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Exam Code: NCLEX-PN Practice test 2022 by Killexams.com team
NCLEX-PN National Council Licensure Examination(NCLEX-PN)

The test plan is reviewed and approved by the NCLEX®
Examination Committee (NEC) every three years.
Multiple resources are used, including the latest practice analysis of licensed practical/vocational nurses (LPN/VNs), and expert opinions of the NEC, NCSBN staff and nursing regulatory bodies (NRBs) to ensure that the test plan is consistent with nurse practice acts. Following the endorsement of proposed revisions by the NEC, the test plan document is presented for approval to the Delegate Assembly, which is the decisionmaking body of NCSBN. The test plan serves a variety of purposes. It is used to guide candidates preparing for the examination, to direct item writers in the development of items, and to facilitate the classification of examination items. This document offers a comprehensive listing of content for each client needs category and subcategory outlined in the test plan. demo items are provided at the end of each category, which are specific to the client needs category in that section. There is an item writing guide along with demo case scenarios, which provide nurse educators with hands-on experience in writing NCLEX-style test items.

Entry into the practice of nursing is regulated by the licensing authorities within each of the NCSBN nursing regulatory bodies (state, commonwealth and territorial boards of nursing). To ensure public protection, each jurisdiction requires candidates for licensure to meet set requirements that include passing an examination that measures the competencies needed to perform safely and effectively as a licensed practical/vocational nurse (LPN/VN). NCSBN develops a licensure examination, the National Council Licensure Examination for Practical Nurses (NCLEX-PN®), which is used by U.S. members to assist in making licensure decisions.
Several steps occur in the development of the NCLEX-PN Test Plan. The first step is conducting a practice analysis that is used to collect data on the current practice of entry-level LPN/VNs (Report of Findings from the 2018 LPN/VN Practice Analysis: Linking the NCLEX-PN® Examination to Practice, NCSBN, 2019). Twelve thousand newly licensed practical/vocational nurses are asked about the frequency and priority of performing nursing care activities. Nursing care activities are then analyzed in relation to the frequency of performance, impact on maintaining client safety and client care settings where the activities are performed. This analysis guides the development of a framework for entry-level nursing practice that incorporates specific client needs, as well as processes that are fundamental to the practice of nursing. The next step is the development of the NCLEX-PN Test Plan, which guides the selection of content and behaviors to be tested. Variations in jurisdiction laws and regulations are considered in the development of the test plan. The NCLEX-PN Test Plan provides a concise summary of the content and scope of the licensure examination. It serves as a guide for examination development as well as candidate preparation. The NCLEX® assesses the knowledge, skills and abilities that are essential for the entry-level LPN/VN to use in order to meet the needs of clients requiring the promotion, maintenance and restoration of health. The following sections describe beliefs about people and nursing that are integral to the examination, cognitive abilities that will be tested in the examination and specific components of the NCLEX-PN Test Plan.

Client Needs
Percentage of Items from Each
Category/Subcategory
Safe and Effective Care Environment
„ Coordinated Care 18–24%
„ Safety and Infection Control 10–16%
Health Promotion and Maintenance 6–12%
Psychosocial Integrity 9–15%
Physiological Integrity
„ Basic Care and Comfort 7–13%
„ Pharmacological Therapies 10–16%
„ Reduction of Risk Potential 9–15%
„ Physiological Adaptation 7–13%

The activity statements used in the 2018 LPN/VN Practice Analysis: Linking the NCLEX-PN® Examination to Practice (NCSBN, 2019) preface each of the eight content categories and are identified throughout the test plan by an asterisk (*). NCSBN performs an analysis of those activities used frequently and identified as important by entry-level nurses to ensure client safety. This is called a practice analysis; it provides data to support the NCLEX as a reliable, valid measure of competent, entry-level LPN/VN practice. The practice analysis is conducted every three years. In addition to the practice analysis, NCSBN conducts a knowledge, skills and abilities (KSA) survey. The primary purpose of this study is to identify the knowledge needed by newly licensed practical/vocational nurses in order to provide safe and effective care. Findings from both the 2018 LPN/VN Practice Analysis: Linking the NCLEX-PN® Examination to Practice (NCSBN, 2019) and the 2018 LPN/VN Nursing Knowledge Survey (NCSBN, 2019) can be found at www.ncsbn.org/1235.htm. Both documents are used in the development of the NCLEX-PN Test Plan as well as to inform item development. All task statements in the 2020 NCLEX-PN® Test Plan require the nurse to apply the fundamental principles of clinical decision making and critical thinking to nursing practice. The test plan also makes the assumption that the nurse integrates concepts from the following bodies of knowledge:
„ Social Sciences (psychology and sociology); and
„ Biological Sciences (anatomy, physiology, biology and microbiology) Collaboration with Interdisciplinary Team
„ Identify roles/responsibilities of health care team members
„ Identify need for nursing or interdisciplinary client care conference
„ Contribute to the development of and/or update the client plan of care
„ Contribute to planning interdisciplinary client care conferences
„ Participate as a member of an interdisciplinary team Concepts of Management and Supervision
„ Recognize and report staff conflict
„ Verify abilities of staff members to perform assigned tasks (e.g., job description, scope of practice, training, experience)
„ Provide input for performance evaluation of other staff
„ Participate in staff education (e.g., inservices, continued competency)
„ Use data from various credible sources in making clinical decisions
„ Serve as resource person to other staff
„ Monitor activities of assistive personnel
Confidentiality/Information Security
„ Identify staff actions that impact client confidentiality and intervene as needed (e.g., access to medical records, discussions at nurses station, change-of-shift reports)
„ Recognize staff member and client understanding of confidentiality requirements
„ Apply knowledge of facility regulations when accessing client records
„ Maintain client confidentiality*
„ Provide for privacy needs Continuity of Care
„ Follow up with client after discharge*
„ Participate in client discharge or transfer*
„ Provide follow-up for unresolved client care issues
„ Provide and receive report*
„ Record client information (e.g., medical record, referral/transfer form)
„ Use agency guidelines to guide client care (e.g., clinical pathways, care maps, care plans)
Establishing Priorities
„ Organize and prioritize care based on client needs*
„ Participate in planning client care based upon client needs (e.g., diagnosis, abilities, prescribed treatment)
„ Use effective time management skills
Ethical Practice
„ Identify ethical issues affecting staff or client
„ Inform client of ethical issues affecting client care
„ Intervene to promote ethical practice
„ Practice in a manner consistent with code of ethics for nurses*
„ Review client and staff member knowledge of ethical issues affecting client care Informed Consent
„ Identify appropriate person to provide informed consent for client (e.g., client, parent, legal guardian)
„ Participate in client consent process*
„ Describe informed consent requirements (e.g., purpose for procedure, risks of procedure)
„ Recognize that informed consent was obtained (e.g., completed consent form, client understanding of procedure)
Information Technology
„ Use information technology in client care*
„ Access data for client or staff through online databases and journals
„ Enter computer documentation accurately, completely and in a timely manner
Legal Responsibilities
„ Identify legal issues affecting staff and client (e.g., refusing treatment)
„ Verify and process health care provider orders*
„ Recognize self-limitations of task/assignments and seek assistance when needed*
„ Respond to the unsafe practice of a health care provider (e.g., intervene, report)*
„ Follow regulation/policy for reporting specific issues (e.g., abuse, neglect, gunshot wound, communicable disease)*
„ Document client care
„ Provide care within the legal scope of practice*
Performance Improvement (Quality Improvement)
„ Identify impact of performance improvement/quality improvement activities on client care outcomes
„ Participate in quality improvement (QI) activity (e.g., collecting data, serving on QI committee)*
„ Document performance improvement/quality improvement activities
„ Report identified performance improvement/quality improvement concerns to appropriate
personnel (e.g., nurse manager, risk manager)
„ Apply evidence-based practice when providing care*

National Council Licensure Examination(NCLEX-PN)
NCLEX Examination(NCLEX-PN) test contents
Killexams : NCLEX Examination(NCLEX-PN) test contents - BingNews https://killexams.com/pass4sure/exam-detail/NCLEX-PN Search results Killexams : NCLEX Examination(NCLEX-PN) test contents - BingNews https://killexams.com/pass4sure/exam-detail/NCLEX-PN https://killexams.com/exam_list/NCLEX Killexams : HESI Exams: An Overview of Reliability and Validity

Psychometric Properties of HESI Exams

HESI determines the reliability of HESI exams by conducting an item analysis on each test that is administered and returned to the company for a composite report of the aggregate data. Discrimination data are obtained for each test item by calculating a point biserial correlation coefficient. As a measure of the test's overall reliability, a Kuder Richardson Formula 20 is calculated for every test administered. Data obtained from these calculations are used to estimate the reliability of an test prior to administration. These reliability estimates are based on all previous administrations of the test items on each test and are reflective of the most recently updated item analysis. Reliability estimates are recalculated every time a HESI test is scored, and they are updated concurrently on all exams that include any of the same test items. Table 1 describes the estimated reliability coefficients and the range of the number of uses for items contained on eight HESI specialty exams, four versions of the E2 for RN students, and two versions of the E2 for PN students as of December 31, 2003. The estimated reliability coefficients for these HESI exams ranged from 0.86 to 0.99, and the number of times the items were used on these exams ranged from 180 to 47,320.

Research designed to quantify the degree of validity of all HESI exams is an ongoing process. The most current evidence of validity for various HESI exams is determined through an assessment of content validity, construct validity, and criterion-related validity as described in classical test theory.

Content Validity. Content validity refers to the effectiveness of the test items in measuring the basic nursing knowledge and skills of students. Expert nurse educators and clinicians establish content validity for each HESI test item by evaluating the relevance of the content to entry-level nursing practice. This evaluation is conducted before test items are placed into the HESI item banks and periodically thereafter to determine their continued relevance to current nursing practice. HESI uses course syllabi from nursing programs and NCLEX test blueprints to define the content for the E2. The HESI database provides a test blueprint report that describes the distribution of test items in each subject area, including client needs as defined by the NCSBN.[11,12] When an E2 is designed and test items are selected from the database for use in the exam, this test blueprint report is reviewed and changed as necessary until the distribution of test items in the subject areas mimics the distribution described by the NCSBN.

The content validity of HESI specialty exams and HESI custom exams is determined by reviewing the syllabi of nursing courses that these exams are designed to evaluate. As of December 31, 2003, HESI nurse educators had developed 1203 custom exams. At least one course syllabus was reviewed when developing each of these custom exams, and in many cases, several course syllabi were reviewed. HESI nurse educators determine the content domain for inclusion in HESI specialty exams and HESI custom exams by reviewing these course syllabi. On average, five or more syllabi arrive monthly at HESI for the development of custom exams. Based on a review of these syllabi, new test items are written by HESI nurse educators as deemed necessary.

Construct validity. Construct validity refers to the extent to which a test measures specified traits or attributes at an abstract level. A construct is a trait, attribute, or quality that cannot be observed directly, but that can be inferred from testing. HESI specialty exams and HESI exit exams measure constructs that are essential to entry-level nursing practice. These constructs, which are reflected in the NCLEX test blueprints,[11,12] are defined by nursing faculties and are also defined by the NCSBN's practice analyses of recently graduated nurses.[18] Nursing faculties also use HESI scores to make inferences regarding the appropriateness of their nursing curricula and the competence of their students related to specific nursing content areas. HESI Summary Reports for specialty exams and exit exams describe individual and aggregate data on student performance in the subject areas tested.

The increased use of HESI specialty exams and HESI exit exams may indicate that faculties trust the data reported by these exams, and such confidence provides an additional indication of construct validity. According to HESI database records, the administration of specialty exams, including custom exams, increased from 8702 in academic year 1999-2000 to 30,004 in the academic year 2002-2003, an increase of 245% in 4 years.[1] Although there are myriad possible reasons why faculties are increasingly choosing to administer HESI specialty exams and HESI custom exams, this increase in use suggests that faculties find these exams worthwhile evaluation tools for measuring student outcomes within particular nursing courses. Use of HESI exit exams increased from 7193 administrations in academic year 1999-2000 to 25,241 administrations in academic year 2002-2003, an increase of 251% in 4 years.[1] This increase in use suggests that faculties find the E2 a useful tool in identifying students' remediation needs[8] and predicting NCLEX success.

Efforts made to demonstrate convergent validity offer support for a test's construct validity.[10,17] Evidence of convergent validity was obtained by comparing HESI test scores to other measures of the same constructs. In three as-yet unpublished studies, associate degree nursing (ADN) and bachelor of science in nursing faculties that use HESI exams provided evidence of convergent validity for these exams by correlating students' HESI test scores with their final course grades and cumulative grade point averages (GPAs). Murray and Nibert[19] correlated ADN students' (N = 52) HESI specialty exams scores with their final course grades in three courses the exams were designed to evaluate. The correlations were statistically significant (P ≤ .01) for maternity nursing (r = 0.515), pediatric nursing (r = 0.517), and psychiatric-mental health nursing (r = 0.494).[19] Three custom exams were administered in the first year of the ADN program. Scores for two of the three custom exams were significantly correlated (P ≤ .01) with students' final course grades in the courses for which they were designed to evaluate, Custom-2 (r = 0.569) and Custom-3 (r = 0.691).[19] The Custom-1 test was designed to evaluate three courses, and scores on this test were significantly correlated (P ≤ .01) with two of the three final course grades, fundamentals (r = 0.581) and pharmacology (r = 0.463), but scores were not significantly correlated with final course grades in therapeutic communications.[19]

M. Owings (unpublished data, 2002) correlated the HESI specialty test scores of second-year ADN students (N = 19) with their cumulative objective course grades (scores for papers, presentations, and clinical grades were not included). The HESI Pediatric Nursing specialty test scores were significantly correlated (P ≥ .05) with test scores in the pediatric nursing course (r = 0.402). However, HESI Maternity Nursing specialty test scores were not significantly correlated with test scores in the maternity nursing course.

L. Symes (unpublished data, 2002) found a significant correlation (P ≤ .01) between the cumulative GPAs and E2 scores (r = 0.498) of senior students completing a baccalaureate nursing program (N = 27). Based on the findings of these studies conducted by faculty members in two types of nursing programs at three different schools, it can be concluded that HESI specialty exams and HESI custom exams were valid at the time the studies were conducted for these three schools, with the exception of the Maternity Nursing specialty test scores for one group of students (N = 19).

Criterion-Related Validity. Criterion-related validity refers to inferences made from analyses of test scores for the purpose of predicting student outcomes on another criterion of interest, such as performance in an entry-level nursing position or success on the NCLEX-RN or NCLEX-PN. HESI scores are used to make inferences about students' nursing content knowledge and their ability to apply concepts to nursing problems. Specialty test scores, including custom test scores, and exit test scores provide inferences about students' ability to succeed on the NCLEX.

Evidence of criterion-related validity for the E2 was obtained from four annual validity studies conducted to determine the accuracy of this test in predicting NCLEX-RN and NCLEX-PN outcomes. Based on the aggregate data collected from 19,554 subjects over four consecutive years, the E2 was found to be 96.36% to 98.46% accurate in predicting NCLEX-RN and NCLEX-PN success.[4,5,6,7] Additionally, in two different studies the E2 was described as 96.42%[20] and 100% accurate[21] in predicting NCLEX-RN failures. A chi-square goodness-of-fit test revealed that the predictive accuracy of the E2 did not differ significantly throughout the 4 years of study. Furthermore, there were no significant differences in predictive accuracy by types of programs examined: associate degree, baccalaureate degree, diploma, or practical nursing programs. Nibert et al[7] concluded that E2 was a valid measure of students' preparedness for the licensure exam.

Validity can also be evaluated by examining evidence of the consequence or meaning given to the test.[17,18,22] Increasing numbers of nursing schools are establishing policies that incorporate HESI exams as a benchmark for progression and remediation. Nibert et al[8] reported in a latest study that 45 of 149 RN programs (30.20%) indicated that they had established policies that used E2 scores as benchmarks for progression. The authors also described three consequences of such progression policies: an incomplete or failing grade in the capstone course (34.29%); denial of eligibility for graduation (51.43%); and withholding of approval for NCLEX candidacy (14.29%).[8] Morrison et al[9] interviewed administrators at seven nursing programs and found that NCLEX-RN pass rates increased by 9% to 41% within 2 years after implementation of policies that used E2 scores as a benchmark for progression.

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Killexams : Aspen University's Phoenix program falling far short on nursing test, could face closure No result found, try new keyword!Aspen needs an 80% or higher first-time pass rate for the nursing licensure test this year, but so far for 2022, its pass rate is 69.4%. Fri, 29 Jul 2022 13:56:52 -0500 en-us text/html https://www.msn.com/en-us/news/us/aspen-universitys-phoenix-program-falling-far-short-on-nursing-test-could-face-closure/ar-AA107sHC Killexams : 10 Best Nclex Books No result found, try new keyword!Microsoft and partners may be compensated if you purchase something through recommended links in this article. Please provide an overall site rating: ... Thu, 10 Dec 2020 19:18:00 -0600 text/html https://www.msn.com/en-gb/lifestyle/rf-best-products-uk/best-nclex-books-reviews Killexams : Medtutor - Free Website Help Complete Preparation For Health And Medical-Related Exams

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The website introduces its thousand practice questions and tests in detail.

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The health and medical exams require a lot of expert knowledge to pass. Therefore, this is not straightforward for people to learn about health and medicine without a learning plan and taking practice questions continuously. For candidates still concerned about where it is reliable to learn and practice, Medtutor is the top website that provides free thousands of questions and practice tests. With the belief that everybody can become a soldier, Medtutor was founded to help users have the best preparation for their upcoming Health And Medical-Related Exams in the future. 

Users can find needed Topics to learn and practice easily because Medtutor divides it into different practice tests, including CNA, EMT, HESIA2, MCAT, NCLEX PN, NCLEX RN, and USMLE. In each test, there are thousands of exercise questions on diverse Topics such as Basic Nurse Skills, Restorative Skills, Anatomy&Physiology, Medical and Obstetrics/Gynecology, Cardiology and Resuscitation and much more. All the questions are designed and followed by Health And Medical expertise to provide users with the most complete and reliable documentation source. Users can find all they need for the Medtutor test from the website.

After practicing the questioning that simulated a real test for specific topics, users can identify their strengths and weaknesses and where to pay more attention. For each question, Medtutor has a detailed explanation to help users get deep knowledge of why correct or not, from there help users learn from the mistake to Boost the result.

The website also has different features to help optimize the user learning experience. For instance, 3 interesting test modes allow users to practice more excitedly by increasing the difficulty level of the examination. Special review mode help reevaluate the past result, which is good, medium or bad, to help the user use their study time effectively. Moreover, the website also has a 'Blog' to share the knowledge and information about each test type. From the blog, the user can know about the differences between CNA and CMA, Study Guide, Daily Tips, Interview Tips, CNA Duties, Perineal Hygiene, Qualities Of A Nurse, and extensively more. Blog articles are updated continuously to provide the user with the most complete, fast and accurate information.

Not only the website, but Medtutor also offers the application on google play or AppStore and allows lifetime access 100% free. Therefore, users can learn with any device, at any time, without requiring an internet connection or member registration. 

With outstanding training and testing services, Medtutor has successfully designed a professional, simple and useful e-education platform. With more than 10,123 users and 20,432 downloaded and the application, which is always in the top 3 on both App Store and Google Play, Medtutor is expected to become one of the top 5 biggest education companies in the US. 

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About the company: Medtutor is a top e-education platform that provides users with thousands of questions and practice questions about Health And Medical. The company's priority mission is to help people have the best preparation, learn happier, and pass easier with the flying colors.

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Killexams : Databases A to Z BoardVitals additional information about this title    UW login not required

A set of question banks intended to help in the preparation for the following board exams: AACN Adult-Gerontology Acute Care NP, AANP Family Nurse Practitioner, Adult-Gerontology Primary Care NP, ANCC Adult-Gerontology Acute Care NP, ANCC Family Nurse Practitioner, Critical Care Nursing, Family Medicine, Family Medicine MOC, NAPLEX, NBDHE, NCLEX-PN, NCLEX-RN, Pediatric Nurse Practitioner, and Psychiatric-Mental Health Nurse Practitioner.

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Killexams : Area students receive practical nursing pins and diplomas

Associate degree nursing and practical nursing students were recognized during a special ceremony at Northeast Community College in Norfolk with the presentation of their nursing pins and diplomas. In addition, the tradition of nursing students receiving their pins from family members or a close friend who have helped them along their journey was part of the ceremony.

The nurse pinning observance is the culmination of the students’ initial journey of professional nursing education. It is a bridge from nursing’s past to nursing’s future and is a time-honored nursing school tradition. It also signifies the official initiation into the brotherhood and sisterhood of nurses.

Each nursing school, at every level of education, has its own unique pin which is worn on the nursing uniform. The nursing school pin that graduates of the Northeast Community College’s associate degree nursing (ADN) and practical nursing program receive is symbolic of nursing’s heritage and tradition.

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Upon completion of the first two semesters of nursing studies at Northeast Community College, students are eligible to take the National Council of Licensure Examination (NCLEX-PN) to become licensed practical nurses. Students who hold a 3.0 GPA in their nursing courses are eligible to complete the last two semesters of the Northeast program and take the National Council of Licensure test (NCLEX-RN) to practice as licensed registered nurses.

Students who graduate with an ADN are eligible to continue their studies for a Bachelor of Science degree in Nursing. The general education courses for a Bachelor of Science in Nursing can be taken at Northeast Community College. The majority of the practical nursing students have chosen to continue in the associate degree nursing program at Northeast.

The following area students received their Practical Nursing pin and diploma.

Fremont: Oscar Garcia, Brittney Perina.

Oakland: Bradley Gillett.

West Point: Kelly Hansen, Allyson Plagge.

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Killexams : BCCC Class of 2022 practice nurse graduates celebrate with pinning ceremony No result found, try new keyword!The graduates must pass the NCLEX-PN before starting employment at physicians ... Students must pass the TEAS test for admission, and BCCC is now accepting passing TEAS scores from 3 years ... Tue, 26 Jul 2022 12:07:00 -0500 en-us text/html https://www.msn.com/en-us/news/us/bccc-class-of-2022-practice-nurse-graduates-celebrate-with-pinning-ceremony/ar-AA100qi5 Killexams : Area students compete at SkillsUSA National Leadership Conference

Area students compete at national conference

Northeast Community College student Jake Bartosh of Arlington earned a silver medal in crime scene investigation at the 2022 SkillsUSA National Leadership Conference.

In the competitions, students in skilled and technical education science work against the clock and each other, proving their expertise in a myriad of occupations. The philosophy of the SkillsUSA championships is to reward students for excellence, to involve industry in directly evaluating student performance and to keep training relevant to employers’ needs.

In all, Northeast Community had 26 students in 16 categories who won state competition events in April to qualify for the national competition in Atlanta. Area students include: Bartosh, Crime Scene Investigation; Aaron Disher of West Point and Cooper Hilgenkamp of Arlington, Teamworks Competition.

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The 58th annual SkillsUSA National Leadership Conference, the world’s largest showcase of skilled trades, featured 108 hands-on skills and leadership competitions at State Farm Arena and the Georgia World Congress Center in Atlanta. More than 12,000 students, teachers, education leaders, and representatives from 650 national corporations, trade associations, businesses and labor unions participated.

SkillsUSA serves approximately 334,000 students and instructors annually. This includes 19,000 instructors who join as professional members. Including alumni, SkillsUSA membership totals over 394,000. SkillsUSA has served nearly 14 million annual members cumulatively since 1965 and is recognized by the U.S. Department of Education and the U.S. Department of Labor as a successful model of employer-driven workforce development.

South Dakota Mines announces dean’s listSouth Dakota Mines has named 587 students to the spring 2022 dean’s list.

In order to merit a spot on the dean’s list, students must earn a grade point average of 3.5 or higher for the semester. Full-time students must have earned a minimum of 12 credit hours for the term while part-time students must have earned between three and 11 credit hours that term.

The following area students were named to the dean’s list:

NCTA honors area students

Academic honors for students at the Nebraska College of Technical Agriculture were announced for the spring semester.

Students must be fulltime enrollees, with at least 12 credit hours for the semester to be eligible for the academic designations. The dean’s list honors are for students achieving a perfect 4.0 grade point average for the semester. Those on honor roll earn a 3.5 to 3.99 GPA.

The following area students were named to the honor roll:

North Bend: Hannah Murray.

Queen named to dean’s list

Pacey Queen of Fremont has been named to the dean’s list for the spring 2022 term at York College.

To be named to the dean’s list, students must carry 12 or more graded hours and achieve a semester grade point average of at least 3.75 with no incomplete grades and no grade below “C” for the semester.

Herink named to dean’s list

Eli Herink of Fremont has been named to the dean’s list for the spring 2022 semester at Rockhurst University.

This honor recognizes students who have achieved a grade-point average of 3.5 or above.

Union University graduate

Six hundred eleven students graduated from Union University on May 21 during spring commencement services of the 197th graduating class at Oman Arena.

Sen. Ben Sasse of Nebraska delivered the commencement address.

Gabrielle McClellan of Fremont earned a Bachelor of Arts in English.

CCC honor lists

Central Community College has announced the names of full-time students who earned spots on the president’s and dean’s honor lists for the 2022 spring semester.

The students were enrolled at one or more CCC locations, which include the Columbus, Grand Island and Hastings campuses; Holdrege, Kearney and Lexington centers; and Ord Learning Center.

Students on the president’s honor list earned a perfect 4.0 grade point average while students on the dean’s honor list earned a GPA between 3.5 and 3.99.

The following area students were recognized:

President’s honor list

Linwood: Madisen Jelinek.

Morse Bluff: Katelyn Bayer.

Dean’s honor list

Linwood: Lesvia Marroquin.

Students earn degrees from SCC

Southeast Community College in Nebraska has released the names of students who graduated with degrees, diplomas or certificates following the 2022 spring term on the Beatrice, Lincoln and Milford campuses, as well as learning centers.

Zachary Keith Bode of Fremont received an Associate of Applied Science Degree in Diesel Technology-Truck.

Jeremy David Neill of Fremont earned an Associate of Applied Science in Electrical & Electromechanical Technology.

Nathan Christopher Wusk of Fremont graduated with distinction with an Associate of Applied Science in Ford Automotive Student Service Educational Training.

Endorf earns two bachelor degrees

More than 3,300 students graduated from the University of Mississippi in May 2022.

Undergraduate and graduate candidates received degrees from the College of Liberal Arts, General Studies and schools of Accountancy, Applied Sciences, Business Administration, Education, Engineering, Journalism and New Media, Law and Pharmacy.

Ella Endorf of North Bend majored in Public Policy Leadership and Integrated Marketing Communications and earned a Bachelor of Arts in Public Policy Leadership and Bachelor of Science in Integrated Marketing Communications from the College of Liberal Arts.

Students receive nursing pins

Associate degree nursing and practical nursing students were recognized during a special ceremony at Northeast Community College in Norfolk with the presentation of their nursing pins and diplomas. In addition, the tradition of nursing students receiving their pins from family members or a close friend who have helped them along their journey was part of the ceremony.

The nurse pinning observance is the culmination of the students’ initial journey of professional nursing education. It is a bridge from nursing’s past to nursing’s future and is a time-honored nursing school tradition. It also signifies the official initiation into the brotherhood and sisterhood of nurses.

Each nursing school, at every level of education, has its own unique pin which is worn on the nursing uniform. The nursing school pin that graduates of the Northeast Community College’s associate degree nursing (ADN) and practical nursing program receive is symbolic of nursing’s heritage and tradition.

Upon completion of the first two semesters of nursing studies at Northeast Community College, students are eligible to take the National Council of Licensure Examination (NCLEX-PN) to become licensed practical nurses. Students who hold a 3.0 GPA in their nursing courses are eligible to complete the last two semesters of the Northeast program and take the National Council of Licensure test (NCLEX-RN) to practice as licensed registered nurses.

Students who graduate with an ADN are eligible to continue their studies for a Bachelor of Science degree in Nursing. The general education courses for a Bachelor of Science in Nursing can be taken at Northeast Community College. The majority of the practical nursing students have chosen to continue in the associate degree nursing program at Northeast.

The following area students received their Practical Nursing pin and diploma.

Fremont: Oscar Garcia, Brittney Perina.

Oakland: Bradley Gillett.

West Point: Kelly Hansen, Allyson Plagge.

Creighton University graduates

Creighton University, a Jesuit university in the BIG EAST Conference, held its undergraduate commencement ceremony on Saturday, May 14, at the CHI Health Center in Omaha.

The following area students were awarded degrees:

Fremont: Gabrielle Keaton, Bachelor of Science in Business Administration, magna cum laude; James Kostal, Bachelor of Science in Physics, magna cum laude; Catherine Walker, Bachelor of Arts, Certificate in Business Administration, magna cum laude.

Wahoo: Mary Pockrandt, Bachelor of Science in Nursing, cum laude.

Waterloo: Mackenzie Carlson, Bachelor of Science in Business Administration, cum laude.

West Point: Kaitlyn Pilakowski, Bachelor of Science.

Peru State awards master’s degrees

At its latest commencement ceremony on May 7, Peru State College and its President, Dr. Michael Evans, granted master’s degrees to 82 individuals.

Peru State College offers two graduate programs – a Master of Science in Education – Curriculum and Instruction and a Master of Science in Organizational Management.

The following area students were awarded master’s degrees:

Fremont: Sadie Marie Jaline Brown, Master of Science in Education – Curriculum and Instruction; Samuel W. McCormick, Master of Science in Education – Curriculum and Instruction; Anna White, Master of Science in Education – Curriculum and Instruction;

Wahoo: Jessie Krien Belford, Master of Science in Organizational Management; Jacob Scheef, Master of Science in Education – Curriculum and Instruction;

Waterloo: Anna Claire Engelbert, Master of Science in Education – Curriculum and Instruction.

West Point: Paige Emma Faeth, Master of Science in Education – Curriculum and Instruction.

Franzluebbers earns doctorate degree

College of Saint Mary (CSM) presented degrees to 124 students during two spring commencement ceremonies May 14-15.

These graduates participated in the first spring commencement held on campus in nearly 40 years. The ceremony was held in the new Lied Fitness Center Fieldhouse. A graduate ceremony for master’s and doctoral students was held on May 14, while an undergraduate ceremony was May 15.

Elizabeth Franzluebbers of Dodge was presented with an Occupational Therapy Doctorate.

Drake University dean’s and president’s lists

Drake University has announced its dean’s and president’s lists for the spring 2022 semester.

Jack Wilmes of Fremont was named to the president’s list. To be eligible for the president’s list, students must have earned a perfect 4.0 GPA during the spring 2022 semester.

Rachel Kelsey of Washington, Nebraska, was named to the dean’s list. To be eligible for the dean’s list, students must have earned a GPA of 3.5 or higher during the spring 2022 semester.

Gruhn honored at recognition celebration

Buena Vista University recognized 52 students during its annual Senior Recognition Celebration this spring. This event honors students for their academic excellence, civic engagement, and leadership.

Katie Gruhn, a senior from Fremont, majoring in social work, was named Senior of the Year among social work majors at BVU.

Carnahan serving as honor society president

Tiffany Carnahan, a native of Fremont, is now serving as the president of the Doane University Circle (chapter) of Omicron Delta Kappa, the National Leadership Honor Society.

Students who serve as circle presidents are leaders amongst leaders. Members of ODK must be sophomores, juniors, seniors, or graduate/professional students in the top 35% of their class and embrace the society’s ideals. They also must demonstrate leadership experience in at least one of the five pillars of campus life celebrated by ODK: academics and research, athletics, service to campus and community, communications, and creative and performing arts. Fewer than 5% of students on a campus are invited to join each year.

Omicron Delta Kappa Society, the National Leadership Honor Society, was founded in Lexington, Virginia, on Dec. 3, 1914. A group of 15 students and faculty members established the society to recognize and encourage leadership at the collegiate level. The founders established the ODK Idea-the concept that individuals representing all phases of collegiate life should |collaborate with faculty and others to support the campus and community.

ODK’s mission is to honor and develop leaders; encourage collaboration among students, faculty, staff, and alumni; and promote ODK’s leadership values of collaboration, inclusivity, integrity, scholarship, and service on college and university campuses throughout North America. The society’s national headquarters are located in Lexington, Virginia.

Sat, 23 Jul 2022 02:50:00 -0500 en text/html https://fremonttribune.com/news/local/education/area-students-compete-at-skillsusa-national-leadership-conference/article_ee314291-48f7-5bc9-9a8c-48aa570fc666.html
Killexams : HESI Exams: An Overview of Reliability and Validity

Description of HESI Exams

HESI specialty exams were developed to assess students' knowledge and their ability to apply nursing concepts within specific content areas. Faculties often use scores provided by these specialty exams as a substitute for teacher-made final exams. The E2 was developed to assess students' preparedness for the licensing exam. Data provided by these exams can be useful in preparing self studies for accreditation that are required by accrediting agencies. The National League for Nursing Accrediting Commission (NLNAC)[2] and the Commission on Collegiate Nursing Education (CCNE)[3] require schools of nursing to demonstrate a systematic program evaluation. HESI Summary Reports provide content area scores that can be used to evaluate curricular strengths and weaknesses.[4] Because these exams provide interval-level data, the data can be analyzed using a variety of statistical methods. Since the E2 has demonstrated a high degree of accuracy in predicting outcomes of NCLEX-RN and NCLEX-PN,[4,5,6,7] nursing faculties are increasingly choosing to use E2 scores as benchmarks for progression and remediation.[8,9]

The conceptual framework used to develop HESI exams is grounded in classical test theory and critical thinking theory. The creation, administration, and interpretation of tests are accomplished through educational and psychological measurement processes. Crocker and Algina[10] stated that measurement of psychological attributes occurs when quantitative values are assigned to the demo of behaviors obtained from administering a test. By observing and classifying similar behaviors, the test designer is able to draw inferences about the psychological constructs that contribute to the makeup of the test taker. The test designer may also be able to identify relationships between psychological constructs and practical consequences, therefore predicting test-taking behaviors, such as success in academic programs or nursing practice. To make such predictions, the test designer must first quantify the observations representing the constructs that define these behaviors. The nurses who design and revise the nursing exams use course syllabi from nursing programs across the United States in combination with NCLEX test blueprints provided by the National Council of State Boards of Nursing (NCSBN)[11,12] to define the constructs indicative of behaviors required for entry-level practice. HESI item writers create test items for use on HESI exams that specifically measure these behaviors. Figure 1 describes the theoretical framework for development of HESI exams.

HESI conceptual framework for test development.

The method used by HESI for development of critical thinking test items[13,14] is based on concepts derived from the critical thinking theory described by Paul[15] and the cognitive taxonomy developed by Bloom.[16] Test items on all HESI exams are written and reviewed by nurse educators and clinicians who evaluate the merit of the items as current measures of nursing practice-specifically, the items that reflect high-priority and high-frequency activities characteristic of entry-level RN practice. All submitted test items are reviewed by HESI nurse educators and modified, as needed, by HESI editors. Each test item is categorized by numerous subject areas, and each subject area provides subset scores. All test items are stored in a database along with their particular item analysis data.

HESI specialty exams are available for RN curricula only. However, PN specialty exams are currently in the pilot stage. The specialty exams presented in this article describe only the eight most widely used RN specialty exams.

Specialty exams are designed to measure the student's ability to apply concepts related to specific clinical nursing content areas. Typically, specialty exams consist of 50 test items. Test blueprints for these exams are developed by HESI nurse educators whose clinical practice area is congruent with the test being developed. Test items that measure nursing knowledge and competencies within the specific clinical specialty area are selected from the HESI database.

Custom exams are specialty exams that are designed to meet specific curricular evaluation needs. Typically, custom specialty exams consist of 50 test items. Test blueprints for custom exams are developed by HESI nurse educators and include the content domain specified in the syllabus or syllabi that are provided to HESI by the faculty requesting the development of a custom exam. Test items that best measure nursing knowledge and competencies within the designated content area are selected from the HESI database. Custom exams are completed following consultation between faculty and HESI nurse educators to ensure that the final products are valid for the constructs to be tested.

Midcurricular exams are custom exams that evaluate content from several nursing courses. Typically, midcurricular exams consist of 100 test items. These exams are administered halfway through the curriculum, which makes them useful as exit exams at the conclusion of the first half of the curriculum. While it is impractical to cite reliability findings for every custom test that has been developed, the reliability of custom exams is determined in the same manner as it is for all other HESI exams.

The E2 is a 150-item comprehensive test that is designed for administration near the completion of the curriculum to measure student preparedness for the NCLEX-RN or NCLEX-PN. It is used to identify the strengths and weaknesses of the students and the possible need for remediation prior to taking the licensure exam. Four versions of the E2 are available for RN students, and two versions are available for PN students. RN students serve as the norming group for the test items that are included on the RN version of the E2, whereas PN students serve as the norming group for the PN version of the E2. Different versions of the E2 are often used to retest those students who require remediation so that the success of such remediation can be evaluated.

The HESI Predictability Model, a proprietary mathematical model, is used to calculate scores for HESI specialty exams and HESI exit exams. All scores provided by these HESI exams are based on the application of this model to the raw data. Test items are individually weighted based on their difficulty level, which is determined by dividing the number of correct responses to the item by the total number of responses to that item, thereby deriving a percentage of correct responses to the item. Each HESI specialty test and HESI exit test also provides a conversion score. This score is presented as a percentage that reflects the average weight of all the test items on an test and the average weight of the test items answered correctly. Therefore, this conversion score is a weighted percentage score that faculty can include as a part of the student's final course grade.

Crocker and Algina[10] identified the basic elements of an test within the framework of classical test theory as the observed score, the true (universe) score, and the error score (error of measurement). The relationship provided by these scores is described by the formula: observed score equals true score plus error score. Crocker and Algina[10] and Sax[17] asserted that the reduction of systematic and random error is critically important to ensure that obtained scores on tests closely represent the student's true score. All item analysis and reliability calculations regarding HESI exams are based upon this interpretation.

The item analysis data include each test item's difficulty level and discrimination data as expressed by the point biserial correlation coefficient as well as the number of times the test item has been used on an exam. These data are stored for the last administration of the test item as well as for all administrations of the test item (cumulative data). No test item is scored on any HESI test until it has been piloted and the item analysis data obtained on that item. HESI nurse educators review and revise test items based on the results of pilot testing. The parameters HESI uses to judge the quality of test items include a cumulative difficulty level of no less than 40% and a point biserial correlation coefficient of 0.15 or above. HESI exams that contain 50 test items include five pilot (nonscored) items, and exams that contain 75 or more test items include 10 pilot items.

Tue, 12 Jul 2022 12:00:00 -0500 en text/html https://www.medscape.com/viewarticle/484343_2
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