Simply study and remember these HPE6-A44 Exam Cram questions

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Exam Code: HPE6-A44 Practice exam 2022 by Killexams.com team
HPE6-A44 Scalable WLAN Design and Implementation (SWDI) 8

This course teaches the knowledge, skills and practical experience required to set up and configure advanced features on Aruba WLAN utilizing the AOS 8.X architecture and features. This course includes lectures and labs which provide the technical understanding and hands-on experience of configuring a redundant Mobility Master with two controllers and two APs. Participants will learn how install a redundant Aruba WLAN network with clustering while using many features like Multizone for guest access, voice optimization and tunneled node. This course includes the AirWave management system and troubleshooting commands. The SWDI course provides the underlying material required to prepare candidates for the Aruba Certified Mobility Professional (ACMP) V8 certification exam.

Exam courses | Course Objectives | Syllabus
Introduction
Review courses from the IAW V8 course
AP terminology
GUI Hierarchy
WLAN forwarding modes
Explain the features of AOS 8
MobilityMasterRedundancy
Explain VRRP setup
DB synchronization procedures
Validating MM DB synchronization
MobilityMaster andMCOperations
Grow the network to multiple controllers
Review the configuration hierarchy
MC deployments methods
Explain advanced license features
Multizone
Describe Multizone
Explain Multizone AP functional flow
Describe the functions of primary and data zones
Troubleshooting Multizone setup
Introduction toMCclusters
Reviews advantages of a MC cluster
The cluster leader election process
Defines the MC cluster roles
AP and user mapping into a cluster
Requirements for hitless cluster failover
AP and user load balancing within the cluster
Mobility
Explain standard 802.11 roaming
Describes single and multi-controller roaming
Defines the advantages of cluster mobility
RoleDerivation
Review of policies and rules
Explains role derivation using VSAs
Description of user rules
Description of authentication default roles
Explains how to troubleshoot role derivation
RemoteAccess
Review of all remote access methods RAP/ VIA / IAP-VPN / branch controller
Explains RAP certification and setup methods
Configuration of RAP WLAN
Explores the options for RAP redundancy
Explains how to troubleshoot RAP setup
VIA configuration, downloading and installation
Explains how to troubleshoot VIA setup
VoiceOptimization
Review of voice QOS
Explanation of WMM
Description of UCC Heuristic and SDN API mode
Monitoring and troubleshooting voice connections
Mesh
Explains mesh networks and technology
Configuration of mesh clusters
Administration
Explains management accounts and password reset
Configuration of guest provisioning accounts
The use of authentication using RADIUS or TACACS
Describes how to disable console access
Operations
Explains how to upgrade new images
Describes AP preloading
Explains cluster in service upgrade
Auto roll backs of configuration
Describes loadable in service modules
AirGroup
Explains the Aruba AirGroup solution
Configuration of AirGroup with limitations
Explores the integration with ClearPass
Monitoring AirGroup servers and users
TunneledNode
Explains port based tunneled node
Explains user based tunneled node
Describes the interaction between switches and Mobility controllers
Explains how to troubleshoot tunnel connections
AirWaveIntroduction
Explains the different features of AirWave
The use of groups and folders
AirWave features description
Configuration of device credentials and adding devices
AirWaveNetworkHealth
Explains diagnostic page indications
Describe network health graphs to identify network issues
Performance graphs to help in network planning
The use of clarity to direct administrator to the source of the problem
AirWaveClient andDeviceTroubleshooting
Explains how to find a client and troubleshoot association issues
Diagnosing associated client issues
Investigating client SNR
Describes AP, network and controller diagnosing
Explains how to monitor a MC cluster within AirWave
AirWaveVisualRF, Reports andAlerts
Explains the different VirtualRF display options
Describes the VisualRF application monitoring
Configuration of triggers to create alerts
Generation of 22 type of reports as well as custom reports
Objectives | Syllabus | Outline
After you successfully complete this course, expect to be able to:
Explain the integration Mobility Masters and Mobility controllers
Describe redundancy giving the user seamless failover
Setup secure guest access using Multizone
Explain the uses and advantages of clustering
Describe user mobility in the wireless spectrum
Integrate voice over WiFi and deliver QOS
Explain how roles are assigned to users wireless or wired
Learn to setup remote access using RAPs or VIA
Describe how to create a mesh cluster
Learn the advantages given to AirGroup when leveraged on an Aruba network
Integrating wire users into the security given to wireless users
Learn how to use AirWave to monitor the health of the network
Learn how to useAirWave to troubleshoot client
Explain AirWaves Virsual RF feature as well as alerts and triggers

Scalable WLAN Design and Implementation (SWDI) 8
HP Implementation history
Killexams : HP Implementation history - BingNews https://killexams.com/pass4sure/exam-detail/HPE6-A44 Search results Killexams : HP Implementation history - BingNews https://killexams.com/pass4sure/exam-detail/HPE6-A44 https://killexams.com/exam_list/HP Killexams : HP Inc. (HPQ)
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NYSE - NYSE Delayed Price. Currency in USD

25.44-0.58 (-2.23%)

At close: 04:05PM EDT

25.76 +0.32 (+1.26%)
Pre-Market: 08:04AM EDT

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Time Period:
Oct 17, 2021 - Oct 17, 2022
Date Open High Low Close* Adj Close** Volume
Oct 14, 2022 26.11 26.35 25.40 25.44 25.44 10,700,700
Oct 13, 2022 24.19 26.33 24.08 26.02 26.02 11,791,900
Oct 12, 2022 24.86 25.02 24.62 24.69 24.69 7,896,900
Oct 11, 2022 25.01 25.33 24.60 24.78 24.78 7,287,300
Oct 10, 2022 25.28 25.46 24.60 24.99 24.99 6,557,500
Oct 07, 2022 25.77 25.85 24.90 25.04 25.04 10,317,900
Oct 06, 2022 26.58 27.04 26.45 26.48 26.48 8,415,900
Oct 05, 2022 26.17 26.95 26.12 26.78 26.78 7,457,100
Oct 04, 2022 26.38 26.86 26.30 26.64 26.64 8,844,900
Oct 03, 2022 25.34 26.11 25.09 25.89 25.89 8,922,800
Sep 30, 2022 25.01 25.68 24.87 24.92 24.92 8,858,200
Sep 29, 2022 25.16 25.16 24.74 25.04 25.04 8,265,600
Sep 28, 2022 24.89 25.69 24.86 25.61 25.61 7,576,100
Sep 27, 2022 25.38 25.57 24.84 24.98 24.98 5,951,200
Sep 26, 2022 25.07 25.50 24.81 24.96 24.96 8,872,700
Sep 23, 2022 25.29 25.47 24.92 25.35 25.35 8,645,600
Sep 22, 2022 25.96 26.23 25.69 25.71 25.71 8,775,900
Sep 21, 2022 26.62 26.94 26.00 26.00 26.00 8,884,100
Sep 20, 2022 26.53 26.62 26.09 26.45 26.45 9,853,600
Sep 19, 2022 26.98 27.32 26.59 26.95 26.95 9,768,600
Sep 16, 2022 26.75 27.37 26.52 27.23 27.23 39,537,000
Sep 15, 2022 26.87 27.41 26.62 26.94 26.94 11,525,200
Sep 14, 2022 27.07 27.31 26.73 27.04 27.04 9,079,200
Sep 13, 2022 27.39 27.70 26.81 26.96 26.96 10,378,100
Sep 13, 2022 0.25 Dividend
Sep 12, 2022 28.45 28.90 28.41 28.51 28.26 9,386,100
Sep 09, 2022 27.72 28.36 27.70 28.26 28.01 8,965,600
Sep 08, 2022 27.21 27.62 26.94 27.50 27.26 11,824,700
Sep 07, 2022 27.21 27.60 26.87 27.47 27.23 10,039,400
Sep 06, 2022 27.61 27.92 27.15 27.33 27.09 13,430,700
Sep 02, 2022 28.58 28.67 27.53 27.64 27.40 12,379,700
Sep 01, 2022 28.26 28.51 27.56 28.17 27.92 16,713,500
Aug 31, 2022 29.50 30.22 28.67 28.71 28.46 28,214,900
Aug 30, 2022 31.77 31.82 30.95 31.10 30.83 15,527,100
Aug 29, 2022 31.05 31.99 31.03 31.53 31.25 10,606,600
Aug 26, 2022 33.41 33.58 31.37 31.39 31.11 14,112,800
Aug 25, 2022 33.52 34.52 33.47 34.47 34.17 7,450,900
Aug 24, 2022 33.20 33.46 32.92 33.22 32.93 6,467,400
Aug 23, 2022 33.40 33.98 33.34 33.40 33.11 5,810,000
Aug 22, 2022 33.72 33.81 33.29 33.41 33.12 6,436,900
Aug 19, 2022 34.55 34.63 33.66 34.23 33.93 9,640,400
Aug 18, 2022 34.63 35.32 34.28 35.23 34.92 5,989,700
Aug 17, 2022 34.38 34.67 34.02 34.31 34.01 7,033,700
Aug 16, 2022 34.30 34.83 34.23 34.50 34.20 6,605,500
Aug 15, 2022 34.37 34.74 34.14 34.40 34.10 4,525,700
Aug 12, 2022 34.41 34.68 34.05 34.65 34.35 5,489,200
Aug 11, 2022 33.83 34.78 33.83 34.22 33.92 7,084,000
Aug 10, 2022 33.11 34.34 33.05 33.98 33.68 7,426,900
Aug 09, 2022 33.18 33.24 32.05 32.49 32.21 9,175,500
Aug 08, 2022 33.80 34.05 33.35 33.45 33.16 5,651,500
Aug 05, 2022 32.76 33.99 32.72 33.58 33.29 6,523,900
Aug 04, 2022 32.88 33.28 32.61 33.26 32.97 6,559,800
Aug 03, 2022 33.12 33.27 32.30 32.96 32.67 7,073,900
Aug 02, 2022 33.31 33.31 32.44 32.74 32.45 5,776,100
Aug 01, 2022 33.05 33.83 33.01 33.67 33.37 6,400,700
Jul 29, 2022 33.00 33.42 32.51 33.39 33.10 8,459,200
Jul 28, 2022 32.67 33.22 32.30 32.89 32.60 4,713,500
Jul 27, 2022 32.19 32.83 31.85 32.62 32.33 6,991,000
Jul 26, 2022 32.53 32.65 31.88 31.95 31.67 5,908,200
Jul 25, 2022 32.64 32.73 32.20 32.60 32.31 4,482,300
Jul 22, 2022 33.20 33.57 32.31 32.47 32.19 7,558,900
Jul 21, 2022 32.82 33.52 32.54 33.46 33.17 6,927,700
Jul 20, 2022 32.90 33.47 32.57 32.94 32.65 5,546,800
Jul 19, 2022 31.96 32.89 31.93 32.83 32.54 8,753,800
Jul 18, 2022 31.99 32.40 31.37 31.50 31.22 7,539,600
Jul 15, 2022 31.61 31.73 31.32 31.66 31.38 7,103,600
Jul 14, 2022 30.52 31.28 30.26 31.18 30.91 7,471,600
Jul 13, 2022 30.76 31.40 30.51 31.06 30.79 7,313,000
Jul 12, 2022 31.45 31.94 31.06 31.33 31.06 9,769,200
Jul 11, 2022 31.56 31.83 31.28 31.40 31.12 5,855,500
Jul 08, 2022 31.92 32.42 31.56 32.11 31.83 6,584,700
Jul 07, 2022 31.65 32.00 31.46 31.78 31.50 7,022,200
Jul 06, 2022 31.54 31.70 30.76 31.17 30.90 8,306,000
Jul 05, 2022 30.91 31.56 30.01 31.54 31.26 13,971,000
Jul 01, 2022 32.67 32.87 31.48 31.87 31.59 12,193,600
Jun 30, 2022 32.95 33.40 32.61 32.78 32.49 10,878,700
Jun 29, 2022 34.34 34.37 33.44 33.61 33.32 5,989,000
Jun 28, 2022 35.41 35.70 34.18 34.44 34.14 7,226,000
Jun 27, 2022 35.44 35.75 35.15 35.36 35.05 5,804,500
Jun 24, 2022 34.26 35.26 34.21 35.23 34.92 10,532,800
Jun 23, 2022 33.91 34.05 33.42 33.87 33.57 7,334,100
Jun 22, 2022 33.68 34.12 33.41 33.74 33.44 10,701,700
Jun 21, 2022 34.46 34.89 34.07 34.29 33.99 11,277,200
Jun 17, 2022 32.88 33.81 32.63 33.55 33.26 20,542,300
Jun 16, 2022 33.65 33.67 32.31 32.71 32.42 13,398,000
Jun 15, 2022 34.26 34.94 33.87 34.41 34.11 12,683,600
Jun 14, 2022 33.90 34.13 33.36 33.75 33.45 10,769,300
Jun 13, 2022 34.40 34.68 33.60 33.76 33.46 12,114,900
Jun 10, 2022 35.89 36.23 35.25 35.28 34.97 9,522,500
Jun 09, 2022 37.84 38.12 36.66 36.67 36.35 8,047,700
Jun 08, 2022 39.01 39.01 37.85 37.95 37.62 10,885,400
Jun 07, 2022 38.88 39.47 38.58 39.36 39.01 6,560,200
Jun 07, 2022 0.25 Dividend
Jun 06, 2022 40.07 40.59 39.28 39.52 38.93 8,041,200
Jun 03, 2022 39.35 40.28 39.27 39.81 39.21 6,884,600
Jun 02, 2022 39.91 40.20 39.21 39.89 39.29 12,330,500
Jun 01, 2022 39.76 40.79 39.05 40.34 39.73 19,330,000
May 31, 2022 38.69 39.51 38.26 38.84 38.26 26,899,500
May 27, 2022 38.00 39.14 38.00 38.75 38.17 14,840,200
May 26, 2022 35.73 36.96 35.52 36.77 36.22 10,805,200
*Close price adjusted for splits.**Adjusted close price adjusted for splits and dividend and/or capital gain distributions.

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Fri, 14 Oct 2022 12:00:00 -0500 en-US text/html https://finance.yahoo.com/quote/HPQ/history
Killexams : Helmerich & Payne, Inc. (HP)
U.S. markets open in 1 hour 6 minutes

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NYSE - NYSE Delayed Price. Currency in USD

40.44-2.63 (-6.11%)

At close: 04:00PM EDT

40.21 -0.23 (-0.57%)
Pre-Market: 08:23AM EDT

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Time Period:
Oct 17, 2021 - Oct 17, 2022
Date Open High Low Close* Adj Close** Volume
Oct 14, 2022 42.42 42.69 40.37 40.44 40.44 648,900
Oct 13, 2022 40.54 43.25 39.84 43.07 43.07 1,168,500
Oct 12, 2022 41.64 41.71 40.32 41.20 41.20 951,900
Oct 11, 2022 41.54 42.74 40.91 41.82 41.82 667,800
Oct 10, 2022 43.00 43.86 41.77 42.28 42.28 482,900
Oct 07, 2022 43.05 44.06 42.60 43.30 43.30 644,300
Oct 06, 2022 42.61 43.84 42.45 43.11 43.11 756,100
Oct 05, 2022 41.23 43.55 41.06 43.19 43.19 851,600
Oct 04, 2022 40.00 41.46 39.41 41.44 41.44 1,393,200
Oct 03, 2022 38.64 39.74 38.23 38.88 38.88 973,100
Sep 30, 2022 36.98 37.98 36.21 36.97 36.97 894,700
Sep 29, 2022 37.67 37.93 36.63 37.53 37.53 784,000
Sep 28, 2022 36.72 38.82 36.49 38.58 38.58 804,000
Sep 27, 2022 37.03 37.69 35.75 36.32 36.32 1,130,000
Sep 26, 2022 35.88 37.53 35.09 35.83 35.83 1,251,200
Sep 23, 2022 37.68 37.76 34.74 35.48 35.48 1,258,800
Sep 22, 2022 41.64 41.99 39.82 39.95 39.95 537,000
Sep 21, 2022 42.81 43.19 40.84 40.85 40.85 471,600
Sep 20, 2022 42.47 42.47 41.28 41.83 41.83 618,400
Sep 19, 2022 41.14 43.11 40.75 42.92 42.92 871,100
Sep 16, 2022 43.73 43.73 41.76 42.72 42.72 1,495,100
Sep 15, 2022 44.37 45.21 43.90 44.14 44.14 785,500
Sep 14, 2022 45.10 47.63 45.02 46.39 46.39 908,200
Sep 13, 2022 45.58 46.69 44.21 44.74 44.74 885,600
Sep 12, 2022 45.73 46.90 45.27 46.83 46.83 865,300
Sep 09, 2022 44.30 45.36 43.97 44.95 44.95 603,300
Sep 08, 2022 42.27 43.10 41.13 42.80 42.80 775,600
Sep 07, 2022 42.25 42.74 40.63 42.21 42.21 626,600
Sep 06, 2022 44.98 44.98 42.32 43.28 43.28 761,900
Sep 02, 2022 42.62 44.98 41.73 44.45 44.45 848,100
Sep 01, 2022 41.66 42.27 40.73 40.96 40.96 1,204,800
Aug 31, 2022 41.37 43.68 41.24 42.75 42.75 558,100
Aug 30, 2022 44.23 44.50 41.32 42.48 42.48 832,500
Aug 29, 2022 44.68 46.26 44.43 45.42 45.42 807,100
Aug 26, 2022 46.26 46.68 44.55 45.29 45.29 557,100
Aug 25, 2022 46.20 47.44 46.20 46.84 46.84 515,100
Aug 24, 2022 44.66 46.21 44.28 45.96 45.96 649,700
Aug 23, 2022 43.76 45.88 43.62 44.74 44.74 584,600
Aug 22, 2022 42.59 43.46 42.08 42.80 42.80 590,900
Aug 19, 2022 43.28 43.69 42.69 43.23 43.23 544,400
Aug 18, 2022 41.86 44.20 41.62 44.00 44.00 688,300
Aug 17, 2022 40.66 41.14 39.68 40.73 40.73 971,100
Aug 16, 2022 42.00 42.75 40.32 40.79 40.79 677,000
Aug 16, 2022 0.25 Dividend
Aug 15, 2022 42.01 42.28 40.37 41.94 41.69 816,300
Aug 12, 2022 43.28 44.33 42.94 44.28 44.02 418,500
Aug 11, 2022 42.15 43.97 42.15 43.51 43.25 491,800
Aug 10, 2022 41.64 42.07 40.28 41.63 41.38 516,800
Aug 09, 2022 41.64 42.49 40.97 41.43 41.18 539,200
Aug 08, 2022 40.28 41.39 39.92 40.88 40.64 536,000
Aug 05, 2022 38.40 41.18 38.40 40.35 40.11 934,600
Aug 04, 2022 42.72 43.02 39.02 39.07 38.84 1,113,900
Aug 03, 2022 45.14 45.40 42.71 42.96 42.70 1,002,400
Aug 02, 2022 45.56 46.39 44.51 44.72 44.45 770,700
Aug 01, 2022 44.96 45.93 44.43 45.27 45.00 1,030,300
Jul 29, 2022 45.74 47.36 44.92 46.30 46.02 1,041,000
Jul 28, 2022 45.61 46.30 43.45 44.33 44.07 1,238,700
Jul 27, 2022 42.77 45.32 42.30 44.66 44.39 1,084,700
Jul 26, 2022 42.55 43.32 41.60 42.15 41.90 578,700
Jul 25, 2022 40.12 42.28 39.69 42.19 41.94 643,200
Jul 22, 2022 39.90 40.75 38.86 39.40 39.17 678,000
Jul 21, 2022 40.90 41.07 38.57 39.79 39.55 1,283,500
Jul 20, 2022 42.14 42.93 41.28 42.86 42.60 777,700
Jul 19, 2022 41.79 42.95 41.50 42.65 42.40 672,300
Jul 18, 2022 40.00 41.91 39.83 41.81 41.56 1,158,200
Jul 15, 2022 39.52 39.52 37.91 38.87 38.64 703,100
Jul 14, 2022 37.65 38.38 37.10 38.31 38.08 1,084,400
Jul 13, 2022 38.43 39.91 38.43 39.06 38.83 923,600
Jul 12, 2022 40.49 40.79 38.72 39.18 38.95 1,229,000
Jul 11, 2022 42.00 42.78 41.19 41.64 41.39 548,300
Jul 08, 2022 42.39 43.47 41.39 42.98 42.72 769,000
Jul 07, 2022 41.73 42.49 41.18 41.70 41.45 641,600
Jul 06, 2022 40.00 40.30 38.03 40.10 39.86 1,322,600
Jul 05, 2022 42.15 42.31 39.05 40.25 40.01 1,838,600
Jul 01, 2022 43.12 43.79 41.41 43.51 43.25 1,101,400
Jun 30, 2022 42.66 43.90 42.22 43.06 42.80 1,151,100
Jun 29, 2022 44.58 44.91 43.29 43.78 43.52 922,000
Jun 28, 2022 44.89 45.80 43.61 44.01 43.75 1,327,900
Jun 27, 2022 44.90 44.91 43.00 43.88 43.62 1,751,600
Jun 24, 2022 39.15 44.54 38.85 43.94 43.68 4,276,900
Jun 23, 2022 39.47 39.56 37.34 38.33 38.10 1,471,800
Jun 22, 2022 38.47 39.53 37.83 39.07 38.84 1,207,800
Jun 21, 2022 39.72 41.22 39.20 40.87 40.63 1,377,600
Jun 17, 2022 40.98 41.46 38.04 38.86 38.63 3,466,900
Jun 16, 2022 42.87 43.29 40.72 41.06 40.82 1,646,500
Jun 15, 2022 45.00 45.50 43.10 43.79 43.53 1,550,900
Jun 14, 2022 47.91 47.99 44.06 44.93 44.66 1,086,900
Jun 13, 2022 47.56 48.02 44.92 46.85 46.57 1,514,600
Jun 10, 2022 49.84 50.97 47.93 49.55 49.25 981,200
Jun 09, 2022 53.20 53.24 51.00 51.00 50.70 1,087,600
Jun 08, 2022 53.83 54.59 52.96 53.86 53.54 882,300
Jun 07, 2022 52.56 53.65 52.17 53.40 53.08 962,300
Jun 06, 2022 51.20 52.84 50.90 52.78 52.47 1,406,000
Jun 03, 2022 50.01 51.24 48.96 51.18 50.87 833,200
Jun 02, 2022 50.60 51.42 49.53 49.75 49.45 1,066,300
Jun 01, 2022 50.86 51.91 50.67 50.84 50.54 1,334,700
May 31, 2022 52.19 53.22 49.71 50.35 50.05 1,160,700
May 27, 2022 50.83 52.09 50.55 51.69 51.38 677,900
May 26, 2022 50.68 52.21 50.63 51.48 51.17 985,300
May 25, 2022 47.88 50.13 47.83 49.73 49.43 1,354,800
*Close price adjusted for splits.**Adjusted close price adjusted for splits and dividend and/or capital gain distributions.

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Thu, 13 Oct 2022 11:59:00 -0500 en-US text/html https://finance.yahoo.com/quote/HP/history
Killexams : Best HP Laptops for 2022

HP laptops offer something for you, whether you're a creative looking to edit photos, a gamer in search of a powerful laptop or a student in need of a small, lightweight laptop.

Many of the best HP laptops have features designed for remote or hybrid work such as improved webcams and microphones, better audio quality, longer battery life, faster charging and the fastest Wi-Fi 6 wireless.

Like other PC makers such as Dell, Lenovo, Acer and Asus, HP is in the midst of updating the processors in its laptops and two-in-ones. That means Intel-based models are moving from 11th-gen to 12th-gen CPUs, while AMD Ryzen systems are switching from 5000-series chips to 6000-series. It also means it's generally a good time to look for deals on older models of the best HP laptops. However, we've also seen big performance improvements with the new processors. An updated model might cost a little more but will add to the overall longevity. 

CNET

Spectre is HP's top consumer laptop line so you're getting the best of the best with this 16-inch two-in-one. 

  • Beautiful design
  • Lots of features for home and office work
  • Great webcam
  • Active pen and laptop sleeve included

Of course, a premium two-in-one like the Spectre x360 comes at a relatively high price; it starts at around $1,200. The top-end configuration we reviewed was good but not great considering its $2,030 price. This is definitely one we recommend getting with the 12th-gen Intel processors and Intel Arc graphics if you're going to go all-in. Read our HP Spectre x360 16 review.

James Martin/CNET

HP's Victus 16 is a surprisingly robust and powerful gaming laptop that keeps up with the latest games at a more affordable price. Compared to HP's high-end Omen gaming laptop line, the Victus is more of an all-purpose laptop but still configured for gaming with a price starting at less than $1,000. HP offers several configurations with graphics chip options ranging from Nvidia's entry-level GeForce GTX 1650 up to a midrange RTX 3060 or AMD Radeon RX 6500M. We like almost everything about it except for its flimsy display hinge and underwhelming speakers. Read our HP Victus 16 review.

Josh Goldman/CNET

There are plenty of convertible Chromebooks, where the screen flips around to the back of the keyboard so you can use it as a tablet. But Chrome tablets with removable keyboards like the HP Chromebook x2 11 are still a rarity. It offers long battery life and performance that rises (slightly) above the competition. The main downside is that it's expensive; the model we reviewed is $599. However, that price did include both the keyboard cover and USI pen and it's regularly on sale for $200. If you're interested make sure to wait for one of those deals. Read our HP Chromebook x2 11 review.

Josh Goldman/CNET

If you're making a laptop aimed at creatives, it's not enough to just put discrete graphics and a strong processor in a slim body. The extra performance really should be paired with a good screen, and that's what you get with the HP Envy 14. The laptop's 16:10 14-inch 1,920x1,200-pixel display not only gives you more vertical room to work, but is color-calibrated at the factory and covers 100% of the sRGB color gamut. The result: a well-rounded option for creatives looking for on-the-go performance at a reasonable price. This model is due for a refresh, though, so keep an eye out for updated models. Read our HP Envy 14 review.

Fri, 24 Jun 2022 23:01:00 -0500 See full bio en text/html https://www.cnet.com/tech/computing/best-hp-laptops-for-2022/
Killexams : The 6 best Intel CPUs of all time

Of all the players in the world of computing, Intel is one of the oldest as well as one of the most titanic. It can be hard getting excited about Intel, whether the company is dominating as it did in the 2010s or floundering as it is in the 2020s; it’s pretty difficult for people to fall in love with the status quo or a large company that loses to smaller ones. The opposite is true for Intel’s rival AMD, which has always been the underdog, and everyone (usually) loves the underdog.

But Intel couldn’t become the monolithic giant it is today without being a hot and innovative upstart once upon a time. Every now and then, Intel has managed to shake things up on the CPU scene for the better. Here are six of Intel’s best CPUs of all time.

Intel 8086

Intel becomes a leader

Thomas Nguyen © Provided by Digital Trends Thomas Nguyen

The Intel 8086 basically ticks all the boxes for what makes a CPU great: It was a massive commercial success, it represented significant technological progress, and its legacy has endured so well that it’s the progenitor of all x86 processors. The x86 architecture is named after this very chip, in fact.

Although Intel claims the 8086 was the first 16-bit processor ever launched, that’s only true with very specific caveats. The 16-bit computing trend emerged in the 1960s by using multiple chips to form one complete processor capable of 16-bit operation. The 8086 wasn’t even the first single-chip processor with 16-bit capability as other CPUs, having been pipped at the post by the General Instrument CP1600 and the Texas Instruments TMS9900. In actuality, the 8086 was rushed out to put Intel on even ground with its rivals, and finally came out in 1978 after a development period of just 18 months.

Initially, sales for the 8086 were poor due to pressure from competing 16-bit processors, and to address this, Intel decided to take a gamble and embark on a massive advertising campaign for its CPU. Codenamed Operation Crush, Intel set aside $2 million just for advertising through seminars, articles, and sales programs. The campaign was a great success, and the 8086 saw use in about 2,500 designs, the most important of which was arguably IBM’s Personal Computer.

Equipped with the Intel 8088, a cheaper variant of the 8086, the IBM Personal Computer (the original PC) launched in 1981 and it quickly conquered the entire home computer market. By 1984, IBM’s revenue from its PC was double that of Apple’s, and the device’s market share ranged from 50% to over 60%. When the IBM PS/2 came out, the 8086 itself was finally used, along with other Intel CPUs.

The massive success of the IBM PC and by extension the 8086 family of Intel CPUs was extremely consequential for the course of computing history. Because the 8086 was featured in such a popular device, Intel of course wanted to iterate on its architecture rather than make a new one, and although Intel has made many different microarchitectures since, the overarching x86 instruction set architecture (or ISA) has stuck around ever since.

The other consequence was an accident. IBM required Intel to find a partner that could manufacture additional x86 processors, just in case Intel couldn’t make enough. The company Intel teamed up with was none other than AMD, which at the time was just a small chip producer. Although Intel and AMD started out as partners, AMD’s aspirations and Intel’s reluctance to deliver up ground put the two companies on a collision course that they’ve stayed on to this day.

Celeron 300A

The best budget CPU in town

Qurren © Provided by Digital Trends Qurren

In the two decades following the 8086, the modern PC ecosystem began to emerge, with enthusiasts building their own machines with off-the-shelf parts just like we do today. By the late 90s, it became pretty clear that if you wanted to build a PC, you wanted Windows, which only ran on x86 hardware. Naturally, Intel became an extremely dominant figure in PCs since there were only two other companies with an x86 license (AMD, and VIA).

In 1993, Intel launched the very first Pentium CPU, and it would launch CPUs under this brand for years to come. Each new Pentium was faster than the last, but none of these CPUs were particularly remarkable, and definitely not as impactful as the 8086. That’s not to say these early Pentiums were bad, they were just meeting standard expectations. This was all fine until AMD launched its K6 CPU, which offered similar levels of performance as Pentium CPUs for lower prices. Intel had to respond to AMD, and it did so with a brand-new line of CPUs: Celeron.

At first glance, Celeron CPUs didn’t appear to be anything more than cut-down Pentiums with a lower price tag. But overclocking these chips transformed them into full-fledged Pentiums. CPUs based on the Mendocino design (not to be confused with AMD’s Mendocino-based APUs) were particularly well regarded because they had L2 cache just like higher-end Pentium CPUs, albeit not nearly as much.

Of the Mendocino chips, the 300A was the slowest but could be overclocked to an extreme degree. In its review, Anandtech was able to get it to 450MHz, a 50% overclock. Intel’s 450MHz Pentium II sold for about $700, while the Celeron 300A sold for $180, which made the Celeron extremely appealing to those who could deal with the slightly lower performance that resulted from having less L2 cache. Anandtech concluded that between AMD’s K6 and Intel’s Celeron, the latter was the CPU to buy.

In fact, the 300A was so compelling to Anandtech that for a while, it just recommended buying a 300A instead of slightly faster Celerons. And when the 300A got too old, the publication started recommending newer low-end Celerons in its place. Among Anandtech’s CPU reviews from the late 90s and early 2000s, these low-end Celerons were the only Intel CPUs that consistently got a thumbs up; even AMD’s own low-end CPUs weren’t received as warmly until the company launched its Duron series.

Core 2 Duo E6300

The empire strikes back

Intel © Provided by Digital Trends Intel

Although Intel had an extremely strong empire in the late 90s, cracks were beginning to appear starting in the year 2000. This was the year Intel launched Pentium 4, based on the infamous NetBurst architecture. With NetBurst, Intel had decided that rapidly increasing clock speed was the way forward; Intel even had plans to reach 10GHz by 2005. As for the company’s server business, Intel launched Itanium, the world’s first 64-bit implementation of the x86 architecture and hopefully (for Intel) the server CPU everyone would be using.

Unfortunately for Intel, this strategy quickly fell apart, as it became apparent NetBurst wasn’t capable of the clock speeds Intel thought it was. Itanium wasn’t doing well either and saw slow adoption even when it was the only 64-bit CPU in town. AMD seized the opportunity to start carving out its own place in the sun, and Intel began rapidly losing market share in both desktops and servers. Part of Intel’s response was to simply bribe OEMs to not sell systems that used AMD, but Intel also knew it needed a competitive CPU as the company couldn’t keep paying Dell, HP, and others billions of dollars forever.

Intel finally launched its Core 2 series of CPUs in 2006, fully replacing all desktop and mobile CPUs based on NetBurst, as well as the original Core CPUs that launched solely for laptops earlier in the year. Not only did these new CPUs bring a fully revamped architecture (the Core architecture had almost no resemblance to NetBurst) but also the first quad-core x86 CPUs. Core 2 didn’t just put Intel on an equal footing with AMD, it put Intel back in the lead outright.

Although high-end Core 2 CPUs like the Core 2 Extreme X6800 and the Core 2 Quad Q6600 amazed people with high performance (the X6800 didn’t lose a single benchmark in Anandtech’s review), there was one CPU that really impressed everyone: the Core 2 Duo E6300. The E6300 was a dual-core with decent overall performance, but just like the 300A, it was a great overclocker. Anandtech was able to overclock its E6300 to 2.59GHz (from 1.86GHz at stock), which allowed it to beat AMD’s top-end Athlon FX-62 (another dual core) in almost every single benchmark the publication ran.

The Core 2 series and the Core architecture revived Intel’s technological leadership, the likes of which hadn’t been seen since the 90s. AMD meanwhile had a very difficult time catching up, let alone staying competitive; it didn’t even launch its own quad-core CPU until 2007. Core 2 was just the beginning though, and Intel had no desire to slow down. At least not yet.

Core i5-2500K

Leaving AMD in the dust

© Provided by Digital Trends

Unlike NetBurst, Core wasn’t a dead end, which allowed Intel to iterate and Strengthen the architecture with each generation. At the same time, the company was also creating new manufacturing processes or nodes at a steady pace. This gave rise to the “tick-tock” model, with the “tick” representing a process improvement and the “tock” representing an architectural improvement. The first Core 2 CPUs were a tock (since they used the same 65nm process as NetBurst) and later Core 2 CPUs were a tick since they were manufactured on the 45nm process.

By 2011, Intel had already gone through two full cycles of tick-tock, delivering better and better CPUs like clockwork. Meanwhile, AMD was having an extremely hard time catching up. Its new Phenom chips finally brought quad-cores (and later hexa-cores) to AMD’s lineup, but these CPUs were rarely (if ever) performance leaders, and AMD returned to its old value-oriented strategy. The pressure was on for AMD when Intel launched its 2nd Gen CPUs in 2011.

Codenamed Sandy Bridge, 2nd Gen Core CPUs were a tock and significantly improved instructions per clock (or IPC), in addition to increasing frequency itself. The end result was a 10-50% performance improvement over 1st Gen CPUs. Sandy Bridge also had pretty decent integrated graphics, and was the first CPU to introduce Quick Sync, a video encoding accelerator.

In its Core i7-2600K and Core i5-2500K, Anandtech recommended the 2500K over the 2600K. The 2500K was just $216, had most of the performance of the 2600K (which cost $100 more), and beat pretty much every single last generation chip except for the workstation-class Core i7-980X. To this day, the 2500K is remembered fondly as a midrange CPU with lots of performance for a good price.

Meanwhile, AMD was simply left in the dust; Anandtech didn’t even mention Phenom CPUs as a viable alternative to 2nd Gen. AMD needed to launch a CPU that could compete with Sandy Bridge if it wanted to be more than just the budget alternative. Later in 2011, AMD finally launched its new FX series based on the Bulldozer architecture.

It went poorly for AMD. The flagship FX-8150 could sometimes match the Core i5-2500K, but overall it was slower, especially in single-threaded benchmarks; sometimes it even lost to old Phenom CPUs. Overall, Bulldozer was a disaster for both AMD and PC users. Without a competitive AMD to keep its rival in check, Intel could do basically whatever it wanted, something which Anandtech was worried about:

“We all need AMD to succeed,” it said in its coverage at the time. “We’ve seen what happens without a strong AMD as a competitor. We get processors that are artificially limited and severe restrictions on overclocking, particularly at the value end of the segment. We’re denied choice simply because there’s no other alternative.”

Unfortunately, that prediction would prove all too accurate.

Core i7-8700K

Intel gets with the times

Coffee Lake-S © Provided by Digital Trends Coffee Lake-S

Although Sandy Bridge was great, it heralded a dark age for PC users, who had always expected the next generation would be faster and cheaper than the last. But with AMD out of the picture, Intel had no reason to offer better CPUs for less. Over the next six years, Intel only offered quad-cores on its mainstream platforms, and always for the same price: $200 for the i5, and $300 for the i7. Furthermore, as Anandtech predicted, Intel started locking down its CPUs more aggressively than ever before. All i3 grade processors up until 2017 had no overclocking support whatsoever, and it didn’t take long for most i5s and i7s to get the same treatment.

Things got very frustrating by the time Intel’s 7th Gen Kaby Lake came out in early 2017. According to the tick-tock model, Intel should have launched a 10nm CPU using a similar architecture as 14nm 6th Gen Skylake CPUs from 2015. Instead, 7th Gen CPUs were identical to 6th Gen CPUs: same old 14nm process, same old Skylake architecture. With this, Intel announced the end of the tick-tock model and introduced the process-architecture-optimization model, with 7th Gen being the optimization. People were understandably not happy with Intel as even generational improvements were ending.

It was ultimately up to AMD to change the situation and shake things up, and it definitely did when it launched Ryzen just a couple of months after 7th Gen CPUs came out. Based on the new Zen architecture, Ryzen 1000 CPUs finally got AMD back into the game thanks to good enough single-threaded performance and extremely high multi-threaded performance, bringing eight high-performance cores to the mainstream for the first time. Intel’s competing 7th Gen did hold a lead in single-threaded applications and gaming, but not enough to make Zen the new Bulldozer. For the first time in years, Intel was compelled to offer something truly new and worthwhile.

Intel took Ryzen very seriously, and rushed a new generation out the door as soon as it could. The 7th Gen only lasted for 9 months before it was replaced by 8th Gen Coffee Lake, which was yet another optimization of Skylake but with even higher clock speeds and crucially, more cores. Core i7 CPUs now had 6 cores and 12 threads, Core i5s had 6 cores and 6 threads, and Core i3s had 4 cores and 4 threads (which was identical to the old i5s). But one thing that didn’t change was the price, which meant the value of 8th Gen was much, much higher than that of prior Core CPUs.

Equipped with the fast single-threaded performance of the 7700K and an extra two cores, the Core i7-8700K was Intel’s best flagship in years. Against AMD’s Ryzen 7 1800X, the 8700K was only a little behind in multi-threaded benchmarks and significantly ahead in everything else. Techspot concluded “it almost wasn’t even a contest.” At $360, it was also $100 cheaper than AMD’s flagship. The 8700K was a very well-rounded CPU with a relatively low price; if the 8700K was anything else, it simply wouldn’t have been nearly as good.

The outlook for Intel was dreary, however. Already with 8th Gen CPUs, the process-architecture-optimization model was a failure as 8th Gen was the second optimization in a row. When 10nm Cannon Lake CPUs finally came out in 2018, it became clear that Intel’s latest process was extremely broken. How many more optimizations would Intel go through before it finally did something new?

It turns out, quite a few.

Core i9-12900K

A much-needed comeback

Jacob Roach / Digital Trends © Provided by Digital Trends Jacob Roach / Digital Trends

In 2018, 10nm was only suitable for barely functioning mobile chips. Things improved in 2019 when Intel launched its mobile Ice Lake CPUs, but these were just quad-cores with decent integrated graphics; nowhere near desktop grade. Things improved again in 2020 with the launch of 11th-generation Tiger Lake processors which were an optimization of Ice Lake with even better graphics, but still not good enough for the desktop.

Intel desperately needed 10nm desktop CPUs. Its 14nm process was very old and prevented increases in core counts and clock speed. In contrast, AMD had gone from strength to strength with Ryzen 3000 Zen 2 CPUs, and then Ryzen 5000 Zen 3 processors, each more impressive than the last, and now even stealing the gaming performance crown from Intel. It needed a comeback in a big way.

Finally, in late 2021, Intel launched its first 10nm CPUs for the desktop, 12th Gen Alder Lake. These CPUs were radically different from previous ones; its hybrid architecture combined large and powerful performance cores (or P-cores) with smaller and more efficient efficiency cores (or E-cores) delivering incredibly multi-threaded performance for the top chips, and much-improved single-threaded performance for everything else.

The Core i9-12900K, Intel’s new flagship, sported a core configuration of 8 P-cores plus 8 E-cores, making it both great at multi-threaded tasks and single-threaded tasks. In our review, we found that the 12900K didn’t just put Intel on an equal footing with AMD, but firmly back in the lead in every single metric. The Ryzen 9 5950X, which launched as an expensive and premium flagship, suddenly looked like a budget alternative, but the 12900K was also much cheaper. Describing Alder Lake as a comeback is an understatement.

The only downside was that the 12900K (and Alder Lake in general) was a year late to the party, and it also consumed a lot of power, a sign that 10nm wasn’t quite ready for prime time. But nevertheless, the renewal of competition had a very positive effect for basically everyone. Ryzen 5000 CPUs fell in price to match Intel, and AMD finally launched new models for budget buyers in response to lower-end Alder Lake CPUs, like the Core i5-12400, which was $100 cheaper than the 5600X while also being significantly faster. Alder Lake proved once again that we need both Intel and AMD to compete, otherwise PC users get a bad deal.

Intel’s uncertain future

Wccftech © Provided by Digital Trends Wccftech

Alder Lake is about one year old now, and Intel is following it up with Raptor Lake: an optimization. It’s a bit disappointing, but Intel isn’t about to return to its old practices as 13th Gen CPUs offer more cores than 12th Gen for the same price, which is similar to what happened with 8th Gen. Raptor Lake isn’t super exciting and it might not be fast enough to retake the lead from AMD’s Ryzen 7000 series, but everyone can agree that more cores for the same price is a good deal.

But further beyond, Intel’s future is uncertain. The company is apparently making good progress on its 7nm process (officially named Intel 4) which will debut in Meteor Lake, but I’ve expressed some concerns over Intel’s strategy. With such a complex design that incorporates no less than four different processes, I feel very uncomfortable with how many points of failure Meteor Lake has. Hopefully, Intel executes its future CPUs just fine with this design philosophy, because it can’t afford any more delays.

Even if Meteor Lake is a success, though, it’s hard to see Intel returning to the level of domination it has historically enjoyed. Earlier this year, AMD surpassed Intel in market cap, which means AMD is no longer an underdog, but a full-fledged competitor. In this new era of the Intel-AMD rivalry, we’ll have to see how things go when both companies compete as equals. Intel is still shrinking in size and ceding market share to AMD, but hopefully it can remain an equal and not disintegrate any further. In theory, a balance of power could be the best outcome for everyone.

Sun, 09 Oct 2022 09:30:43 -0500 en-US text/html https://www.msn.com/en-us/lifestyle/shopping/the-6-best-intel-cpus-of-all-time/ar-AA12KlWa
Killexams : HP targets construction sites with autonomous floorplan-printing robots

HP has put forward a small robot it says can dramatically speed up construction work, by autonomously printing guidelines straight from the blueprints onto the floor. Rugged, roadworthy and extremely accurate, Siteprint is a super-quick layout tool.

The robot replaces the time-consuming manual process of site layout, using a variety of different inks to place precise lines, exact curves and faithful reproductions of complex shapes on all kinds of floors, from porous surfaces like concrete and plywood to terrazzo, vinyl or epoxy.

It doesn't require a perfectly smooth or clean floor – indeed, it can handle a certain degree of surface irregularity and obstacles up to 2 cm (0.8 in) high. It runs built-in obstacle and cliff drop sensors for fully autonomous operation, and will work around barriers even if they're not in the plans.

As well as layout lines, it's capable of printing more or less whatever else you need on the floor too, including text notes. Operators set it up using cloud-based tools for job preparation, fleet management and tracking, and can run it on site with a touch-screen tablet and a tripod-mounted "totalstation."

HP claims the SitePrint robot replicated seven hours of manual layout work in 45 minutes in testing, with extreme accuracy

HP

“The existing manual layout process can be slow and labor intensive,” said Albert Zulps, Director of Emerging Technology at Skanska - a global construction and development company currently using the SitePrint system for two of its US projects. "Despite being done by specialists, there is always the risk of human error, which can result in costly reworks. Layout experts are a scarce resource who add a lot of value in terms of planning and strategy, but often end up dedicating most of their time to manual execution. HP SitePrint lets us do more with less, helping reduce schedules thanks to a much faster layout process, and allowing senior operators to focus on other critical activities like quality control.”

While HP hasn't announced pricing, we assume the printer robot itself will be surprisingly cheap, but the ink's gonna be a killer. Yuk yuk.

Check out Siteprint in the video below.

HP SitePrint Skanska testimonial | HP

Source: HP

Thu, 15 Sep 2022 12:00:00 -0500 en-US text/html https://newatlas.com/robotics/hp-siteprint-building-blueprint/
Killexams : The History of the Funky, Fun Subaru BRAT

Once upon a time there was a brat—and no, it wasn't a tantrum-throwing two-year-old inside the grocery store, but rather a little trucklet parked out front. It was the Subaru BRAT, which stood for Bi-Drive Recreational All-terrain Transporter. Bi-drive meant that there was a part-time all-wheel-drive system, actuated with a switch. Now, was the BRAT acronym actually dictated by that super technical, unexciting name, or did a team of rebellious marketing folks come up with a half-hearted retcon? That's an investigation for another time.

A lot of people wouldn't know a BRAT from a bratwurst, and even fewer would be able to recall the last time they spotted one on the road. Indeed, it's an obscure automotive specimen that hasn't been imported to the United States in nearly 35 years—but with the return of the 2022 Ford Maverick, maybe it's an apt time to recall the capable little BRAT.

The two-door Subaru BRAT, Japan's ute-like version of a compact truck, was created in response to the growing demand for smaller, compact trucks in the U.S. It wasn't built on a new platform. Instead, it shared its underpinnings and AWD system with the Subaru Leone station wagon. By grafting on a bed, Subaru had a vehicle to throw into the burgeoning ring of compact pickups, including car-based models like the contemporaneous Volkswagen Pickup built in Pennsylvania, and larger body-on-frame models from the Japanese brands. The BRAT had a shorter wheelbase than the mini trucks and was about as long as the single cabs.

The Subaru BRAT in the U.S. and Abroad

The Subaru BRAT lived a short life in the United States, spanning the years of 1978-1987. Overseas markets in Europe, Latin America, New Zealand, and Australia imported it until 1994. Outside of the U.S., it was known as the 284, Brumby, Shifter, MV, and Targa. Ironically, it was never sold in its home market of Japan since there was no real demand.

It was launched in 1978 with one engine option, a 1.6-liter H-4. The EA-71 boxer-four pushed out 67 hp and 81 lb-ft of torque and was mated to a standard 4-speed manual transmission. A few years later, the BRAT received a facelift and displacement increased to 1.8 liters, good for 73 hp and 94 lb-ft of torque. A dual-range transfer case was added. A turbocharged variant was added for 1983 and 1984 models, boosting output to 95 hp and 123 lb-ft of torque.

Truck, Ute, Or ???

Was the Subaru BRAT truly a truck? Or a coupe-utility? Were the beefier Chevrolet El Camino or Ford Ranchero trucks? The debate rages on as to what constitutes a truck. The government, however, considered the Subaru BRAT a truck, which meant it was subject to the hefty 25 percent "chicken tax" import tariff imposed on light-duty trucks.

Subaru had a solution for this costly hurdle in the form of rear-facing jump seats in the bed of BRAT, allowing the BRAT to qualify as a passenger car with merely a 2.5 percent tariff. What a fun era, right! These loophole seats were discontinued for the last couple of years; finding a BRAT with the jump seats still intact is special.

In addition to the jump seats, the Subaru BRAT had some other goodies: a spring-loaded hidden door that included a side step for the carpeted cargo bed, an available T-top split roof, and a spare tire in the engine bay. That's right, the spare tire was nestled neatly under the hood between the engine and the firewall. Some BRATs were equipped with a matching camper shell. This custom Subaru Brat camper conversion drew a crowd at the 2020 Chicago Auto Show.

The BRAT Looks Familiar—What Do I Know It From?

The BRAT was no stranger to TV shows and movies. A 1985 BRAT appeared in the television show My Name is Earl, and a 1982 BRAT was in the movie Napoleon Dynamite. Eivin Kilcher of Discovery's Alaska: The Last Frontier rebuilt a BRAT for his brother and considered the souped-up BRAT his dream car.

There are dedicated websites to all-things BRAT, and it seems that BRATs in various stages of decay can be found across the country. Drivable BRATs in poor condition can be found for a couple of grand, while nicer ones have auctioned anywhere from $6,200 to over $20,000. A 2,500-mile 1978 BRAT reportedly owned by a former Subaru executive sold for $46,198. According to Hagerty, about 100,000 BRATs were sold in North America.

What replaced the Subaru BRAT? The all-wheel-drive four-door Subaru Baja arrived some 15 years after the last BRAT was imported to the U.S. The Baja was made in Lafayette, Indiana, and was sold for a short time as model years 2003-2006. But it could never match the funky radness of the jump-seat-equipped original. Maybe one day we'll see an EV BRAT restomod next to an Alpha Wolf at a stoplight.

This story was originally published March 31, 2021.

Watch! 1978 Subaru Brat: The Greatest Chicken Tax Truck of Them All

On episode 101 of Ignition, host Jonny Lieberman gets to do something he's dreamed about doing since he was 10 years old: ride in the back of a Subaru BRAT, a lovable answer to America's notorious chicken tax (the law that states all pickup trucks not built in the USA must pay a 25-percent import tariff). Sign up for a free trial to MotorTrend+ and start watching every episode of Ignition, plus much more!

Sat, 17 Sep 2022 23:00:00 -0500 en text/html https://www.motortrend.com/features/1978-1994-subaru-brat-classic-truck-history/
Killexams : HP Envy 16 Review Mon, 10 Oct 2022 02:32:00 -0500 en text/html https://www.pcmag.com/reviews/hp-envy-16 Killexams : Dividend History

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Killexams : The Data Analytics Implementation Journey In Business And Finance

Leon Gordon is a leader in data analytics, a current Microsoft MVP based in the U.K. and a partner at Pomerol Partners.

Data analytics is an emerging trend and has been around for a while. It’s an important tool in business intelligence, decision making and reporting. Organizations use data analytics to find insights to make better decisions and gain a competitive advantage. In this article, I’ll provide an overview of the implementation journey of data analytics in business and finance; I’ll also provide you with a compelling case study of how one organization leveraged its data using big data technologies to Strengthen its performance metrics across various departments like sales, customer service, marketing, etc.

Finding The Needle In The Haystack

One of the most important aspects of data analytics implementation is identifying valuable insights from data. With so much information to sift through, it’s essential to have a partner that can help you find the needle in a haystack.

As we’ve outlined, implementing data analytics is no easy task. Data analysts must be highly skilled and trained in order to succeed at their job effectively. While this might seem like an obvious requirement for someone working in such an important field, there are many other challenges that may arise during implementation.

Finding qualified candidates with the skills required for this type of work can be difficult because there aren’t enough qualified people available yet (this will likely change as more businesses adopt data analytics). This means that companies need to plan ahead when hiring new employees because they may not be able to find anyone who has experience with these types of projects yet—which means longer wait times before results start coming back!

Data Is Gold

Data is the raw material of data analytics and can come from many different sources. Data can be collected from websites, social media, mobile apps, sensors or even other databases. Data can take many forms—structured or unstructured—and it can be analyzed to understand trends and patterns. For example, the weather app on your phone knows that you’re running late for work because it predicts that it will rain later today; your online bank has calculated how much money you spend each month on groceries based on previous transactions, and a retailer’s web server records every time someone visits their website (even if they don’t make a purchase).

Creating Value From Data

Data is a source of competitive advantage. The ability to turn data into insight and action gives you the upper hand in your industry and makes you more attractive as a business partner for suppliers, customers and partners.

Data can be used to make better decisions. The right insights allow you to make smarter business decisions that drive growth or Strengthen efficiency by helping you understand customer behavior, employee engagement and productivity, supplier relationships and risk management.

Data can be used to Strengthen customer experience (CX). Understanding who your customers are before they become customers allows you to provide relevant services at all stages of their journey with your brand—from pre-purchase through life cycle management post-purchase—so that they remain loyal customers over time rather than churning out onto the competition’s doorstep when they need something else from your industry supply chain in another part of town (or country) while continuing shopping online elsewhere!

Data Tells A Story

It’s the most valuable asset of your company. It’s the key to the future, it’s fuel for digital transformation, it’s the new oil and more.

Data is what makes businesses run, and as such, it has become one of the most valuable commodities on earth. We all know that data is a powerful asset: companies will pay anything for access to information about their customers or product usage patterns; governments are investing billions into building up their data infrastructure; people are making careers out of simply analyzing numbers (and getting paid well for it). But there’s so much more we can do with this stuff!

The Implementation Journey In Business And Finance

The data analytics implementation journey begins with the right data. A process that helps you take your company’s data, extract information from it and analyze it is called a “data science” project. Once this is done, the next step is to make a decision based on that analysis. After all, if we can’t interpret the results correctly and put them into practice effectively, what’s the point?

Data analytics doesn’t just help companies make more informed decisions; it also helps them safeguard their investments by providing better risk management strategies for both internal and external stakeholders. It gives businesses an edge over competitors by providing them with advanced technologies such as artificial intelligence (AI), machine learning or user experience design (UXD).

Businesses are looking for partners and consultants who can support them at strategic, implementation and execution stages. Data analytics is a key component of any business strategy. Businesses need to find ways to make sense of the data they have and use it in a way that improves the business.

The implementation journey is the most complex and challenging stage, where businesses require a lot of support for managing their data and making it valuable. Only through strategic planning, implementation and execution can companies extract insights from data to gain a competitive advantage. The business leaders who are willing to invest in analytics solutions today will be able to take advantage of new technologies in the future when they become more affordable or accessible.

Where should these leaders start?

1. Get A Partner: Data analytics is an ongoing process that requires expertise. At the very least, it will require someone with experience finding the right solution for your needs.

2. Consult With Experts: Data analysts know their stuff! They’ll be able to help you understand how it all works and limit any surprises later down the line.

3. Be Patient: Data analytics takes time! It might seem like there isn’t much happening at first, but don’t worry—this is normal.

In the end, data analytics is a simply way of looking at your business from a new perspective. It can help you make better decisions.


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Fri, 14 Oct 2022 00:37:00 -0500 Leon Gordon en text/html https://www.forbes.com/sites/forbestechcouncil/2022/10/14/the-data-analytics-implementation-journey-in-business-and-finance/
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