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BASINGSTOKE, England--(BUSINESS WIRE)--Oct 12, 2022--

A new Juniper Research study found that the total cost of eCommerce fraud to merchants will exceed $48 billion globally in 2023, from just over $41 billion in 2022. It predicted that this growth will be accelerated by increasing use of alternative payment methods, such as digital wallets and BNPL (Buy-Now-Pay-Later), which are creating new fraud risks.

This press release features multimedia. View the full release here: https://www.businesswire.com/news/home/20221011005739/en/

Online Payment Fraud market infographic (Graphic: Business Wire)

The report recommended that fraud prevention vendors focus on building platforms providing AI‑powered risk-based scoring, which can be payment method agnostic, to best suit changing market conditions.

Online payment fraud includes losses across sales of digital goods, physical goods, money transfer transactions and banking, as well as purchases like airline ticketing. Fraudster attacks can include phishing, business email compromises and socially engineered fraud.

North America Tops League Table for Fraud

The research identified North America as having the largest fraudulent transaction value of any regional market, accounting for over 42% of global fraud by value in 2023, despite representing less than 7% of banked individuals globally. The research cited the vast volume of data breaches and the broad availability of stolen credit card information as key risk factors in this market.

Research author Nick Maynard explained: “To combat this fraud, eCommerce merchants must implement simple steps such as address verification, combined with risk-based scoring on transactions, which will allow merchants to best mitigate the massive fraud threats present.”

BNPL Fraud – A Major Risk

Additionally, the research found that the potential of fraud with BNPL is a major risk going forward. Given the delayed nature of BNPL payments, fraudsters can make several illegitimate payments using stolen card details before the fraudulent activity is identified, creating significant risk. In turn, the research recommended that BNPL vendors conduct robust identity verification at the point of onboarding to mitigate these risks.

Online Payment Fraud market research: https://www.juniperresearch.com/researchstore/fintech-payments/online-payment-fraud-research-report

Download the free whitepaper: https://www.juniperresearch.com/whitepapers/fighting-online-payment-fraud-in-2022-beyond

Juniper Research provides research and analytical services to the global hi-tech communications sector; providing consultancy, analyst reports, and industry commentary.

View source version on businesswire.com:https://www.businesswire.com/news/home/20221011005739/en/

CONTACT: Sam Smith, Press Relations

T: +44(0)1256 830002

E:sam.smith@juniperresearch.com

KEYWORD: UNITED KINGDOM EUROPE

INDUSTRY KEYWORD: TECHNOLOGY FINANCE SECURITY BANKING PROFESSIONAL SERVICES SOFTWARE RETAIL ARTIFICIAL INTELLIGENCE ONLINE RETAIL

SOURCE: Juniper Research

Copyright Business Wire 2022.

PUB: 10/12/2022 02:00 AM/DISC: 10/12/2022 02:02 AM

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Tue, 11 Oct 2022 18:22:00 -0500 en text/html https://www.eagletribune.com/region/juniper-research-ecommerce-losses-to-online-payment-fraud-to-exceed-48-billion-globally-in-2023/article_3e459ca4-533a-5c8f-a663-03fe08ab11c8.html
Killexams : Four of five pinyon-juniper tree species declining in their ranges in the West

Pinyon-juniper woodlands host unique wildlife and wildlife habitat, as well as areas for hiking and outdoor recreation. They are also part of a web of healthy ecosystems that, together, help to balance water availability, storage and runoff; and prevent erosion. A new study published in Global Ecology and Biogeography and led by University of Nevada, Reno researcher Robert Shriver sheds new light on what is happening in pinyon-juniper woodlands across the West. The research is unique, in that it looks at both tree mortality, as well as recruitment, or new seedlings and saplings, to calculate a "net effect." And, the news isn't necessarily good, particularly in warmer, drier locations.

"We found that four of the five species were declining," said Shriver, an assistant professor in the University's College of Agriculture, Biotechnology & Natural Resources. "And, in the driest, warmest locations, up to about 50% of populations are declining. It's pretty severe in those locations, which are usually at lower elevations that tend to be hotter and get less water than woodlands at higher elevations."

Shriver said that when looking at all locations studied, which included over 6,000 plots and more than 59,000 tagged trees, up to 10-20% of populations were declining. Of the five species, including two pinyon pines and three junipers, Pinus edulis, more commonly referred to as two-needle pinyon or simply pinyon, showed the greatest declines, with about 24% of its populations in decline. The other pinyon species and two of the juniper species showed more moderate declines overall, but still quite severe declines in the hotter, drier areas. These species include Pinus monophylla (single-leaf pinyon), Juniperus monosperma (one-seed juniper) and Juniperus scopulorum (Rocky Mountain juniper). Juniperus osteosperma (Utah juniper) was the only species that did not show a decline.

"Utah juniper was the exception to everything," Shriver, who conducts research as part of the College's Department of Natural Resources & Environmental Science and Experiment Station, said. "What we found pretty much matches up with what we know about that species' resiliency. It's the most abundant in the Great Basin, and is typically less vulnerable to hotter, drier climate conditions, so it could mean that there might be compositional shifts occurring in the future, where some areas that are mixed species might become more juniper-dominated."

Gathering the data and building the models

In part, Shriver used data from the Forest Inventory and Analysis, a nationwide survey of forested lands in the U.S., conducted by the U.S. Forest Service.

"They tag the trees and return to the same plots for comparison at least every 10 years, but they have a systematic scheme to determine where," he explained. "They are making sure they are getting a broad sample of both federal and private land. The result is a representative sample of what all forests look like across the U.S., even covering some very remote locations. It's staggered, with 10% of plots surveyed in a given year."

Shriver said the plots that were included in this pinyon-juniper research were first sampled between 2000 and 2007, and were surveyed the second time between 2010 and 2017. It is data obtained within those 10-year spans that he used for the research. He pointed out, however, that the Forest Service survey doesn't capture as complete data on recruitment, or seedlings, since they don't tag anything under 1 inch in diameter. Trees of this size are counted, but not tagged.

"Recruitment is the really hard part," he said. "Tree mortality is easy to see, but recruitment is harder to observe, so it's been harder to account for. Having a stable population is dependent on both mortality and recruitment. So, we developed a new statistical approach that allowed us to understand and factor in recruitment. Using these modeling approaches, we were able to quantify what the recruitment rate is in these different areas, and then combine that data with the mortality data to get a more clear, accurate picture of what is really going on in terms of change in species' populations under different climate conditions and woodland densities in different regions."

The research excluded plots where fire mortality or intentional tree harvesting occurred, allowing the researchers to more directly observe changes occurring due to climatic conditions across each species' range.

Impacts of the findings

Shriver says the declines in populations they calculated could be significant for a number of reasons.

"In regard to wildlife, probably the most significant effect is on the pinyon jay, which has been in decline for the last couple of decades, and is really dependent on the seed that is produced by pinyon pine," he said. "The areas where the pinyon jay tends to choose are on that border of the sagebrush and the pinyon. It likes those habitats that are probably the most vulnerable. But, beyond the pinyon jay, certainly a number of species could be affected -- mule deer, and other birds and wildlife."

In addition, Shriver said pinyons and pine nut harvesting are culturally important, to Native Americans and others, and pinyon-juniper woodlands provide recreational value for hikers and outdoor enthusiasts. Importantly, he adds, there's the functions that pinyon-juniper woodlands play in our watersheds. Pinyon-juniper woodlands play an important role in water and soil retention in some locations.

What does the future hold?

"We are likely to see pretty big changes in where we find forests in the Great Basin and the Southwest over the next few decades," Shriver said. "A lot of places where we saw forests, we may not see them, especially in lower elevations, because they tend to be the hottest and driest."

Shriver said there has been a lot of expansion in these woodlands since the mid-1800s, and that some declines may not be a bad thing everywhere. For example, in some areas the pinyon-juniper woodlands have encroached on shrubland ecosystems that provide important ecosystem services and unique wildlife habitat. And, the trees, especially when packed in too densely and without enough moisture, also increase the intensity of wildfires.

"Our results also suggest that for some locations, management actions could slow down or reverse the woodland declines," Shriver said. "As it gets warmer and drier, the density of trees a landscape is able to support lessens, so reductions in tree density might expand the envelope of where the trees can be, reducing the chance of large tree mortality events."

While woodland decline could create an opportunity for expansion of native shrublands such as sagebrush, Shriver cautioned that other, less beneficial vegetation could also take hold.

"Just because the pinyon and juniper die off, doesn't mean something desirable would establish in their place," he said. "You might get cheatgrass or other undesirable vegetation."

Shriver said the purpose of the research and models it created is to help anticipate the vulnerability of woodlands and forecast coming range shifts, so that we might be able to sway the outcomes to be more positive ones.

"If we know where this is likely to happen, we can do the best we can to influence what might happen next," he said. "We might be able to direct these into ecosystems that might support native plants and animals in the Great Basin and the Southwest, and fit into our watersheds in a beneficial way."

Funding for the study was provided by the United States Geological Survey North Central Climate Adaptation Science Center. Coauthors of the study include Charles B. Yackulic and John B. Bradford, with the USGS Southwest Biological Science Center; and David M. Bell, with the USDA Forest Service Pacific Northwest Research Station.

Wed, 12 Oct 2022 12:08:00 -0500 en text/html https://www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2022/10/221006160635.htm
Killexams : Juniper cultivars deserve more consideration | Tony Tomeo

Fads come and go. Many can be good, even if only briefly. A few might be bad enough to later stigmatize the object of the fad. For example, the formerly esteemed crape myrtle is now familiar as a mundanely common tree.

Flashy bloom and complaisance contributed to its excessive popularity. Most sorts of juniper are similarly victims of their previous fad.

A few cultivars of juniper suddenly became overly popular during suburbanization of the 1950s. They were remarkably reliable and resilient. Most were shrubbery or low hedges. A few were groundcover.

Hollywood juniper grew as a compact sculptural tree. However, most junipers grew too big. They became difficult to maintain, or impossible to renovate.

As many outgrew suburban gardens, few junipers outgrew their reputation. Even modern cultivars that were unavailable during the fad of the 1950s are perhaps less popular than they should be. Realistically, many old and new cultivars of juniper are quite practical for refined home gardens. They merely need to be appropriate to their particular application.

Many cultivars of several species of Juniperus are commonly available. Straight species are very rare from nurseries, although a few are native nearby.

All junipers are evergreen with tiny awl or scale leaves. Foliar color ranges from forest green to silvery gray. Bloom is unremarkable. Some junipers produce pretty and aromatic blue, gray or black berries.

Junipers generally do not respond favorably to pruning that damages their natural forms. Those that grow as groundcovers, with stems that sprawl over the surface of the soil, are not offended by pruning to contain their edges. However, most groundcover junipers are actually just low shrubbery. Pruning might leave holes within their dense foliar canopies.

Junipers that grow as small trees do not mind removal of lower limbs at their main trunks, but object to partial pruning or 'stubbing' of such limbs. Regardless of their natural forms, all junipers should be proportionate to their particular applications.

With sufficient space, they can mature and develop their naturally distinguished forms with minimal altercation. Maintenance could really be quite minimal.

Rocky Mountain juniper

Hollywood juniper had formerly been the only popular juniper of tree form. As it became less popular during the past few decades, cultivars of the once obscure Rocky Mountain juniper, Juniperus scopulorum, became more popular.

Also, a few more modern cultivars became available. Now, the once overly common Hollywood juniper is quite uncommon.

Rocky Mountain juniper is naturally rather grayish for protection from the harsh exposure of the high elevations which it inhabits. Cultivars are grayer, bluish or silvery, and mostly develop symmetrically conical form.

Old specimens that were initially conical eventually grow as small trees with rounded and relatively dense canopies, perhaps on bare trunks.

'Skyrocket' and 'Blue Arrow' are very narrow like Italian cypress that grow only 15 feet tall. 'Wichita Blue' and 'Moonglow' are stoutly conical. 'Blue Arrow' and 'Wichita Blue' are bluish green. 'Skyrocket' and 'Moonglow' are silvery gray.

Established specimens do not require much water, but develop better foliar color with warmth and occasional watering.

Sat, 08 Oct 2022 01:01:00 -0500 en text/html https://lompocrecord.com/lifestyles/juniper-cultivars-deserve-more-consideration-tony-tomeo/article_2de545b7-6bcf-52a5-9617-3af9196e2524.html
Killexams : Juniper Research: ePharmacy Users to Reach 1 Billion Globally by 2027; Capitalising on COVID-19 Surge

A new study from Juniper Research found that the number of ePharmacy users will reach 1 billion globally by 2027; increasing from 795 million in 2022, a growth of 28%. The research identified this increase as the culmination of surging adoption resulting from the COVID-19 pandemic, where consumers were unable to leave their homes and turned to receiving medication through ePharmacies. Growth will continue, as vendors focus on retaining and expanding their customer bases by refining the efficiency and simplicity that ePharmacy provides.

ePharmacy is where online pharmacies sell medication, including prescriptions, over the Internet, with the ability to deliver straight to the consumer.

Increase in Accessibility of eCommerce Driving Growth

The research predicts that consumers will continue to utilise ePharmacies as they realise the benefits they provide them, including affordability of medication, and a wider range of choice compared to bricks‑and-mortar pharmacies.

Furthermore, the report predicts that ePharmacy growth will be sustained by simplifying the online process. This can be achieved through more widespread acceptance of ePrescriptions; eliminating paper copies of prescriptions.

Research author Cara Malone remarked: "ePharmacy vendors have the ability to further simplify the process through the use of solutions, including consumers receiving their prescribed medication, sorted into daily pouches containing information regarding dosage, date and time to be taken."

Issues Surrounding Delivery Remain a Barrier

The research anticipates that ePharmacy services will continue to be predominantly utilised for OTC (Over-the-Counter) medication. OTC transactions will reach 8.9 billion globally in 2027; accounting for 64% of total global transaction value. This is compared to 5 billion prescription transactions globally in the same year. Prescription digitisation will lag behind due to consumer concerns around delivery accuracy, timing and missed deliveries. In order to allay these concerns and offset the abundance of illegitimate ePharmacies, real-time tracking and stronger regulations for ePharmacies should be priorities to secure future growth.

View the ePharmacy market research: https://www.juniperresearch.com/researchstore/key-vertical-markets/epharmacy-market-research-report

Download the whitepaper: https://www.juniperresearch.com/whitepapers/diagnosing-epharmacy-three-key-challenges

Juniper Research provides research and analytical services to the global hi-tech communications sector; providing consultancy, analyst reports, and industry commentary.

© 2022 Benzinga.com. Benzinga does not provide investment advice. All rights reserved.

Sun, 09 Oct 2022 18:00:00 -0500 text/html https://www.benzinga.com/pressreleases/22/10/b29197352/juniper-research-epharmacy-users-to-reach-1-billion-globally-by-2027-capitalising-on-covid-19-surg
Killexams : Virtual-Q Selects Juniper Networks to Provide Scalable, Automated Data Center Infrastructure

Juniper Apstra solution enables simplified data center management and reliable operations to deliver a better user experience for customers

SUNNYVALE, Calif., October 11, 2022--(BUSINESS WIRE)--Juniper Networks (NYSE: JNPR), a leader in secure, AI-driven networks, today announced that Virtual-Q, a provider of IT Services and IT Consulting, has selected Juniper Apstra data center solutions to modernize and automate its network infrastructure to provide a scalable and seamless customer experience.

Based in Houston, Texas, Virtual-Q specializes in IT-as-a-Service through its hosted desktop solution, streamlining the costs associated with remote IT solutions. The company delivers enterprise-class security, computing, support and disaster recovery solutions to businesses across all sectors and sizes.

Virtual-Q had been operating with a network that lacked scalability and struggled to meet the increasing hybrid and virtual customer demands associated with the pandemic. With the need to accommodate large-scale growth but also be able to easily manage and operate, Virtual-Q turned to Juniper Networks to help design and build their new network, along with support from Juniper’s partner GDT. Apstra was deployed to simplify and automate data center operations management from design to deployment through everyday operations and assurance. Additionally, Apstra delivers a high level of visibility into the network fabric, allowing for faster resolution times and increased operational efficiencies. With an approach to data center operations based on the insight that a reliability-focused strategy results in speed and efficiency, Apstra enables Virtual-Q to transform their operations.

By also deploying Juniper’s QFX switches, EX switches and MX series universal routing platforms, Virtual-Q is well-positioned to expand its capacity with 400G bandwidth, develop a cloud-ready network infrastructure that can grow alongside its evolving data center needs and meet its 1,082 percent annual growth rate. The company also utilizes Juniper professional services.

Supporting Quotes:

"Juniper Apstra allows us to seamlessly manage and automate our data center infrastructure without compromising our ability to serve our customers. With Apstra’s intent-based design, operators can focus on what needs to be accomplished in the data center instead of how it should be done. As one of the most user-friendly products on the market, we are excited to see the transformation Apstra will bring to our network operations."

- Victor J. Quinones, Jr., Founder and CEO, Virtual-Q

"In addition to simplifying data center management, Apstra allows its customers to automate each aspect of the design, deployment and operation of their data center infrastructure. Apstra enables Virtual-Q to lay a strong foundation for reliable and flexible operations regardless of vendor."

- Mansour Karam, VP of Products, Juniper Networks

Additional Resources:

  • Product & Solution Pages:

About Juniper Networks

Juniper Networks is dedicated to dramatically simplifying network operations and driving superior experiences for end users. Our solutions deliver industry-leading insight, automation, security and AI to drive real business results. We believe that powering connections will bring us closer together while empowering us all to solve the world’s greatest challenges of well-being, sustainability and equality. Additional information can be found at Juniper Networks (www.juniper.net) or connect with Juniper on Twitter, LinkedIn and Facebook.

Juniper Networks, the Juniper Networks logo, Juniper, Junos, and other trademarks listed here are registered trademarks of Juniper Networks, Inc. and/or its affiliates in the United States and other countries. Other names may be trademarks of their respective owners.

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View source version on businesswire.com: https://www.businesswire.com/news/home/20221011005526/en/

Contacts

Media Relations:
Kelsey Akerson
Juniper Networks
+1 (503) 860-9890
kakerson@juniper.net

Tue, 11 Oct 2022 14:12:00 -0500 en-US text/html https://finance.yahoo.com/news/virtual-q-selects-juniper-networks-114500108.html
Killexams : Juniper Networks Appoints New Chief Revenue Officer

SUNNYVALE, Calif.--(BUSINESS WIRE)--Oct 13, 2022--

Juniper Networks (NYSE: JNPR), a leader in secure, AI-driven networks, announced today that effective October 17, 2022, Chris Kaddaras has been named Executive Vice President and Chief Revenue Officer, reporting to Chief Executive Officer, Rami Rahim. Mr. Kaddaras will be responsible for continuing Juniper's sales growth momentum and driving the strategic and operational elements of the sales and partner functions for the company. Mr. Kaddaras will lead a global organization that includes direct and indirect sales, systems engineering, advanced technologies sales and field operations.

“I've watched Juniper change the networking industry by enabling digital transformation for customers of all shapes and sizes that are increasingly seeking cloud-delivered, AI-driven and secure solutions to power their strategic evolutions. It’s no longer enough for a network to be ‘up;’ it must also be ‘good’, and Juniper is uniquely positioned to deliver on that promise. The opportunity to continue to grow Juniper’s market share in enterprise and continue to serve as a trusted strategic partner with service providers and cloud providers is huge. And as a sales leader, it’s always exciting to have technology that’s not only highly differentiated but can also actually deliver real outcomes for organizations. I couldn’t be more motivated to join this team.” - Chris Kaddaras, executive vice president and chief revenue officer, Juniper Networks

Prior to Juniper, Chris served as Chief Revenue Officer at Transmit Security, a provider of customer identity and access management SaaS solutions. Before that, he held multiple roles at Nutanix from 2016-2021, including Chief Revenue Officer. Prior to joining Nutanix, Chris was with EMC Corporation for 16 years, where he held positions including Vice President of Commercial Sales and Vice President of Sales Engineering across EMEA.

“Juniper has achieved significant growth recently as we've executed on our experience-first networking strategy and deliberately reinvented ourselves for a new era of highly automated and secure networks that simplify operations and enable seamless end-user experiences. Chris’ 25-plus years of experience as a data-driven operational leader, building and leading winning sales teams, will help Juniper accelerate along our proven path. I’ve never been more optimistic and excited about our opportunity ahead to scale our momentum, and I’m thrilled to welcome Chris to Juniper.” - Rami Rahim, chief executive officer, Juniper Networks

About Juniper Networks

Juniper Networks is dedicated to dramatically simplifying network operations and driving superior experiences for end users. Our solutions deliver industry-leading insight, automation, security and AI to drive real business results. We believe that powering connections will bring us closer together while empowering us all to solve the world’s greatest challenges of well-being, sustainability and equality. Additional information can be found at Juniper Networks ( www.juniper.net ) or connect with Juniper on Twitter, LinkedIn and Facebook.

Juniper Networks, the Juniper Networks logo, Juniper, Junos, and other trademarks listedhereare registered trademarks of Juniper Networks, Inc. and/or its affiliates in the United States and other countries. Other names may be trademarks of their respective owners.

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CONTACT: Leslie Moore

Chief Communications Officer

llmoore@juniper.net

KEYWORD: UNITED STATES NORTH AMERICA CALIFORNIA

INDUSTRY KEYWORD: DATA MANAGEMENT TECHNOLOGY SECURITY OTHER TECHNOLOGY TELECOMMUNICATIONS ARTIFICIAL INTELLIGENCE NETWORKS INTERNET MOBILE/WIRELESS HARDWARE ELECTRONIC DESIGN AUTOMATION

SOURCE: Juniper Networks

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Thu, 13 Oct 2022 00:00:00 -0500 en text/html https://www.joplinglobe.com/region/national_business/juniper-networks-appoints-new-chief-revenue-officer/article_76044ab2-421a-5f29-a5d9-880b0816b40c.html
Killexams : Juniper Research: eCommerce Losses to Online Payment Fraud to Exceed $48 Billion Globally in 2023, as Fraud Incursions Evolve

16% Growth in eCommerce Fraud Losses in Just 12 Months

BASINGSTOKE, England, October 12, 2022--(BUSINESS WIRE)--A new Juniper Research study found that the total cost of eCommerce fraud to merchants will exceed $48 billion globally in 2023, from just over $41 billion in 2022. It predicted that this growth will be accelerated by increasing use of alternative payment methods, such as digital wallets and BNPL (Buy-Now-Pay-Later), which are creating new fraud risks.

This press release features multimedia. View the full release here: https://www.businesswire.com/news/home/20221011005739/en/

Online Payment Fraud market infographic (Graphic: Business Wire)

The report recommended that fraud prevention vendors focus on building platforms providing AI‑powered risk-based scoring, which can be payment method agnostic, to best suit changing market conditions.

Online payment fraud includes losses across sales of digital goods, physical goods, money transfer transactions and banking, as well as purchases like airline ticketing. Fraudster attacks can include phishing, business email compromises and socially engineered fraud.

North America Tops League Table for Fraud

The research identified North America as having the largest fraudulent transaction value of any regional market, accounting for over 42% of global fraud by value in 2023, despite representing less than 7% of banked individuals globally. The research cited the vast volume of data breaches and the broad availability of stolen credit card information as key risk factors in this market.

Research author Nick Maynard explained: "To combat this fraud, eCommerce merchants must implement simple steps such as address verification, combined with risk-based scoring on transactions, which will allow merchants to best mitigate the massive fraud threats present."

BNPL Fraud – A Major Risk

Additionally, the research found that the potential of fraud with BNPL is a major risk going forward. Given the delayed nature of BNPL payments, fraudsters can make several illegitimate payments using stolen card details before the fraudulent activity is identified, creating significant risk. In turn, the research recommended that BNPL vendors conduct robust identity verification at the point of onboarding to mitigate these risks.

Online Payment Fraud market research: https://www.juniperresearch.com/researchstore/fintech-payments/online-payment-fraud-research-report

Download the free whitepaper: https://www.juniperresearch.com/whitepapers/fighting-online-payment-fraud-in-2022-beyond

Juniper Research provides research and analytical services to the global hi-tech communications sector; providing consultancy, analyst reports, and industry commentary.

View source version on businesswire.com: https://www.businesswire.com/news/home/20221011005739/en/

Contacts

Sam Smith, Press Relations
T: +44(0)1256 830002
E: sam.smith@juniperresearch.com

Tue, 11 Oct 2022 18:00:00 -0500 en-US text/html https://www.yahoo.com/now/juniper-research-ecommerce-losses-online-060000415.html
Killexams : Four of five pinyon-juniper tree species declining in their ranges in the West

Pinyon-juniper woodlands host unique wildlife and wildlife habitat, as well as areas for hiking and outdoor recreation. They are also part of a web of healthy ecosystems that, together, help to balance water availability, storage and runoff; and prevent erosion. A new study published in Global Ecology and Biogeography and led by University of Nevada, Reno researcher Robert Shriver sheds new light on what is happening in pinyon-juniper woodlands across the West. The research is unique, in that it looks at both tree mortality, as well as recruitment, or new seedlings and saplings, to calculate a “net effect.” And, the news isn’t necessarily good, particularly in warmer, drier locations.

“We found that four of the five species were declining,” said Shriver, an assistant professor in the University’s College of Agriculture, Biotechnology & Natural Resources. “And, in the driest, warmest locations, up to about 50% of populations are declining. It’s pretty severe in those locations, which are usually at lower elevations that tend to be hotter and get less water than woodlands at higher elevations.”

Shriver said that when looking at all locations studied, which included over 6,000 plots and more than 59,000 tagged trees, up to 10-20% of populations were declining. Of the five species, including two pinyon pines and three junipers, Pinus edulis, more commonly referred to as two-needle pinyon or simply pinyon, showed the greatest declines, with about 24% of its populations in decline. The other pinyon species and two of the juniper species showed more moderate declines overall, but still quite severe declines in the hotter, drier areas. These species include Pinus monophylla (single-leaf pinyon), Juniperus monosperma (one-seed juniper) and Juniperus scopulorum (Rocky Mountain juniper). Juniperus osteosperma (Utah juniper) was the only species that did not show a decline.

“Utah juniper was the exception to everything,” Shriver, who conducts research as part of the College’s Department of Natural Resources & Environmental Science and Experiment Station, said. “What we found pretty much matches up with what we know about that species’ resiliency. It’s the most abundant in the Great Basin, and is typically less vulnerable to hotter, drier climate conditions, so it could mean that there might be compositional shifts occurring in the future, where some areas that are mixed species might become more juniper-dominated.”

Gathering the data and building the models

In part, Shriver used data from the Forest Inventory and Analysis, a nationwide survey of forested lands in the U.S., conducted by the U.S. Forest Service.

“They tag the trees and return to the same plots for comparison at least every 10 years, but they have a systematic scheme to determine where,” he explained. “They are making sure they are getting a broad sample of both federal and private land. The result is a representative sample of what all forests look like across the U.S., even covering some very remote locations. It’s staggered, with 10% of plots surveyed in a given year.”

Pinyon woodland in Nevada.
A dead tree canopy can be seen in the top right of this pinyon pine stand in the Anchorite Hills in western Nevada. Research shows pinyon pine populations have been declining in western Nevada. Photo by Robert Shriver.

Shriver said the plots that were included in this pinyon-juniper research were first sampled between 2000 and 2007, and were surveyed the second time between 2010 and 2017. It is data obtained within those 10-year spans that he used for the research. He pointed out, however, that the Forest Service survey doesn’t capture as complete data on recruitment, or seedlings, since they don’t tag anything under 1 inch in diameter. Trees of this size are counted, but not tagged.

“Recruitment is the really hard part,” he said. “Tree mortality is easy to see, but recruitment is harder to observe, so it’s been harder to account for. Having a stable population is dependent on both mortality and recruitment. So, we developed a new statistical approach that allowed us to understand and factor in recruitment. Using these modeling approaches, we were able to quantify what the recruitment rate is in these different areas, and then combine that data with the mortality data to get a more clear, accurate picture of what is really going on in terms of change in species’ populations under different climate conditions and woodland densities in different regions.”

The research excluded plots where fire mortality or intentional tree harvesting occurred, allowing the researchers to more directly observe changes occurring due to climatic conditions across each species’ range.

Impacts of the findings

Shriver says the declines in populations they calculated could be significant for a number of reasons.

“In regard to wildlife, probably the most significant effect is on the pinyon jay, which has been in decline for the last couple of decades, and is really dependent on the seed that is produced by pinyon pine,” he said. “The areas where the pinyon jay tends to choose are on that border of the sagebrush and the pinyon. It likes those habitats that are probably the most vulnerable. But, beyond the pinyon jay, certainly a number of species could be affected – mule deer, and other birds and wildlife.”

In addition, Shriver said pinyons and pine nut harvesting are culturally important, to Native Americans and others, and pinyon-juniper woodlands provide recreational value for hikers and outdoor enthusiasts. Importantly, he adds, there’s the functions that pinyon-juniper woodlands play in our watersheds. Pinyon-juniper woodlands play an important role in water and soil retention in some locations.

What does the future hold?

“We are likely to see pretty big changes in where we find forests in the Great Basin and the Southwest over the next few decades,” Shriver said. “A lot of places where we saw forests, we may not see them, especially in lower elevations, because they tend to be the hottest and driest.”

Shriver said there has been a lot of expansion in these woodlands since the mid-1800s, and that some declines may not be a bad thing everywhere. For example, in some areas the pinyon-juniper woodlands have encroached on shrubland ecosystems that provide important ecosystem services and unique wildlife habitat. And, the trees, especially when packed in too densely and without enough moisture, also increase the intensity of wildfires.

“Our results also suggest that for some locations, management actions could slow down or reverse the woodland declines,” Shriver said. “As it gets warmer and drier, the density of trees a landscape is able to support lessens, so reductions in tree density might expand the envelope of where the trees can be, reducing the chance of large tree mortality events.”

While woodland decline could create an opportunity for expansion of native shrublands such as sagebrush, Shriver cautioned that other, less beneficial vegetation could also take hold.

“Just because the pinyon and juniper die off, doesn’t mean something desirable would establish in their place,” he said. “You might get cheatgrass or other undesirable vegetation.”

Shriver said the purpose of the research and models it created is to help anticipate the vulnerability of woodlands and forecast coming range shifts, so that we might be able to sway the outcomes to be more positive ones.

“If we know where this is likely to happen, we can do the best we can to influence what might happen next,” he said. “We might be able to direct these into ecosystems that might support native plants and animals in the Great Basin and the Southwest, and fit into our watersheds in a beneficial way.”

Funding for the study was provided by the United States Geological Survey North Central Climate Adaptation Science Center. Coauthors of the study include Charles B. Yackulic and John B. Bradford, with the USGS Southwest Biological Science Center; and David M. Bell, with the USDA Forest Service Pacific Northwest Research Station.

Wed, 05 Oct 2022 03:14:00 -0500 en-us text/html https://www.unr.edu/nevada-today/news/2022/pinyon-juniper-population
Killexams : Virtual-Q Selects Juniper Networks to Provide Scalable, Automated Data Center Infrastructure

Virtual-Q Selects Juniper Networks to Provide Scalable, Automated Data Center Infrastructure

Juniper Apstra solution enables simplified data center management and reliable operations to deliver a better user experience for customers

Juniper Networks (NYSE: JNPR), a leader in secure, AI-driven networks, today announced that Virtual-Q, a provider of IT Services and IT Consulting, has selected Juniper Apstra data center solutions to modernize and automate its network infrastructure to provide a scalable and seamless customer experience.

Based in Houston, Texas, Virtual-Q specializes in IT-as-a-Service through its hosted desktop solution, streamlining the costs associated with remote IT solutions. The company delivers enterprise-class security, computing, support and disaster recovery solutions to businesses across all sectors and sizes.

Virtual-Q had been operating with a network that lacked scalability and struggled to meet the increasing hybrid and virtual customer demands associated with the pandemic. With the need to accommodate large-scale growth but also be able to easily manage and operate, Virtual-Q turned to Juniper Networks to help design and build their new network, along with support from Juniper’s partner GDT. Apstra was deployed to simplify and automate data center operations management from design to deployment through everyday operations and assurance. Additionally, Apstra delivers a high level of visibility into the network fabric, allowing for faster resolution times and increased operational efficiencies. With an approach to data center operations based on the insight that a reliability-focused strategy results in speed and efficiency, Apstra enables Virtual-Q to transform their operations.

By also deploying Juniper’s QFX switches, EX switches and MX series universal routing platforms, Virtual-Q is well-positioned to expand its capacity with 400G bandwidth, develop a cloud-ready network infrastructure that can grow alongside its evolving data center needs and meet its 1,082 percent annual growth rate. The company also utilizes Juniper professional services.

Supporting Quotes:

“Juniper Apstra allows us to seamlessly manage and automate our data center infrastructure without compromising our ability to serve our customers. With Apstra’s intent-based design, operators can focus on what needs to be accomplished in the data center instead of how it should be done. As one of the most user-friendly products on the market, we are excited to see the transformation Apstra will bring to our network operations.”

- Victor J. Quinones, Jr., Founder and CEO, Virtual-Q

“In addition to simplifying data center management, Apstra allows its customers to automate each aspect of the design, deployment and operation of their data center infrastructure. Apstra enables Virtual-Q to lay a strong foundation for reliable and flexible operations regardless of vendor.”

- Mansour Karam, VP of Products, Juniper Networks

Additional Resources:

  • Product & Solution Pages:

About Juniper Networks

Juniper Networks is dedicated to dramatically simplifying network operations and driving superior experiences for end users. Our solutions deliver industry-leading insight, automation, security and AI to drive real business results. We believe that powering connections will bring us closer together while empowering us all to solve the world’s greatest challenges of well-being, sustainability and equality. Additional information can be found at Juniper Networks (www.juniper.net) or connect with Juniper on Twitter, LinkedIn and Facebook.

Juniper Networks, the Juniper Networks logo, Juniper, Junos, and other trademarks listed here are registered trademarks of Juniper Networks, Inc. and/or its affiliates in the United States and other countries. Other names may be trademarks of their respective owners.

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Media Relations:
Kelsey Akerson
Juniper Networks
+1 (503) 860-9890
kakerson@juniper.net

View source version on businesswire.com: https://www.businesswire.com/news/home/20221011005526/en/

Tue, 11 Oct 2022 00:07:00 -0500 en text/html https://www.morningstar.com/news/business-wire/20221011005526/virtual-q-selects-juniper-networks-to-provide-scalable-automated-data-center-infrastructure
Killexams : Juniper Research: eCommerce Losses to Online Payment Fraud to Exceed $48 Billion Globally in 2023, as Fraud Incursions Evolve

16% Growth in eCommerce Fraud Losses in Just 12 Months

BASINGSTOKE, England, October 12, 2022--(BUSINESS WIRE)--A new Juniper Research study found that the total cost of eCommerce fraud to merchants will exceed $48 billion globally in 2023, from just over $41 billion in 2022. It predicted that this growth will be accelerated by increasing use of alternative payment methods, such as digital wallets and BNPL (Buy-Now-Pay-Later), which are creating new fraud risks.

This press release features multimedia. View the full release here: https://www.businesswire.com/news/home/20221011005739/en/

Online Payment Fraud market infographic (Graphic: Business Wire)

The report recommended that fraud prevention vendors focus on building platforms providing AI‑powered risk-based scoring, which can be payment method agnostic, to best suit changing market conditions.

Online payment fraud includes losses across sales of digital goods, physical goods, money transfer transactions and banking, as well as purchases like airline ticketing. Fraudster attacks can include phishing, business email compromises and socially engineered fraud.

North America Tops League Table for Fraud

The research identified North America as having the largest fraudulent transaction value of any regional market, accounting for over 42% of global fraud by value in 2023, despite representing less than 7% of banked individuals globally. The research cited the vast volume of data breaches and the broad availability of stolen credit card information as key risk factors in this market.

Research author Nick Maynard explained: "To combat this fraud, eCommerce merchants must implement simple steps such as address verification, combined with risk-based scoring on transactions, which will allow merchants to best mitigate the massive fraud threats present."

BNPL Fraud – A Major Risk

Additionally, the research found that the potential of fraud with BNPL is a major risk going forward. Given the delayed nature of BNPL payments, fraudsters can make several illegitimate payments using stolen card details before the fraudulent activity is identified, creating significant risk. In turn, the research recommended that BNPL vendors conduct robust identity verification at the point of onboarding to mitigate these risks.

Online Payment Fraud market research: https://www.juniperresearch.com/researchstore/fintech-payments/online-payment-fraud-research-report

Download the free whitepaper: https://www.juniperresearch.com/whitepapers/fighting-online-payment-fraud-in-2022-beyond

Juniper Research provides research and analytical services to the global hi-tech communications sector; providing consultancy, analyst reports, and industry commentary.

View source version on businesswire.com: https://www.businesswire.com/news/home/20221011005739/en/

Contacts

Sam Smith, Press Relations
T: +44(0)1256 830002
E: sam.smith@juniperresearch.com

Wed, 12 Oct 2022 02:59:00 -0500 en-US text/html https://finance.yahoo.com/news/juniper-research-ecommerce-losses-online-060000415.html
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