, quoted a Senate report from 1946, the year Congress extended the federal pension system to lawmakers:The retirement plan, it said, “would contribute to independence of thought and action (and be) an inducement for retirement for those of retiring age or with other infirmities.””Sixty years of results have shown that experiment to be an utter failure,” commented Peter Sepp, a spokesman for the National Taxpayers Union. The average age of senators in the current Congress is 60.4 years, the oldest in history, according to the CRS. The average age of House members is 55 years, also probably the oldest ever, the CRS said.Congress’ pension system was overhauled in 1983, when the Social Security Act was changed to require federal employees, including members of Congress, to participate in Social Security. Those elected in 1984 or later, under what is now called the Federal Employees’ Retirement System or FERS, get smaller pensions than their more senior colleagues. But they also get bigger Social Security checks.The CRS said that as of October 2002, there were 340 retired members receiving pensions under the pre-1984 system averaging $55,800 a year. There were also 71 who retired with service under both systems or only FERS, with annual benefits of $41,900. The total cost of the pension program for members of Congress is estimated at $25 million a year.Sepp said his group’s figures show that lawmakers’ contributions to the FERS defined benefit plan cover about 20 percent of the typical lifetime payout. Lawmakers send 1.3 percent of their annual pay into the FERS pension plan, and the government adds 15.8 percent. Other federal workers contribute 0.8 percent, and the government adds 10.7 percent of their pay.One lawmaker who won’t be getting the benefits is Rep. Howard Coble, R-N.C., who since his election in 1984 has declined participation in either the pension or the thrift savings plan and has tried, without success, to eliminate or scale them back.”He thought taxpayers should not have to subsidize retirement programs for people who run for public office,” said his spokesman, Ed McDonald. But he’s “given up on trying to reform the system.”The latest flurry of legislative action in the wake of the Cunningham and lobbying controversies has produced several proposals to deny pensions to those convicted of felonies. Currently, an act of treason is one of the few ways a House member or senator can lose a pension.Members of Congress also participate in the Federal Employees Health Benefits Program or FEHB, which covers some 8 million federal workers. The FEHB is lauded as a model for a large-scale comprehensive health care plan, and lawmakers are frequently criticized for failing to come up with a comparable system for the tens of millions of Americans without adequate health care.The key ingredient of the FEHB, said Robert Moffit, director of health policy studies at the Heritage Foundation, is “the government doesn’t force you into some kind of straitjacket.”Participants choose from about a dozen fee-for-service plans, plus several hundred HMO plans and, more recently, health savings accounts paired with high-deductible health plans.The government pays an average 72 percent of premiums, less than the average 82 percent that employers in the private sector paid in 2003, according to a Labor Department survey. Retiring legislators, as well as other federal workers, can continue to participate after just five years of enrollment, and the government continues to pick up 72 percent of the premiums.Once 65 and eligible for Medicare, they can still buy so-called wraparound plans to fill any gaps in coverage.Current members can also purchase top-of-the-line care, using their FEHB benefits, at Washington’s military hospitals, and for an annual fee, now $480, can drop by the Attending Physician’s Office in the first floor of the U.S. Capitol for X-rays, EKGs, physical exams and consultations.—On the Net:National Taxpayers Union: http://www.ntu.org/Federal Employee Health Benefits Program: http://www.opm.gov/insure/health/

Wed, 03 Jul 2019 07:59:00 -0500 en-US text/html https://www.vaildaily.com/news/lawmakers-far-outpace-most-americans-in-pensions-health-benefits/
Killexams : College of Arts and Sciences News
    • Shake Down Tent Ross Ice Shelf

      December 31, 2018

      Ted Daeschler, PhD, professor in the Department of Biodiversity, Earth & Environmental Science, reports on his fourth week in Antarctica...

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    • Antarctica White Out

      December 23, 2018

      From BEES Prof Ted Daeschler from Antartica Week Three: We got our team into our field site at Deception Glacier on December 19 and 20. Weather was clear for the move days, and we set up camp in a ravine bounded by Devonian outcrop on one side and a tongue of glacial ice on the other.  We are well protected from prevailing winds from off the ice cap.

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    • Sumita Gangwani, Environmental Studies, Drexel University

      December 21, 2018

      If IKEA sounds like an unlikely co-op employer for an Environmental Studies and Sustainability major, it’s not news to Sumita Gangwani. The sophomore received questioning looks when she told friends that she would complete her first co-op in corporate communications at the Swedish retail giant’s North American headquarters.

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    • Cargo Yard McMurdo Station

      December 17, 2018

      Week Two at McMurdo Station in Antarctica has been spent with more training, including a “shake-down” of equipment during a night-out in the field. We’ve been getting food, supplies and equipment organized and entered into the cargo system used for air support.

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    • Top stories 2018

      December 17, 2018

      2018 was a big year for Drexel University. Thanks to DrexelNow, you can relive the year's top stories concerning faculty, staff and students who were involved with some of the biggest news and events on and off campus.

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  • Ashley Flear Drexel University Communication Alumni

    December 14, 2018

    After many years of teaching public relations, I can always spot those students I just know will become what I call “PR Stars.” That’s Ashley Flear. The latest communication graduate never bragged about her many skills, but I noticed how she efficiently developed a website for an ovarian-cancer awareness project, overachieved on every assignment, and then, created an amazing crisis communication magazine for her senior project.

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  • Antartica Mountain Ranges by Ted Daeschler, PhD

    December 12, 2018

    Week One in Antarctica has been a whirlwind of training workshops and organizational work at McMurdo Station to get ready for the four weeks we plan to spend at our field sites in the interior of this frozen continent.

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  • Mona Elgohail headshot

    December 11, 2018

    Mona Elgohail, a PhD candidate in the clinical psychology program in Drexel University’s College of Arts and Sciences, brought her clinical training to a city in Jordan near the Syrian border in order to make a difference in “the worst humanitarian crisis of our time.”

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  • Philadelphia at Night

    December 11, 2018

    The Drexel University Center for Public Policy debuted the latest edition of Drexel Policy Notes titled Climate Change and the Future of the North American City at the Philadelphia Citizen's Ideas We Should Steal conference on November 30, 2018. The Issue brings together 15 of Drexel's environmental experts to weigh in on what Philadelphia may look like in 2100.

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  • Book Cover - Mobility Justice by Mimi Sheller

    December 03, 2018

    In 2018 Sheller published her ninth book, “Mobility Justice: The Politics of Movement in an Age of Extremes” (Verso, 2018).

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  • Ted Daeschler in Antartica

    November 28, 2018

    Loads of dark chocolate. Reams of toilet paper. Dozens of hand warmers. Six snowmobiles and a leaf blower. Academy Curator of Paleontology Ted Daeschler, PhD is all packed for his next big camping adventure. He leaves November 29th for a month in Antarctica.

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  • Shannon Jacobsen, PhD

    November 27, 2018

    Assistant Professor of Criminology and Justice Studies Shannon Jacobsen, PhD, was inspired by her own experiences as an undergrad to investigate the role of gender in perceptions of risk and fear of crime on college campuses.

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  • Book Cover: Breathtaking

    November 27, 2018

    Alison Kenner, PhD, assistant professor of politics and of science, technology and society, has studied how people live with and care for asthma for more than a decade. Her new book, “Breathtaking: Asthma Care in a Time of Climate Change,” published by the University of Minnesota Press, examines this chronic disorder in light of global environmental changes.

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  • Drexel Dragon Logo Blue

    November 26, 2018

    We are pleased to recognize the latest grants, publications, presentations, awards and honors of members of the College of Arts and Sciences.

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  • Rock Cactus DIY Gift Idea for Geoscience Major

    November 26, 2018

    Majors in the College of Arts and Sciences span a wide range of interests — from conservation to communication, global justice to disease biology. Draw some DIY inspiration from the CoAS majors with these 16 homemade gift ideas!

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  • Eastern Box Turtle - Jakub Zegar

    November 20, 2018

    Environmental science major Jakub Zegar ’20 has focused his research in conservation biology, herpetology and amphibian thermoregulation while pursuing a STEM education minor at Drexel. He combines his passions in his Instagram account @jakub.zegar, where he shares facts and photos about the animals he encounters out in the field.

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  • Startup Fest 2018 Winners

    November 15, 2018

    The Charles D. Close School of Entrepreneurship hosted its fifth-annual Startup Fest Nov. 7–8. Students from a variety of majors and background competed to have their business ideas heard and funded.

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  • Kelly Underman

    November 14, 2018

    The European Society of Intensive Care Medicine represents a global membership of over 9,000 healthcare professionals working in intensive care. The Diversity Task Force was initiated to increase gender, racial and ethnic, and interprofessional diversity in the Society's membership and leadership.

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  • John Brooks

    November 12, 2018

    United States Marine Corps veteran and senior political science major John Brooks shared his path to Drexel and how he’s giving back to veterans in the Philadelphia community. Here’s his story in his own words, as told to staff writer Kylie Gray.

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  • Rogelio Miñana, PhD, department head and professor in the Department of Global Studies and Modern Languages in the College of Arts and Sciences. He will chair the new Global Engagement Council.

    November 09, 2018

    The Office of the Provost recently established a council to map out a university-wide action plan for global engagement at Drexel.

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  • Ocean and waves

    November 08, 2018

    Global temperatures have been rising for decades, but latest headlines indicate that climate change is happening even faster than climate scientists anticipated. latest studies show the Earth’s oceans are building and storing heat at rates much higher than previously estimated. The Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change (IPCC), recently released a sobering report detailing the looming economic and environmental impacts of a rapidly warming world.

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  • Title page of a 1626 edition of the Thesaurus exorcismorum. Saint Louis University Libraries Special Collections.

    October 31, 2018

    Whether you are Preparing for a gory Halloween movie marathon, taking it to the streets to trick-or-treat – or priming your costume for a spooky soiree, remember, as we indulge in the spirit of make-believe and pretend, some scary traditions are based in reality — yikes!

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  • Renewable energy sources, wind turbines

    October 30, 2018

    Diane M. Sicotte and Kelly A. Joyce were awarded $345,270 from NSF through the Science, Technology and Society program for a three-year project, titled “Societal Aspects of Energy Infrastructure Expansion.”

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  • Chengdu Famous Foods Dan Dan Noodles

    October 23, 2018

    With the weather cooling down, there’s no better time to treat yourself to some delicious, fall comfort foods (in moderation, of course)! Check out this list of recommendations from members of Drexel’s College of Arts and Sciences.

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  • The Thinker by Auguste Rodin. Photo by Mustang Joe

    October 22, 2018

    Many people think the most practical route to a successful and satisfying career necessarily leads through a business or STEM-related field. However, studies have shown that many employers value “broad capacities” and skills like creativity and critical thinking over narrow, technical skills.

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  • Asta Zelenkauskaite is an associate professor of communication at Drexel University

    October 22, 2018

    Asta Zelenkauskaite, PhD, is an associate professor of communication and of communication, culture and media in Drexel’s College of Arts and Sciences.

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  • A field in San Antonio where Ezra Wood deployed in ECHAMP instrument to measure photochemical smog

    October 22, 2018

    In May of 2017, Ezra Wood, PhD, associate professor of chemistry, and a group of researchers deployed a large suite of analytical instrumentation to several sites in and near San Antonio, Texas. Their goal was to investigate the formation of ozone, also known as photochemical smog.

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  • Elizabeth Kimball

    October 22, 2018

    Liz Kimball, PhD, assistant professor of English, celebrates the diverse roots of Philadelphia as she seeks to bring that historical legacy alive with her students.

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  • Brain stimulation

    October 22, 2018

    Drexel psychologists studied the public's attitudes toward brain stimulation.

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  • Pakims Pond

    October 22, 2018

    A new way of measuring the relative habitability of freshwater environments for fish and aquatic insects suggests that New Jersey’s water monitoring and treatment standards could use a boost.


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  • Drexel Dragon Logo Blue

    October 19, 2018

    We are pleased to recognize the latest grants, publications, presentations, awards and honors of members of the College of Arts and Sciences.

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  • From the Karren mountain, our Drexel group could see four countries as well as the city of Dornbin and Francis Matin Drexel’s birth house.

    October 16, 2018

    In October, a team of 10 Drexel University professors, students and alumni flew to Austria to visit the ancestral birthplace of the University founder’s father.

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  • Drexel University Main Building Exterior

    October 15, 2018

    Explore how natural disasters shape our world, changing perceptions of mental illness, and the effects of social movements on theories of democracy in these new and noteworthy winter courses.

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  • Musical Chairs

    October 12, 2018

    Several leadership positions have been filled by Dragons that were already part of the Drexel community.

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  • Faculty Highlights

    October 09, 2018

    Over the past two terms, there has been a lot of research funding, commercialization activity and faculty honors at Drexel University.

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  • Meghan Barrett

    September 27, 2018

    Meghan Barrett, a PhD candidate in Drexel University’s Department of Biology within the College of Arts and Sciences, is sharing her passion for… bugs … with undergraduates and the world. 

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  • Drexel Dragon Logo Blue

    September 26, 2018

    The College of Arts and Sciences is pleased to announce the following changes in College leadership.

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  • Student Jobs graphic

    September 26, 2018

    Sharpen your professional and research skills, earn extra money and gain valuable experience with these student job opportunities!

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  • Drexel University Main Building Exterior

    September 25, 2018

    We are thrilled to introduce the following new faculty members and welcome them to the College of Arts and Sciences community.

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  • Drexel Dragon Logo Blue

    September 24, 2018

    We are pleased to recognize the latest grants, publications, presentations, awards and honors of members of the College of Arts and Sciences.

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  • Eastern Coyote Pup. Photo © Christian Hunold

    September 24, 2018

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  • Drexel Cell Biologist and Assistant Professor of Biology, Ryan Petrie, PhD

    September 24, 2018

    Ryan Petrie, PhD, is an assistant professor of biology in Drexel’s College of Arts and Sciences. He was recently awarded a $323,429 grant from the National Institutes of Health for his project “Physical Mechanisms of 3D Cell Motility.”

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  • Nneka Van Gronigen '19

    September 24, 2018

    The Drexel Public Relations Student Society of America (PRSSA) is an organization for students interested in public relations. Most members come from the communication and marketing fields, but others study engineering, economics and even culinary arts. I interviewed communication major Nneka Van Gronigen ’19, the president of Drexel PRSSA from 2016 to 2018, for her perspective on the organization.

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  • Rosemary Oakes

    September 20, 2018

    On Museum Day, Saturday, Sept. 22, the Academy is honoring women making science history. General admission to the museum will be free, and visitors will be able to talk with some of our female scientists making a difference. We profile some of them here so you can get to know them before you come. Have your questions ready!

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  • Drexel Dragon Logo Blue

    September 17, 2018

    Michael Silverstein, a second year doctoral student working under the mentorship of Brian Daly, was awarded the APAGS/Psi Chi Junior Scientist Fellowship to fund his research into risk factors for and the etiology of PTSD.

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  • Favorite Wawa

    September 17, 2018

    To celebrate the grand opening of the new Wawa on Drexel University’s University City Campus, DrexelNow asked faculty and staff to relay their favorite Wawa hoagie order, and why.

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  • SPAN 440 class.

    August 28, 2018

    SPAN 440 — a Spanish-language course aimed at introducing students to the meaning of “sanctuaries” — was built to offer unique experiences and context to one of today’s most-pressing controversies surrounding immigration.

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  • Fraser Fleming, PhD, head of the chemistry department in the College of Arts and Sciences, teaching the course.

    August 10, 2018

    Two Drexel University faculty members from different disciplines have come together to provide a unique opportunity for graduate students: learn how to flex their creative muscles.

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  • From left to right: Elisabeth Van Bockstaele, PhD, who was recently appointed vice provost for graduate education; Koren A. Bedeau, PhD, who will serve as interim vice provost for global engagement; and Shivanthi Annandan, PhD, who will serve as interim vice provost for undergraduate education.

    August 08, 2018

    Drexel University's Provost announced updates on leadership positions in the Graduate College, Office of International Programs and on his staff.

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  • President Fry

    August 06, 2018

    Drexel President John Fry recently stopped by a classroom with student and community learners, as well as visiting Mandela Fellows, to discuss his views and efforts with civic engagement.

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  • cicada killer wasp220

    August 01, 2018

    “Ant-Man and The Wasp,” sequel to Marvel Cinematic Universe’s 2015 “Ant-Man,” is in movie theaters this summer. Wondering how the superheroes compare to real insects, we checked in with the Academy’s Entomology Department, which houses 3.5 million insect specimens – a treasure for researchers around the world.

    There we found Robert Conrow, an affable Drexel PhD student and teaching assistant who studies crane flies with Entomology Curator Jon Gelhaus, PhD, a world expert. Gelhaus  also is a professor in Drexel’s Department of Biodiversity, Earth and Environmental Science. Conrow says crane flies would make terrible superheroes “because their long legs easily fall off in the slightest breeze.”

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  • 8 Philly Day Trip Ideas

    July 25, 2018

    Are the lazy days of summer behind you? No way! There’s still time to squeeze in some summer fun. Pack up the car (or hop on a train), grab some road treats and head off on one of these great day trips from the Philly area.

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  • Rebecca Olsho, Global Studies Major

    July 24, 2018

    Growing up, Rebecca Olsho ’16 recalls the global languages and cultures shared around her family’s dinner table. Her parents frequently opened their home to foreign exchange students, exposing Olsho to the diverse perspectives and opportunities of the world.

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  • Fall Courses

    July 23, 2018

    Learn about the social dynamics of urban spaces, the language of the body in popular culture, and the philosophies of social and political life in these exciting fall courses.

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  • Fossil Fuels

    July 19, 2018

    A new study by Drexel environmental sociologist Robert J. Brulle, PhDshows that between 2000 and 2016, lobbyists spent more than two billion dollars on influencing relevant legislation in the US Congress. As the first peer-reviewed, comprehensive analysis ever conducted of climate lobbying data, Brulle’s research confirms the spending of environmental groups and the renewable energy sector was eclipsed by the spending of the electrical utilities, fossil fuel, and transportation sectors.

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  • Illustrating a Devonian Predator

    July 16, 2018

    Jason Poole was charged with depicting Hyneria lindae, the largest creature living in an ancient stream ecosystem in Devonian-age Pennsylvania, about 365 million years ago. This lobe-finned fish, belonging to a group of back-boned animals called sarcopterygians, was at least twice the size of the largest of the other animals with which it shared the waters.

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  • An X-ray view of the heads of a worker and a soldier ant and the brains inside their head. The worker is much smaller with the brain filling more of its head.

    July 16, 2018

    A Drexel University study found that ant colonies evolved to spend less energy on developing the brains of soldier ants, who have relatively simple jobs, compared to multi-tasking workers.

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  • An artist's rendering of a blazer shooting neutrinos down to sensors at the IceCube facility in Antarctica

    July 12, 2018

    With nine-and-a-half years of data and a South Pole observatory, a Drexel professor and her colleagues has shown the origin of at least some of the high-energy particles known as "neutrinos."

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  • WELL Clinic

    July 12, 2018

    The WELL Clinic will provide evidence-based treatment for weight management, eating disorders and related conditions, all under one roof.

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  • Drexel Dragon Logo Blue

    July 11, 2018

    Students in Drexel’s College of Arts and Sciences are scientific innovators, global explorers and leaders in education, communication and advocacy. Reflecting their accomplishments is the impressive number of national and international fellowships they received this year to support graduate education, professional experiences and research abroad.

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  • Drexel Dragon Logo Blue

    July 03, 2018

    The Departments of History and Politics are seeking a work study department assistant for 10 – 20 hours per week. The position involves physical and electronic filing, information collection and organization, light editing, promotion assistance, set-up and breakdown of lectures and panel discussions, deliveries (not heavy), and other duties as assigned by the Program Manager and Department Administrator.

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  • Balsillie School of International Affairs

    July 02, 2018

    In March 2018 Sheller gave a Keynote Address at the Mobilities Pedagogies Symposium at Wilfred Laurier University and the Balsillie School of International Affairs, Waterloo, Canada, where she was also invited to provide a Master Class.

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  • David Ambrose, PhD receives T. Brooke Benjamin Prize in Nonlinear Waves

    June 28, 2018

    David Ambrose, PhD, associate department head and professor of mathematics at Drexel University, is the recipient of the second biennial T. Brooke Benjamin Prize in Nonlinear Waves. The SIAM Activity Group on Nonlinear Waves and Coherent Structures awards the prize every two years to an outstanding midcareer researcher in the area of nonlinear waves.

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  • Book and notebook open on a table in a library

    June 26, 2018

    Dig into subjects like criminal justice ethics, U.S. immigration and the history of work in these exciting fall courses.

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  • Drexel Dragon Logo Blue

    June 26, 2018

    Formerly a judge in Tunisia, Amel Mili, JD, PhD, is inspired by the everyday teaching moments in her career as an assistant teaching professor of global studies and modern languages.

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  • Drexel Dragon Logo Blue

    June 26, 2018

    The College of Arts and Sciences is pleased to announce that Rehab (Rubie) Ghazal, PhD, has been appointed Director of Drexel’s English Language Center.

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  • Students in BIO 213

    June 22, 2018

    Freshmen and sophomore biology students at Drexel can take the elective BIO 213, which introduces them to independent, novel research and a hands-on learning opportunity working with fruit flies.

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  • transcranial magnetic stimulation

    June 21, 2018

    Using transcranial magnetic stimulation and network control theory, Drexel psychologists have taken a novel approach to understanding how signals travel across the brain's highways and how stimulation can lead to better cognitive function.

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  • Drexel Writers Room

    June 15, 2018

    Drexel University’s Writers Room celebrated the release of the program’s fourth collective work, “Anthology,” and the culmination of its year-long, writer-in-residence program, TRIPOD.

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  • Drexel University Geoscience Student Nick Barber with Dean Donna Murasko and the Drexel University Mascot, Mario.

    June 14, 2018

    What does it take to become a #ForeverDragon? Beyond the classes, co-ops and research, there are a few things that are quintessentially Drexel. Find out how many of these experiences you can check off your list before you graduate!

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  • Drexel Student Nicole Naranjo

    June 13, 2018

    When Nicole Naranjo takes her seat on stage at the Drexel University College of Arts and Sciences Commencement, she will be accompanied by her teacher Angel Garcia from the Centro Educativo Bilingue Interamericano in Ecuador. Naranjo nominated Garcia for the Harold W. Pote “Behind Every Graduate” award, a Drexel initiative to acknowledge inspiring high school teachers with an expenses-paid trip to the ceremonies.

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  • Paul Offit - Colbert Report

    June 12, 2018

    Scientist, educator, vaccine advocate and author Paul Offit, MD has a new title to add to the list: Drexel’s 2018 College of Arts and Sciences Commencement Speaker. Learn more about Offit and his accomplishments before the College ceremonies on June 15 at the Mann Center.

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  • Peru Ostomy

    June 08, 2018

    After seven years of living with bouts of excruciating gastrointestinal pain and constant trips to the bathroom, the option of ostomy surgery sounded “freeing” to then 19-year-old Jennie David.

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  • Drexel College of Arts and Sciences 2018 Commencement Speaker Anu Gupta

    June 08, 2018

    Biological Sciences major and BS + MD student Anuranita Gupta will address graduates as the class of 2018 representative at the College of Arts and Sciences Commencement ceremony on June 15, 2018.

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  • A sensor in an orange box buried in the vast Antarctica snow with a solar sensor on a post next to it

    June 04, 2018

    Half of Antarctica has long thought to be seismically dormant, but a Drexel University researcher tripled the number of recorded earthquakes by monitoring for just one year.

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  • Drexel Dragon Logo Blue

    June 01, 2018

    Psychology graduate students receive awards for their research: Stephanie Goldstein, Helen Burton Murray and Victoria Grunberg.

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  • Jacob Owens standing and holding Qian Qian

    May 31, 2018

    From the professor who dreamed up the panda release program to the alums who run it, Dragons play a huge role in "Pandas."

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  • Soccer Star Bridges Activism, Leadership and Research

    May 29, 2018

    Outside a soccer stadium in Buenos Aires, 18-year-old Dakota Peterson and his youth academy teammates sat late into the evening. As Latin music drifted overhead, Peterson felt life pulling him — not toward a career in professional soccer, as he had once imagined, but toward one that would invoke a similar spirit of collaboration, leadership and global connectedness.

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  • A person looking at a brain image on a monitor while someone else is helped into an MRI in the background.

    May 24, 2018

    A new study out of Drexel University showed that, when confronted with physics problems, new parts of a student's brain are utilized after receiving instruction in the topic.

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  • Felice Elefant, PhD

    May 23, 2018

    Felice Elefant, PhD, associate professor of biology, is one of 18 Fellows selected nationwide for this year’s Executive Leadership in Academic Technology and Engineering program at Drexel University. ELATE at Drexel is an elite professional and leadership development program for women in the academic STEM fields.

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  • Nick Barber

    May 23, 2018

    Nicholas Barber, a geoscience student from the College of Arts and Sciences, has become the second Drexel student to be awarded the prestigious Gates Cambridge Scholarship, making his PhD program at the University of Cambridge cost-free.

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  • 2018 NEDA regional conference attendees

    May 23, 2018

    On Saturday, May 12th, Drexel University and the WELL Center played host to the first-ever National Eating Disorders Association regional conference. NEDA is the nation's largest eating disorder association, and the NEDA regional conference is designed to bring together individuals who are experiencing eating disorders or who want to learn more about eating and body image issues.

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  • Drexel Dragon Logo Blue

    May 22, 2018

    The mission of the College of Arts and Sciences and the University could not be accomplished without the dedication and support of our faculty members. It is their pursuit of excellence in teaching, research and scholarship that reinforces our position as a modern liberal arts college, and enhances our University’s reputation as a world-class research institution.

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  • The new Frozen Horchata from Saxbys was created for Drexel's Class of 2018 and will be available at the two Saxbys locations on the University City Campus. Photo courtesy Saxbys.

    May 21, 2018

    In honor of the Drexel University Class of 2018’s upcoming graduation, Saxbys designed a special iced beverage for the graduating seniors.

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  • Kathy Chen '18 - Communication Major

    May 21, 2018

    As the plane hovered 13,000 feet above the Earth, Kathy Chen didn’t feel fear until the adventure-seeker beside her hurtled out. Moments later, she and her skydiving instructor were free falling as well, the countryside of Japan and a distant view of Mt. Fuji unfurling beneath them.

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  • A screenshot of a video game created in Drexel’s Entrepreneurial Game Studio

    May 18, 2018

    Think the Drexel Writing Festival is only for English majors? Not true. Here’s why you should come to the festivities on May 21 – 23, 2018.

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  • Roger Thomas and Danielle Kreeger, PhD transplanting mussels

    May 17, 2018

    Freshwater mussels and shad were once plentiful in the Delaware Estuary and its tributaries, providing a range of natural benefits to people and waterways. Today they face an uncertain future in local streams and rivers, creating a serious disadvantage when it comes to ecological health.

    Now, the Academy of Natural Sciences, the College of Arts and Sciences of Drexel University, the Partnership for the Delaware Estuary, Philadelphia Water Department and Department of Parks and Recreation, Bartram’s Garden, and the Independence Seaport Museum have come together to develop the Aquatic Research and Restoration Center to coordinate large-scale restoration efforts that do not currently exist in the Philadelphia region.

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  • A fruit fly standing on a plant's leaf.

    May 14, 2018

    A study from Drexel University showed that restoring a balance between two epigenetic regulator enzymes restored learning and memory function in flies that displayed symptoms of Alzheimer's disease.

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  • National Eating Disorder Association’s (NEDA) #NEDAcon Logo

    May 10, 2018

    The WELL Clinic at Drexel University is proud to co-sponsor the National Eating Disorder Association’s (NEDA) #NEDAcon on Saturday, May 12th. #NEDAcon will be the organization’s first ever Regional Conference. Its purpose is to connect individuals who are experiencing eating disorders, or those who are interested in learning more about eating disorders and body image issues

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  • third-hand smoke

    May 09, 2018

    Despite decades of indoor smoking bans and restrictions, new research from Drexel University suggests the toxins we’ve been trying to keep out are still finding their way into the air inside. Findings by a group of environmental engineers show that third-hand smoke, the chemical residue from cigarette smoke that attaches to anything and anyone in the vicinity of a smoke cloud, can make its way into the air and circulate through buildings where no one is smoking.

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  • 2017 commencement.

    May 09, 2018

    More than a dozen respected speakers will address Drexel Dragons at various college- and school-level ceremonies, as well as at a University-wide event.

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  • Adrienne Juarascio Receives Junior Faculty Award

    May 08, 2018

    Adrienne Juarascio, PhD, assistant professor of psychology, has received the 2018 Hilda and Preston Davis Foundation Junior Faculty Award. The $200,000 award will support the 2-year project "Using Continuous Glucose Monitoring to Detect Eating Disorder Symptoms in Bulimia Nervosa."

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  • Schultheis

    May 08, 2018

    As Donna M. Murasko, PhD, prepares to end her 16-year tenure as dean to return to the faculty, the College of Arts and Sciences will move ahead under new leadership with the appointment of Maria T. Schultheis as interim dean, effective July 1.

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  • Drexel Student Jackie Garcia

    May 08, 2018

    Drexel University environmental science graduate Jackie Garcia had the opportunity to pursue an independent study during her senior year. She chose Academy scientist and Drexel professor Jon Gelhaus as her mentor. Together, the two set out to explore the complex field of forensic entomology. We talked with Garcia about learning a new field during an independent study, sharing her work with the public at Bug Fest and inspiring one high school student to pursue her own work in the field.

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  • A drawing of the Hyneria Lindae

    May 07, 2018

    More than two decades of exploration at a Pennsylvania fossil site have given Academy of Natural Sciences paleontologists their best idea of how a giant, prehistoric predator would have looked and behaved.

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  • Drexel Dragon Logo Blue

    May 03, 2018

    Three faculty—Vincent Duclos, Christian Hunold, and Ali Kenner—won Drexel Summer Faculty Research Awards. One faculty—Gwen Ottinger—won a Drexel Faculty Scholarly and Creative Activity Award. These awards demonstrate STS faculty’s commitment to research, training students, and explaining research findings to diverse publics.

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  • Janine Bower

    May 03, 2018

    Janine Bower, MS in science, technology and society '18, is the recipient of the 2018 Excellence in Science, Technology and Society Prize. This is the third year that the Center for STS has offered this annual prize. Nominated and voted on by STS-affiliated faculty, the prize is presented to a STS graduate student who has demonstrated exemplary performance in research, academics and service to t