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Today’s AI systems are quickly evolving to become humans’ new best friend. We now have AIs that can concoct award-winning whiskey, write poetry, and help doctors perform extremely precise surgical operations. But one thing they can’t do — which is, on the surface, far simpler than all those other things — is use common sense.

Common sense is different from intelligence in that it is usually something innate and natural to humans that helps them navigate daily life, and cannot really be taught. In 1906, philosopher G. K. Chesterton wrote that “common sense is a wild thing, savage, and beyond rules.”

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Robots, of course, run on algorithms that are just that: rules.

So no, robots can’t use common sense — yet. But thanks to current efforts in the field, we can now measure an AI’s core psychological reasoning ability, bringing us one step closer.

So why does it matter if we teach AI common sense?

Really it comes down to the fact that common sense will make AI better at helping us solve real-world issues. Many argue that AI-driven solutions designed for complex problems, like diagnosing Covid-19 treatments for example, often fail, as the system can’t readily adapt to a real-world situation where the problems are unpredictable, vague, and not defined by rules.

Common sense includes not only social abilities and reasoning but also a “naive sense of physics.”

Injecting common sense into AI could mean big things for humans; better customer service, where a robot can actually assist a disgruntled customer beyond sending them into an endless “Choose from the following options” loop. It can make autonomous cars react better to unexpected roadway incidences. It can even help the military draw life-or-death information from intelligence.

So why haven’t scientists been able to crack the common sense code thus far?

Called the “dark matter of AI”, common sense is both crucial to AI’s future development and, thus far, elusive. Equipping computers with common sense has actually been a goal of computer science since the field’s very start; in 1958, pioneering computer scientist John McCarthy published a paper titled “Programs with common sense” which looked at how logic could be used as a method of representing information in computer memory. But we’ve not moved much closer to making it a reality since.

Common sense includes not only social abilities and reasoning but also a “naive sense of physics” — this means that we know certain things about physics without having to work through physics equations, like why you shouldn’t put a bowling ball on a slanted surface. It also includes basic knowledge of abstract things like time and space, which lets us plan, estimate, and organize. “It’s knowledge that you ought to have,” says Michael Witbrock, AI researcher at the University of Auckland.

All this means that common sense is not one precise thing, and therefore cannot be easily defined by rules.

Secret AGENT

We’ve established that common sense requires a computer to infer things based on complex, real-world situations — something that comes easily to humans, and starts to form since infancy.

Computer scientists are making (slow) but steady progress toward building AI agents that can infer mental states, predict future actions, and work with humans. But in order to see how close we actually are, we first need a rigorous benchmark for evaluating an AI’s “common sense,” or its psychological reasoning ability.

Researchers from IBM, MIT, and Harvard have created just that: AGENT, which stands for Action-Goal-Efficiency-coNstraint-uTility. After testing and validation, this benchmark is shown to be able to evaluate the core psychological reasoning ability of an AI model. This means it can actually give a sense of social awareness and could interact with humans in real-world settings.

To demonstrate common sense, an AI model must have built-in representations of how humans plan.

So what is AGENT? AGENT is a large-scale dataset of 3D animations inspired by experiments that study cognitive development in kids. The animations depict someone interacting with different objects under different physical constraints. According to IBM:

“The videos comprise distinct trials, each of which includes one or more ‘familiarization’ videos of an agent’s typical behavior in a certain physical environment, paired with ‘test’ videos of the same agent’s behavior in a new environment, which are labeled as either ‘expected’ or ‘surprising,’ given the behavior of the agent in the corresponding familiarization videos.”

A model must then judge how surprising the agent’s behaviors in the ‘test’ videos are, based on the actions it learned in the ‘familiarization’ videos. Using the AGENT benchmark, that model is then validated against large-scale human-rating trials, where humans rated the ‘surprising’ ‘test’ videos as more surprising than the ‘expected’ test videos.

Common sense?

IBM’s trial shows that to demonstrate common sense, an AI model must have built-in representations of how humans plan. This means combining both a basic sense of physics and ‘cost-reward trade-offs’, which means an understanding of how humans take actions “based on utility, trading off the rewards of its goal against the costs of reaching it.”

While not yet perfect, the findings show AGENT is a promising diagnostic tool for developing and evaluating common sense in AI, something IBM is also working on. It also shows that we can utilize similar traditional developmental psychology methods to those used to teach human children how objects and ideas relate.

In the future, this could help significantly reduce the need for training in these models allowing businesses to save on computing energy, time, and money.

Robots don’t understand human consciousness yet — but with the development of benchmarking tools like AGENT, we’ll be able to measure how close we’re getting.

Sat, 01 Oct 2022 10:50:00 -0500 en text/html https://thenextweb.com/news/common-sense-test-for-ai-smarter-machines
Killexams : IBM and AWS Create a Path to Modernization Via Industry-Specific Solutions No result found, try new keyword!Any vertical modernization approach should balance in-depth, vertical sector expertise with a solutions-based methodology that caters to specific business needs. As part of their partnership, IBM ... Wed, 12 Oct 2022 14:17:00 -0500 en-US text/html https://www.cio.com/article/409679/ibm-and-aws-create-a-path-to-modernization-via-industry-specific-solutions.html Killexams : Converge Technology Solutions Announces IBM zSystems and LinuxONE Certification in Canada

TORONTO and GATINEAU, QC, Sept. 28, 2022 /CNW/ - Converge Technology Solutions Corp. ("Converge" or "the Company") (TSX: CTS) (FSE: 0ZB) (OTCQX: CTSDF) a software-enabled IT & Cloud Solutions provider, is pleased to announce it is now certified to sell and implement IBM zSystems and LinuxONE in Canada.

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IBM zSystems is an overarching title used by IBM for all of its z/Architecture mainframe computers, beginning with the z900 up to the most accurate z16, released in May 2022. The "z" stands for "zero downtime," which reflects the reliability of the system. Data that is handled by IBM zSystems is encrypted by dedicated processors over the complete ecosystem, using quantum-safe data encryption. This means that encrypted data can withstand future unauthorized decryption using quantum computing capacity. Similarly, LinuxONE is an enterprise-grade server with a unique architecture designed to meet the needs of mission-critical workloads. It brings together IBM's experience in building sustainable, secure, and scalable systems with the openness of the Linux operating system. LinuxONE runs on IBM zSystems servers.

"Converge looks forward to expanding our IBM zSystems and LinuxONE capabilities into Canada," stated Greg Berard, President and North American CEO of Converge. "Converge has been offering these solutions to our clients across the United States for many years and have strong technical resources with deep expertise and knowledge around these offerings.  We're excited to now be able to bring those skills to our Canadian clients and offer the same level of these IBM services and solutions across North America."

About Converge

Converge Technology Solutions Corp. is a software-enabled IT & Cloud Solutions provider focused on delivering industry-leading solutions and services. Converge's global solution approach delivers advanced analytics, application modernization, cloud platforms, cybersecurity, digital infrastructure, and digital workplace offerings to clients across various industries. The Company supports these solutions with advisory, implementation, and managed services expertise across all major IT vendors in the marketplace. This multi-faceted approach enables Converge to address the unique business and technology requirements for all clients in the public and private sectors. For more information, visit convergetp.com.

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Killexams : IBM doubles down on partner ecosystem investment
Kate Woolley (IBM)

Kate Woolley (IBM)

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IBM is on a mission to double its revenue via its partner ecosystem in the next three to five years, making some significant updates to its PartnerWorld program along the way. 

As part of its efforts to re-position ecosystem partners at the center of the company’s go-to-market strategy, partners will now have access to the same badges and selling enablement materials as IBM sellers.

This is part of IBM’s ongoing commitment to growing its ecosystem.

“We will continue to make investments in the partner experience so that together, as a single team, we can achieve our goal of doubling revenue through the IBM ecosystem in the next 3–5 years,” said Kate Woolley, IBM’s ecosystem general manager.

The badges and additional materials are available through a new learning hub, designed to Improve the digital experience for partners.

“Users will notice a more modernised and consistent experience on the IBM training site, making it easier to find resources,” Woolley said.

All registered partners have access to these resources at the same time as IBM sellers, and at no cost.