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Exam Code: ITILF2011 Practice test 2022 by Killexams.com team
The ITIL Foundation - 2011
ISEB Foundation health
Killexams : ISEB Foundation health - BingNews https://killexams.com/pass4sure/exam-detail/ITILF2011 Search results Killexams : ISEB Foundation health - BingNews https://killexams.com/pass4sure/exam-detail/ITILF2011 https://killexams.com/exam_list/ISEB Killexams : Foundation for Seacoast Health supports the Seacoast with 3 community grants

Mon, 10 Oct 2022 12:35:00 -0500 en text/html https://www.unionleader.com/news/health/foundation-for-seacoast-health-supports-the-seacoast-with-3-community-grants/article_6029aa73-ff52-57b3-a13b-c40c7867caba.html Killexams : Episcopal Health Foundation receives $20M donation

The Houston-based Episcopal Health Foundation received a $20 million donation from philanthropist MacKenzie Scott, according to a Sept. 27 news release.

The one-time, unrestricted gift will maximize the impact of the foundation's ongoing grantmaking, research, and community engagement programs, according to the release. 

"This generous donation is validation that our work to go beyond the doctor's office to address the underlying, non-medical factors that impact health is critical in Texas. We've worked to find successful solutions to help ensure everyone has a fair and just opportunity to be healthy. This gift is a vote of confidence in the need for this work," said Episcopal Health Foundation president and CEO Elena Marks.

The Episcopal Health Foundation was founded in 2013. 

MacKenzie Scott is a philanthropist, author and the former wife of Amazon founder Jeff Bezos.

Tue, 27 Sep 2022 09:57:00 -0500 en-gb text/html https://www.beckershospitalreview.com/finance/episcopal-health-foundation-receives-20m-donation.html
Killexams : OVP Health creates foundation for healthier communities

Wed, 12 Oct 2022 06:45:00 -0500 en text/html https://www.herald-dispatch.com/business/ovp-health-creates-foundation-for-healthier-communities/article_2730e907-9a32-5b46-a803-81952deb5116.html Killexams : Kettering Health Foundation surpasses $100M

Kettering (Ohio) Health Foundation has exceeded $100 million in gifts received and funds dispersed, according to an Oct. 10 news release. 

Founded in 1974, Kettering Health Foundation is the supporting arm of Kettering Health Main Campus and raises money to support initiatives to Boost the health of the community. 

Notable projects from the foundation include facility improvements to Schuster Heart Hospital and the pavilion at Kettering Health Main Campus, scholarships to nursing school, financial assistance for patients and financial support for employees.

"Throughout the last 48 years, Kettering Health Foundation strategically invested in programs designed to drive innovation and keep Kettering Health on the forefront of modern medicine," Rick Thie, president of Kettering Health Foundation, said in the release. "Our community can access the high-quality care they deserve when we focus time and resources on facility improvement, equipment and technology, employee and patient assistance, and support of Kettering College."

Kettering Health includes 14 medical centers, more than 120 outpatient facilities and over 1,800 physicians across Ohio, according to the the health system's website

Mon, 10 Oct 2022 09:50:00 -0500 en-gb text/html https://www.beckershospitalreview.com/finance/kettering-health-foundation-surpasses-100m.html
Killexams : A Foundation For Health And Well-Being: Meaningful Employment

Support: Leanne Brooks, a Nashville, Tennessee–based social worker, is a team member under Employment and Community First Choices, a program for people with intellectual and developmental disabilities that was created and paid for by TennCare, the state’s Medicaid program. Brooks is part of a team that helps participants work and live independently.

Photograph by Alan Poizner

Wearing a black polo shirt stitched with a Vanderbilt University logo, Sean Jefferson, 26, nestled his large frame into an armchair in the compact living room of his studio apartment in Nashville, Tennessee. Leanne Brooks, a social worker, sat across from him on the matching loveseat. It was a hot, humid late afternoon in July. Jefferson is autistic and speaks in quick, monotone bursts. But Brooks knows him well. She easily drew him into a conversation about sports, a passion they share. Jefferson, a football and wrestling fan, lit up as he told her about the tickets his aunt has said she’ll buy him to an upcoming WWE professional wrestling event.

“That’s gonna be a blast,” Brooks said, smiling at Jefferson.

Brooks and Jefferson met in 2017, when Jefferson enrolled in a program called Employment and Community First Choices (ECF CHOICES) for people with intellectual and developmental disabilities (IDD) that was created and paid for by TennCare, the state’s Medicaid program. Brooks is his support coordinator, part of a team that helps Jefferson work and live independently. He’s a cashier at a Vanderbilt University student store and has lived on his own in a small apartment complex since 2016.

“I get up every morning happy and ready for work,” Jefferson said. He has a team that supports his independence, including Brooks, a job coach, and direct service providers who help him grocery shop and manage other household needs. All of these services and more are included in the program, which is administered by the managed care organizations established under contracts between TennCare and three insurers: UnitedHealthcare Community Plan, Amerigroup, and BlueCare.

Shannon James, Jefferson’s aunt, explained that the program has helped Jefferson create a full life for himself, including playing flag football, volunteering with the Vanderbilt football team, and lifting weights at the gym. He attends dinners and movie nights hosted by the supportive housing nonprofit that provides his apartment.

Work is his anchor, and his on-campus position was a dream come true. He worked at Walgreens when he met Brooks—a job he found through a transition program to help people with IDD find work after graduating from high school. “He was like, you know, I like my job just fine, but what I really want to do is work at Vanderbilt,” she recalled. “And here we are.”

ECF CHOICES is based on the premise that employment provides a crucial boost to the well-being of people living with IDD by strengthening their ties to the broader community and creating routine social interaction at work. According to a 2020 evaluation of the program, ECF CHOICES met four of its five main objectives: It expanded access to home and community-based care for people with IDD, provided more cost-effective services, increased the proportion of Medicaid spent on home and community-based care, and increased the number of working-age adults with IDD enrolled in home and community-based care earning at or above the minimum wage.1 More than 500 employers have hired clients of ECF CHOICES, according to Katie Moss, chief of the Long-Term Services and Supports Division of TennCare.

As the name suggests, giving people with IDD choices, not just about whether they work but where they work, is a crucial part of the program. The program’s fundamental idea is that people with IDD can and should make decisions about their lives, and it represents the latest in a slow yet profound shift that’s unfolded since the 1960s. As advocates, policy makers, and care providers engaged in a decades-long struggle to develop policy and practices that reflected these new perceptions of the potential independence of people with IDD, employment proved to be an integral component of change.

Policy Lags Changing Perceptions

Until very recently, integrated employment settings for people with IDD were pretty rare; far more common were specialized workplaces, in which people with IDD worked alongside others with IDD, doing repetitive tasks, often at substandard wages.2 The isolation of people with disabilities in workplaces, usually called sheltered workshops, began in the late nineteenth century.3 Substandard wages for people with disabilities were codified into law during the New Deal era.3 The number of people with IDD working in sheltered workshops continued to rise in the twenty-first century and increased by nearly 34 percent between 1999 and 2015, whereas integrated employment rates remained nearly flat, increasing only by 4.6 percent. About 610,000 people with IDD worked in sheltered workplaces in 2015 compared with about 113,000 who worked in integrated employment. The people with IDD continued to perform menial, repetitive work, such as shredding paper or slicing open boxes, with little hope for advancement or a more complex work assignment, regardless of their capabilities.2

The practice of sheltered employment continued despite shifting perceptions of people with IDD and new laws that safeguarded the rights of people with disabilities—and those with IDD specifically.4 A focus on deinstitutionalizing people with IDD and integrating them into the community started in the 1960s.5 The idea of supported employment—that even the most severely disabled people could work in integrated settings with the assistance of job coaching and other services—was widely accepted by the 1980s and 1990s.6

Meanwhile, integrated work was recognized by the federal government as integral to the health and well-being of people with disabilities. The Rehabilitation Services Administration “limited the meaning of a successful employment outcome to integrated outcomes only” in 2011, according to a National Disability Rights Network report.4 The report also noted that in a 2011 bulletin, the Centers for Medicare and Medicaid Services (CMS) spelled out its position in no uncertain terms: “Work is a fundamental part of adult life for people with and without disabilities. It provides a sense of purpose, shaping who we are and how we fit into our community. Meaningful work has also been associated with positive physical and mental health benefits and is a part of building a healthy lifestyle as a contributing member of society.”4

Yet Medicaid still funded sheltered workshops despite their seeming misalignment with the agency’s purported philosophy and that of other federal agencies. And although the Americans with Disabilities Act of 1990 protected people from wage discrimination, a provision of the labor codes (Section 14c of the Fair Labor Standards Act of 1938) allowed the practice of subminimum pay to continue for people with IDD.

Then, during the Obama administration, a series of horror stories about the exploitation of people with IDD in these workplaces exploded in the media. It began in 2009, when reporting by the Des Moines Register revealed deplorable conditions for men with intellectual disabilities who worked inseminating turkeys. Living in unsanitary conditions at an Atalissa, Iowa, labor camp, the workers had little to no freedom of movement and were paid a meager $65 per month.7 The Atalissa operation had continued for nearly thirty years before it closed after the Register published its story in 2009. A New York Times exposé and documentary sustained public interest in and outrage at the sheltered workshops after the closure.8 Media reports on the limited employment opportunities at places such as Goodwill and intense advocacy work by organizations such as the National Disability Rights Network also created pressure for change.7

In 2014 CMS issued a home and community-based settings rule aimed at discouraging the use of Medicaid funding to support services that retained the characteristics of institutions, especially isolation from the community at large.9 Funding was tied to ending isolating practices such as segregated workplaces—a connection that was made more explicit by rules revisions in 2019.10 Since then, the number of people in sheltered workshops has dropped accordingly. However, as of April 2022 more than 37,000 people still worked in segregated workplaces for subminimum wage, according to the Department of Labor.11

Creating New Solutions

Tennessee has its own troubled history with caring for people with IDD. In the 1990s advocacy groups and the federal government sued the state for inadequate care of institutionalized people with IDD—lawsuits that were ongoing for twenty-five years. The last suit was dismissed in 2017, when a federal court judge found that “the state had complied with all conditions of a court approved plan to Boost services and the quality of life for citizens with intellectual and developmental disabilities.”12

The state’s settlement with plaintiffs, reached in 2015, required it to close all remaining institutions, shift people with IDD out of congregate settings, and develop programs for quality assurance and protection from harm. The state also stepped up efforts to offer people home-based care. To make it happen, officials used Medicaid Section 1915(c) home and community-based services waivers, which were designed to keep people with intellectual disabilities living in their communities.13 The first waiver was issued in 1987, followed by waivers in 2000 and 2005 to expand home-based care offerings.

“By every measure possible, the transformation has been a remarkable success,” said Judith Gran, an attorney for People First of Tennessee, one of the advocacy groups that sued the state in the 1990s, in a statement featured in a press release after the last suit was dismissed.12

Even with three separate Section 1915(c) Medicaid waivers, however, there weren’t enough resources to meet the demand for help. The Section 1915(c) programs had a waitlist of 5,000 people with intellectual disabilities seeking home-based care in 2016, according to Moss. The waivers also didn’t apply to people with developmental disabilities such as autism; they only assisted people with intellectual disabilities.

In response to the previous approaches’ ongoing challenges, TennCare’s Long-Term Services and Supports Division developed ECF CHOICES, a program that, by design, helps people with IDD “achieve their personally defined goals and meaningful employment and community integration,” Moss explained.

Creating a new program was easier than reforming the existing programs developed under the Section 1915(c) waivers, Moss said. “We could use this program to address the fiscal and capacity-related issues that were ongoing,” she explained. Bringing down costs was key to offering home-based care to more people, she said, so ECF CHOICES took a different fiscal approach from the outset. Instead of a traditional fee-for-service model used under the Section 1915(c) waivers, ECF CHOICES formed managed care organizations that would administer the program.

Integrated employment was at the center of the new plan from the beginning. “It was a very intentional focus on employment because what we do know is that employment is tied to positive health outcomes,” Moss said. “It is tied to independence. It is tied to mental health. Financial stability is tied to overall positive health outcomes and mental health outcomes. And we want to do away with the stigma that just because someone has an intellectual and developmental disability…they cannot be a meaningful participant in the community up to and including employment.”

ECF CHOICES is outperforming the state’s Section 1915(c) waiver program on several measures, including employment.

ECF CHOICES is outperforming the state’s Section 1915(c) waiver program on several measures, including employment. Only 12 percent of people enrolled in the state’s 1915(c) waiver program are employed; for those enrolled in ECF CHOICES, that number jumped to 24 percent by the end of fiscal year 2021, Moss noted. Moreover, for the first time, people with developmental disabilities are also being served by the program.

ECF CHOICES has also decreased costs for home-based services dramatically. In the Section 1915(c) waiver programs, the average annual cost of services per person was $95,000 in the 2020–21 fiscal year; those costs were $25,000 per person for ECF CHOICES that year, according to Moss.

The transition to managed care was carefully managed. Expectations for what the health plans would provide to people enrolled in ECF CHOICES were painstakingly spelled out in an agreement between the plans and the state.14 A publication by the Commonwealth Fund called it “a model for other states considering a transition from fee-for-service to managed Medicaid for beneficiaries with disabilities.”15

The significant cost decrease was also achieved in part by aligning financial incentives, Moss said. When people in ECF CHOICES are meeting their goals, their service providers reduce how many hours they spend with their clients. Yet the service providers’ hourly rates increase as their hours are reduced. Job coaches who help clients 100 percent of the time, for instance, make about $26 an hour, but that rate jumps to $34 an hour when they assist clients on the job for 80 percent of the time, Moss reported.

Evaluation of the program shows that the sharp decrease in costs has not come at the expense of quality of life for people enrolled in ECF CHOICES compared with people enrolled in the Section 1915(c) waiver programs. People in both programs score nearly identically on measures such as their ability to make everyday choices and larger life decisions and how well integrated they are into their communities, based on surveys administered to clients and their family members.16

Challenges remain, especially for people who are waiting to enroll in ECF CHOICES. Historically, there has been a waitlist of 4,000 people for ECF CHOICES. Moss said that she expects that the exact funding the program received from the American Rescue Plan Act of 2021 has reduced the number of people waiting for services. “We’ve had a had a pretty high increase [in capacity] just recently in our ECF CHOICES program because we were able to draw down the [American Rescue Plan Act] dollars for 2,000 new slots,” Moss explained.

This is probably one of the most exciting times to work in this field, she added. “Not only do we get to support individuals with intellectual and developmental disabilities to achieve goals that fifty years ago nobody thought was possible, but we also have this kind of once-in-a-lifetime funding.”

Choice In Action

Person-centered care is at the heart of the new program. When a new member joins Amerigroup as part of the ECF CHOICES program, for instance, the first step is a thorough assessment of the member’s goals and any possible risks to their safety and independence. But assessment isn’t confined to the initial intake, Brooks explained. “It’s an ongoing assessment as their life changes, as their goals and needs change,” she said. People don’t always know what they want in the initial meetings, and goal setting becomes a process and an education for members about the services that are available to them, she added.

Once members’ employment goals are set, employment certified help connect them to jobs and assist them through the hiring process. Paperwork can be a daunting task for people with IDD, Brooks noted. And once work begins, members are supported by a job coach, who shadows and assists them throughout their working hours. As the member becomes more comfortable in their job, the job coaching hours are reduced accordingly.

A crucial part of the ongoing support is identifying potential obstacles to members’ goals and then removing those obstacles.

Another crucial part of the ongoing support is identifying potential obstacles to members’ goals and then removing those obstacles. Often, those obstacles are related to low incomes. “I’ve got folks that I’ve helped to get air conditioners or food,” Brooks said. “We really have to look at all those hierarchies of needs and try to meet them.” Housing is another pressing need for people with IDD, and Brooks has successfully placed people who want to leave a parent’s home and live on their own in supportive housing in the community. Transportation is another challenge, and ECF CHOICES helps with Lyft and Uber vouchers, as well as technical assistance that shows people how to use the apps.

This tailored support is what helps Amerigroup keep so many of its ECF CHOICES members working, explained Tina Brill, the vice president of Long-Term Services and Supports at Amerigroup. Their integrated employment rate for members enrolled in ECF CHOICES is 30 percent, Brill said. (The current average for people in ECF CHOICES across all insurers is 27.6 percent, according to Moss). Work is crucial to the members’ well-being, Brill added. “With the focus being community and integrating supports, employment brings that,” she explained. It brings natural peer groups, natural friends, natural support that brings a lot of independence—not only the monetary independence, it brings a lot of other life skills and life supports.”

It’s also important not to downplay the financial importance of work, added Amerigroup employment specialist Stephanie Potter. She pointed to a long-standing association between IDD and poverty.17 “We really do feel like employment is one of the only ways to really help people [who are on Social Security disability] move out of poverty,” Potter said. “Nobody can live on Social Security alone and really not be in poverty. And so there’s so many people with disabilities living in poverty.”

The depth of need requires an entire team of certified on hand dedicated to maintaining each member’s independence—direct service providers, service coordinators, and employment specialists—as well as in-depth knowledge on the part of people such as Brooks and Potter about other resources and social services that can help cover needs that are not paid for by ECF benefits. Moreover, Brill said, the Amerigroup teams work closely with health care and service providers. They routinely check in with their clients’ families or other caretakers, who are an active part of solving problems as they arise with the rest of the support team.

Independence As A Lifelong Project

The need for Brooks’s emphasis on continual assessment was made clear in our July visit to Jefferson. Brooks leaned forward, toward the armchair where he was sitting. “Do you want to tell her about something very sad that happened?” she asked gently.

Jefferson started to fidget. “That happened two years ago,” he said, rushing through the words. “I lost my beautiful mother.” Jefferson’s mother was his caretaker. She died unexpectedly of a massive heart attack. Her sister, Jefferson’s aunt Shannon James, happened to be in Nashville visiting when she died.

Amid the shock and grief came the immediate stress of managing everyday details, James said. Brooks had to meet her right away to make sure that Jefferson’s basic needs were met. “Like how are we going to get the rent paid? The cell phone bill? Social Security?” James recalled.

After his most pressing needs were squared away, it was time for the larger questions, James said. She lived in Biloxi, Mississippi. Where would Jefferson live? Mississippi doesn’t have a program like ECF CHOICES, she said—if he left the state, he would have to leave his independent life behind, too. “That’s a thing I weighed heavily on,” James said. “He would not have the freedom or the liberty to do what he does there.”

Brooks and James asked Jefferson what he wanted to do. “I’ll think about it,” he replied, “but I want to stay here.” So James has provided emotional and practical support from afar. When problems at work or elsewhere arise, she gets on the phone with Brooks. After Vanderbilt reopened from the pandemic shutdown, for instance, Jefferson was switched from a day shift to a night shift at the student store. Those hours didn’t work for his needs, James explained, and Brooks then worked to get Jefferson back on the day shift.

James also looks after Jefferson’s finances and pays his bills, although she plans to teach Jefferson how to do it himself eventually. “I won’t always be here,” she said, a fact that her sister’s unexpected death made all too tangible.

“I hear that a lot,” Brooks replied. “That’s a very common fear.”

“We will always take care of him,” she assured James. “We will make sure that he is getting what he needs.”

NOTES

Mon, 03 Oct 2022 06:12:00 -0500 en text/html https://www.healthaffairs.org/doi/10.1377/hlthaff.2022.01069
Killexams : Watch Harry Kane’s inspirational cartoon of tough journey including Arsenal release as he launches mental health charity

ENGLAND captain and Tottenham striker Harry Kane has released an inspirational cartoon on his tough journey through football and announced the launch of a mental health foundation.

The 29-year-old faced rejection as a kid after being released by boyhood club Arsenal.

Kane launched his mental health foundation with a cartoon of his journey in football

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Kane launched his mental health foundation with a cartoon of his journey in footballCredit: Instagram / harrykane
The striker was handed a chance by Tottenham after being released by Arsenal

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The striker was handed a chance by Tottenham after being released by ArsenalCredit: Instagram / harrykane
Kane was desperate to make Spurs' first-team

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Kane was desperate to make Spurs' first-teamCredit: Instagram / harrykane
However, the forward had several unsuccessful loan spells

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However, the forward had several unsuccessful loan spellsCredit: Instagram / harrykane
Kane had a stint with Millwall, where he 'had to work hard through some really tough times'

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Kane had a stint with Millwall, where he 'had to work hard through some really tough times'Credit: Instagram / harrykane

His dad put his arm around him and told him "We go again, and work even harder".

Those words have stuck with Kane through numerous unsuccessful loan spells and even up to this very day, where he is the captain of his country and recognised as one of the best strikers of his generation.

Spurs striker Kane says with self-belief and support from others, "the more real" his dreams became.

Kane also announced the launch of his mental health foundation, which will seek to "tackle stigma" and "transform a generation’s thinking about mental health."

His website reads: "Harry launched the Harry Kane Foundation (HKF) with a long-term goal to help transform a generation’s thinking about mental health.

"The launch of his own dedicated Foundation marks the start of Harry’s journey to learn more about mental health and work with chosen charities and strategic partners. 

"HKF will use Harry’s profile and curate partnerships to reach audiences of all ages through tactical awareness campaigns and practical support.

"The purpose of HKF is to help normalise conversations around mental health, promote positive habits that support mental health and tackle stigma."

HOW TO GET FREE BETS ON FOOTBALL

Kane added on Twitter: "I'm very proud to launch the Harry Kane Foundation - it marks the start of a journey for me as my Foundation aims to transform a generation’s thinking about mental health.

"I want to learn more, help normalise conversations around mental health, promote positive habits that support mental wellbeing and tackle the stigma surrounding the subject.

"I will use my profile to encourage others to look after their mental health, be their best and know that it's ok to ask for help.

"I'll be working with some amazing organisations and causes close to my heart.

"Some exciting activations are launching today, on World Mental Health Day, with more to follow."

Kane says he doubted himself a lot

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Kane says he doubted himself a lotCredit: Instagram / harrykane
Kane would repeat his dad's inspirational words of 'work even harder'

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Kane would repeat his dad's inspirational words of 'work even harder'Credit: Instagram / harrykane
Kane broke into Spurs' first-team and is closing in on the all-time Premier League goals record, currently held by Alan Shearer

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Kane broke into Spurs' first-team and is closing in on the all-time Premier League goals record, currently held by Alan ShearerCredit: Instagram / harrykane
Kane is also the England captain, guiding the Three Lions to a World Cup semi in 2018, and the Euros final last summer

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Kane is also the England captain, guiding the Three Lions to a World Cup semi in 2018, and the Euros final last summerCredit: Instagram / harrykane
Mon, 10 Oct 2022 17:15:00 -0500 Joshua Mbu en-gb text/html https://www.thesun.co.uk/sport/20058329/harry-kane-mental-health-foundation-cartoon/
Killexams : Cybin & The Chopra Foundation Recognize World Mental Health Day

-- Cybin and The Chopra Foundation continue to work together to advance the research and education of psychedelic-based therapeutics as a new paradigm for the treatment of mental health --

Cybin Inc. (NEO:CYBN) CYBN ("Cybin" or the "Company"), a biopharmaceutical company focused on progressing Psychedelics to Therapeutics®, and The Chopra Foundation ("Foundation"), a not-for-profit organization dedicated to improving health and well-being founded by Dr. Deepak Chopra, join everyone in recognizing World Mental Health Day. The two organizations continue to work toward the research and education of psychedelic-based therapies and their role in enhancing well-being and consciousness.

According to the World Health Organization ("WHO"), over 900 million people are affected by mental illness around the world. The pandemic has increased the number of individuals that are affected by different forms of mental illness. In 2021 the WHO released data that over 280 million people were affected by depression.

"World Mental Health Day sends a reminder that our mental health is just as important as our physical health," said Doug Drysdale, Cybin's Chief Executive Officer. "At Cybin, mental health and well-being is at the center of everything that we do. It's this value that drives us to invest our energy and resources to discover new and innovative treatment options for mental health conditions. The commitment from organizations like The Chopra Foundation plays a critical role in this goal, and we are proud to partner with the Foundation to continue to educate and support what is possible for the treatment of mental health from psychedelics."

This year's World Mental Health Day theme is "Make Mental Health and Well-Being for All a Global Priority," and marks an opportunity for people with mental health conditions, advocates, governments, employers, employees and other stakeholders to come together to recognize progress in the field and to be vocal about what is needed to ensure mental health and well-being becomes a global priority for all. These initiatives are at the forefront of the work that Cybin and The Chopra Foundation are doing together to ensure that everyone has access to well-being resources, including those in underserved communities. An example of these initiatives is through The Chopra Foundation's Never Alone movement.

"The Chopra Foundation is committed to working with Cybin for creative and holistic solutions for alleviating the immense human suffering from mental disorders," said Deepak Chopra, The Chopra Foundation Founder, Chairman of the Board and Director. "Psychedelics research, creating support communities, emotional AI, and love in action through NeverAlone.love are just some of the areas we are working together on."

"On World Mental Health Day we recognize the urgency and desperate need to provide resources to those that are suffering. For that, we are grateful for the collaboration between Cybin and the Chopra Foundation, which is meaningful on multiple levels," said Poonacha Machaiah, Chief Executive Officer of The Chopra Foundation. "Mental health and longevity are core pillars of the Chopra Foundation, and we look forward to continuing to create an impact through our partnership with Cybin."

About The Chopra Foundation and Never Alone

The Chopra Foundation is a 501 (c) (3) organization (#36-4793898) dedicated to improving health and well-being, cultivating spiritual knowledge, expanding consciousness, and promoting world peace to all members of the human family. The Foundation's Never Alone movement will be providing the world with the tools to proactively pursue their path to joy and freedom from suffering.

About Cybin

Cybin is a leading ethical biopharmaceutical company, working with a network of world-class partners and internationally recognized scientists, on a mission to create safe and effective therapeutics for patients to address a multitude of mental health issues. Headquartered in Canada and founded in 2019, Cybin is operational in Canada, the United States, the United Kingdom, the Netherlands and Ireland. The Company is focused on progressing Psychedelics to Therapeutics by engineering proprietary drug discovery platforms, innovative drug delivery systems, novel formulation approaches and treatment regimens for mental health disorders.

© 2022 Benzinga.com. Benzinga does not provide investment advice. All rights reserved.

Mon, 10 Oct 2022 04:13:00 -0500 text/html https://www.benzinga.com/pressreleases/22/10/b29204098/cybin-the-chopra-foundation-recognize-world-mental-health-day
Killexams : World Mental Health Day is a reminder to check in on yourself, and others

NEW YORK - We continue to break the stigma when it comes to mental illness. 

October 10 is World Mental Health Day. It's an important time to check in with yourself and with others. 

CBS2's Cindy Hsu has more on how to to take action.

It has been a tough couple of years, dealing with everything from the pandemic to inflation. According to the National Alliance on Mental Illness, or NAMI: 

  • 1 in 5 U.S. adults experience mental illness each year
  • 1 in 20 U.S. adults suffer "serious" mental illness every year
  • 1 in 6 U.S. youth aged 6-17 experience a "mental health disorder" each year

Lady Gaga's Born This Way Foundation is a huge driving force in raising awareness and providing resources to support mental health in youth. Executive Director of the foundation Maya Smith says now's the time to talk about our stories openly.

How "Born This Way Foundation" helps break the stigma 05:39

"The opportunity to share your story helps people feel less alone. It might make you feel less alone. And it's an invitation for other folks to talk to you about what they may be going through," Smith said. 

This is the perfect time to reach out to anyone you may be concerned about.

"Saying hey, Cindy, you've been a little quieter than usual. Is there anything going on, is there anything I can do to support you? Or hey Dave, my husband, right, I've noticed that you're under a lot of stress lately. So just leaning in and noticing things about people and letting them know that they matter to you," Smith said. 

On the Born This Way Foundation website, you can also earn your "Be There Certificate." It's a free online course that teaches you how to recognize when someone is struggling and how to safely support them while maintaining your own mental health.

A exact guide was just released on the best ways to deal with problems like anxiety and depression offering 11 tips to boosting mental health, including connecting with nature, exercising, talking to someone, getting more sleep, not using alcohol and drugs to cope and managing money and debt.

These are good habits we can focus on all year long.

Some other tips experts say could Boost your mental health include: Being kind, open minded to new experiences, and planning things to look forward to. 

Additionally, CLICK HERE for more on Boyer's STEAM Connection project. 

Mon, 10 Oct 2022 04:41:00 -0500 en-US text/html https://www.cbsnews.com/newyork/news/how-lady-gagas-born-this-way-foundation-is-helping-break-the-stigma-around-youth-mental-health/
Killexams : LUNG HEALTH FOUNDATION ANNOUNCES NEW CHIEF EXECUTIVE OFFICER, JESSICA BUCKLEY

TORONTO, Sept. 20, 2022 /CNW/ - In a move designed to build on its long-standing history of impact and success, the Board of Directors of the Lung Health Foundation announces the appointment of Jessica Buckley, former Senior Vice President of Woodbine Entertainment, as the organization's new President & Chief Executive Officer.

Lung Health Foundation (CNW Group/Lung Health Foundation)

She succeeds George Habib, who held the title of CEO for 15 years. Under Habib's successful leadership, the Lung Health Foundation established itself as an innovative and patient-centric organization that brought much-needed attention to the issue of lung disease, elevating its importance to policy-makers and the public alike. Constantly evolving the organization to better serve its patient community, he most recently led the transition of the Lung Health Foundation into a national organization amidst the challenges and uncertainty of the pandemic.

Assuming the role of CEO, Ms. Buckley brings with her over two decades of progressive entrepreneurial experience in the sports and entertainment industry, most recently as Senior Vice President of Standardbred and Thoroughbred Racing for Woodbine Entertainment Group. With notable success in leading organizational transformation and growth, engaging stakeholders, and building government relationships at all levels, Buckley is well-positioned to step into the leadership role at the Lung Health Foundation.

"With an exciting new strategic plan in place, the Lung Health Foundation promises to make big, bold changes in our approach to closing the gaps in the prevention, diagnosis, and care of lung disease in Canada," says Dan Markovich, Chair, Lung Health Foundation. "We are thrilled that Ms. Buckley will be guiding us in our work, given her demonstrated ability as a leader throughout her 20+ year entrepreneurial career. She has proven herself to be able to respond nimbly to constantly evolving markets and environments which is exactly what our organization needs as we move swiftly and urgently in our mission to help Canadians breathe better."

Each year in Canada, hundreds will needlessly lose their lives to asthma; tens of thousands with COPD will end up in hospital; more than 20,000 people will die from lung cancer; thousands will fail to get the vaccines they need to prevent hospitalization and even death; and thousands of young Canadians will continue to smoke and vape, putting their health severely at risk. The Lung Health Foundation aims to change that.

"This is an important time for the Lung Health Foundation as we make strides in becoming better and more impactful – in becoming the industry leader," promises Buckley. "I'm incredibly excited and honoured to be leading the Lung Health Foundation team. The mission of this organization -- improving the lung health of all Canadians -- is critically important to each and every one of us, and it's absolutely what attracted me to this opportunity. I'm looking forward to getting to know this amazing team and using my experience to help expand our reach to all patients and their families across the country."

About the Lung Health Foundation

The Lung Health Foundation is national organization dedicated to ending gaps in the prevention, diagnosis, and care of lung disease in Canada. We invest in the future by driving ground-breaking research, and we deliver patients and their families the programs and support they need today. Lung health starts now!

SOURCE Lung Health Foundation

Cision

View original content to get multimedia: http://www.newswire.ca/en/releases/archive/September2022/20/c9718.html

Tue, 20 Sep 2022 01:03:00 -0500 en-US text/html https://finance.yahoo.com/news/lung-health-foundation-announces-chief-130000748.html
Killexams : Cybin & The Chopra Foundation Recognize World Mental Health Day

-- Cybin and The Chopra Foundation continue to work together to advance the research and education of psychedelic-based therapeutics as a new paradigm for the treatment of mental health --

TORONTO, October 10, 2022--(BUSINESS WIRE)--Cybin Inc. (NEO:CYBN) (NYSE AMERICAN:CYBN) ("Cybin" or the "Company"), a biopharmaceutical company focused on progressing Psychedelics to Therapeutics®, and The Chopra Foundation ("Foundation"), a not-for-profit organization dedicated to improving health and well-being founded by Dr. Deepak Chopra, join everyone in recognizing World Mental Health Day. The two organizations continue to work toward the research and education of psychedelic-based therapies and their role in enhancing well-being and consciousness.

According to the World Health Organization ("WHO"), over 900 million people are affected by mental illness around the world. The pandemic has increased the number of individuals that are affected by different forms of mental illness. In 2021 the WHO released data that over 280 million people were affected by depression.

"World Mental Health Day sends a reminder that our mental health is just as important as our physical health," said Doug Drysdale, Cybin’s Chief Executive Officer. "At Cybin, mental health and well-being is at the center of everything that we do. It's this value that drives us to invest our energy and resources to discover new and innovative treatment options for mental health conditions. The commitment from organizations like The Chopra Foundation plays a critical role in this goal, and we are proud to partner with the Foundation to continue to educate and support what is possible for the treatment of mental health from psychedelics."

This year’s World Mental Health Day theme is "Make Mental Health and Well-Being for All a Global Priority," and marks an opportunity for people with mental health conditions, advocates, governments, employers, employees and other stakeholders to come together to recognize progress in the field and to be vocal about what is needed to ensure mental health and well-being becomes a global priority for all. These initiatives are at the forefront of the work that Cybin and The Chopra Foundation are doing together to ensure that everyone has access to well-being resources, including those in underserved communities. An example of these initiatives is through The Chopra Foundation’s Never Alone movement.

"The Chopra Foundation is committed to working with Cybin for creative and holistic solutions for alleviating the immense human suffering from mental disorders," said Deepak Chopra, The Chopra Foundation Founder, Chairman of the Board and Director. "Psychedelics research, creating support communities, emotional AI, and love in action through NeverAlone.love are just some of the areas we are working together on."

"On World Mental Health Day we recognize the urgency and desperate need to provide resources to those that are suffering. For that, we are grateful for the collaboration between Cybin and the Chopra Foundation, which is meaningful on multiple levels," said Poonacha Machaiah, Chief Executive Officer of The Chopra Foundation. "Mental health and longevity are core pillars of the Chopra Foundation, and we look forward to continuing to create an impact through our partnership with Cybin."

About The Chopra Foundation and Never Alone

The Chopra Foundation is a 501 (c) (3) organization (#36-4793898) dedicated to improving health and well-being, cultivating spiritual knowledge, expanding consciousness, and promoting world peace to all members of the human family. The Foundation’s Never Alone movement will be providing the world with the tools to proactively pursue their path to joy and freedom from suffering.

About Cybin

Cybin is a leading ethical biopharmaceutical company, working with a network of world-class partners and internationally recognized scientists, on a mission to create safe and effective therapeutics for patients to address a multitude of mental health issues. Headquartered in Canada and founded in 2019, Cybin is operational in Canada, the United States, the United Kingdom, the Netherlands and Ireland. The Company is focused on progressing Psychedelics to Therapeutics by engineering proprietary drug discovery platforms, innovative drug delivery systems, novel formulation approaches and treatment regimens for mental health disorders.

View source version on businesswire.com: https://www.businesswire.com/news/home/20221010005183/en/

Contacts

Media Inquiries for The Chopra Foundation:
Kristen Marion
kristen@marionpr.com
623-308-2638

Investor & Media Inquiries for Cybin:
Leah Gibson
Vice President, Investor Relations & Strategic Communications
Cybin Inc.
irteam@cybin.com – or – media@cybin.com

Gabriel Fahel
Chief Legal Officer
Cybin Inc.
1-866-292-4601

Mon, 10 Oct 2022 07:04:00 -0500 en-US text/html https://www.yahoo.com/entertainment/cybin-chopra-foundation-recognize-world-160000909.html
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