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Exam Code: P2170-036 Practice exam 2022 by Killexams.com team
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Killexams : IBM Support learn - BingNews https://killexams.com/pass4sure/exam-detail/P2170-036 Search results Killexams : IBM Support learn - BingNews https://killexams.com/pass4sure/exam-detail/P2170-036 https://killexams.com/exam_list/IBM Killexams : Colorado’s P-TECH Students Graduate Ready for Tech Careers (TNS) — Abraham Tinajero was an eighth grader when he saw a poster in his Longmont middle school’s library advertising a new program offering free college with a technology focus.

Interested, he talked to a counselor to learn more about P-TECH, an early college program where he could earn an associate’s degree along with his high school diploma. Liking the sound of the program, he enrolled in the inaugural P-TECH class as a freshman at Longmont’s Skyline High School.

“I really loved working on computers, even before P-TECH,” he said. “I was a hobbyist. P-TECH gave me a pathway.”


He worked with an IBM mentor and interned at the company for six weeks as a junior. After graduating in 2020 with his high school diploma and the promised associate’s degree in computer science from Front Range Community College, he was accepted to IBM’s yearlong, paid apprenticeship program.

IBM hired him as a cybersecurity analyst once he completed the apprenticeship.

“P-TECH has given me a great advantage,” he said. “Without it, I would have been questioning whether to go into college. Having a college degree at 18 is great to put on a resume.”


Stanley Litow, a former vice president of IBM, developed the P-TECH, or Pathways in Technology Early College High Schools, model. The first P-TECH school opened 11 years ago in Brooklyn, New York, in partnership with IBM.

Litow’s idea was to get more underrepresented young people into tech careers by giving them a direct path to college while in high school — and in turn create a pipeline of employees with the job skills businesses were starting to value over four-year college degrees.

The program, which includes mentors and internships provided by business partners, gives high school students up to six years to earn an associate's degree at no cost.

SKYLINE HIGH A PIONEER IN PROGRAM

In Colorado, St. Vrain Valley was among the first school districts chosen by the state to offer a P-TECH program after the Legislature passed a bill to provide funding — and the school district has embraced the program.

Colorado’s first P-TECH programs started in the fall of 2016 at three high schools, including Skyline High. Over the last six years, 17 more Colorado high schools have adopted P-TECH, for at total of 20. Three of those are in St. Vrain Valley, with a fourth planned to open in the fall of 2023 at Longmont High School.

Each St. Vrain Valley high school offers a different focus supported by different industry partners.

Skyline partners with IBM, with students earning an associate’s degree in Computer Information Systems from Front Range. Along with being the first, Skyline’s program is the largest, enrolling up to 55 new freshmen each year.

Programs at the other schools are capped at 35 students per grade.

Frederick High’s program, which started in the fall of 2019, has a bioscience focus, partners with Aims Community College and works with industry partners Agilent Technologies, Tolmar, KBI Biopharma, AGC Biologics and Corden Pharma.

Silver Creek High’s program started a year ago with a cybersecurity focus. The Longmont school partners with Front Range and works with industry partners Seagate, Cisco, PEAK Resources and Comcast.

The new program coming to Longmont High will focus on business.

District leaders point to Skyline High’s graduation statistics to illustrate the program’s success. At Skyline, 100 percent of students in the first three P-TECH graduating classes earned a high school diploma in four years.

For the 2020 Skyline P-TECH graduates, 24 of the 33, or about 70 percent, also earned associate’s degrees. For the 2021 graduating class, 30 of the 47 have associate’s degrees — with one year left for those students to complete the college requirements.

For the most accurate 2022 graduates, who have two years left to complete the college requirements, 19 of 59 have associate’s degrees and another six are on track to earn their degrees by the end of the summer.

JUMPING AT AN OPPORTUNITY

Louise March, Skyline High’s P-TECH counselor, keeps in touch with the graduates, saying 27 are working part time or full time at IBM. About a third are continuing their education at a four year college. Of the 19 who graduated in 2022 with an associate’s degree, 17 are enrolling at a four year college, she said.

Two of those 2022 graduates are Anahi Sarmiento, who is headed to the University of Colorado Boulder’s Leeds School of Business, and Jose Ivarra, who will study computer science at Colorado State University.

“I’m the oldest out of three siblings,” Ivarra said. “When you hear that someone wants to supply you free college in high school, you take it. I jumped at the opportunity.”

Sarmiento added that her parents, who are immigrants, are already working two jobs and don’t have extra money for college costs.

“P-TECH is pushing me forward,” she said. “I know my parents want me to have a better life, but I want them to have a better life, too. Going into high school, I kept that mentality that I would push myself to my full potential. It kept me motivated.”

While the program requires hard work, the two graduates said, they still enjoyed high school and had outside interests. Ivarra was a varsity football player who was named player of the year. Sarmiento took advantage of multiple opportunities, from helping elementary students learn robotics to working at the district’s Innovation Center.

Ivarra said he likes that P-TECH has the same high expectations for all students, no matter their backgrounds, and gives them support in any areas where they need help. Spanish is his first language and, while math came naturally, language arts was more challenging.

“It was tough for me to see all these classmates use all these big words, and I didn’t know them,” he said. “I just felt less. When I went into P-TECH, the teachers focus on you so much, checking on every single student.”

They said it’s OK to struggle or even fail. Ivarra said he failed a tough class during the pandemic, but was able to retake it and passed. Both credited March, their counselor, with providing unending support as they navigated high school and college classes.

“She’s always there for you,” Sarmiento said. “It’s hard to be on top of everything. You have someone to go to.”

Students also supported each other.

“You build bonds,” Ivarra said. “You’re all trying to figure out these classes. You grow together. It’s a bunch of people who want to succeed. The people that surround you in P-TECH, they push you to be better.”

SUPPORT SYSTEMS ARE KEY

P-TECH has no entrance requirements or prerequisite classes. You don’t need to be a top student, have taken advanced math or have a background in technology.

With students starting the rigorous program with a wide range of skills, teachers and counselors said, they quickly figured out the program needed stronger support systems.

March said freshmen in the first P-TECH class struggled that first semester, prompting the creation of a guided study class. The every other day, hour-and-a-half class includes both study time and time to learn workplace skills, including writing a resume and interviewing. Teachers also offer tutoring twice a week after school.

“The guided study has become crucial to the success of the program,” March said.

Another way P-TECH provides extra support is through summer orientation programs for incoming freshmen.

At Skyline, ninth graders take a three-week bridge class — worth half a credit — that includes learning good study habits. They also meet IBM mentors and take a field trip to Front Range Community College.

“They get their college ID before they get their high school ID,” March said.

During a session in June, 15 IBM mentors helped the students program a Sphero robot to travel along different track configurations. Kathleen Schuster, who has volunteered as an IBM mentor since the P-TECH program started here, said she wants to “return some of the favors I got when I was younger.”

“Even this play stuff with the Spheros, it’s teaching them teamwork and a little computing,” she said. “Hopefully, through P-TECH, they will learn what it takes to work in a tech job.”

Incoming Skyline freshman Blake Baker said he found a passion for programming at Trail Ridge Middle and saw P-TECH as a way to capitalize on that passion.

“I really love that they supply you options and a path,” he said.

Trail Ridge classmate Itzel Pereyra, another programming enthusiast, heard about P-TECH from her older brother.

“It’s really good for my future,” she said. “It’s an exciting moment, starting the program. It will just help you with everything.”

While some of the incoming ninth graders shared dreams of technology careers, others see P-TECH as a good foundation to pursue other dreams.

Skyline incoming ninth grader Marisol Sanchez wants to become a traveling nurse, demonstrating technology and new skills to other nurses. She added that the summer orientation sessions are a good introduction, helping calm the nerves that accompany combining high school and college.

“There’s a lot of team building,” she said. “It’s getting us all stronger together as a group and introducing everyone.”

THE SPARK OF MOTIVATION

Silver Creek’s June camp for incoming ninth graders included field trips to visit Cisco, Seagate, PEAK Resources, Comcast and Front Range Community College.

During the Front Range Community College field trip, the students heard from Front Range staff members before going on a scavenger hunt. Groups took photos to prove they completed tasks, snapping pictures of ceramic pieces near the art rooms, the most expensive tech product for sale in the bookstore and administrative offices across the street from the main building.

Emma Horton, an incoming freshman, took a cybersecurity class as a Flagstaff Academy eighth grader that hooked her on the idea of technology as a career.

“I’m really excited about the experience I will be getting in P-TECH,’ she said. “I’ve never been super motivated in school, but with something I’m really interested in, it becomes easier.”

Deb Craven, dean of instruction at Front Range’s Boulder County campus, promised the Silver Creek students that the college would support them. She also gave them some advice.

“You need to advocate and ask for help,” she said. “These two things are going to help you the most. Be present, be engaged, work together and lean on each other.”

Craven, who oversees Front Range’s P-TECH program partnership, said Front Range leaders toured the original P-TECH program in New York along with St. Vrain and IBM leaders in preparation for bringing P-TECH here.

“Having IBM as a partner as we started the program was really helpful,” she said.

When the program began, she said, freshmen took a more advanced technology class as their first college class. Now, she said, they start with a more fundamental class in the spring of their freshman year, learning how to build a computer.

“These guys have a chance to grow into the high school environment before we stick them in a college class,” she said.

Summer opportunities aren’t just for P-TECH’s freshmen. Along with summer internships, the schools and community colleges offer summer classes.

Silver Creek incoming 10th graders, for example, could take a personal financial literacy class at Silver Creek in the mornings and an introduction to cybersecurity class at the Innovation Center in the afternoons in June.

Over at Skyline, incoming 10th graders in P-TECH are getting paid to teach STEM lessons to elementary students while earning high school credit. Students in the fifth or sixth year of the program also had the option of taking computer science and algebra classes at Front Range.

EMBRACING THE CHALLENGE

And at Frederick, incoming juniors are taking an introduction to manufacturing class at the district's Career Elevation and Technology Center this month in preparation for an advanced manufacturing class they’re taking in the fall.

“This will supply them a head start for the fall,” said instructor Chester Clark.

Incoming Frederick junior Destini Johnson said she’s not sure what she wants to do after high school, but believes the opportunities offered by P-TECH will prepare her for the future.

“I wanted to try something challenging, and getting a head start on college can only help,” she said. “It’s really incredible that I’m already halfway done with an associate’s degree and high school.”

IBM P-TECH program manager Tracy Knick, who has worked with the Skyline High program for three years, said it takes a strong commitment from all the partners — the school district, IBM and Front Range — to make the program work.

“It’s not an easy model,” she said. “When you say there are no entrance requirements, we all have to be OK with that and support the students to be successful.”

IBM hosted 60 St. Vrain interns this summer, while two Skyline students work as IBM “co-ops” — a national program — to assist with the P-TECH program.

The company hosts two to four formal events for the students each year to work on professional and technical skills, while IBM mentors provide tutoring in algebra. During the pandemic, IBM also paid for subscriptions to tutor.com so students could get immediate help while taking online classes.

“We want to get them truly workforce ready,” Knick said. “They’re not IBM-only skills we’re teaching. Even though they choose a pathway, they can really do anything.”

As the program continues to expand in the district, she said, her wish is for more businesses to recognize the value of P-TECH.

“These students have had intensive training on professional skills,” she said. “They have taken college classes enhanced with the same digital credentials that an IBM employee can learn. There should be a waiting list of employers for these really talented and skilled young professionals.”

©2022 the Daily Camera (Boulder, Colo.). Distributed by Tribune Content Agency, LLC.

Thu, 04 Aug 2022 02:41:00 -0500 en text/html https://www.govtech.com/education/k-12/colorados-p-tech-students-graduate-ready-for-tech-careers
Killexams : SVVSD embraces early college P-TECH program No result found, try new keyword!In Colorado, St. Vrain Valley was among the first school districts chosen by the state to offer a P-TECH program after the Legislature passed a bill to provide funding — and the school ... Sat, 30 Jul 2022 15:39:40 -0500 en-us text/html https://www.msn.com/en-us/money/careersandeducation/svvsd-embraces-early-college-p-tech-program/ar-AA1098v3 Killexams : Welcome back, Watson

Earlier this year, IBM sold its Watson Health data assets to PE firm Francisco Partners, marking the end of its push to transform healthcare through artificial intelligence. Now Francisco Partners has spun off the Watson assets into a standalone firm, Merative.

The move is designed to bring the company’s health data offerings to providers and government entities as well as the life sciences businesses IBM originally targeted. The goal, the company said in a statement, is “to Strengthen healthcare delivery, decision-making and performance.”

The announcement comes on the heels of several trying years for IBM Watson, when the organization proved unable to deliver on many of its ambitious promises. For instance, STAT reported that IBM Watson wasn’t able to get its software to analyze patient medical records reliably.

That investigation found that several of IBM Watson’s customers ended their relationships with the company because it “never invested in the technology needed to do the job we were being asked to do,” a former IBM Watson employee told the publication.

Project Josephine, an effort to fix problems with its natural language processing offering, similarly fell short. Its failure prompted an executive exodus, including Dr. Andrew Norden (deputy chief health officer of Watson Health) and Dr. Patrick McNeillie (clinical lead of Watson for Genomics).

In some ways, Merative appears to represent an attempt to redeem those previous blunders – and resuscitate the reputation of what used to comprise IBM Watson.

On its website, Merative lists six main areas of work it plans to be involved in: clinical decision support, clinical development, enterprise imaging, healthcare analytics, social program management and real-world evidence. It also touts six product lines.

The company promises to bring “technology and expertise to clients across healthcare through industry-leading data and analytics solutions,” said Francisco Partners co-president Ezra Perlman and principal Justin Chen in a statement. “Our ownership will help Merative drive crucial focus in executing on organic and inorganic growth strategies.”

But whether Merative can fully realize the initial promise of IBM Watson is anyone’s guess.

“There is an enormous risk to our credibility as marketers when we drive hype cycles,” Hans Kaspersetz, Relevate Health Group chief innovation officer, told MM+M last year. “As we move into the next evolution of development around artificial intelligence and machine learning, it’s critical that we demand transparency into the research that supports it, into the data sets and training corpuses that are used, and into the algorithms so that we can ensure there’s not systemic or implicit bias and that we can reproduce the outcomes in a scientific way.”

Though Merative is distancing itself from IBM Watson’s troubles, the company isn’t hiding ties to its past. The company claims a “half-century of history” on its website, starting with IBM innovations from as early as 1973. The last item on the timeline? Merative’s birth in 2022.

Mon, 11 Jul 2022 09:23:00 -0500 en-US text/html https://www.mmm-online.com/home/channel/welcome-back-watson/
Killexams : Edology partners with IBM to launch Post Graduate Certificate Program in Data Science

Gurugram (Haryana) [India], July 30 (ANI/NewsVoir): Edology has announced a partnership with IBM, one of the world's top leading and reputed corporations, to introduce its Post Graduate Certificate Program in Data Science for working professionals and everyone wanting to enter the field of Data Science. Developed by IBM inventors and experts who hold numerous patents in the field of Data Science, this is the first IBM programme that has been completely designed by IBM and is being delivered by its faculty.

"The programme for the Edology x IBM Data Science course is a very special offering from IBM, and this is one-of-a-kind initiative," according to Hari Ramasubramanian, Leader, Business Development and Academia Relationships, IBM Expert Labs, India/South Asia. He further added, "There is a strong demand for skilled technology and trained professionals across the industry. Data science is not confined to IT. It includes all the verticals one can imagine-from board meetings to sports, data science brings a lot of value to organizations worldwide. For students, as well as professionals with experience, if you want to fast track your career on to the next level, this is the course you should be doing."

"The IBM Data Science certificate program through the Edology platform, will equip to adapt to the dynamics in the industry and drive technology innovation," said, Vithal Madyalkar, Program Director, IBM Innovation Centre for Education, India/South Asia. "The Data Science course modules will provide deep practical knowledge, coupled with broad-based industry alignment, interaction, talent discoverability as well as excellence in their professional practice."

A global Ed-Tech company, Edology helps students and professionals all around the world advance their careers in a variety of subjects, including data science, artificial intelligence, machine learning, cyber security, and more.

Unique Offerings of the IBM x Edology PG Certificate Programme in Data Science:

- 100+ hours of Live classes by IBM experts

- Globally recognized IBM digital badge

- Job opportunities with 300+ corporate partners

- Edology-IBM Award for Top Performers

- 1 on 1 mentorship from industry experts

- 1 day networking session with IBM team

- Guaranteed interview with IBM for top performers in each cohort

- Dedicated career assistance team

Sumanth Palepu, the Business Head at Edology, states, "Statistical estimates reveal that the worldwide market size for Data Science and analytics is anticipated to reach around a whopping $450 billion by 2025, which also means that the rivalry would be quite severe at the employee level, the competition will be very fierce. Thus, this collaboration with IBM is now more essential than ever, so that we are collectively able to deliver advanced level teaching to the students and working professionals and they get first-hand industry knowledge with our IBM experts."

(https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=rjWGU_k2Dhg)

Edology is a Global Ed-Tech Brand that provides industry-powered education and skills to students and professionals across the world, to help them achieve fast-track career growth. Launched in 2017, Edology connects professionals from across the globe with higher education programmes in the fields of law, finance, accounting, business, computing, marketing, fashion, criminology, psychology, and more.

It's a part of Global University Systems (GUS), an international network of higher-education institutions, brought together by a shared passion of providing industry-driven global education accessible and affordable. All the programs of Edology are built with the objective of providing its learners career enhancement and strong CV credentials, along with a quality learning experience.

The courses offered by Edology include Data Science, Certification in AI and Machine Learning, Data Analytics, PGP in International Business, PGP in Renewable Energy Management, PGP in Oil and Gas Management among others. These offerings are done through hands-on industry projects, interactive live classes, global peer-to-peer learning and other facilities.

This story is provided by NewsVoir. ANI will not be responsible in any way for the content of this article. (ANI/NewsVoir)

DISCLAIMER

(This story has not been edited by Business Standard staff and is auto-generated from a syndicated feed.)

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Fri, 29 Jul 2022 21:40:00 -0500 text/html https://www.business-standard.com/content/press-releases-ani/edology-partners-with-ibm-to-launch-post-graduate-certificate-program-in-data-science-122073000636_1.html
Killexams : IBM extends Power10 server lineup for enterprise use cases

Were you unable to attend Transform 2022? Check out all of the summit sessions in our on-demand library now! Watch here.


IBM is looking to grow its enterprise server business with the expansion of its Power10 portfolio announced today.

IBM Power is a RISC (reduced instruction set computer) based chip architecture that is competitive with other chip architectures including x86 from Intel and AMD. IBM’s Power hardware has been used for decades for running IBM’s AIX Unix operating system, as well as the IBM i operating system that was once known as the AS/400. In more accurate years, Power has increasingly been used for Linux and specifically in support of Red Hat and its OpenShift Kubernetes platform that enables organizations to run containers and microservices.

The IBM Power10 processor was announced in August 2020, with the first server platform, the E1080 server, coming a year later in September 2021. Now IBM is expanding its Power10 lineup with four new systems, including the Power S1014, S1024, S1022 and E1050, which are being positioned by IBM to help solve enterprise use cases, including the growing need for machine learning (ML) and artificial intelligence (AI).

What runs on IBM Power servers?

Usage of IBM’s Power servers could well be shifting into territory that Intel today still dominates.

Steve Sibley, vp, IBM Power product management, told VentureBeat that approximately 60% of Power workloads are currently running AIX Unix. The IBM i operating system is on approximately 20% of workloads. Linux makes up the remaining 20% and is on a growth trajectory.

IBM owns Red Hat, which has its namesake Linux operating system supported on Power, alongside the OpenShift platform. Sibley noted that IBM has optimized its new Power10 system for Red Hat OpenShift.

“We’ve been able to demonstrate that you can deploy OpenShift on Power at less than half the cost of an Intel stack with OpenShift because of IBM’s container density and throughput that we have within the system,” Sibley said.

A look inside IBM’s four new Power servers

Across the new servers, the ability to access more memory at greater speed than previous generations of Power servers is a key feature. The improved memory is enabled by support of the Open Memory Interface (OMI) specification that IBM helped to develop, and is part of the OpenCAPI Consortium.

“We have Open Memory Interface technology that provides increased bandwidth but also reliability for memory,” Sibley said. “Memory is one of the common areas of failure in a system, particularly when you have lots of it.”

The new servers announced by IBM all use technology from the open-source OpenBMC project that IBM helps to lead. OpenBMC provides secure code for managing the baseboard of the server in an optimized approach for scalability and performance.

E1050

Among the new servers announced today by IBM is the E1050, which is a 4RU (4 rack unit) sized server, with 4 CPU sockets, that can scale up to 16TB of memory, helping to serve large data- and memory-intensive workloads.

S1014 and S1024

The S1014 and the S1024 are also both 4RU systems, with the S1014 providing a single CPU socket and the S1024 integrating a dual-socket design. The S1014 can scale up to 2TB of memory, while the S1024 supports up to 8TB.

S1022

Rounding out the new services is the S1022, which is a 1RU server that IBM is positioning as an ideal platform for OpenShift container-based workloads.

Bringing more Power to AI and ML

AI and ML workloads are a particularly good use case for all the Power10 systems, thanks to optimizations that IBM has built into the chip architecture.

Sibley explained that all Power10 chips benefit from IBM’s Matrix Match Acceleration (MMA) capability. The enterprise use cases that Power10-based servers can help to support include organizations that are looking to build out risk analytics, fraud detection and supply chain forecasting AI models, among others. 

IBM’s Power10 systems support and have been optimized for multiple popular open-source machine learning frameworks including PyTorch and TensorFlow.

“The way we see AI emerging is that a vast majority of AI in the future will be done on the CPU from an inference standpoint,” Sibley said.

VentureBeat's mission is to be a digital town square for technical decision-makers to gain knowledge about transformative enterprise technology and transact. Learn more about membership.

Mon, 11 Jul 2022 09:01:00 -0500 Sean Michael Kerner en-US text/html https://venturebeat.com/2022/07/11/ibm-extends-power10-server-lineup-for-enterprise-use-cases/
Killexams : Big Blue

What Is Big Blue?

Big Blue is a nickname used since the 1980s for the International Business Machines Corporation (IBM). The moniker may have arisen from the blue tint of its early computer displays, or from the deep blue color of its corporate logo.

Key Takeaways

  • Big Blue refers to the IBM corporation, an early developer of both business machines and personal computers.
  • The nickname may refer to the color used in its logo, or from its blue-colored computer displays and cases prevalent in the 1960s through 1980s.
  • IBM is also a blue-chip stock, a mature and dominant company that is a component of the Dow Jones Industrial Average index.
  • IBM is responsible for including the UPC barcode, the magnetic stripe card, the personal computer, the floppy disk, the hard disk drive, and the ATM.
IBM Logo. www.ibm.com

Understanding Big Blue

Big Blue arose in the early 1980s in the popular and financial press as a nickname for IBM. The name has unclear specific origins, but is generally assumed to refer to the blue tint of the cases of its computers.

The nickname was embraced by IBM, which has been content with leaving its origins in obscurity and has named many of its projects in homage of the nickname. For example, Deep Blue, IBM’s chess-playing computer, challenged and ultimately defeated grandmaster Garry Kasparov in a controversial 1997 tournament.

The first known print reference to the Big Blue nickname appeared in the June 8, 1981, edition of Businessweek magazine, and is attributed to an anonymous IBM enthusiast.

“No company in the computer business inspires the loyalty that IBM does, and the company has accomplished this with its almost legendary customer service and support … As a result, it is not uncommon for customers to refuse to buy equipment not made by IBM, even though it is often cheaper. ‘I don't want to be saying I should have stuck with the “Big Blue,”’ says one IBM loyalist. ‘The nickname comes from the pervasiveness of IBM's blue computers.’”

Other speculators have also associated the Big Blue nickname with the company’s logo and its one-time dress code, as well as IBM’s historical association with blue-chip stocks.

History of Big Blue

Investopedia / Alison Czinkota

IBM began in 1911 as the Computing-Tabulating-Recording Company (CTR) in Endicott, NY. CTR was a holding company created by Charles R. Flint that amalgamated three companies that together produced scales, punch-card data processors, employee time clocks, and meat slicers. In 1924, CTR was renamed International Business Machines.

In the following century, IBM would go on to become one of the world’s top technological leaders, developing, inventing, and building hundreds of hardware and software information technologies. IBM is responsible for many inventions that quickly became commonplace, including the UPC barcode, the magnetic stripe card, the personal computer, the floppy disk, the hard disk drive, and the ATM.

IBM technologies were crucial to the implementation of U.S. government initiatives such as the launch of the Social Security Act in 1935 and many NASA missions, from the 1963 Mercury flight to the 1969 moon landing and beyond.

IBM holds the most U.S. patents of any business and, to date, IBM employees have been awarded many notable titles, including five Nobel Prizes and six Turing Awards.  

One of the first multinational conglomerates to emerge in U.S. history, IBM maintains a multinational presence, operating in 175 countries worldwide and employing some 350,000 employees globally.

Examples of Big Blue's Financial Performance

IBM has underperformed the broader S&P 500 index and Nasdaq-100 index. Significant divergence began in 1985 when the Nasdaq-100 and S&P 500 moved higher while IBM was mostly flat or lower until 1997. Since then it has continued to lose ground, especially when compared to the Nasdaq-100 index.

Image by Sabrina Jiang © Investopedia 2021

The underperformance in the stock price between 1985 and 2019 is underscored by the firm's financial performance. Between 2005 and 2012, net income generally rose, but at less than 12% per year on average. Between 2012 and 2017, net income fell by 65% over the time period, before recovering in 2018 and 2019. In 2019, though, net income was still about 43% lower than it was in 2012.

Tue, 19 Jul 2022 00:35:00 -0500 en text/html https://www.investopedia.com/terms/b/big-blue.asp
Killexams : IBM Impact: Making a Lasting, Positive Impact in Business Ethics, Our Environment, and Communities

Published 07-14-22

Issued by IBM

Summary

IBM launched IBM Impact, a new framework for the company's ESG work that reflects how IBM aspires to create a more sustainable, equitable, and ethical future. 

Report Highlights

Recently, IBM launched IBM Impact, a new framework for the company's environmental, social, and governance (ESG) work that reflects how IBM aspires to create a more sustainable, equitable, and ethical future.

As detailed in the 2021 ESG report, IBM Impact comprises three pillars: Environmental Impact, Equitable Impact, and Ethical Impact. These values have been embedded in IBM's DNA as a company and have driven its work for its employees, clients, and other stakeholders across the world over the past century.

Get insights on how IBM is creating better pathways to conserve natural resources; creating spaces and opportunities for everyone by focusing on diversity, equity, and inclusivity; and creating innovations, policies and practices that prioritize ethics, trust, transparency, and above all – accountability:

ESG Contact
Suzanne Klatt
Director ESG Program & Strategy

Media Contact
Carmen San Segundo
Global Communications Director, CSR and Sustainability

IBM

IBM

Innovation – joining invention and insight to produce important, new value – is at the heart of what we are as a company. And, today, IBM is leading an evolution in corporate citizenship by contributing innovative solutions and strategies that will help transform and empower our global communities.

Our diverse and sustained programs support education, workforce development, arts and culture, and communities in need through targeted grants of technology and project funds. To learn more about our work in the context of IBM's broader corporate responsibility efforts, please visit Innovations in Corporate Responsibility.

Thu, 14 Jul 2022 01:34:00 -0500 en text/html https://www.csrwire.com/reports/749076/ibm-impact-making-lasting-positive-impact-business-ethics-our-environment-and
Killexams : Can IBM Get Back Into HPC With Power10?

The “Cirrus” Power10 processor from IBM, which we codenamed for Big Blue because it refused to do it publicly and because we understand the value of a synonym here at The Next Platform, shipped last September in the “Denali” Power E1080 big iron NUMA machine. And today, the rest of the Power10-based Power Systems product line is being fleshed out with the launch of entry and midrange machines – many of which are suitable for supporting HPC and AI workloads as well as in-memory databases and other workloads in large enterprises.

The question is, will IBM care about traditional HPC simulation and modeling ever again with the same vigor that it has in past decades? And can Power10 help reinvigorate the HPC and AI business at IBM. We are not sure about the answer to the first question, and got the distinct impression from Ken King, the general manager of the Power Systems business, that HPC proper was not a high priority when we spoke to him back in February about this. But we continue to believe that the Power10 platform has some attributes that make it appealing for data analytics and other workloads that need to be either scaled out across small machines or scaled up across big ones.

Today, we are just going to talk about the five entry Power10 machines, which have one or two processor sockets in a standard 2U or 4U form factor, and then we will follow up with an analysis of the Power E1050, which is a four socket machine that fits into a 4U form factor. And the question we wanted to answer was simple: Can a Power10 processor hold its own against X86 server chips from Intel and AMD when it comes to basic CPU-only floating point computing.

This is an important question because there are plenty of workloads that have not been accelerated by GPUs in the HPC arena, and for these workloads, the Power10 architecture could prove to be very interesting if IBM thought outside of the box a little. This is particularly true when considering the feature called memory inception, which is in effect the ability to build a memory area network across clusters of machines and which we have discussed a little in the past.

We went deep into the architecture of the Power10 chip two years ago when it was presented at the Hot Chip conference, and we are not going to go over that ground again here. Suffice it to say that this chip can hold its own against Intel’s current “Ice Lake” Xeon SPs, launched in April 2021, and AMD’s current “Milan” Epyc 7003s, launched in March 2021. And this makes sense because the original plan was to have a Power10 chip in the field with 24 fat cores and 48 skinny ones, using dual-chip modules, using 10 nanometer processes from IBM’s former foundry partner, Globalfoundries, sometime in 2021, three years after the Power9 chip launched in 2018. Globalfoundries did not get the 10 nanometer processes working, and it botched a jump to 7 nanometers and spiked it, and that left IBM jumping to Samsung to be its first server chip partner for its foundry using its 7 nanometer processes. IBM took the opportunity of the Power10 delay to reimplement the Power ISA in a new Power10 core and then added some matrix math overlays to its vector units to make it a good AI inference engine.

IBM also created a beefier core and dropped the core count back to 16 on a die in SMT8 mode, which is an implementation of simultaneous multithreading that has up to eight processing threads per core, and also was thinking about an SMT4 design which would double the core count to 32 per chip. But we have not seen that today, and with IBM not chasing Google and other hyperscalers with Power10, we may never see it. But it was in the roadmaps way back when.

What IBM has done in the entry machines is put two Power10 chips inside of a single socket to increase the core count, but it is looking like the yields on the chips are not as high as IBM might have wanted. When IBM first started talking about the Power10 chip, it said it would have 15 or 30 cores, which was a strange number, and that is because it kept one SMT8 core or two SMT4 cores in reserve as a hedge against bad yields. In the products that IBM is rolling out today, mostly for its existing AIX Unix and IBM i (formerly OS/400) enterprise accounts, the core counts on the dies are much lower, with 4, 8, 10, or 12 of the 16 cores active. The Power10 cores have roughly 70 percent more performance than the Power9 cores in these entry machines, and that is a lot of performance for many enterprise customers – enough to get through a few years of growth on their workloads. IBM is charging a bit more for the Power10 machines compared to the Power9 machines, according to Steve Sibley, vice president of Power product management at IBM, but the bang for the buck is definitely improving across the generations. At the very low end with the Power S1014 machine that is aimed at small and midrange businesses running ERP workloads on the IBM i software stack, that improvement is in the range of 40 percent, supply or take, and the price increase is somewhere between 20 percent and 25 percent depending on the configuration.

Pricing is not yet available on any of these entry Power10 machines, which ship on July 22. When we find out more, we will do more analysis of the price/performance.

There are six new entry Power10 machines, the feeds and speeds of which are shown below:

For the HPC crowd, the Power L1022 and the Power L1024 are probably the most interesting ones because they are designed to only run Linux and, if they are like prior L classified machines in the Power8 and Power9 families, will have lower pricing for CPU, memory, and storage, allowing them to better compete against X86 systems running Linux in cluster environments. This will be particularly important as IBM pushed Red Hat OpenShift as a container platform for not only enterprise workloads but also for HPC and data analytic workloads that are also being containerized these days.

One thing to note about these machines: IBM is using its OpenCAPI Memory Interface, which as we explained in the past is using the “Bluelink” I/O interconnect for NUMA links and accelerator attachment as a memory controller. IBM is now calling this the Open Memory Interface, and these systems have twice as many memory channels as a typical X86 server chip and therefore have a lot more aggregate bandwidth coming off the sockets. The OMI memory makes use of a Differential DIMM form factor that employs DDR4 memory running at 3.2 GHz, and it will be no big deal for IBM to swap in DDR5 memory chips into its DDIMMs when they are out and the price is not crazy. IBM is offering memory features with 32 GB, 64 GB, and 128 GB capacities today in these machines and will offer 256 GB DDIMMs on November 14, which is how you get the maximum capacities shown in the table above. The important thing for HPC customers is that IBM is delivering 409 GB/sec of memory bandwidth per socket and 2 TB of memory per socket.

By the way, the only storage in these machines is NVM-Express flash drives. No disk, no plain vanilla flash SSDs. The machines also support a mix of PCI-Express 4.0 and PCI-Express 5.0 slots, and do not yet support the CXL protocol created by Intel and backed by IBM even though it loves its own Bluelink OpenCAPI interconnect for linking memory and accelerators to the Power compute engines.

Here are the different processor SKUs offered in the Power10 entry machines:

As far as we are concerned, the 24-core Power10 DCM feature EPGK processor in the Power L1024 is the only interesting one for HPC work, aside from what a theoretical 32-core Power10 DCM might be able to do. And just for fun, we sat down and figured out the peak theoretical 64-bit floating point performance, at all-core base and all-core turbo clock speeds, for these two Power10 chips and their rivals in the Intel and AMD CPU lineups. Take a gander at this:

We have no idea what the pricing will be for a processor module in these entry Power10 machines, so we took a stab at what the 24-core variant might cost to be competitive with the X86 alternatives based solely on FP64 throughput and then reckoned the performance of what a full-on 32-core Power10 DCM might be.

The answer is that IBM can absolutely compete, flops to flops, with the best Intel and AMD have right now. And it has a very good matrix math engine as well, which these chips do not.

The problem is, Intel has “Sapphire Rapids” Xeon SPs in the works, which we think will have four 18-core chiplets for a total of 72 cores, but only 56 of them will be exposed because of yield issues that Intel has with its SuperFIN 10 nanometer (Intel 7) process. And AMD has 96-core “Genoa” Epyc 7004s in the works, too. Power11 is several years away, so if IBM wants to play in HPC, Samsung has to get the yields up on the Power10 chips so IBM can sell more cores in a box. Big Blue already has the memory capacity and memory bandwidth advantage. We will see if its L-class Power10 systems can compete on price and performance once we find out more. And we will also explore how memory clustering might make for a very interesting compute platform based on a mix of fat NUMA and memory-less skinny nodes. We have some ideas about how this might play out.

Mon, 11 Jul 2022 12:01:00 -0500 Timothy Prickett Morgan en-US text/html https://www.nextplatform.com/2022/07/12/can-ibm-get-back-into-hpc-with-power10/
Killexams : Top 10 data lake solution vendors in 2022

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As the world becomes increasingly data-driven, businesses must find suitable solutions to help them achieve their desired outcomes. Data lake storage has garnered the attention of many organizations that need to store large amounts of unstructured, raw information until it can be used in analytics applications.

The data lake solution market is expected to grow rapidly in the coming years and is driven by vendors that offer cost-effective, scalable solutions for their customers.

Learn more about data lake solutions, what key features they should have and some of the top vendors to consider this year. 

What is a data lake solution?

A data lake is defined as a single, centralized repository that can store massive amounts of unstructured and semi-structured information in its native, raw form. 

It’s common for an organization to store unstructured data in a data lake if it hasn’t decided how that information will be used. Some examples of unstructured data include images, documents, videos and audio. These data types are useful in today’s advanced machine learning (ML) and advanced analytics applications.

Data lakes differ from data warehouses, which store structured, filtered information for specific purposes in files or folders. Data lakes were created in response to some of the limitations of data warehouses. For example, data warehouses are expensive and proprietary, cannot handle certain business use cases an organization must address, and may lead to unwanted information homogeneity.

On-premise data lake solutions were commonly used before the widespread adoption of the cloud. Now, it’s understood that some of the best hosts for data lakes are cloud-based platforms on the edge because of their inherent scalability and considerably modular services. 

A 2019 report from the Government Accountability Office (GAO) highlights several business benefits of using the cloud, including better customer service and the acquisition of cost-effective options for IT management services.

Cloud data lakes and on-premise data lakes have pros and cons. Businesses should consider cost, scale and available technical resources to decide which type is best.

Read more about data lakes: What is a data lake? Definition, benefits, architecture and best practices

5 must-have features of a data lake solution

It’s critical to understand what features a data lake offers. Most solutions come with the same core components, but each vendor may have specific offerings or unique selling points (USPs) that could influence a business’s decision.

Below are five key features every data lake should have:

1. Various interfaces, APIs and endpoints

Data lakes that offer diverse interfaces, APIs and endpoints can make it much easier to upload, access and move information. These capabilities are important for a data lake because it allows unstructured data for a wide range of use cases, depending on a business’s desired outcome.

2. Support for or connection to processing and analytics layers

ML engineers, data scientists, decision-makers and analysts benefit most from a centralized data lake solution that stores information for easy access and availability. This characteristic can help data professionals and IT managers work with data more seamlessly and efficiently, thus improving productivity and helping companies reach their goals.

3. Robust search and cataloging features

Imagine a data lake with large amounts of information but no sense of organization. A viable data lake solution must incorporate generic organizational methods and search capabilities, which provide the most value for its users. Other features might include key-value storage, tagging, metadata, or tools to classify and collect subsets of information.

4. Security and access control

Security and access control are two must-have features with any digital tool. The current cybersecurity landscape is expanding, making it easier for threat actors to exploit a company’s data and cause irreparable damage. Only certain users should have access to a data lake, and the solution must have strong security to protect sensitive information.

5. Flexibility and scalability

More organizations are growing larger and operating at a much faster rate. Data lake solutions must be flexible and scalable to meet the ever-changing needs of modern businesses working with information.

Also read: Unlocking analytics with data lake and graph analysis

Top 10 data lake solution vendors in 2022

Some data lake solutions are best suited for businesses in certain industries. In contrast, others may work well for a company of a particular size or with a specific number of employees or customers. This can make choosing a potential data lake solution vendor challenging. 

Companies considering investing in a data lake solution this year should check out some of the vendors below.

1. Amazon Web Services (AWS)

The AWS Cloud provides many essential tools and services that allow companies to build a data lake that meets their needs. The AWS data lake solution is widely used, cost-effective and user-friendly. It leverages the security, durability, flexibility and scalability that Amazon S3 object storage offers to its users. 

The data lake also features Amazon DynamoDB to handle and manage metadata. AWS data lake offers an intuitive, web-based console user interface (UI) to manage the data lake easily. It also forms data lake policies, removes or adds data packages, creates manifests of datasets for analytics purposes, and features search data packages.

2. Cloudera

Cloudera is another top data lake vendor that will create and maintain safe, secure storage for all data types. Some of Cloudera SDX’s Data Lake Service capabilities include:

  • Data schema/metadata information
  • Metadata management and governance
  • Compliance-ready access auditing
  • Data access authorization and authentication for improved security

Other benefits of Cloudera’s data lake include product support, downloads, community and documentation. GSK and Toyota leveraged Cloudera’s data lake to garner critical business intelligence (BI) insights and manage data analytics processes.

3. Databricks 

Databricks is another viable vendor, and it also offers a handful of data lake alternatives. The Databricks Lakehouse Platform combines the best elements of data lakes and warehouses to provide reliability, governance, security and performance.

Databricks’ platform helps break down silos that normally separate and complicate data, which frustrates data scientists, ML engineers and other IT professionals. Aside from the platform, Databricks also offers its Delta Lake solution, an open-format storage layer that can Strengthen data lake management processes. 

4. Domo

Domo is a cloud-based software company that can provide big data solutions to all companies. Users have the freedom to choose a cloud architecture that works for their business. Domo is an open platform that can augment existing data lakes, whether it’s in the cloud or on-premise. Users can use combined cloud options, including:

  • Choosing Domo’s cloud
  • Connecting to any cloud data
  • Selecting a cloud data platform

Domo offers advanced security features, such as BYOK (bring your own key) encryption, control data access and governance capabilities. Well-known corporations such as Nestle, DHL, Cisco and Comcast leverage the Domo Cloud to better manage their needs.

5. Google Cloud

Google is another big tech player offering customers data lake solutions. Companies can use Google Cloud’s data lake to analyze any data securely and cost-effectively. It can handle large volumes of information and IT professionals’ various processing tasks. Companies that don’t want to rebuild their on-premise data lakes in the cloud can easily lift and shift their information to Google Cloud. 

Some key features of Google’s data lakes include Apache Spark and Hadoop migration, which are fully managed services, integrated data science and analytics, and cost management tools. Major companies like Twitter, Vodafone, Pandora and Metro have benefited from Google Cloud’s data lakes.

6. HP Enterprise

Hewlett Packard Enterprise (HPE) is another data lake solution vendor that can help businesses harness the power of their big data. HPE’s solution is called GreenLake — it offers organizations a truly scalable, cloud-based solution that simplifies their Hadoop experiences. 

HPE GreenLake is an end-to-end solution that includes software, hardware and HPE Pointnext Services. These services can help businesses overcome IT challenges and spend more time on meaningful tasks. 

7. IBM

Business technology leader IBM also offers data lake solutions for companies. IBM is well-known for its cloud computing and data analytics solutions. It’s a great choice if an operation is looking for a suitable data lake solution. IBM’s cloud-based approach operates on three key principles: embedded governance, automated integration and virtualization.

These are some data lake solutions from IBM: 

  • IBM Db2
  • IBM Db2 BigSQL
  • IBM Netezza
  • IBM Watson Query
  • IBM Watson Knowledge Catalog
  • IBM Cloud Pak for Data

With so many data lakes available, there’s surely one to fit a company’s unique needs. Financial services, healthcare and communications businesses often use IBM data lakes for various purposes.

8. Microsoft Azure

Microsoft offers its Azure Data Lake solution, which features easy storage methods, processing, and analytics using various languages and platforms. Azure Data Lake also works with a company’s existing IT investments and infrastructure to make IT management seamless.

The Azure Data Lake solution is affordable, comprehensive, secure and supported by Microsoft. Companies benefit from 24/7 support and expertise to help them overcome any big data challenges they may face. Microsoft is a leader in business analytics and tech solutions, making it a popular choice for many organizations.

9. Oracle

Companies can use Oracle’s Big Data Service to build data lakes to manage the influx of information needed to power their business decisions. The Big Data Service is automated and will provide users with an affordable and comprehensive Hadoop data lake platform based on Cloudera Enterprise. 

This solution can be used as a data lake or an ML platform. Another important feature of Oracle is it is one of the best open-source data lakes available. It also comes with Oracle-based tools to add even more value. Oracle’s Big Data Service is scalable, flexible, secure and will meet data storage requirements at a low cost.

10. Snowflake

Snowflake’s data lake solution is secure, reliable and accessible and helps businesses break down silos to Strengthen their strategies. The top features of Snowflake’s data lake include a central platform for all information, fast querying and secure collaboration.

Siemens and Devon Energy are two companies that provide testimonials regarding Snowflake’s data lake solutions and offer positive feedback. Another benefit of Snowflake is its extensive partner ecosystem, including AWS, Microsoft Azure, Accenture, Deloitte and Google Cloud.

The importance of choosing the right data lake solution vendor 

Companies that spend extra time researching which vendors will offer the best enterprise data lake solutions for them can manage their information better. Rather than choose any vendor, it’s best to consider all options available and determine which solutions will meet the specific needs of an organization.

Every business uses information, some more than others. However, the world is becoming highly data-driven — therefore, leveraging the right data solutions will only grow more important in the coming years. This list will help companies decide which data lake solution vendor is right for their operations.

Read next: Get the most value from your data with data lakehouse architecture

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Fri, 15 Jul 2022 07:14:00 -0500 Shannon Flynn en-US text/html https://venturebeat.com/2022/07/15/top-10-data-lake-solution-vendors-in-2022/
Killexams : What's the Better Passive Income Tech Stock: IBM or Verizon?

Investors tend to ignore tech stocks when looking for passive income. Many growth tech stocks tend to reinvest in themselves and thus attract investors who hope to benefit from outsized returns.

However, many tech companies have existed for decades, adopting dividend policies as they mature. Two of these companies, International Business Machines (IBM 0.64%) and Verizon (VZ 1.17%), pay dividends well above the S&P 500 average of 1.7%, though well below the current 9% inflation rate. With these challenges, the question for investors is which passive income tech stock will likely serve them better?

The case for IBM

After years of sluggish growth, IBM reinvented itself again when it bought Red Hat for $34 billion. With this move, IBM has transformed itself into a cloud stock.

It has built on that move by acquiring over 20 smaller companies since the former head of the cloud and cognitive software segment, Arvind Krishna, became CEO in April 2020. The spin-off of its managed infrastructure segment into Kyndryl also gave IBM more latitude to focus on the cloud.

With that move into the cloud, it faces more competition from the likes of Amazon, Microsoft, and Alphabet. Still, the capabilities of Red Hat could help make it a leader in the hybrid cloud space. Mordor Intelligence forecasts a compound annual growth rate (CAGR) of 21% in the hybrid cloud market through 2027, giving IBM the potential to soar in 2022's second half and beyond.

That growth may also appeal to income investors who want IBM to keep its Dividend Aristocrat status. Last April, IBM increased its annual dividend to $6.60 per share, the 27th consecutive year that IBM hiked its payout. At current prices, this amounts to a 4.8% cash return.

Still, its annual dividend only increased by $0.04 per share, less than 1%. Moreover, in 2021, its capital expenditure (CapEx) was a comparatively modest $2.4 billion. Still, IBM dealt with the cost of spinning off Kyndryl. Consequently, its $6.5 billion in free cash flow in 2021 barely covered the $5.9 billion in dividend costs for that year. Additionally, buying Red Hat took its debt to elevated levels. While debt has fallen since 2019, it currently holds $54 billion in total debt compared to about $19 billion in stockholders' equity.

However, the company believes it can generate $35 billion in free cash flow in the 2022 to 2024 time frame. With the company on track for around $6 billion in dividend costs this year, that should hold the payout in good stead. If trends continue, IBM will probably continue the payout hikes and may increase the dividend at a faster pace.

Why income investors may choose Verizon

Despite IBM's potential, Verizon seems to outperform it as an income stock on many levels. Verizon is one of only three nationwide 5G providers in the U.S. Also, it has won the most J.D. Power awards on network quality for 28 years in a row, giving it an advantage within its industry.

Verizon also appears to operate in a faster-growing industry. Grand View Research forecasts a CAGR of 52% for the global 5G services market.

Finally, it offers an annual payout of $2.56 per share, taking its cash return to 5.1%. While it is not a Dividend Aristocrat, Verizon has hiked the dividend annually since 2007. Also, in 2021, its $19.3 billion in free cash flow financed $10.4 billion in dividend costs and left significant amounts of cash applicable to other purposes.

Unfortunately, it may need that cash more than IBM. Maintaining its top rating meant it spent $20.3 billion in CapEx, an amount consistent with spending in previous years and more than eight times IBM's CapEx spending. It also had to pay $53 billion in 2021 for licensed spectrum, a type of radio frequency-related "real estate" that aids in network operations.

That outlay took Verizon to $151 billion in total debt, a crashing burden and potential threat to the dividend given Verizon's $83 billion in stockholders' equity. This is particularly concerning since its peer AT&T surrendered its Dividend Aristocrat status last year amid heavy debts. Such concerns could temper its tremendous potential in 5G services.

IBM or Verizon?

In the end, Verizon appears positioned to better serve passive income investors.

Still, deciding between these dividend stocks is not an easy task. Both IBM and Verizon hold heavy debt burdens that potentially threaten their payouts. Also, both companies' minuscule payout hikes will not hearten investors in an inflationary environment. Additionally, IBM has significantly lighter CapEx costs, and the Aristocrat status is an added incentive to continue payout hikes.

Nonetheless, unlike IBM, Verizon leads its peers in quality, and its industry holds the potential for more rapid growth. Verizon also holds less debt relative to its stockholders' equity. Such factors may ultimately supply Verizon's dividend an added edge.

Suzanne Frey, an executive at Alphabet, is a member of The Motley Fool's board of directors. John Mackey, CEO of Whole Foods Market, an Amazon subsidiary, is a member of The Motley Fool's board of directors. Will Healy has no position in any of the stocks mentioned. The Motley Fool has positions in and recommends Alphabet (A shares), Alphabet (C shares), Amazon, and Microsoft. The Motley Fool recommends Verizon Communications. The Motley Fool has a disclosure policy.

Mon, 18 Jul 2022 11:26:00 -0500 Will Healy en text/html https://www.fool.com/investing/2022/07/18/better-passive-income-tech-stock-ibm-vs-verizon/
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