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Exam Code: JN0-1300 Practice exam 2022 by Killexams.com team
JN0-1300 Juniper Networks Certified Design Specialist Data Center

Exam Name : Data Center Design Specialist
Exam Number : JN0-1301 JNCDS-DC
Exam Duration : 90 minutes
Questions in exam : 65
Passing Score : Variable (60-70% Approx.)
Recommended Training : Juniper Networks Design - Data Center (JND-DC)
Exam Registration : PEARSON VUE
Real Questions : Juniper JN0-1301 Real Questions
VCE practice questions : Juniper Networks Certified Design Specialist Data Center Practice Test

Data Center Design Considerations
Describe the concepts of data center design
- Physical considerations including placement, cabling, power, heating, and cooling
- Access switch placement
- Traditional multi-tiered design
- Management
- Automation
- Data center monitoring
- Data center support and serviceability

Ethernet Fabric Architectures
Describe the design considerations of data center Ethernet Fabric architectures
- Virtual Chassis
- Virtual Chassis Fabric
- Fusion

IP Fabric Architectures
Describe the design considerations of a data center IP fabric
- Layer 3 overlay networking
- Layer 3 control plane options

Data Center Interconnect
Describe the design considerations for interconnecting data centers
- MPLS
- Layer 3 VPNs
- VPLS
- EVPN
- VXLAN

Data Center Security
Describe the design considerations for securing the data center
- Micro-perimeterization
- Micro-segmentation
- Virtual routers
- Firewalls
- Security automation
- Device sprawl
- Data classification
- Risk management

Virtualization in the Data Center
Describe the design considerations for virtualization in the data center
- NFV
- ETSI standards
- Virtualization security
- SDN

Traffic Prioritization in the Data Center
Describe the design considerations for traffic prioritization in the data center
- QoS
- CoS
- DCB

High Availability in the Data Center
Describe the design considerations for high availability in the data center
- Business continuity
- Device-level high availability features
- Intra-DC high availability
- Inter-DC high availability

Juniper Networks Certified Design Specialist Data Center
Juniper Specialist Topics
Killexams : Juniper Specialist syllabus - BingNews https://killexams.com/pass4sure/exam-detail/JN0-1300 Search results Killexams : Juniper Specialist syllabus - BingNews https://killexams.com/pass4sure/exam-detail/JN0-1300 https://killexams.com/exam_list/Juniper Killexams : Juniper cultivars deserve more consideration | Tony Tomeo

Fads come and go. Many can be good, even if only briefly. A few might be bad enough to later stigmatize the object of the fad. For example, the formerly esteemed crape myrtle is now familiar as a mundanely common tree.

Flashy bloom and complaisance contributed to its excessive popularity. Most sorts of juniper are similarly victims of their previous fad.

A few cultivars of juniper suddenly became overly popular during suburbanization of the 1950s. They were remarkably reliable and resilient. Most were shrubbery or low hedges. A few were groundcover.

Hollywood juniper grew as a compact sculptural tree. However, most junipers grew too big. They became difficult to maintain, or impossible to renovate.

As many outgrew suburban gardens, few junipers outgrew their reputation. Even modern cultivars that were unavailable during the fad of the 1950s are perhaps less popular than they should be. Realistically, many old and new cultivars of juniper are quite practical for refined home gardens. They merely need to be appropriate to their particular application.

Many cultivars of several species of Juniperus are commonly available. Straight species are very rare from nurseries, although a few are native nearby.

All junipers are evergreen with tiny awl or scale leaves. Foliar color ranges from forest green to silvery gray. Bloom is unremarkable. Some junipers produce pretty and aromatic blue, gray or black berries.

Junipers generally do not respond favorably to pruning that damages their natural forms. Those that grow as groundcovers, with stems that sprawl over the surface of the soil, are not offended by pruning to contain their edges. However, most groundcover junipers are actually just low shrubbery. Pruning might leave holes within their dense foliar canopies.

Junipers that grow as small trees do not mind removal of lower limbs at their main trunks, but object to partial pruning or 'stubbing' of such limbs. Regardless of their natural forms, all junipers should be proportionate to their particular applications.

With sufficient space, they can mature and develop their naturally distinguished forms with minimal altercation. Maintenance could really be quite minimal.

Rocky Mountain juniper

Hollywood juniper had formerly been the only popular juniper of tree form. As it became less popular during the past few decades, cultivars of the once obscure Rocky Mountain juniper, Juniperus scopulorum, became more popular.

Also, a few more modern cultivars became available. Now, the once overly common Hollywood juniper is quite uncommon.

Rocky Mountain juniper is naturally rather grayish for protection from the harsh exposure of the high elevations which it inhabits. Cultivars are grayer, bluish or silvery, and mostly develop symmetrically conical form.

Old specimens that were initially conical eventually grow as small trees with rounded and relatively dense canopies, perhaps on bare trunks.

'Skyrocket' and 'Blue Arrow' are very narrow like Italian cypress that grow only 15 feet tall. 'Wichita Blue' and 'Moonglow' are stoutly conical. 'Blue Arrow' and 'Wichita Blue' are bluish green. 'Skyrocket' and 'Moonglow' are silvery gray.

Established specimens do not require much water, but develop better foliar color with warmth and occasional watering.

Sat, 08 Oct 2022 01:01:00 -0500 en text/html https://lompocrecord.com/lifestyles/juniper-cultivars-deserve-more-consideration-tony-tomeo/article_2de545b7-6bcf-52a5-9617-3af9196e2524.html
Killexams : New resource sheds light on tree encroachment on sagebrush ecosystems

Extensive research shows that native conifer trees, such as juniper and pinyon pine, have been increasing their footprint on the landscape at an unprecedented rate for the past 150 years, especially in places such as the Great Basin, where 1.1 million acres have transitioned from shrubland or rangeland to woodlands since 2000. This accelerated conversion of shrubland and grassland ecosystems to woodlands is having undesirable impacts, including the loss of unique wildlife and wildlife habitat, reduced water availability and increased runoff and erosion, less land available for livestock grazing, and greater fuel loading for wildfires.

A new website by the collaborative “PJ (pinyon-juniper) Encroachment Education Project” sheds light on the issue. The site is also a resource for those trying to manage this threat, particularly in the Great Basin, where encroaching pinyon pine and juniper trees are taking over sagebrush ecosystems and contributing to the decrease of imperiled species such as the sage grouse.

“The whole thrust of this project is to provide science-based information on the ecology and impacts of the problem, as well as the collaborative work being done to address it,” said Christina Restaino, natural resource specialist with University of Nevada, Reno Extension, the organization leading the project. “The website is intended to help people understand the issue and serve as a clearinghouse of information to help land managers, professionals and agencies throughout the West in their collaborative efforts.”

Restaino, who is also an assistant professor in the University’s College of Agriculture, Biotechnology & Natural Resources, said a new report by the U.S. Geological Survey and Western Association of Fish & Wildlife Agencies identifies tree encroachment as one of the top three threats to sagebrush ecosystems – the other two being invasive species and land development.

The website launched today and includes sections explaining the ecology of how and where the conversion is happening, as well as outlining the impacts of sagebrush range converting to woodlands. The “Resilience in Action” section shows projects being done around the West to manage the issue. Finally, there is an impressive “See the Science” section, where online viewers can search a database with over 400 peer-reviewed articles on an interactive map for information on the issue by location, topic, key word or year.

The partners in the project worked for two years to build the website, diving into research; holding multiple stakeholder working sessions; working with web designers to create an organized, easy-to-navigate site; and working with a technical illustrator to provide clear, accessible graphics for the site. Partners in the project include the USDA Natural Resources Conservation Service’s Working Lands for Wildlife partnership, the Bureau of Land Management, and the Intermountain West Joint Venture’s Partnering to Conserve Sagebrush Rangelands initiative.

“Communicating why more trees everywhere isn’t always a good thing is a real challenge for land managers charged with conserving nonforest lands,” said Jeremy Maestas, who is part of the working group and a sagebrush ecosystem specialist with the USDA-NRCS. “With Extension, we were able to build a website that helps broad audiences understand the science behind the problem.”

Besides the devastating effect on sagebrush-dependent wildlife, Maestas points out there are also economic impacts of the encroachment.

“In the Intermountain West, 90% of tree encroachment has occurred in sagebrush shrublands, a habitat type that has already been reduced by half due to a wide variety of threats. Species like sage grouse, found nowhere else in the world, will abandon breeding habitats when there are just a few trees per acre. Encroaching trees also suck up precious soil moisture needed on arid lands to grow other native grasses and wildflowers, which means less food and cover not only for wildlife, but also for livestock that sustain rural agricultural economies in the West.”

Mandi Hirsch, sagebrush collaborative conservation specialist for the Intermountain West Joint Venture and leader of the Partnering to Conserve Sagebrush Rangelands initiative, is also part of the project’s working group. She knows firsthand the impact the encroachment of trees on rangeland can have to ranchers. Hirsch is a rancher at heart and by trade who now also works toward the conservation and sustainability of Western rangelands.

“The conservation of a unique species like sage grouse is very important, but it’s only part of the entire picture when managing natural resources at a landscape scale. What many people don’t realize is there are many other potentially devastating impacts of encroachment – including jeopardizing the livelihoods of our ranchers and their ability to produce food. I really think this website can help people to understand that, and all the other impacts of this encroachment. And, I think it will be a tremendous ongoing resource for those trying to do something about it.”

Fri, 14 Oct 2022 21:52:00 -0500 en-us text/html https://www.unr.edu/nevada-today/news/2022/tree-encroachment-on-sagebrush-ecosystems-
Killexams : Four of five pinyon-juniper tree species declining in their ranges in the West

Pinyon-juniper woodlands host unique wildlife and wildlife habitat, as well as areas for hiking and outdoor recreation. They are also part of a web of healthy ecosystems that, together, help to balance water availability, storage and runoff; and prevent erosion. A new study published in Global Ecology and Biogeography and led by University of Nevada, Reno researcher Robert Shriver sheds new light on what is happening in pinyon-juniper woodlands across the West. The research is unique, in that it looks at both tree mortality, as well as recruitment, or new seedlings and saplings, to calculate a "net effect." And, the news isn't necessarily good, particularly in warmer, drier locations.

"We found that four of the five species were declining," said Shriver, an assistant professor in the University's College of Agriculture, Biotechnology & Natural Resources. "And, in the driest, warmest locations, up to about 50% of populations are declining. It's pretty severe in those locations, which are usually at lower elevations that tend to be hotter and get less water than woodlands at higher elevations."

Shriver said that when looking at all locations studied, which included over 6,000 plots and more than 59,000 tagged trees, up to 10-20% of populations were declining. Of the five species, including two pinyon pines and three junipers, Pinus edulis, more commonly referred to as two-needle pinyon or simply pinyon, showed the greatest declines, with about 24% of its populations in decline. The other pinyon species and two of the juniper species showed more moderate declines overall, but still quite severe declines in the hotter, drier areas. These species include Pinus monophylla (single-leaf pinyon), Juniperus monosperma (one-seed juniper) and Juniperus scopulorum (Rocky Mountain juniper). Juniperus osteosperma (Utah juniper) was the only species that did not show a decline.

"Utah juniper was the exception to everything," Shriver, who conducts research as part of the College's Department of Natural Resources & Environmental Science and Experiment Station, said. "What we found pretty much matches up with what we know about that species' resiliency. It's the most abundant in the Great Basin, and is typically less vulnerable to hotter, drier climate conditions, so it could mean that there might be compositional shifts occurring in the future, where some areas that are mixed species might become more juniper-dominated."

Gathering the data and building the models

In part, Shriver used data from the Forest Inventory and Analysis, a nationwide survey of forested lands in the U.S., conducted by the U.S. Forest Service.

"They tag the trees and return to the same plots for comparison at least every 10 years, but they have a systematic scheme to determine where," he explained. "They are making sure they are getting a broad trial of both federal and private land. The result is a representative trial of what all forests look like across the U.S., even covering some very remote locations. It's staggered, with 10% of plots surveyed in a given year."

Shriver said the plots that were included in this pinyon-juniper research were first sampled between 2000 and 2007, and were surveyed the second time between 2010 and 2017. It is data obtained within those 10-year spans that he used for the research. He pointed out, however, that the Forest Service survey doesn't capture as complete data on recruitment, or seedlings, since they don't tag anything under 1 inch in diameter. Trees of this size are counted, but not tagged.

"Recruitment is the really hard part," he said. "Tree mortality is easy to see, but recruitment is harder to observe, so it's been harder to account for. Having a stable population is dependent on both mortality and recruitment. So, we developed a new statistical approach that allowed us to understand and factor in recruitment. Using these modeling approaches, we were able to quantify what the recruitment rate is in these different areas, and then combine that data with the mortality data to get a more clear, accurate picture of what is really going on in terms of change in species' populations under different climate conditions and woodland densities in different regions."

The research excluded plots where fire mortality or intentional tree harvesting occurred, allowing the researchers to more directly observe changes occurring due to climatic conditions across each species' range.

Impacts of the findings

Shriver says the declines in populations they calculated could be significant for a number of reasons.

"In regard to wildlife, probably the most significant effect is on the pinyon jay, which has been in decline for the last couple of decades, and is really dependent on the seed that is produced by pinyon pine," he said. "The areas where the pinyon jay tends to choose are on that border of the sagebrush and the pinyon. It likes those habitats that are probably the most vulnerable. But, beyond the pinyon jay, certainly a number of species could be affected -- mule deer, and other birds and wildlife."

In addition, Shriver said pinyons and pine nut harvesting are culturally important, to Native Americans and others, and pinyon-juniper woodlands provide recreational value for hikers and outdoor enthusiasts. Importantly, he adds, there's the functions that pinyon-juniper woodlands play in our watersheds. Pinyon-juniper woodlands play an important role in water and soil retention in some locations.

What does the future hold?

"We are likely to see pretty big changes in where we find forests in the Great Basin and the Southwest over the next few decades," Shriver said. "A lot of places where we saw forests, we may not see them, especially in lower elevations, because they tend to be the hottest and driest."

Shriver said there has been a lot of expansion in these woodlands since the mid-1800s, and that some declines may not be a bad thing everywhere. For example, in some areas the pinyon-juniper woodlands have encroached on shrubland ecosystems that provide important ecosystem services and unique wildlife habitat. And, the trees, especially when packed in too densely and without enough moisture, also increase the intensity of wildfires.

"Our results also suggest that for some locations, management actions could slow down or reverse the woodland declines," Shriver said. "As it gets warmer and drier, the density of trees a landscape is able to support lessens, so reductions in tree density might expand the envelope of where the trees can be, reducing the chance of large tree mortality events."

While woodland decline could create an opportunity for expansion of native shrublands such as sagebrush, Shriver cautioned that other, less beneficial vegetation could also take hold.

"Just because the pinyon and juniper die off, doesn't mean something desirable would establish in their place," he said. "You might get cheatgrass or other undesirable vegetation."

Shriver said the purpose of the research and models it created is to help anticipate the vulnerability of woodlands and forecast coming range shifts, so that we might be able to sway the outcomes to be more positive ones.

"If we know where this is likely to happen, we can do the best we can to influence what might happen next," he said. "We might be able to direct these into ecosystems that might support native plants and animals in the Great Basin and the Southwest, and fit into our watersheds in a beneficial way."

Funding for the study was provided by the United States Geological Survey North Central Climate Adaptation Science Center. Coauthors of the study include Charles B. Yackulic and John B. Bradford, with the USGS Southwest Biological Science Center; and David M. Bell, with the USDA Forest Service Pacific Northwest Research Station.

Wed, 12 Oct 2022 12:08:00 -0500 en text/html https://www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2022/10/221006160635.htm
Killexams : Spire Wealth Management Sells 881 Shares of Juniper Networks, Inc. (NYSE:JNPR)

Spire Wealth Management reduced its stake in shares of Juniper Networks, Inc. (NYSE:JNPRGet Rating) by 39.7% in the 2nd quarter, according to the company in its most accurate filing with the Securities & Exchange Commission. The fund owned 1,338 shares of the network equipment provider’s stock after selling 881 shares during the period. Spire Wealth Management’s holdings in Juniper Networks were worth $38,000 at the end of the most accurate quarter.

Several other large investors have also bought and sold shares of JNPR. BlackRock Inc. raised its position in Juniper Networks by 9.4% during the 4th quarter. BlackRock Inc. now owns 34,261,011 shares of the network equipment provider’s stock worth $1,223,460,000 after purchasing an additional 2,939,731 shares during the last quarter. Sadoff Investment Management LLC bought a new position in shares of Juniper Networks in the 1st quarter worth about $31,646,000. Robeco Institutional Asset Management B.V. boosted its holdings in shares of Juniper Networks by 57.9% during the 1st quarter. Robeco Institutional Asset Management B.V. now owns 1,887,320 shares of the network equipment provider’s stock worth $70,132,000 after buying an additional 691,998 shares in the last quarter. Panagora Asset Management Inc. lifted its holdings in shares of Juniper Networks by 1,065.8% in the 1st quarter. Panagora Asset Management Inc. now owns 688,722 shares of the network equipment provider’s stock worth $25,593,000 after purchasing an additional 629,643 shares in the last quarter. Finally, Smith Group Asset Management LLC bought a new position in shares of Juniper Networks in the 1st quarter worth $21,790,000. 91.28% of the stock is owned by institutional investors.

Juniper Networks Trading Down 1.9 %

Shares of Juniper Networks stock opened at $25.81 on Monday. Juniper Networks, Inc. has a 1 year low of $25.18 and a 1 year high of $38.14. The firm has a market cap of $8.33 billion, a PE ratio of 21.69, a P/E/G ratio of 2.49 and a beta of 0.86. The stock has a fifty day moving average price of $27.84 and a 200-day moving average price of $29.68. The company has a debt-to-equity ratio of 0.38, a current ratio of 1.58 and a quick ratio of 1.37.

Juniper Networks (NYSE:JNPRGet Rating) last announced its earnings results on Tuesday, July 26th. The network equipment provider reported $0.27 earnings per share (EPS) for the quarter, missing the consensus estimate of $0.33 by ($0.06). Juniper Networks had a net margin of 7.93% and a return on equity of 9.14%. The business had revenue of $1.27 billion for the quarter, compared to analysts’ expectations of $1.26 billion. Equities research analysts anticipate that Juniper Networks, Inc. will post 1.38 EPS for the current year.

Juniper Networks Announces Dividend

The company also recently declared a quarterly dividend, which was paid on Thursday, September 22nd. Stockholders of record on Thursday, September 1st were paid a dividend of $0.21 per share. The ex-dividend date of this dividend was Wednesday, August 31st. This represents a $0.84 annualized dividend and a dividend yield of 3.25%. Juniper Networks’s payout ratio is 70.59%.

Analysts Set New Price Targets

JNPR has been the Topic of a number of accurate research reports. KeyCorp cut their target price on Juniper Networks from $46.00 to $36.00 and set an “overweight” rating on the stock in a report on Wednesday, July 27th. Rosenblatt Securities cut their target price on Juniper Networks from $33.00 to $32.00 and set a “neutral” rating on the stock in a report on Wednesday, July 27th. Evercore ISI cut their target price on Juniper Networks from $35.00 to $33.00 and set an “in-line” rating on the stock in a report on Tuesday, June 28th. StockNews.com initiated coverage on Juniper Networks in a report on Wednesday, October 12th. They issued a “buy” rating on the stock. Finally, Citigroup lowered their price target on Juniper Networks from $36.00 to $30.00 and set a “neutral” rating for the company in a research report on Wednesday, July 27th. Four analysts have rated the stock with a sell rating, four have issued a hold rating and nine have given a buy rating to the company’s stock. Based on data from MarketBeat, the stock presently has a consensus rating of “Hold” and a consensus target price of $33.35.

Insider Transactions at Juniper Networks

In other news, CEO Rami Rahim sold 6,250 shares of the stock in a transaction on Thursday, September 8th. The stock was sold at an average price of $28.56, for a total transaction of $178,500.00. Following the completion of the transaction, the chief executive officer now owns 819,985 shares in the company, valued at approximately $23,418,771.60. The transaction was disclosed in a filing with the Securities & Exchange Commission, which can be accessed through this hyperlink. In the last 90 days, insiders sold 25,000 shares of company stock worth $702,313. 1.30% of the stock is owned by company insiders.

Juniper Networks Profile

(Get Rating)

Juniper Networks, Inc designs, develops, and sells network products and services worldwide. The company offers routing products, such as ACX series universal access routers to deploy high-bandwidth services; MX series Ethernet routers that function as a universal edge platform; PTX series packet transport routers; wide-area network SDN controllers; and session smart routers.

Further Reading

Institutional Ownership by Quarter for Juniper Networks (NYSE:JNPR)

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Sun, 16 Oct 2022 22:26:00 -0500 Defense World Staff en text/html https://www.defenseworld.net/2022/10/17/spire-wealth-management-sells-881-shares-of-juniper-networks-inc-nysejnpr.html
Killexams : Virtual-Q Selects Juniper Networks to Provide Scalable, Automated Data Center Infrastructure

Juniper Apstra solution enables simplified data center management and reliable operations to deliver a better user experience for customers

SUNNYVALE, Calif., October 11, 2022--(BUSINESS WIRE)--Juniper Networks (NYSE: JNPR), a leader in secure, AI-driven networks, today announced that Virtual-Q, a provider of IT Services and IT Consulting, has selected Juniper Apstra data center solutions to modernize and automate its network infrastructure to provide a scalable and seamless customer experience.

Based in Houston, Texas, Virtual-Q specializes in IT-as-a-Service through its hosted desktop solution, streamlining the costs associated with remote IT solutions. The company delivers enterprise-class security, computing, support and disaster recovery solutions to businesses across all sectors and sizes.

Virtual-Q had been operating with a network that lacked scalability and struggled to meet the increasing hybrid and virtual customer demands associated with the pandemic. With the need to accommodate large-scale growth but also be able to easily manage and operate, Virtual-Q turned to Juniper Networks to help design and build their new network, along with support from Juniper’s partner GDT. Apstra was deployed to simplify and automate data center operations management from design to deployment through everyday operations and assurance. Additionally, Apstra delivers a high level of visibility into the network fabric, allowing for faster resolution times and increased operational efficiencies. With an approach to data center operations based on the insight that a reliability-focused strategy results in speed and efficiency, Apstra enables Virtual-Q to transform their operations.

By also deploying Juniper’s QFX switches, EX switches and MX series universal routing platforms, Virtual-Q is well-positioned to expand its capacity with 400G bandwidth, develop a cloud-ready network infrastructure that can grow alongside its evolving data center needs and meet its 1,082 percent annual growth rate. The company also utilizes Juniper professional services.

Supporting Quotes:

"Juniper Apstra allows us to seamlessly manage and automate our data center infrastructure without compromising our ability to serve our customers. With Apstra’s intent-based design, operators can focus on what needs to be accomplished in the data center instead of how it should be done. As one of the most user-friendly products on the market, we are excited to see the transformation Apstra will bring to our network operations."

- Victor J. Quinones, Jr., Founder and CEO, Virtual-Q

"In addition to simplifying data center management, Apstra allows its customers to automate each aspect of the design, deployment and operation of their data center infrastructure. Apstra enables Virtual-Q to lay a strong foundation for reliable and flexible operations regardless of vendor."

- Mansour Karam, VP of Products, Juniper Networks

Additional Resources:

  • Product & Solution Pages:

About Juniper Networks

Juniper Networks is dedicated to dramatically simplifying network operations and driving superior experiences for end users. Our solutions deliver industry-leading insight, automation, security and AI to drive real business results. We believe that powering connections will bring us closer together while empowering us all to solve the world’s greatest challenges of well-being, sustainability and equality. Additional information can be found at Juniper Networks (www.juniper.net) or connect with Juniper on Twitter, LinkedIn and Facebook.

Juniper Networks, the Juniper Networks logo, Juniper, Junos, and other trademarks listed here are registered trademarks of Juniper Networks, Inc. and/or its affiliates in the United States and other countries. Other names may be trademarks of their respective owners.

category-datacenter

View source version on businesswire.com: https://www.businesswire.com/news/home/20221011005526/en/

Contacts

Media Relations:
Kelsey Akerson
Juniper Networks
+1 (503) 860-9890
kakerson@juniper.net

Tue, 11 Oct 2022 06:02:00 -0500 en-US text/html https://www.yahoo.com/entertainment/virtual-q-selects-juniper-networks-114500108.html
Killexams : Juniper Networks Appoints New Chief Revenue Officer

SUNNYVALE, Calif.--(BUSINESS WIRE)--Oct 13, 2022--

Juniper Networks (NYSE: JNPR), a leader in secure, AI-driven networks, announced today that effective October 17, 2022, Chris Kaddaras has been named Executive Vice President and Chief Revenue Officer, reporting to Chief Executive Officer, Rami Rahim. Mr. Kaddaras will be responsible for continuing Juniper's sales growth momentum and driving the strategic and operational elements of the sales and partner functions for the company. Mr. Kaddaras will lead a global organization that includes direct and indirect sales, systems engineering, advanced technologies sales and field operations.

“I've watched Juniper change the networking industry by enabling digital transformation for customers of all shapes and sizes that are increasingly seeking cloud-delivered, AI-driven and secure solutions to power their strategic evolutions. It’s no longer enough for a network to be ‘up;’ it must also be ‘good’, and Juniper is uniquely positioned to deliver on that promise. The opportunity to continue to grow Juniper’s market share in enterprise and continue to serve as a trusted strategic partner with service providers and cloud providers is huge. And as a sales leader, it’s always exciting to have technology that’s not only highly differentiated but can also actually deliver real outcomes for organizations. I couldn’t be more motivated to join this team.” - Chris Kaddaras, executive vice president and chief revenue officer, Juniper Networks

Prior to Juniper, Chris served as Chief Revenue Officer at Transmit Security, a provider of customer identity and access management SaaS solutions. Before that, he held multiple roles at Nutanix from 2016-2021, including Chief Revenue Officer. Prior to joining Nutanix, Chris was with EMC Corporation for 16 years, where he held positions including Vice President of Commercial Sales and Vice President of Sales Engineering across EMEA.

“Juniper has achieved significant growth recently as we've executed on our experience-first networking strategy and deliberately reinvented ourselves for a new era of highly automated and secure networks that simplify operations and enable seamless end-user experiences. Chris’ 25-plus years of experience as a data-driven operational leader, building and leading winning sales teams, will help Juniper accelerate along our proven path. I’ve never been more optimistic and excited about our opportunity ahead to scale our momentum, and I’m thrilled to welcome Chris to Juniper.” - Rami Rahim, chief executive officer, Juniper Networks

About Juniper Networks

Juniper Networks is dedicated to dramatically simplifying network operations and driving superior experiences for end users. Our solutions deliver industry-leading insight, automation, security and AI to drive real business results. We believe that powering connections will bring us closer together while empowering us all to solve the world’s greatest challenges of well-being, sustainability and equality. Additional information can be found at Juniper Networks ( www.juniper.net ) or connect with Juniper on Twitter, LinkedIn and Facebook.

Juniper Networks, the Juniper Networks logo, Juniper, Junos, and other trademarks listedhereare registered trademarks of Juniper Networks, Inc. and/or its affiliates in the United States and other countries. Other names may be trademarks of their respective owners.

category - Corporate

View source version on businesswire.com:https://www.businesswire.com/news/home/20221013005371/en/

CONTACT: Leslie Moore

Chief Communications Officer

llmoore@juniper.net

KEYWORD: UNITED STATES NORTH AMERICA CALIFORNIA

INDUSTRY KEYWORD: DATA MANAGEMENT TECHNOLOGY SECURITY OTHER TECHNOLOGY TELECOMMUNICATIONS ARTIFICIAL INTELLIGENCE NETWORKS INTERNET MOBILE/WIRELESS HARDWARE ELECTRONIC DESIGN AUTOMATION

SOURCE: Juniper Networks

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PUB: 10/13/2022 07:45 AM/DISC: 10/13/2022 07:47 AM

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Thu, 13 Oct 2022 00:00:00 -0500 en text/html https://www.joplinglobe.com/region/national_business/juniper-networks-appoints-new-chief-revenue-officer/article_76044ab2-421a-5f29-a5d9-880b0816b40c.html
Killexams : Grant Gustin Shares Adorable Video Dancing With Daughter Juniper

Grant Gustin is giving fans a super cute peak into his life as a dad!

The 32-year-old The Flash star uploaded a new video on Instagram of him tap dancing on the deck with his one year old daughter Juniper.

“Looks like Julie Andrews, dances like Debbie Reynolds,” he captioned the clip.

Check out the video inside…

Supergirl‘s Melissa Benoist commented, “This is maybe too much for me to handle,” while Arrow‘s John Barrowman wrote, “That’s how it starts… come and meet those dancing feet.”

Grant is of course no stranger to performing. He was on a National Broadway Revival Tour of West Side Story when he booked a recurring role on Glee!

He also shared a cute photo of him and Juniper sitting on a fallen tree, captioning it with a heart.

If you didn’t know, Grant and his wife LA Thoma welcomed Juniper in the summer of 2021.

Currently, Grant is in the early stages of filming the upcoming ninth and final season of The Flash, which will be a little shorter.

He also has a movie coming out with Lucy Hale!

Like Just Jared Jr. on FB
Wed, 12 Oct 2022 11:10:00 -0500 en-US text/html https://www.justjaredjr.com/2022/10/12/grant-gustin-shares-adorable-video-dancing-with-daughter-juniper/ Killexams : Four of five pinyon-juniper tree species declining in their ranges in the West

Pinyon-juniper woodlands host unique wildlife and wildlife habitat, as well as areas for hiking and outdoor recreation. They are also part of a web of healthy ecosystems that, together, help to balance water availability, storage and runoff; and prevent erosion. A new study published in Global Ecology and Biogeography and led by University of Nevada, Reno researcher Robert Shriver sheds new light on what is happening in pinyon-juniper woodlands across the West. The research is unique, in that it looks at both tree mortality, as well as recruitment, or new seedlings and saplings, to calculate a "net effect." And, the news isn't necessarily good, particularly in warmer, drier locations.

"We found that four of the five species were declining," said Shriver, an assistant professor in the University's College of Agriculture, Biotechnology & Natural Resources. "And, in the driest, warmest locations, up to about 50% of populations are declining. It's pretty severe in those locations, which are usually at that tend to be hotter and get less water than woodlands at higher elevations."

Shriver said that when looking at all locations studied, which included over 6,000 plots and more than 59,000 tagged trees, up to 10-20% of populations were declining. Of the five species, including two pinyon pines and three junipers, Pinus edulis, more commonly referred to as two-needle pinyon or simply pinyon, showed the greatest declines, with about 24% of its populations in decline. The other pinyon species and two of the juniper species showed more moderate declines overall, but still quite severe declines in the hotter, drier areas. These species include Pinus monophylla (single-leaf pinyon), Juniperus monosperma (one-seed juniper) and Juniperus scopulorum (Rocky Mountain juniper). Juniperus osteosperma (Utah juniper) was the only species that did not show a decline.

"Utah juniper was the exception to everything," Shriver, who conducts research as part of the College's Department of Natural Resources & Environmental Science and Experiment Station, said. "What we found pretty much matches up with what we know about that species' resiliency. It's the most abundant in the Great Basin, and is typically less vulnerable to hotter, drier climate conditions, so it could mean that there might be compositional shifts occurring in the future, where some areas that are mixed species might become more juniper-dominated."

Gathering the data and building the models

In part, Shriver used data from the Forest Inventory and Analysis, a nationwide survey of forested lands in the U.S., conducted by the U.S. Forest Service.

"They tag the trees and return to the same plots for comparison at least every 10 years, but they have a systematic scheme to determine where," he explained. "They are making sure they are getting a broad trial of both federal and private land. The result is a representative trial of what all forests look like across the U.S., even covering some very remote locations. It's staggered, with 10% of plots surveyed in a given year."

Shriver said the plots that were included in this pinyon-juniper research were first sampled between 2000 and 2007, and were surveyed the second time between 2010 and 2017. It is data obtained within those 10-year spans that he used for the research. He pointed out, however, that the Forest Service survey doesn't capture as complete data on recruitment, or seedlings, since they don't tag anything under 1 inch in diameter. Trees of this size are counted, but not tagged.

"Recruitment is the really hard part," he said. "Tree mortality is easy to see, but recruitment is harder to observe, so it's been harder to account for. Having a stable population is dependent on both mortality and recruitment. So, we developed a new statistical approach that allowed us to understand and factor in recruitment. Using these modeling approaches, we were able to quantify what the recruitment rate is in these different areas, and then combine that data with the mortality data to get a more clear, accurate picture of what is really going on in terms of change in species' populations under different climate conditions and woodland densities in different regions."

The research excluded plots where fire mortality or intentional tree harvesting occurred, allowing the researchers to more directly observe changes occurring due to climatic conditions across each species' range.

Impacts of the findings

Shriver says the declines in populations they calculated could be significant for a number of reasons.

"In regard to wildlife, probably the most significant effect is on the pinyon jay, which has been in decline for the last couple of decades, and is really dependent on the seed that is produced by pinyon pine," he said. "The areas where the pinyon jay tends to choose are on that border of the sagebrush and the pinyon. It likes those habitats that are probably the most vulnerable. But, beyond the pinyon jay, certainly a number of species could be affected—mule deer, and other birds and wildlife."

In addition, Shriver said pinyons and pine nut harvesting are culturally important, to Native Americans and others, and pinyon-juniper woodlands provide recreational value for hikers and outdoor enthusiasts. Importantly, he adds, there's the functions that pinyon-juniper woodlands play in our watersheds. Pinyon-juniper woodlands play an important role in water and soil retention in some locations.

What does the future hold?

"We are likely to see pretty big changes in where we find forests in the Great Basin and the Southwest over the next few decades," Shriver said. "A lot of places where we saw forests, we may not see them, especially in lower elevations, because they tend to be the hottest and driest."

Shriver said there has been a lot of expansion in these woodlands since the mid-1800s, and that some declines may not be a bad thing everywhere. For example, in some areas the pinyon-juniper woodlands have encroached on shrubland ecosystems that provide important ecosystem services and unique wildlife habitat. And, the trees, especially when packed in too densely and without enough moisture, also increase the intensity of wildfires.

"Our results also suggest that for some locations, management actions could slow down or reverse the woodland declines," Shriver said. "As it gets warmer and drier, the density of trees a landscape is able to support lessens, so reductions in tree density might expand the envelope of where the trees can be, reducing the chance of large events."

While woodland decline could create an opportunity for expansion of native shrublands such as sagebrush, Shriver cautioned that other, less beneficial vegetation could also take hold.

"Just because the pinyon and juniper die off, doesn't mean something desirable would establish in their place," he said. "You might get cheatgrass or other undesirable vegetation."

Shriver said the purpose of the research and models it created is to help anticipate the vulnerability of woodlands and forecast coming range shifts, so that we might be able to sway the outcomes to be more positive ones.

"If we know where this is likely to happen, we can do the best we can to influence what might happen next," he said. "We might be able to direct these into ecosystems that might support native plants and animals in the Great Basin and the Southwest, and fit into our watersheds in a beneficial way."



More information: Robert K. Shriver et al, Dry forest decline is driven by both declining recruitment and increasing mortality in response to warm, dry conditions, Global Ecology and Biogeography (2022). DOI: 10.1111/geb.13582

Citation: Four of five pinyon-juniper tree species declining in their ranges in the West (2022, October 6) retrieved 17 October 2022 from https://phys.org/news/2022-10-pinyon-juniper-tree-species-declining-ranges.html

This document is subject to copyright. Apart from any fair dealing for the purpose of private study or research, no part may be reproduced without the written permission. The content is provided for information purposes only.

Wed, 05 Oct 2022 19:56:00 -0500 en text/html https://phys.org/news/2022-10-pinyon-juniper-tree-species-declining-ranges.html
Killexams : Virtual-Q Selects Juniper Networks to Provide Scalable, Automated Data Center Infrastructure

SUNNYVALE, Calif.--(BUSINESS WIRE)--Oct 11, 2022--

Juniper Networks (NYSE: JNPR), a leader in secure, AI-driven networks, today announced that Virtual-Q, a provider of IT Services and IT Consulting, has selected Juniper Apstra data center solutions to modernize and automate its network infrastructure to provide a scalable and seamless customer experience.

Based in Houston, Texas, Virtual-Q specializes in IT-as-a-Service through its hosted desktop solution, streamlining the costs associated with remote IT solutions. The company delivers enterprise-class security, computing, support and disaster recovery solutions to businesses across all sectors and sizes.

Virtual-Q had been operating with a network that lacked scalability and struggled to meet the increasing hybrid and virtual customer demands associated with the pandemic. With the need to accommodate large-scale growth but also be able to easily manage and operate, Virtual-Q turned to Juniper Networks to help design and build their new network, along with support from Juniper’s partner GDT. Apstra was deployed to simplify and automate data center operations management from design to deployment through everyday operations and assurance. Additionally, Apstra delivers a high level of visibility into the network fabric, allowing for faster resolution times and increased operational efficiencies. With an approach to data center operations based on the insight that a reliability-focused strategy results in speed and efficiency, Apstra enables Virtual-Q to transform their operations.

By also deploying Juniper’s QFX switches, EX switches and MX series universal routing platforms, Virtual-Q is well-positioned to expand its capacity with 400G bandwidth, develop a cloud-ready network infrastructure that can grow alongside its evolving data center needs and meet its 1,082 percent annual growth rate. The company also utilizes Juniper professional services.

Supporting Quotes:

“Juniper Apstra allows us to seamlessly manage and automate our data center infrastructure without compromising our ability to serve our customers. With Apstra’s intent-based design, operators can focus on what needs to be accomplished in the data center instead of how it should be done. As one of the most user-friendly products on the market, we are excited to see the transformation Apstra will bring to our network operations.”

- Victor J. Quinones, Jr., Founder and CEO, Virtual-Q

“In addition to simplifying data center management, Apstra allows its customers to automate each aspect of the design, deployment and operation of their data center infrastructure. Apstra enables Virtual-Q to lay a strong foundation for reliable and flexible operations regardless of vendor.”

- Mansour Karam, VP of Products, Juniper Networks

Additional Resources:

  • Product & Solution Pages:

About Juniper Networks

Juniper Networks is dedicated to dramatically simplifying network operations and driving superior experiences for end users. Our solutions deliver industry-leading insight, automation, security and AI to drive real business results. We believe that powering connections will bring us closer together while empowering us all to solve the world’s greatest challenges of well-being, sustainability and equality. Additional information can be found at Juniper Networks ( www.juniper.net ) or connect with Juniper on Twitter, LinkedIn and Facebook.

Juniper Networks, the Juniper Networks logo, Juniper, Junos, and other trademarks listed here are registered trademarks of Juniper Networks, Inc. and/or its affiliates in the United States and other countries. Other names may be trademarks of their respective owners.

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View source version on businesswire.com:https://www.businesswire.com/news/home/20221011005526/en/

CONTACT: Media Relations:

Kelsey Akerson

Juniper Networks

+1 (503) 860-9890

kakerson@juniper.net

KEYWORD: CALIFORNIA UNITED STATES NORTH AMERICA

INDUSTRY KEYWORD: DATA MANAGEMENT SECURITY TECHNOLOGY SOFTWARE NETWORKS ARTIFICIAL INTELLIGENCE INTERNET

SOURCE: Juniper Networks

Copyright Business Wire 2022.

PUB: 10/11/2022 07:45 AM/DISC: 10/11/2022 07:46 AM

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Copyright Business Wire 2022.

Tue, 11 Oct 2022 00:03:00 -0500 en text/html https://www.joplinglobe.com/region/national_business/virtual-q-selects-juniper-networks-to-provide-scalable-automated-data-center-infrastructure/article_64102cc0-efec-5eac-a48a-84f3a268f998.html
Killexams : Four of five pinyon-juniper tree species declining in their ranges in the West

Pinyon-juniper woodlands host unique wildlife and wildlife habitat, as well as areas for hiking and outdoor recreation. They are also part of a web of healthy ecosystems that, together, help to balance water availability, storage and runoff; and prevent erosion. A new study published in Global Ecology and Biogeography and led by University of Nevada, Reno researcher Robert Shriver sheds new light on what is happening in pinyon-juniper woodlands across the West. The research is unique, in that it looks at both tree mortality, as well as recruitment, or new seedlings and saplings, to calculate a “net effect.” And, the news isn’t necessarily good, particularly in warmer, drier locations.

“We found that four of the five species were declining,” said Shriver, an assistant professor in the University’s College of Agriculture, Biotechnology & Natural Resources. “And, in the driest, warmest locations, up to about 50% of populations are declining. It’s pretty severe in those locations, which are usually at lower elevations that tend to be hotter and get less water than woodlands at higher elevations.”

Shriver said that when looking at all locations studied, which included over 6,000 plots and more than 59,000 tagged trees, up to 10-20% of populations were declining. Of the five species, including two pinyon pines and three junipers, Pinus edulis, more commonly referred to as two-needle pinyon or simply pinyon, showed the greatest declines, with about 24% of its populations in decline. The other pinyon species and two of the juniper species showed more moderate declines overall, but still quite severe declines in the hotter, drier areas. These species include Pinus monophylla (single-leaf pinyon), Juniperus monosperma (one-seed juniper) and Juniperus scopulorum (Rocky Mountain juniper). Juniperus osteosperma (Utah juniper) was the only species that did not show a decline.

“Utah juniper was the exception to everything,” Shriver, who conducts research as part of the College’s Department of Natural Resources & Environmental Science and Experiment Station, said. “What we found pretty much matches up with what we know about that species’ resiliency. It’s the most abundant in the Great Basin, and is typically less vulnerable to hotter, drier climate conditions, so it could mean that there might be compositional shifts occurring in the future, where some areas that are mixed species might become more juniper-dominated.”

Gathering the data and building the models

In part, Shriver used data from the Forest Inventory and Analysis, a nationwide survey of forested lands in the U.S., conducted by the U.S. Forest Service.

“They tag the trees and return to the same plots for comparison at least every 10 years, but they have a systematic scheme to determine where,” he explained. “They are making sure they are getting a broad trial of both federal and private land. The result is a representative trial of what all forests look like across the U.S., even covering some very remote locations. It’s staggered, with 10% of plots surveyed in a given year.”

Pinyon woodland in Nevada.
A dead tree canopy can be seen in the top right of this pinyon pine stand in the Anchorite Hills in western Nevada. Research shows pinyon pine populations have been declining in western Nevada. Photo by Robert Shriver.

Shriver said the plots that were included in this pinyon-juniper research were first sampled between 2000 and 2007, and were surveyed the second time between 2010 and 2017. It is data obtained within those 10-year spans that he used for the research. He pointed out, however, that the Forest Service survey doesn’t capture as complete data on recruitment, or seedlings, since they don’t tag anything under 1 inch in diameter. Trees of this size are counted, but not tagged.

“Recruitment is the really hard part,” he said. “Tree mortality is easy to see, but recruitment is harder to observe, so it’s been harder to account for. Having a stable population is dependent on both mortality and recruitment. So, we developed a new statistical approach that allowed us to understand and factor in recruitment. Using these modeling approaches, we were able to quantify what the recruitment rate is in these different areas, and then combine that data with the mortality data to get a more clear, accurate picture of what is really going on in terms of change in species’ populations under different climate conditions and woodland densities in different regions.”

The research excluded plots where fire mortality or intentional tree harvesting occurred, allowing the researchers to more directly observe changes occurring due to climatic conditions across each species’ range.

Impacts of the findings

Shriver says the declines in populations they calculated could be significant for a number of reasons.

“In regard to wildlife, probably the most significant effect is on the pinyon jay, which has been in decline for the last couple of decades, and is really dependent on the seed that is produced by pinyon pine,” he said. “The areas where the pinyon jay tends to choose are on that border of the sagebrush and the pinyon. It likes those habitats that are probably the most vulnerable. But, beyond the pinyon jay, certainly a number of species could be affected – mule deer, and other birds and wildlife.”

In addition, Shriver said pinyons and pine nut harvesting are culturally important, to Native Americans and others, and pinyon-juniper woodlands provide recreational value for hikers and outdoor enthusiasts. Importantly, he adds, there’s the functions that pinyon-juniper woodlands play in our watersheds. Pinyon-juniper woodlands play an important role in water and soil retention in some locations.

What does the future hold?

“We are likely to see pretty big changes in where we find forests in the Great Basin and the Southwest over the next few decades,” Shriver said. “A lot of places where we saw forests, we may not see them, especially in lower elevations, because they tend to be the hottest and driest.”

Shriver said there has been a lot of expansion in these woodlands since the mid-1800s, and that some declines may not be a bad thing everywhere. For example, in some areas the pinyon-juniper woodlands have encroached on shrubland ecosystems that provide important ecosystem services and unique wildlife habitat. And, the trees, especially when packed in too densely and without enough moisture, also increase the intensity of wildfires.

“Our results also suggest that for some locations, management actions could slow down or reverse the woodland declines,” Shriver said. “As it gets warmer and drier, the density of trees a landscape is able to support lessens, so reductions in tree density might expand the envelope of where the trees can be, reducing the chance of large tree mortality events.”

While woodland decline could create an opportunity for expansion of native shrublands such as sagebrush, Shriver cautioned that other, less beneficial vegetation could also take hold.

“Just because the pinyon and juniper die off, doesn’t mean something desirable would establish in their place,” he said. “You might get cheatgrass or other undesirable vegetation.”

Shriver said the purpose of the research and models it created is to help anticipate the vulnerability of woodlands and forecast coming range shifts, so that we might be able to sway the outcomes to be more positive ones.

“If we know where this is likely to happen, we can do the best we can to influence what might happen next,” he said. “We might be able to direct these into ecosystems that might support native plants and animals in the Great Basin and the Southwest, and fit into our watersheds in a beneficial way.”

Funding for the study was provided by the United States Geological Survey North Central Climate Adaptation Science Center. Coauthors of the study include Charles B. Yackulic and John B. Bradford, with the USGS Southwest Biological Science Center; and David M. Bell, with the USDA Forest Service Pacific Northwest Research Station.

Wed, 05 Oct 2022 03:14:00 -0500 en-us text/html https://www.unr.edu/nevada-today/news/2022/pinyon-juniper-population
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