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Exam Code: MSC-331 Practice exam 2022 by Killexams.com team
Designing and Deploying Mobile Computing Solutions
IBM Designing answers
Killexams : IBM Designing answers - BingNews https://killexams.com/pass4sure/exam-detail/MSC-331 Search results Killexams : IBM Designing answers - BingNews https://killexams.com/pass4sure/exam-detail/MSC-331 https://killexams.com/exam_list/IBM Killexams : Meet the Woman Behind ‘AI for Her’

Ideas are crucial for spurring innovations in products and services. One such innovative leader is Heena Purohit, who plays a major role in providing teams with a framework for maturing their ideas into products for customers. 

Analytics India Magazine interacted with Purohit, head of product at IBM. She is the product lead at IBM’s internal incubator program, which enables IBMers to bring innovative ideas and solutions to the real world. Purohit founded ‘AI for Her’ — a 501(c)(3) non-profit organisation on a mission to bring more women and gender minorities into AI. By reducing the AI diversity gap, it helps to build AI systems that are fair and unbiased.

“A typical day for me involves working with various venture teams that deal with emerging technologies and advising them on their product strategy and execution. This includes tasks such as designing and helping teams execute experiments to ensure the venture would be a viable business for IBM, coaching teams on product thinking or, if needed, rolling up my sleeves and supporting the teams in building customer collateral, lead customer/user interviews, and support sales execution.”

Transforming ideas into products 

Purohit says that no two days are alike at work, especially since each venture team is different and is solving a unique customer problem in a distinct way. “And that’s the most fun part of my job!”

She says, “My program is open for IBMers around the world, providing an opportunity to surface and test the best ideas across IBM. This helps in facilitating a culture of innovation and intrapreneurship within the company, while helping IBM build and launch the next generation of products, faster.” She adds that for many teams submissions are ideas and technologies they’ve been working on for years. Being selected in the program finally gives them the opportunity to put their experiments to work and see if they’re actually viable.

Implementing AI in product management

In her initial years at IBM, Purohit built AI solutions for industrial customers driving the strategy, product management and design to help manufacturing clients. She holds an undergraduate degree in telecommunications engineering from the University of Mumbai, where she built solutions involving IoT data/sensors. She also holds a double-major MBA from the University of Notre Dame. “So during my MBA, I came across a brand-new business that IBM was launching (Watson IoT), I applied and was selected for a product management internship role in the unit.”

Purohit says, like many others, she fell into AI following her interests. “While IoT sensors were a disruptive way to get more data than ever, I felt gravitated towards the part where you analyse the data – from IoT sensors, or other structured and unstructured data – to unlock new insights. I was fascinated by how AI/ML technologies enabled us to do that in new ways.” 

She said her AI journey began during this period, where she had the opportunity to launch and scale vertical AI solutions for industrial customers. The experience gave insights into having a firsthand look at the opportunities and challenges that customers are facing in adopting AI across the company. Having worked with some of the most brilliant AI minds at the company, Purohit says that her passion for emerging AI technologies and solving key business problems only grew.

‘You don’t have to be a data scientist to understand or benefit from AI’

Having worked with several customers and mentees to help them adopt AI or get into AI roles, Purohit shares one of her biggest learnings, “You don’t have to be a data scientist to understand or benefit from AI. This is also freeing because as AI technologies get more and more accessible, it helps bring more diverse voices in AI discussions, getting them to help build an AI-powered future.”

More specifically to her experience working on emerging technologies, Heena says that this is a great time to build a product. “To get started, think about all the tasks you do in your personal and professional life. Identify the manual/repetitive/mundane tasks and think if AI can help you Boost that experience. If the answer is yes, try it out. It’s very likely that there’s a no-code AI tool out there for you to prototype this. This way, you’re not only dipping your toes in AI but also gaining the experience in using AI tools, so that you can then move on to solving bigger and better problems with AI.”

Purohit has been on a mission to make AI more accessible and help bring more people into the AI industry. She adds that this has manifested into the decisions made around which products to lead. Outside her current role at IBM, Purohit has spoken at over 20 events on the topic, and been published in over 15 books and articles. The tech leader has actively judged AI solutions at 6 hackathons. “The ‘AI for Her’ content on getting into AI and AI literacy has impacted over 12,000 students. And this feels like just the beginning.”

Find your tribe of cheerleaders and supporters

Purohit shares that across all channels, the biggest takeaways have come from the questions since they provide insight into the pain points that people are facing today. “These challenges often don’t pertain to the technical skills gap but around the mindset shift. And that’s why in most of the sessions I’ve delivered, we end up touching upon Topics such as imposter syndrome, knowing your worth, and finding your tribe of cheerleaders and supporters,” she said.

She credits IBM for providing an incredible network of mentors that inspired and gave her opportunities to grow. “Perfect segway from the mindset shift because I faced that as I moved up in my career trajectory, too. It’s important to acknowledge that one doesn’t get to where they are without the help of others. I’m grateful for the support I’ve received, and it’s also why I feel passionately about paying it forward.”

Purohit was recognised as one of the Top 11 ‘Women AI Leaders’ at RISE 2020 and Datatech Vibe’s 2021 ‘Top Women Leaders In AI To Watch’. She was awarded the University’s Alumni Award in 2019 for her impact on women in technology initiatives. “I feel incredibly thankful for both recognitions and am honoured to be mentioned alongside many of the women I admire. I want to talk about how this happened. At the start of the pandemic, when everyone was in strict lockdown, I missed my break room conversations where I’d catch up with my colleagues and geek out on AI. I raised this on one of my favourite Women in Tech Facebook groups and turns out, many other women missed this, too.”

Purohit says that this led to the establishment of ‘AI for Her’. “This gave me the confidence to take this further and we’re now a 501c3 nonprofit on a mission to reduce the gender gap in the AI industry today and amplify the message that everyone can get into AI. We’ve been brewing some even more exciting things this year and looking forward to the launch!”

Take Five

1.    Favourite thing in the ML/AI industry today & why? I’m incredibly excited about foundation models. Having tested various foundation models, I can attest that not only are they better than anything else I’ve used, but also they’re equally flawed. So, while I know we have a way to go before foundation models become usable, I’m excited by how they could transform many areas of our lives today

2.    Top three apps you frequently use: YouTube, Elevate, and Reddit

3.    Favourite book on AI: Weapons of Math Destruction 

4.    Favourite podcast in AI and ML: I prefer non-AI podcasts to bring in more diversity to my day-to-day life. I love Exponent (Ben Thomson’s podcast on tech business analysis) and Acquired (Great storytelling and startup analysis)

5.    What would you have been doing if you weren’t a Product Head? I would certainly still be in tech. But as a consultant or a Product Owner

6.    How do you define your leadership style? I strive to lead with empathy. Since the pandemic, this has become more important to me than ever  

Thu, 13 Oct 2022 23:40:00 -0500 en-US text/html https://analyticsindiamag.com/meet-the-woman-behind-ai-for-her/
Killexams : IBM Expands Partner Access To Training Resources

Channel programs News

Wade Tyler Millward

“We can‘t be essential unless our partners are skilled in our products and confident in going to their clients with our products and selling them with us and for IBM,” IBM channel chief Kate Woolley said.

 ARTICLE TITLE HERE

IBM has started giving registered members of its PartnerWorld program access to the training, badges and enablement IBM sales employees get along with a new learning hub for accessing materials.

The expansion is part of the Armonk, N.Y.-based tech giant’s investment in its partner program, IBM channel chief Kate Woolley told CRN in an interview.

“We can‘t be essential unless our partners are skilled in our products and confident in going to their clients with our products and selling them with us and for IBM,” said Woolley (pictured), general manager of the IBM ecosystem.

[RELATED: Channel Chief Kate Woolley: ‘No Better Time To Be An IBM Partner’]

Partners now have access to sales and technical badges showing industry expertise, according to a blog post Tuesday. Badges are shareable on LinkedIn and other professional social platforms. IBM sales representatives and partners will receive new content at the same time as it becomes available.

“This is the next step in that journey in terms of making sure that all of our registered partners have access to all of the same training, all of the same enablement materials as IBMers,” Woolley told CRN. “That’s the big message that we want people to hear. And then also in line with continuing to make it easier to do business with IBM, this has all been done through a much improved digital experience in terms of how our partners are able to access and consume.”

Among the materials available to IBM partners are scripts for sales demonstrations, templates for sales presentations and positioning offerings compared to competitors, white papers, analyst reports and solution briefs. Skilling and enablement materials are available through a new learning hub IBM has launched.

“The partners are telling us they want more expertise on their teams in terms of the IBM products that they‘re able to sell and how equipped they are to sell them,” Woolley said. “And as we look at what we’re hearing from clients as well, clients want that. … Our clients are saying, ‘We want more technical expertise. We want more experiential selling. We want IBM’ – and that means the IBM ecosystem as well – ‘to have all of that expertise and to have access to all the right enablement material to be able to engage with us as clients.’”

The company has doubled the number of brand-specialized partner sellers in the ecosystem and increased the number of technical partner sellers by more than 35 percent, according to IBM.

The company’s recent program changes have led to improved deal registration and introduced to partners more than 7,000 potential deals valued at more than $500 million globally, according to IBM. Those numbers are based on IBM sales data from January 2022 to August.

Along with the expanded access to training and enablement resources, Woolley told CRN that another example of aligning the IBM sales force and partners was a single sales kickoff event for employees and partners. A year ago, two separate events were held.

“I want our partners to continue to feel and see this as a big investment in them and representative of how focused we are on the ecosystem and how invested we are,” she said.

Wade Tyler Millward

Wade Tyler Millward is an associate editor covering cloud computing and the channel partner programs of Microsoft, IBM, Red Hat, Oracle, Salesforce, Citrix and other cloud vendors. He can be reached at wmillward@thechannelcompany.com.

Tue, 04 Oct 2022 07:15:00 -0500 en text/html https://www.crn.com/news/channel-programs/ibm-expands-partner-access-to-training-resources
Killexams : International Business Machines Corp

52 week range

114.56 - 144.73

  • Open0.00
  • Day High0.00
  • Day Low0.00
  • Prev Close120.04
  • 52 Week High144.73
  • 52 Week High Date06/06/22
  • 52 Week Low114.56
  • 52 Week Low Date11/26/21
  • Market Cap108.418B
  • Shares Out903.18M
  • 10 Day Average Volume4.62M
  • Dividend6.60
  • Dividend Yield5.50%
  • Beta0.83
  • YTD % Change-10.19

KEY STATS

  • Open0.00
  • Day High0.00
  • Day Low0.00
  • Prev Close120.04
  • 52 Week High144.73
  • 52 Week High Date06/06/22
  • 52 Week Low114.56
  • 52 Week Low Date11/26/21
  • Market Cap108.418B
  • Shares Out903.18M
  • 10 Day Average Volume4.62M
  • Dividend6.60
  • Dividend Yield5.50%
  • Beta0.83
  • YTD % Change-10.19

RATIOS/PROFITABILITY

  • EPS (TTM)6.42
  • P/E (TTM)18.69
  • Fwd P/E (NTM)12.31
  • EBITDA (TTM)11.935B
  • ROE (TTM)27.73%
  • Revenue (TTM)59.677B
  • Gross Margin (TTM)54.01%
  • Net Margin (TTM)9.61%
  • Debt To Equity (MRQ)259.21%

EVENTS

  • Earnings Date10/19/2022
  • Ex Div Date08/09/2022
  • Div Amount1.65
  • Split Date-
  • Split Factor-

Thu, 13 Oct 2022 11:59:00 -0500 en text/html https://www.cnbc.com/quotes/IBM
Killexams : IBM Acquires Dialexa

IBM (NYSE:IBM) acquired Dialexa, a Dallas TX and Chicago, IL-based digital product engineering services firm.

The amount of the deal was not disclosed. The transaction is expected to close in the fourth quarter of this year and is subject to customary closing conditions and regulatory clearances.

The acquisition is expected to enhance IBM’s product engineering expertise and provide end-to-end digital transformation services for clients. Upon close, Dialexa will join IBM Consulting, strengthening IBM’s digital product engineering services presence in the Americas.

Founded in 2010 and led by CEO Scott Harper, Dialexa delivers a suite of digital product engineering services, enabling organizations to create new products to drive business outcomes. The company has deep experience delivering end-to-end digital product engineering services consisting of strategy, design, build, launch, and optimization services across cloud platforms including AWS and Microsoft Azure. Its team of 300 product managers, designers, full-stack engineers and data scientists, based in Dallas and Chicago, advise and create custom, commercial-grade digital products for clients such as Deere & Company, Pizza Hut US, and Toyota Motor North America.

FinSMEs

26/09/2022

Mon, 26 Sep 2022 15:12:00 -0500 FinSMEs en-US text/html https://www.finsmes.com/2022/09/ibm-acquires-dialexa.html
Killexams : Is a Rochester legend about a wartime friendship and IBM accurate?

Dear Brainiac,

I have a question about why IBM chose to build an $8 million campus in 1956 in Rochester, which had a population of about 30,000 people. The late state lawmaker David Bishop wrote an article in 2011 that said it was the wartime friendship between the IBM CEO and a Rochester pilot that spurred Big Blue to choose the Med City over Madison, Wisconsin.

That sounds like a local legend. Is there proof that a friendship brought a major Fortune 500 company and thousands of jobs to Rochester?

Looking for Big Blue’s clues

Dear clueless,

I have heard many versions of the tale of why IBM chose Rochester. Personally, I think the version that Dave Bishop wrote is my favorite. It is a fantastic story of friendship transforming a community.

Unfortunately, it might not be completely accurate.

Here's the basic background. Thomas Watson, Jr., the son of IBM founder and future CEO, was a pilot in World War II. He flew missions with Leland (Lee) Fiegel of Rochester who was also a pilot. In 1942, they flew to Moscow for a secret mission, which later resulted in Fiegel being awarded the Distinguished Flying Cross medal for "meritorious achievement.”

IBM 1958 pb.jpg
The former IBM campus in Rochester, seen here in an aerial view in 1958, was designed by famed architect Eero Saarinen. (Contributed photo from the History Center of Olmsted County)

Post Bulletin file photo

I reached out to IBM to see if there was ever a recorded instance of Watson saying his connection to Fiegel drove the decision to build in Rochester.

“We have not been able to confirm this story. Yes, Thomas Watson, Jr. and Leland (Lee) Fiegel did fly on bomber missions during the war. And yes, Watson maintained a relationship with the Fiegel family following Lee’s death. However, we have not uncovered any corroboration to support the family’s assertion that Watson chose Rochester as an homage to his war buddy,” according to a response by IBM’s Lorie Luedke.

IBM historians went on to flesh out what is documented about the decision to build in Rochester.

“At the time of the announcement in 1956, the health and vibrancy of the city’s civic institutions were cited by IBM as the official reason. Decades later, in a 1989 speech at the Mayo Clinic, Watson, Jr. singled out the hospital as the chief reason,” wrote IBM’s archivist.

In that 1989 speech, Watson is quoted as saying, “When it became time to build an IBM plant out in that general area of the country, and nobody around the table had any particular idea where to go in that circle that included Lone Rock and some of your other interesting towns, I spoke up for the Mayo Clinic which accounts for the IBM plant being in that area today.”

A 1958 Post Bulletin article mentioned another reason: “Reporters were interested in why a Midwest site was chosen for this plant and how Rochester was picked. Watson explained that the company realized that it was awkward and dangerous for the customers of IBM to have its production concentrated in the East, so the executive plotted on a map the center of 12 Midwest states and swung a pencil in a radius 200 miles, which included Rochester, and then had an independent survey firm investigate about 80 cities for a possible site,” reads a Sept. 30, 1958 Post Bulletin article.

23cf851f573f1e1037639923b3c463e1.jpg
Interior. IBM Manufacturing and Administrative Center in Rochester. 1956-58.

Contributed

Later in the article, Watson explained, “We thought Rochester wanted an industry and it seemed the sort of place where our people could find more than the average intellectual challenge. We thought it was a very logical place to build a plant.”

Bishop’s account states that Fiegel, who was based in Washington, D.C., as a U.S. Army flight trainer, flew to New York in 1948 to meet with Watson. The return to Washington proved to be the last flight for Fiegel, who survived so many battles in World War II.

Fiegel’s plane crashed in Maryland killing him and two others. Newspaper articles in 1948 quote witnesses as saying an engine fell off the plane and it “disintegrated.”

The tragic death of his friend did come up when IBM announced the plans to build in Rochester. “Watson said that he was delighted his firm had decided on the site here (Rochester) because of his association with the Fiegel family,” reported a Sept. 27, 1958, Post Bulletin article.

The bottom line is that neither the archivists at IBM and Mayo Clinic nor the Rochester Public Library’s amazing reference librarian Susan Hansen or even the Answer Man's crack investigative team could find definitive proof that the Watson/Fiegel friendship brought IBM to Rochester.

It's still a good story.

Send questions to Answer Man at answerman@postbulletin.com .

Mon, 26 Sep 2022 01:14:00 -0500 en text/html https://www.postbulletin.com/news/local/is-a-rochester-legend-about-a-wartime-friendship-and-ibm-accurate Killexams : IBM: The Most Innovative and Prizewinning Tech Company

Founded in 1911 as a Computing-Tabulating-Recording Company, International Business Machines (IBM) needs to keep its finger on the pulse of the development of information technology not to be ousted by younger tech giants like Google, Microsoft, Apple, and Amazon. With the advent of the internet, IBM needed to widen the spectrum of its products and services to retain its strong position in the tech field. Although the company lost its dominance, having only a 5% market share in 2021, as opposed to 68% shared by Microsoft, Amazon, and Google, it has many spectacular achievements to its credit. IBM holds more patents than any other technology company and takes pride in employees who have earned five Nobel Prizes, four Turing Awards, five National Medals of Technology, and five National Medals of Science. And it had been the top tech company for longer than any of the titans dominating the market now. 

Also called “Big Blue,” IBM indeed has an impressive pedigree. After starting to produce hardware at the beginning of the last century, it thrived in this business for decades and became the leading provider of mainframe computers worldwide. IBM’s gross income had inexorably grown in the last part of the twentieth century, expanding from $14.450 billion earned in 1975 to $71.940 billion made in 1995. The company’s revenue skyrocketed to the record level of $106.9 billion in 2011, after which it has steadily been declining amidst its transition into new technologies and lines of business. To move with the times and survive the competition from other tech titans, IBM gradually shifted its focus from hardware to software and services. It began to devote more energy and money to cloud-based services and cognitive computing. IBM focuses now on offering primarily network services, application services, cloud services, digital workplace services, business processes and operations, technology consulting services, and AI services. IBM Watson, a cognitive system capable of answering questions posed in natural language, has become the company’s high-visibility offering in the technology field. IBM has a strong faith in Watson, promoting the system as a benevolent digital assistant that would help hospitals, offices, factories, and farms. The company’s white paper referred to Watson as “the future of knowing.”

To see how well IBM has prepared for, what it calls, the new age of understanding, study the statistical data presented below.

Sources: IBM, Wikipedia

 IBM’s Outstanding Achievements

  • In 1891, IBM, then called CTR, invented the computing scale that could show both the weight and the proportionate price of the product simultaneously.
  • In 1888, the company invented the Time Clock, a device that records start and end times for hourly employees. Then, it designed the punch card base data processing machines. IBM is also responsible for inventing the magnetic stripe technology and the Universal Product Code.
  • IBM designed and developed the first smartphone in the world, launching it in November 1992. Designed by IBM and manufactured by Mitsubishi Electric, the device had a touchscreen, a calculator app, email capability, 2 MB RAM, and 2 MB internal storage. There were about 50,000 of these smartphones sold for $899 a unit.
  • IBM also revolutionized the computer industry, inventing DRAM, floppy disk, SQL programming language, ATMs, and hard disk drives.
  • IBM also invented the first personal computer, known as the IBM PC. It was launched in August 1981 and acquired by many companies before PCs were commercialized.
  • Since 1920, IBM has received 151,302 US patents. In 2019, the company received a staggering amount of 9,262 US patents. A year later, IBM beat the record of most US patents received by a business for 27 consecutive years. In 2021, IBM had 1,811 patents granted, while this year it has so far received 492 patents.
  • IBM has long worked with NASA. Although IBM contributed to many missions, the most memorable is landing on the Moon in 1969. IBM’s responsibility was to develop the software and various programs, build computers, and streamline the mission for NASA.
  • One of the fascinating inventions of IBM is the Scanning Tunnelling Microscope developed in 1981 for imaging at the atomic level. Gerd Binnig and Heinrich Rohrer received the Noble Prize in Physics in 1986 for the invention. 
  • IBM developed several chess computers, the most popular of which is Deep Blue. In 1996, Deep Blue beat the chess world champion, Garry Kasparov, who accused IBM of cheating. IBM declined Kasparov’s offer of a rematch. 
  • IBM invented the ASME (The Anatomic and Symbolic Mapper Engine) that offers a 3D interactive avatar of the human body to doctors in real-time, helping them visualize patients’ medical records.
  • Big Blue made LASIK eye surgery mainstream.
  • The company invented the IBM 2990 Blood Cell Separator, designed to harvest white blood cells from blood donors to support patients with leukemia. Later, IBM engineers improved the device, introducing its more sophisticated version, IBM 2997.
  • IBM offers the IBM LinuxONE for cloud computing solutions. This powerful computer system can manage the work of 1000×86 servers simultaneously on a single platform.  

IBM Statistics in 2022

  • Over 90% of credit card transactions are processed by IBM mainframes.
  • About 80% of global retailers use IBM retail solutions in their stores and for online sales.
  • Over 80% of travel reservations are processed through an IBM product.
  • Nearly 97% of banks worldwide use IBM products.
  • There are 245,000 IBM employees worldwide in 2022.
  • IBM employees live in 170 countries.
  • There are 130,000 IBM employees in India.
  • 3,000 researchers are working in IBM’s fifteen laboratories around the world.
  • During the pandemic, between 2020 and 2021, IBM reduced the number of its employees by around 0.24%.
  • Over 29% of IBM managers are women.
  • There are an average of 108 applications per available job position at the company. 
  • Every day, IBM handles 70 billion security events.
  • Every second, it manages 8.18 million security events.
  • Over 27.3 million people use the IBM website every month.
  • The IBM website has a bounce rate of 52.66%.
  • In 2020, IBM’s earnings hit about $73 billion.
  • In 2021, its global revenue diminished by 22%.
  • Almost half of IBM’s revenue is generated in the North American market.
  • IBM bought Red Hat for $33.4 billion.
  • Cognos was purchased by IBM for $4.9 billion in 2008.
  • Big Blue acquired SoftLayer Technologies in 2013 reportedly for $2 billion.
  • To date, IBM has acquired more than 183 companies.

Facts about IBM’s Incumbent CEO, Arvind Krishna

  • Arvind Krishna became IBM’s CEO in 2020, arriving with the mission to reverse the company’s decline. He is expected to create a new line of business that would rediscover IBM’s former glory.
  • Before becoming the company’s CEO, Krishna worked as the Senior Vice President for IBM’s cloud and cognitive software. He developed IBM’s security software business.
  • Krishna was the general manager of IBM Systems and Technology Group’s development and manufacturing organization. He also managed IBM’s acquisition of Red Hat and supervised its synergy with IBM.
  • Krishna is the co-author of 15 patents and has been the editor of IEEE and ACM journals. He has received distinguished alumni awards from IITK and the University of Illinois, where he completed his PhD. His scholarly articles appear in numerous journals.
  • Krishna leads the IBM business unit that provides the cloud and data platform. His responsibilities include IBM Research, IBM Cloud, and IBM’s security and Cognitive Application business.
  • Krishna guides IBM’s overall strategy in core and emerging technologies including AI, quantum computing, blockchain, cloud platform services, data-driven solutions, and nanotechnology.
  • IBM Chairman and CEO Arvind Krishna was paid $17.5 million for 2021, up from $17 million paid in the year before, according to IBM’s 2022 Notice of Annual General Meeting and Proxy Statement.
  • In 2021, IBM’s board approved an annual incentive payment of $2.9 million to Krishna for the 2021 performance, which was 98% of the target.
  • The estimated net worth of Arvind Krishna was about $27.4 million in June 2022. He also owns over 21,803 units of International Business Machines stock worth over $23,629,581.

Source: Fortune

IBM’s Annual Revenue since 2000

Once an unparalleled tech giant, IBM has been struggling for the last decade. It had to adjust to the changing world by selling its low-margin businesses and investing in high-margin ones. To implement its strategies, Big Blue sold IBM WebSphere Commerce to HCL Technologies in 2018 and a part of the Watson Health business at the beginning of this year. Although IBM’s earnings are still high, they do not reach the levels hit between 2006 and 2012. The company’s annual revenue skyrocketed to $106.9 billion in 2011, whereas it was only $57 billion last year. In the second quarter of 2022, IBM’s earnings dropped below expectations. IBM’s falling fortune is reflected in the table below:

IBM’s Annual Revenue since 2000 (in $US Billion)

Year Annual Revenue (in $US Billion)
2000 $88.4
2001 $83.07
2002 $81.19
2003 $89.13
2004 $96.29
2005 $91.13
2006 $91.42
2007 $98.79
2008 $103.63
2009 $95.76
2010 $99.87
2011 $106.92
2012 $104.51
2013 $99.75
2014 $92.8
2015 $81.74
2016 $79.92
2017 $79.14
2018 $79.59
2019 $57.71
2020 $55.18
2021 $57.35
2022 (Q1; Q2) $14.2 billion; $15.5 billion

Source: Statista; IBM

IBM’s Annual Revenue by Segment for 2020-2021

Big Blue has repeatedly changed the segment reporting to reflect its move away from being hardware, software, and service company towards becoming a cognitive solutions and cloud platform company. It changed its segment reporting in 2016, 2019, and 2021. The last change was dictated by IBM’s need to align its segment reporting with its platform-centric approach to hybrid cloud and AI. There are presently six segments in IBM’s business: Technology Services and Cloud Platforms, Infrastructure, Software, Consulting, Financing, and Other. In 2021, IBM’s software segment generated $24.14 billion of its global revenue of $57.35 billion. In 2022 so far, the Software division earned $5.77 billion and $6.2 billion, in the first and second quarters, respectively. The Consulting sector brought the company $4.83 billion in Q1 and $4.8 billion in Q2 of the current year. The revenue earned by the Infrastructure segment amounted to $3.22 billion in the first quarter and $4.0 billion in the second quarter. Revenues generated by IBM’s segments in the last two years are shown in the table below:

IBM’s Annual Revenue by Segment for 2020-2021 (in $US billion)

Segment 2020 2021
Software $22.93 $24.14
Consulting $16.26 $17.84
Infrastructure $14.53 $14.19
Financing $0.98 $0.77
Technology Services and Cloud $25.00 $28.00
Other  $0.49 $0.41

Source: Statista

Worldwide Market Share of Cloud Infrastructure Providers in Q2 2022

In the second quarter of 2022, IBM’s Cloud Infrastructure had only a 4% share of the worldwide market, lagging behind Amazon, Azure, and Google Cloud. The spending on global cloud infrastructure services soared to $55 billion and thus brought the industry’s total for the twelve months to more than $203.5 billion. Outshining IBM, Amazon and Microsoft together accounted for more than half of cloud infrastructure revenues in the three months that ended on June 30.

These figures show how much Big Blue fell from grace because, in the past, it used to enjoy the leading position. In 2017, IBM reported cloud revenue growth of 33% year-over-year in its first quarter earnings. In that quarter, its cloud revenue jumped to $3.5 billion. IBM’s total cloud revenue over the past 12 months that year hit $41.6 billion and catapulted IBM to the top of the list in the field of enterprise cloud.  In the first quarter of 2017, today’s winners were obliged only to trail behind with lower earnings: Microsoft with $14 billion, Amazon with $12.20 billion, and Google with $10 billion. The latest market share of the main providers of cloud infrastructure can be seen in the table below:

Worldwide Market Share of Cloud Infrastructure Providers in Q2 2022

Company Market Share
AWS 34%
Azure 21%
Google Cloud 10%
Alibaba Cloud 5%
IBM Cloud 4%
Salesforce 3%
Tencent Cloud 3%
Oracle Cloud 2%

Sources: Statista, IBM

IBM’s Annual Net Income since 2009

Net income is defined as a company’s net profit or loss after it has accounted for all its revenues, income items, and expenses. IBM’s net income for the quarter ending on June 30, 2022, was $1.292 billion, which constituted a 5.06% jump year-over-year. The company’s net profit for the 12 months ending on June 30, 2022, was $5.588 billion, demonstrating an increase of 4.76% year-over-year. Last year, IBM’s annual net income reached $5.743 billion, a 2.74% surge from 2020. The first year of the pandemic brought IBM a net income of $5.59 billion, which was a whopping 40.73% drop from 2019. In 2019, IBM’s annual net profit was $9.431 billion, an 8.05% advance from 2018. The uneven trajectory of IBM’s annual net income is drawn in the table below:

IBM’s Annual Net Income since 2009 (in $US Billion)

Year Net Income in $US Billion
2009 $13.425
2010 $14.833
2011 $15.855
2012 $16.604
2013 $16.483
2014 $12.022
2015 $13.190
2016 $11.872
2017 $5.753
2018 $8.728
2019 $9.431
2020 -$5.590
2021 $5.743

IBM’s Number of Employees Worldwide from 2000 to 2022

IBM is the fifth largest employer in the United States. In 2021, the company employed 282,000 people worldwide. This year, the number of people working for Big Blue dipped to 245,000. As the company has lately been struggling, experiencing drops in its revenues, it is trying to restructure its business and be on par with such tech giants as Amazon, Microsoft, Google, and Apple. Hence the decline in the number of its employees this year. The table below shows how the number of IBM’s employees has changed over the years:

IBM’s Number of Employees Worldwide from 2000 to 2022 (in 1,000s) 

Year Number of Employees (in 1,000s)
2000 316.3
2001 319.88
2002 315.89
2003 319.27
2004 329
2005 329.37
2006 355.77
2007 386.56
2008 398.46
2009 399.41
2010 426.75
2011 433.36
2012 434.25
2013 431.21
2014 379.59
2015 377.76
2016 380.3
2017 366.6
2018 350.6
2019 352.6
2020 345.9
2021 282.1
2022 245

Source: Statista

Conclusion

As the world is facing a probable recession, analysts believe that the enterprise tech sector will still continue going strong. People who are tech-savvy will turn to IBM in these unpleasant times to help them survive in a tighter economic environment and use the company’s software, consulting, and infrastructure to work productively during an economic decline. Big Blue can definitely provide the products and services people will need in the near future. IBM’s Q2 2022 results signify that technology spending in such spheres as AI, cloud, automation and networking is steady. The company beat anticipated results in the second quarter and boasted its first double-digit quarterly revenue growth in more than a decade. Automatic calculations conducted at Coinpriceforecast.com inspire faith in the company’s future and the cost of its stock. At the beginning of the year, IBM’s stock price was $116.92. At the time of writing, IBM is trading at $118.81, thus demonstrating a 2% jump from January 2022. Coinpriceforecast.com foresees that by Christmas, IBM will surge to $138. In the first half of 2023, the price of the stock might advance to $145 and end the next year at $155, adding 30% to today’s price. Whether or not these predictions prove to be correct, IBM will surely continue pushing technology and innovation forward, as it has spectacularly done since the beginning of the twentieth century.

Mon, 10 Oct 2022 00:38:00 -0500 Daniel Shvartsman en-US text/html https://www.investing.com/academy/statistics/ibm-facts/
Killexams : Biden: IBM investment to help in tech competition with China

POUGHKEEPSIE, N.Y. (AP) — President Joe Biden predicted Thursday a $20 billion investment by IBM in New York's Hudson River Valley will help give the United States a technological edge against China, hailing the expansion during an appearance with two House Democrats in competitive races in next month's critical elections.

The president cited IBM's commitment as part of a larger manufacturing boom, spurred by this summer's passage of a $280 billion measure intended to boost the semiconductor industry and scientific research. That legislation was needed for national and economic security, Biden said in Poughkeepsie, adding that “the Chinese Communist Party actively lobbied against” it.

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“The United States has to lead the world of producing these advanced chips — this law is going to make sure that it will,” Biden said.

The speech was part of a whirlwind trip that focused heavily on campaigning and included two fundraising events. During one, he warned that Russian President Vladimir Putin's threat about using nuclear weapons as his Ukrainian invasion has floundered is the most severe “threat of Armageddon” since Cuban Missile Crisis in 1962.

Democratic candidates have largely avoided election-year appearances with Biden, whose approval ratings remain underwater. Bucking that trend in New York were Reps. Sean Patrick Maloney and Pat Ryan, who attended the president's remarks at IBM.

The lawmakers, along with Democratic Gov. Kathy Hochul, greeted Biden upon his arrival at Stewart Air National Guard Base.

“When I heard @POTUS was looking to see the benefits of the CHIPS & Science Act first-hand, I told him that the Hudson Valley was the perfect place,” Maloney wrote Wednesday on Twitter. “I’m thrilled to host him in Poughkeepsie this week to celebrate the major wins and good-paying jobs we are delivering here in NY.”

The CHIPS and Science Act, which Biden signed in August, was a rare bill for which the president was able to win bipartisan support.

IBM's $20 billion investment over the next decade is intended to bolster research and development and the manufacture of semiconductors, mainframe technology, artificial intelligence and quantum computing.

“As we tackle large-scale technological challenges in climate, energy, transportation and more, we must continue to invest in innovation and discovery — because advanced technologies are key to solving these problems and driving economic prosperity, including better jobs, for millions of Americans," said Arvind Krishna, IBM's chairman and CEO.

IBM's commitment comes on the heels of chipmaker Micron announcing this week an investment of up to $100 billion over the next 20-plus years to build a plant in upstate New York that could create 9,000 factory jobs. In his remarks, Biden also celebrated Intel's plant groundbreaking in Ohio and an investment by WolfSpeed for chip production in North Carolina.

Maloney, chairman of the Democratic congressional campaign fundraising arm, is running against Republican state Assemblyman Mike Lawler in the 17th Congressional District. Ryan faces state Assemblyman Colin Schmitt in the 18th District.

The boundaries of most New York districts, including Maloney's and Ryan’s, have been affected by redistricting.

Ryan in August won a close special election to serve out the term of Democrat Antonio Delgado, who vacated his 19th District seat after he was appointed lieutenant governor by Hochul. Ryan is running for a full term in the 18th District, where he lives.

Maloney, who had represented that district since 2013, decided to run in the 17th District. His Hudson Valley home fell inside the new boundaries after redistricting.

Hochul, who took office last year after Democrat Andrew Cuomo resigned amid sexual harassment allegations, is looking to win a full term as governor. Her opponent is Republican Rep. Lee Zeldin.

Later Thursday, Biden spoke out against Republicans at a fundraiser at the home of New Jersey Gov. Phil Murphy in support of the Democratic National Committee. The president has warned that followers of former President Donald Trump who deny the results of the 2020 presidential election are a threat to U.S. democracy, labeling them through Trump's slogan of “Make America Great Again.”

“Not all Republicans are MAGA Republicans," he said, but a “good 35% are Trumpites."

In the evening, Biden attended a Democratic Senatorial Campaign Committee fundraiser in Manhattan hosted by James Murdoch, the son of News Corp. publisher Rupert Murdoch. He warned about Putin hinting in a speech last month about deploying Russia's nuclear arsenal, a possible response to the recent loss of territory to Ukrainian forces.

“We have not faced the prospect of Armageddon since Kennedy and the Cuban Missile Crisis,” Biden said.

James Murdoch and his wife, Kathryn, a climate change activist, were major donors to Biden’s 2020 presidential campaign. In 2020, Murdoch resigned from the board of News Corp. amid differences over editorial content at his father's company, which operates The Wall Street Journal and the New York Post. The elder Murdoch is also chairman of Fox Corp., which includes Fox News Channel.

While Biden has been kept at arms length by many Democratic candidates, he's been a prodigious fundraiser for his party this election cycle, raising more than $19.6 million for the Democratic National Committee.

Associated Press writers Michelle L. Price in New York City and Michael Catalini in Trenton, New Jersey, contributed to this report.

Copyright 2022 The Associated Press. All rights reserved. This material may not be published, broadcast, rewritten or redistributed without permission.

Thu, 06 Oct 2022 07:24:00 -0500 en text/html https://buffalonews.com/news/science/biden-ibm-investment-to-help-in-tech-competition-with-china/article_8c84d18a-4904-53c4-88e3-edf89c6ccd6c.html
Killexams : IBM Assimilates Red Hat Storage Technology Into Own Storage Business

Storage News

Joseph F. Kovar

IBM, which three years ago acquired Red Hat, is now moving Red Hat OpenShift Data Foundation and Red Hat Ceph, along with their development teams, into IBM Storage as part of a move to make a bigger play in the software-defined and open-source storage worlds.

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IBM Tuesday said it has absorbed storage technology and teams from its Red Hat business to combine them with IBM’s own storage business unit as a way to help clients take advantage of the two without requiring extra integration or having to deal with multiple sales teams.

IBM is integrating Red Hat OpenShift Data Foundation with its IBM Spectrum Fusion and will offer Red Hat Ceph-based storage technologies to its clients in a move to continue Big Blue’s software-defined storage leadership, said Brent Compton, senior director of Data Foundation for Red Hat’s hybrid cloud business.

For IBM, which in mid-2019 acquired Red Hat in a $34-billion deal, the move ensures maximum support for Red Hat OpenShift Data Foundation and Ceph, Compton told CRN.

[Related: 2022 Storage 100: Who’s Got Your Backup?]

“OpenShift Data Foundation and Ceph will become a big part of IBM Storage,” he said. “IBM has been looking for a way to take advantage of Ceph and ODF, and now it can.”

Ceph is an open-source software-defined object storage technology with interfaces for object, block and file storage. Red Hat OpenShift Data Foundation is a software-defined container-native storage that provides cluster data management capabilities as part of the OpenShift container platform.

Scott Baker, chief marketing officer and vice president of IBM hybrid cloud portfolio and product marketing, told CRN the move to combine Red Hat and IBM storage technologies sets the stage for growth in the combined software-defined storage portfolio.

“Customers not only get a choice of where storage runs—at the edge, in the cloud, or on-prem—but will find storage software releases will no longer be tied to the timing of storage hardware releases,” Baker said. “For instance, IBM normally enhances its Spectrum Virtualize or Spectrum Scale with new versions of the IBM FlashSystem. But with software-defined storage, we can drive changes quicker if they’re not tied to hardware releases.”

By bringing Red Hat OpenShift Data Foundation and Ceph into IBM, customers get the opportunity to access unified block, file, and object storage without regard to the actual underlying hardware, Baker said.

“They can use Ceph to add the right type of storage depending on the protocol they need,” he said. “Ceph and ODF also simplifies how IBM provides data storage and protection. To do all that with IBM’s storage portfolio takes time. With CEF and ODF as part of IBM Storage, this can get done immediately.”

It really is the best of both worlds, as Red Hat customers will also see strong benefits from IBM Storage, Compton said.

“It’s important to note that IBM will continue to offer OpenShift Data Foundation inside the Red Hat OpenShift Platform Plus hybrid cloud platform,” he said. “So if a customer gets pre-integrated OpenShift Data Foundation inside Red Hat OpenShift Platform Plus, it accelerates their time to market. There’s no need to integrate the storage. This will not change.”

Also, Red Hat OpenShift customers have used Ceph to accelerate their time to scale for years, and Red Hat will continue to sell Ceph, Compton said.

“But by moving Ceph to IBM Storage, IBM will accelerate development of the storage-specific features,” he said. “Red Hat is not a storage company. So this will accelerate development of unified capabilities.”

IBM’s storage move makes good on the potential many saw with the company’s acquisition of Red Hat, said John Teltsch, chief revenue officer at Converge Technology Solutions, a Gatineau, Quebec-based solution provider and channel partner to both IBM and Red Hat that ranked No. 36 on CRN’s 2022 Solution Provider 500.

“This is something the channel has been waiting for ever since IBM acquired Red Hat,” Teltsch told CRN. “IBM has been doing a lot around software-defined storage. And when you add in Red Hat, it gives us an integrated solutions play. It lets us build an integrated sales team. We don’t have to first talk about IBM storage capabilities, and then bring in our Red Hat team to talk about Red Hat.”

Converge Technology Partners’ IBM and Red Hat sales teams are currently two separate teams, said Teltsch, who joined the company in March from IBM, where he held numerous sales leadership roles, including two years as Big Blue’s channel chief.

“Once IBM and Red Hat storage are together, it gets more simple to sell,” he said. “And it simplifies our training while IBM will have one integrated set of offerings for its clients. This lets us bring the best of Red Hat open-source capabilities with IBM storage. We’re living in a data-driven world. This move simplifies our go-to-market, as well as simplifies the client experience, client engagement, and client adoption.”

Joseph F. Kovar

Joseph F. Kovar is a senior editor and reporter for the storage and the non-tech-focused channel beats for CRN. He keeps readers abreast of the latest issues related to such areas as data life-cycle, business continuity and disaster recovery, and data centers, along with related services and software, while highlighting some of the key trends that impact the IT channel overall. He can be reached at jkovar@thechannelcompany.com.

Tue, 04 Oct 2022 19:00:00 -0500 en text/html https://www.crn.com/news/storage/ibm-assimilates-red-hat-storage-technology-into-own-storage-business
Killexams : This year’s physics Nobel Prize went to pioneers in quantum tech. Here’s how their work could change the world.

Quantum computing is one of those technologies of the future — like nuclear fusion power or self-driving cars — that seems as potentially transformative as it is perpetually just out of reach. If researchers are able to develop quantum machines that are stable and reliable, it could jump-start the pace of computing, which has slowed down as Moore’s Law — the long-accurate prediction by Intel co-founder Gordon Moore that computer chips would get faster and cheaper — seems to be coming to an end. But the path to a practical quantum computer has been long and difficult, combining some of the hardest problems in quantum science with the hardest problems in computing hardware.

Just how long the road to quantum computing has been — and how important it will be to reach the destination — became clear again on Tuesday morning when the Nobel Prize in physics for 2022 was awarded to three researchers whose work had “laid the foundation for a new era of quantum technology,” as the Nobel Committee on Physics put it.

John F. Clauser, an American, showed in 1972 that photon pairs were entangled, underscoring that the particles behave like a single unit even when separated by great distances. Alain Aspect of the University of Paris furthered that work a decade later, and in 1998, Austrian physicist Anton Zeilinger explored entanglement for three or more particles. Together, as the Nobel Committee put it, they paved the way for “new technology based upon quantum information.”

But a real, workable quantum computer will take much more than theory, as I learned on a visit earlier this year to the small Westchester County community of Yorktown Heights. There, amid the rolling hills and old farmhouses, sits the Thomas J. Watson Research Center, the Eero Saarinen-designed, 1960s Jet Age-era headquarters for IBM Research.

Deep inside that building, through endless corridors and security gates guarded by iris scanners, is where the company’s scientists are hard at work developing what IBM director of research Dario Gil told me is “the next branch of computing”: quantum computers.

I was at the Watson Center to preview IBM’s updated technical roadmap for achieving large-scale, practical quantum computing. This involved a great deal of talk about “qubit count,” “quantum coherence,” “error mitigation,” “software orchestration” and other Topics you’d need to be an electrical engineer with a background in computer science and a familiarity with quantum mechanics to fully follow.

I am not any of those things, but I have watched the quantum computing space long enough to know that the work being done here by IBM researchers — along with their competitors at companies like Google and Microsoft, along with countless startups around the world — stands to drive the next great leap in computing. Which, given that computing is a “horizontal technology that touches everything,” as Gil told me, will have major implications for progress in everything from cybersecurity to artificial intelligence to designing better batteries.

Provided, of course, they can actually make these things work.

Entering the quantum realm

The best way to understand a quantum computer — short of setting aside several years for grad school at MIT or Caltech — is to compare it to the kind of machine I’m typing this piece on: a classical computer.

My MacBook Air runs on an M1 chip, which is packed with 16 billion transistors. Each of those transistors can represent either the “1” or “0” of binary information at a single time — a bit. The sheer number of transistors is what gives the machine its computing power.

Sixteen billion transistors packed onto a 120.5 sq. mm chip is a lot — TRADIC, the first transistorized computer, had fewer than 800. The semiconductor industry’s ability to engineer ever more transistors onto a chip, a trend forecast by Intel co-founder Gordon Moore in the law that bears his name, is what has made possible the exponential growth of computing power, which in turn has made possible pretty much everything else.

The exterior of an IBM System One quantum computer, as seen at the Thomas J. Watson Research Center.
Bryan Walsh/Vox

But there are things classic computers can’t do that they’ll never be able to do, no matter how many transistors get stuffed onto a square of silicon in a Taiwan semiconductor fabrication plant (or “fab,” in industry lingo). And that’s where the unique and frankly weird properties of quantum computers come in.

Instead of bits, quantum computers process information using qubits, which can represent “0” and “1” simultaneously. How do they do that? You’re straining my level of expertise here, but essentially qubits make use of the quantum mechanical phenomenon known as “superposition,” whereby the properties of some subatomic particles are not defined until they’re measured. Think of Schrödinger’s cat, simultaneously dead and alive until you open its box.

A single qubit is cute, but things get really exciting when you start adding more. Classic computing power increases linearly with the addition of each transistor, but a quantum computer’s power increases exponentially with the addition of each new reliable qubit. That’s because of another quantum mechanical property called “entanglement,” whereby the individual probabilities of each qubit can be affected by the other qubits in the system.

All of which means that the upper limit of a workable quantum computer’s power far exceeds what would be possible in classic computing.

So quantum computers could theoretically solve problems that a classic computer, no matter how powerful, never could. What kind of problems? How about the fundamental nature of material reality, which, after all, ultimately runs on quantum mechanics, not classical mechanics? (Sorry, Newton.) “Quantum computers simulate problems that we find in nature and in chemistry,” said Jay Gambetta, IBM’s vice president of quantum computing.

Quantum computers could simulate the properties of a theoretical battery to help design one that is far more efficient and powerful than today’s versions. They could untangle complex logistical problems, discover optimal delivery routes, or enhance forecasts for climate science.

On the security side, quantum computers could break cryptography methods, potentially rendering everything from emails to financial data to national secrets insecure — which is why the race for quantum supremacy is also an international competition, one that the Chinese government is pouring billions into. Those concerns helped prompt the White House earlier this month to release a new memorandum to architect national leadership in quantum computing and prepare the country for quantum-assisted cybersecurity threats.

Beyond the security issues, the potential financial upsides could be significant. Companies are already offering early quantum-computing services via the cloud for clients like Exxon Mobil and the Spanish bank BBVA. While the global quantum-computing market was worth less than $500 million in 2020, International Data Corporation projects that it will reach $8.6 billion in revenue by 2027, with more than $16 billion in investments.

But none of that will be possible unless researchers can do the hard engineering work of turning a quantum computer from what is still largely a scientific experiment into a reliable industry.

The cold room

Inside the Watson building, Jerry Chow — who directs IBM’s experimental quantum computer center — opened a 9-foot glass cube to show me something that looked like a chandelier made out of gold: IBM’s Quantum System One. Much of the chandelier is essentially a high-tech fridge, with coils that carry superfluids capable of cooling the hardware to 100th of a degree Celsius above absolute zero — colder, Chow told me, than outer space.

Refrigeration is key to making IBM’s quantum computers work, and it also demonstrates why doing so is such an engineering challenge. While quantum computers are potentially far more powerful than their classic counterparts, they’re also far, far more finicky.

Remember what I said about the quantum properties of superposition and entanglement? While qubits can do things a mere bit could never dream of, the slightest variation in temperature or noise or radiation can cause them to lose those properties through something called decoherence.

That fancy refrigeration is designed to keep the system’s qubits from decohering before the computer has completed its calculations. The very earliest superconducting qubits lost coherence in less than a nanosecond, while today IBM’s most advanced quantum computers can maintain coherence for as many as 400 microseconds. (Each second contains 1 million microseconds.)

The challenge IBM and other companies face is engineering quantum computers that are less error-prone while “scaling the systems beyond thousands or even tens of thousands of qubits to perhaps millions of them,” Chow said.

That could be years off. Last year, IBM introduced the Eagle, a 127-qubit processor, and in its new technical roadmap, it aims to unveil a 433-qubit processor called the Osprey later this year, and a 4,000-plus qubit computer by 2025. By that time, quantum computing could move beyond the experimentation phase, IBM CEO Arvind Krishna told reporters at a press event earlier this month.

Plenty of experts are skeptical that IBM or any of its competitors will ever get there, raising the possibility that the engineering problems presented by quantum computers are simply too hard for the systems to ever be truly reliable. “What’s happened over the last decade is that there have been a tremendous number of claims about the more immediate things you can do with a quantum computer, like solve all these machine learning problems,” Scott Aaronson, a quantum computing expert at the University of Texas, told me last year. “But these claims are about 90 percent bullshit.” To fulfill that promise, “you’re going to need some revolutionary development.”

In an increasingly digital world, further progress will depend on our ability to get ever more out of the computers we create. And that will depend on the work of researchers like Chow and his colleagues, toiling away in windowless labs to achieve a revolutionary new development around some of the hardest problems in computer engineering — and along the way, trying to build the future.

A version of this story was initially published in the Future Perfect newsletter. Sign up here to subscribe!

Update, October 4, 4 pm ET: This story was originally published on May 24 and has been updated to reflect that Clauser, Aspect, and Zeilinger were awarded the 2022 Nobel Prize in physics.

Tue, 04 Oct 2022 08:08:00 -0500 en text/html https://www.vox.com/23132776/quantum-computers-ibm-google-cybersecurity-artificial-intelligence-white-house
Killexams : IBM set to buy Dialexa, adding to list of more than 25 acquisitions since April 2020

RESEARCH TRIANGLE PARK – In a move to enhance its hybrid cloud and AI capabilities, IBM will buy the digital product engineering consulting services firm Dialexa in a deal that will close later this year.

IBM announced the deal in a statement, which also notes that the purchase of the firm will “deepen IBM’s product engineering expertise and provide end-to-end digital transformation services for clients.”

When the deal closes, Dialexa will become the sixth company bought by IBM in 2022.

But Big Blue has been on a buying frenzy since April 2020, when Arvind Krishna became the company’s CEO.  According to the company, IBM has acquired more than 25 other firms, with 13 to bolster IBM Consulting.

The latest acquisition of Dialexa points toward how IBM may grow its consulting services presence.

“In this digital era, clients are looking for the right mix of high-quality products to build new revenue streams and Boost topline growth,” said John Granger, senior vice president, IBM Consulting, in a statement. “Dialexa’s product engineering expertise, combined with IBM’s hybrid cloud and business transformation offerings, will help our clients turn concepts into differentiated product portfolios that accelerate growth.”

The company’s 300 employees are based in Dallas and in Chicago, and will join IBM Consulting, according to the statement.  Among the firm’s clients is Toyota Motor North America, which will invest $2.5 billion in North Carolina to build the company’s first U.S. electric battery manufacturing plant in Randolph County.

Thu, 22 Sep 2022 12:00:00 -0500 en-US text/html https://wraltechwire.com/2022/09/23/ibm-set-to-buy-dialexa-adding-to-list-of-more-than-25-acquisitions-since-april-2020/
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